Citation
Improving Electrodynamic Dust Shield Efficiency For Solar Energy Applications

Material Information

Title:
Improving Electrodynamic Dust Shield Efficiency For Solar Energy Applications
Series Title:
19th Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium
Creator:
Pett, Charles
Wu, Guangnan
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Undetermined

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Subjects / Keywords:
Center for Undergraduate Research
Center for Undergraduate Research
Genre:
Conference papers and proceedings
Poster

Notes

Abstract:
For the first time, a laboratory test method was introduced to evaluate the electrodynamic dust shield (EDS) efficiency using aerosol deposition in the cyclic-operation mode, intended to assess the EDS performance under simulated real-world operating conditions. Sieve deposition and the single-operation mode were also used for comparison. Single-operation EDS efficiency was higher with the sieve deposition method, but the results had similar trends between the two dust deposition methods. A significant finding is that, using aerosol deposition, the cyclic-operation efficiency continually decreased as the number of cycles increased, which can be approximated with a “dead dust” hypothetical scenario. With sieve deposition, the cyclic-operation EDS efficiency fluctuated and maintained a relatively higher average value, which partly resembles a “regenerated dust” hypothetical scenario. The very low cyclic-operation efficiency with the aerosol deposition method, in comparison to that with the sieve deposition method, suggests that further research is critically needed for evaluating the efficacy of soiling mitigation solutions for solar energy applications in dusty environment. Another focus is on improving EDS efficiency through optimizing wave function and dielectric material selection, as well as testing the effectiveness of pollen mitigation by EDS action. ( en )
General Note:
Research authors: Charles Pett, Guangnan Wu, Wyndham Hudson, Chih-Hsiang Chien, Chang-Yu Wu, Bing Guo, Jennifer Chesnutt - University of Florida
General Note:
University Scholars Program
General Note:
Faculty Mentor: For the first time, a laboratory test method was introduced to evaluate the electrodynamic dust shield (EDS) efficiency using aerosol deposition in the cyclic-operation mode, intended to assess the EDS performance under simulated real-world operating conditions. Sieve deposition and the single-operation mode were also used for comparison. Single-operation EDS efficiency was higher with the sieve deposition method, but the results had similar trends between the two dust deposition methods. A significant finding is that, using aerosol deposition, the cyclic-operation efficiency continually decreased as the number of cycles increased, which can be approximated with a “dead dust” hypothetical scenario. With sieve deposition, the cyclic-operation EDS efficiency fluctuated and maintained a relatively higher average value, which partly resembles a “regenerated dust” hypothetical scenario. The very low cyclic-operation efficiency with the aerosol deposition method, in comparison to that with the sieve deposition method, suggests that further research is critically needed for evaluating the efficacy of soiling mitigation solutions for solar energy applications in dusty environment. Another focus is on improving EDS efficiency through optimizing wave function and dielectric material selection, as well as testing the effectiveness of pollen mitigation by EDS action. - Center for Undergraduate Research, University Scholars Program

