Citation
The Relationship Between Subjective Social Status And Body Fat Percentage In Hispanic Adolescents

Material Information

Title:
The Relationship Between Subjective Social Status And Body Fat Percentage In Hispanic Adolescents
Series Title:
19th Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium
Creator:
Yourell, Jacqlyn
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Undetermined

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Center for Undergraduate Research
Center for Undergraduate Research
Genre:
Conference papers and proceedings
Poster

Notes

Abstract:
Obesity rates are substantially higher among Hispanic adolescents than that of their non-Hispanic white counterparts. To date, a great deal of research has focused on the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and its relationship to obesity-related outcomes. However, one’s subjective social status (SSS) has been found to be a more significant predictor of health outcomes in non-Hispanic black and white adolescents than traditionally used measures of SES. Additionally, the relationship between SSS and obesity-related outcomes in Hispanic adolescents have yet to be determined. The study objective is to assess the relationship between SSS and body fat percentage in Hispanic adolescents (n=150; ages 15 to 21; BMI of 18.5-40 kg/m2). Participant’s data are obtained from a study currently underway. A telephone screening is utilized to determine eligibility for the study, identify parent’s highest level of education (SES), and the participant’s SSS. SSS is assessed with the MacArthur Youth Scale of SSS. Eligible participants attend a study visit where body fat percentage is obtained with a BOD POD®. By identifying the possible association between adolescent SSS and body fat percentage, prevention and treatment methods within this population could result by identifying a psychosocial factor not yet considered in the contribution to obesity. ( en )
General Note:
Research authors: Jacqlyn Yourell, Darci Miller, MPH, Alexandra Lee, BS, Michelle Cardel, PhD, RD - University of Florida
General Note:
McNair Scholars
General Note:
Faculty Mentor: Obesity rates are substantially higher among Hispanic adolescents than that of their non-Hispanic white counterparts. To date, a great deal of research has focused on the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and its relationship to obesity-related outcomes. However, one’s subjective social status (SSS) has been found to be a more significant predictor of health outcomes in non-Hispanic black and white adolescents than traditionally used measures of SES. Additionally, the relationship between SSS and obesity-related outcomes in Hispanic adolescents have yet to be determined. The study objective is to assess the relationship between SSS and body fat percentage in Hispanic adolescents (n=150; ages 15 to 21; BMI of 18.5-40 kg/m2). Participant’s data are obtained from a study currently underway. A telephone screening is utilized to determine eligibility for the study, identify parent’s highest level of education (SES), and the participant’s SSS. SSS is assessed with the MacArthur Youth Scale of SSS. Eligible participants attend a study visit where body fat percentage is obtained with a BOD POD®. By identifying the possible association between adolescent SSS and body fat percentage, prevention and treatment methods within this population could result by identifying a psychosocial factor not yet considered in the contribution to obesity. - Center for Undergraduate Research, McNair Scholars

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Jacqlyn Yourell. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
University of Florida Institutional Repository

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

The Relationship between Subjective Social Status and Body Fat Percentage in Hispanic Adolescents Jacqlyn Yourell, Darci Miller, MPH, Alexandra Lee, BS, Michelle Cardel, PhD, RD Department of Health Outcomes & Biomedical Informatics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL of where they perceive themselves within the social ladder of society. SSS has been found to be a more significant predictor of health outcomes in non Hispanic black and white adolescents than traditionally used measures of socioeconomic status (SES). SSS captures: Earlier life circumstances Family history Perceived future trajectories and opportunities Body Fat Percentage Provides more accurate measure of adiposity compared to that of Body Mass Index (BMI) Relationship between SSS and weight outcomes in Hispanic adolescents have yet to be determined By identifying the possible association between adolescent SSS and body fat percentage, SSS may supplement conclusions based upon traditionally used measures of SES for weight outcomes within this population. SSS may have more clinical utility than SES Components that potentially influence SSS can be targeted by health care providers. SSS measurements may be more feasible and less invasive to obtain than SES To investigate the association between SES, SSS, and body fat percentage in Hispanic adolescents. N=150, Hispanic adolescents (ages 15 21); BMI of 18.5 40 kg/m2 A telephone screening is utilized to determine eligibility for the (SES), and the SSS is assessed with the MacArthur Youth Scale of SSS. Eligible participants attend a study visit where body fat percentage is obtained with a BOD POD. Acknowledgements Dr Michelle Cardel and Lab Team Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program Significance Background Methods Hypotheses Objective 1. Higher reported measures of SSS will be associated with lower body fat percentage in Hispanic adolescents. 2. The association between SES and body fat percentage will be weaker than that of SSS. 19.6% 22.6% 22.8% 9.4% 0 5 10 15 20 25 Prevalence of Obesity by Race/Ethnicity in Adolescents in the United States Non Hispanic Asian Hispanic Non Hispanic Black Non Hispanic White Continue study recruitment Continue collecting SES, SSS, and body fat percentage data Analyze data and results upon study completion Next Steps MacArthur Ladder At the top of the ladder are the people who are the best off they have the most money, the most education, and the most respected jobs. At the bottom are the people who are the worst off they have the least money, the least education, and the least respected jobs or no job. Where would you place yourself on this ladder?