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A Study Of Organic Food Labeling In The United States Compared To Denmark

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Title:
A Study Of Organic Food Labeling In The United States Compared To Denmark
Series Title:
19th Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium
Creator:
Vlasak, Abigail
Language:
English
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Undetermined

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Center for Undergraduate Research
Center for Undergraduate Research
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Conference papers and proceedings
Poster

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Abstract:
Organic farming practices produce foods that avoid manufactured fertilizers, pesticides, growth regulators (GMOs), and livestock additives. The definition of what is considered organic in the United States is that 95 percent of the ingredient list must be free of synthetic additives and must not be processed using industrial solvents. The goal of the study was to compare organic labeling and certification between the United States and Denmark. The hypothesis is that labeling and regulation will be similar because the food economy is built on a global scale. Researching organic labeling was required in both the United States and Denmark. A study of one food item from each section of the US food pyramid was completed. Then, labeling data was collected in both Danish and American grocery stores. The work required visiting three grocery stores in both countries. The results were organic labeling requirements are different in the US and Denmark. Denmark has a much more stringent level of organic certification, store labels of studied products confirm these differences. The study demonstrated that organic labeling, is very complicated in both the US and Denmark, and there is not a common standard of organic labeling and certification between these two countries. ( en )
General Note:
Research authors: Abigail Vlasak - University of Florida
General Note:
University Scholars Program
General Note:
Faculty Mentor: Organic farming practices produce foods that avoid manufactured fertilizers, pesticides, growth regulators (GMOs), and livestock additives. The definition of what is considered organic in the United States is that 95 percent of the ingredient list must be free of synthetic additives and must not be processed using industrial solvents. The goal of the study was to compare organic labeling and certification between the United States and Denmark. The hypothesis is that labeling and regulation will be similar because the food economy is built on a global scale. Researching organic labeling was required in both the United States and Denmark. A study of one food item from each section of the US food pyramid was completed. Then, labeling data was collected in both Danish and American grocery stores. The work required visiting three grocery stores in both countries. The results were organic labeling requirements are different in the US and Denmark. Denmark has a much more stringent level of organic certification, store labels of studied products confirm these differences. The study demonstrated that organic labeling, is very complicated in both the US and Denmark, and there is not a common standard of organic labeling and certification between these two countries. - Center for Undergraduate Research, University Scholars Program

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University of Florida
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Copyright Abigail Vlasak. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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It took the USDA almost a decade of much debate to agree on the standards and requirements for certification 90 US agricultural organizations were given the training needed to help farmers gain organic certification The United States comprises a large share of organic agricultural land coming in 4thplace worldwide, yet its overall percentage devoted to organic production is relatively low Europes organic market has experienced faster growth due to greater public awareness of the environmental benefits of transitioning to organic farming Since the 1980s, there has been a major global shift in farms moving away from conventional production methods to organic The organic agriculture sector is worth over 80 billion dollars and has experienced consistent annual growth Organic food production has been developing in the United States for almost half a century Since the 1990s, consumer demand for organic goods has significantly increased In 2002, the USDA established requirements for farms to achieve organic certification of their produce A Study of Organic Food Labeling In the United States Compared to DenmarkAbigail Joy Vlasak & Anne Donnelly, PhDUniversity of Florida, Gainesville, FLCollege of Liberal Arts and Science Introduction Methods Methods Objective Results Acknowledgements ConclusionDanish Ministry of Environment and Food Safety. Organic Production and Consumption Mfvm.dk Danish Ministry 2016. FDA staff. Guidance for Industry: Voluntary Labeling Indicating Whether Foods Have or Have Not Been Derived from Genetically Engineered Plants. Federal Drug Administration( Fda.gov), Nov. 2015. Greene C. (2007) An Overview of Organic Agriculture in the United States. In: Canavari M., Olson K.D. ( eds ) Organic Food. Springer, New York, NY Jankowska Monika. U.S. Food Labelling Versus Freedom of Speech. Heinonline 2017. NatureDK Food Safety Nature.Dk, 2013.1) An online search was conducted regarding organic certification labels found in the United States and Denmark. Key words used to find different types of labels included organic labeling in United States/Denmark, sustainable labeling United States/ Denmark. 2) Online investigation of the labeling requirements needed to adhere to different levels of sustainable, wholesome, and organic certification 3) For in store analysis, an updated American food pyramid was used to select one food item from each group Then, labels were explored in 3 grocery stores in both the US and Denmark The grocery stores chosen were categorized into discount, intermediate, and gourmet grocery stores. 4) C ategorically representative foods chosen as benchmarks for data collection included iceberg lettuce, apples, cow milk, cookies, salmon, and chicken meat Pictures were taken of one conventional and one organic food item from each category 5) T he different labels were organized and compared to determine differences in organic certification and labeling between the United States and Denmark Despite the similar definition for organic in both the US and Denmark, food labeling is different beyond visual appearance. Even though both places have the same definition for what constitutes organic, production and consumption levels do not compare (consider the entirety of Denmark would fit multiple times over inside the state of Florida alone) Denmark is a global leader in both categories when considering the total percent of agricultural production and store sales to that of the US, where less than 1 percent of farmland is certified under organic production This project assesses current organic practices in the United States and Denmark Following research and analysis of the existing literature, an in depth study of how organic practices are reflected in labels and requirements for their certification is conducted Thanks to Dr Anne Donnelly, Dr Alice RhotonVlasak, and the University of Florida Center for Undergraduate Research, without whom this project would not have been possible The results demonstrate that the United States had fewer types of organic certification, as well as a different process to becoming organically certified The USDA makes the standards and labeling requirements in the US In Denmark, labels have to adhere to many similar standards with the addition of other qualifications Table 1 shows the list of labels typically seen on a variety of products Table 2 shows the different labels seen on some US products. References American Food Labels Danish Food Labels Identifying Danish Food Labels Identifying American Food Labels Vlasak, Abigail. Danish Food (Denmark). 2018 Vlasak, Abigail. American Food (USA). 2017 ColourBox Danish Rape Field with Danish Field (Denmark). 2017. Kate Magee. Patriot Project (USA). 2017.Riegens Netto Stores (Denmark). 2017.