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
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Copyright Charles Pett. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Optical method vs. Mass method The same trend existed between optical and mass method The dust caused light reduction from 6% to 14% when the dust loading was from 2000 to 5000 mg/ m 2 Improving Electrodynamic Dust Shield Efficiency for Solar Energy Applications Charles Pett 2 Guangnan Wu 2 Wyndham Hudson 3 Chih -Hsiang Chien 1 Chang-Yu Wu 1 Bing Guo 4 Jennifer Chesnutt 1 Jonathan Scheffe 2 Introduction Result and Discussion Results and Discussion Conclusions and Future W ork This project was supported by the 2015 Wells Fargo Clean Tech and Innovation Program The effect of different glass on dust removal efficiency Between two types of glass, there was no significant difference in dust removal efficiency. However, willow glass is too fragile for practical use. The dust removal efficiency was not only affected by glass thickness, but also the surface of the glass material. 1 Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, 2 Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 3 Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 4 Mechanical Engineering Program, Texas A&M University at Qatar Fig. 4 Dust removal efficiency using different types of pulse waves. Acknowledgments & References 1. Kawamoto H, Shibata T. (2015) Electrostatic cleaning system for removal of sand from solar panels. Journal of Electrostatics; 73: 65-70. 2. Chesnutt JKW, Ashkanani H, Guo B, Wu C-Y. (2017) Simulation of microscale particle interactions for optimization of an electrodynamic dust shield to clean desert dust from solar panels. Solar Energy; 155: 1197-207. Compared with mass method, the optical method had a lower removal efficiency Fig. 3 Dust removal efficiency with 0.1 mm thick willow glass and 0.3 mm thick tempered glass. Fig. 6 The removal efficiency comparison between optical and mass methods. !"# $!"# %!"# &!"# '!"# (!"# )!"# *!"# !# $!!!# %!!!# &!!!# '!!!# (!!!# +,-./0-1# 2345#6789.0:#;<:=< % ># "#$$%"!&$'((!)*+,--.! /0-10203!&$'((!)*+4--.! !"# $!"# %!"# &!"# '!"# (!"# )!"# !# $!!!# %!!!# &!!!# '!!!# (!!!# )!!!# +,-./0-1# 2345#6789.0:#;<:=< % ># (56'20!"'70! ,*!-(!16$(0!"'70! 8-(!16$(0!"'70! The impact of pulse wave on dust removal efficiency Under different pulse waves, the square wave had the highest dust removal efficiency, 5 ms pulse wave had the lowest dust removal efficiency, and 10 ms pulse wave was in between. Low dust removal efficiency under 5 ms pulse wave could have resulted from insufficient time to charge EDS. !"#" $% Material comparison Efficiency was compared between willow glass and tempered glass. An Electrodynamic Dust Shield is a device to remove dust via electric field force. It has been applied on solar panels to mitigate soiling in desert areas without the need of water. [1 ] The effect of different types of glass on removal efficiency is not clear. The removal efficiency can be quantified by mass difference. However, light transmission efficiency is more relevant to solar energy utilization. Introduction Waveform comparison Reference wave: A standing wave with the shape of a square wave applied. Particles were accumulated in the same location because repelled particles' trajectories follow ed electr ic field lines. [2] Test wave: pulse wave with 5 ms and 10 ms. Particles were expected to spend around 5 ms to leave the surface and then deposit back on the surface after EDS was activated. Methodology comparison Mass method (a) vs. Optical method (b) Fig. 1. Soiled solar panels and a clean panel ( lower right ). Source: Qatar Foundation Solar Test Facility. Experimental Methods Experimental Methods Objectives : Investigate removal efficiency using different types of glass with various pulse waves. Compare different methods to quantify removal efficiency. 7%$/'&0!'-1$#902! %(:#$$%(:%10! ;6<:=%<'$! &0<02'/%2! >?@! !# (!!# $!!!# $(!!# %!!!# %(!!# ?# @3A4/#B8C/# *! 4! 4! A4! A4! 4! 4! A4! A4! !# (!!# $!!!# $(!!# %!!!# %(!!# ?# 4D38E/#B8C/# Fig. 2 Inclined EDS, standing wave, voltage V = 6 kV p -p frequency f = 1 Hz, D = 0.3 mm, P = 7 mm, H = 105 m PET cover with 100 m thickness Inclined EDS with Standing Wave )'.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)B.! Conclusions : The square wave was the most efficient waveform with both optical and mass methods. The removal efficiency depended on material composition and thickness. W illow glass proved too fragile to use for future experiments. Thus, tempered will be used. EDS was not an effective device for removing pollen. Future Work : Measure particle distribution around electrode regions via image analysis. Pollen Removal Efficiency Pollen removal efficiency was lower than that of dust An arbitrary correlation exists between pollen loading and efficiency *C! 8C! ,*C! ,8C! D*C! *! D***! E***! F***! G***! +,-./0-1# F7AA/0#6789.0:#;<:=<%># *C! ,*C! D*C! 4*C! E*C! 8*C! *! ,***! D***! 4***! E***! 8***! >H:#0<:I! ?6(/!J%'3#<&!K-&L-MDN! O'((! P1=:'$! Fig. 5 Pollen removal efficiency