Citation
Oral Care In Children With Cystic Fibrosis

Material Information

Title:
Oral Care In Children With Cystic Fibrosis
Series Title:
19th Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium
Creator:
Patel, Shina
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Undetermined

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Center for Undergraduate Research
Center for Undergraduate Research
Genre:
Conference papers and proceedings
Poster

Notes

Abstract:
The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate oral care in children with cystic fibrosis and the relationship between their oral and respiratory care. This study explored the following associations: 1) Beliefs held by families with CF about oral care and it's correlation with self-reported oral health status 2) Patient's level of oral health and his/her respiratory health, and 3) CF symptom acuity and children's fears of going to the dentist or frequency of going to the dentist. Data was collected through surveys assessing self-reported dental care and oral health status, and review of respiratory health from patients' medical records. Hypotheses included: (I) children with CF whose parents report thinking that oral health is important would have better oral health (II) there is a relationship between self-reported oral healthcare, and (III) there is an association between CF symptoms and children's anxiety about going to the dentist. While the findings of this study were not statistically significant, weak associations between each of the variables testing the hypotheses were found. All findings appear to support the hypothesis, but should be further investigated to offer concrete evidence of the relationship between beliefs of oral care and respiratory health in children with CF. ( en )
General Note:
Research authors: Shina Patel, Susan C. Horky - University of Florida
General Note:
University Scholars Program
General Note:
Faculty Mentor: The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate oral care in children with cystic fibrosis and the relationship between their oral and respiratory care. This study explored the following associations: 1) Beliefs held by families with CF about oral care and it's correlation with self-reported oral health status 2) Patient's level of oral health and his/her respiratory health, and 3) CF symptom acuity and children's fears of going to the dentist or frequency of going to the dentist. Data was collected through surveys assessing self-reported dental care and oral health status, and review of respiratory health from patients' medical records. Hypotheses included: (I) children with CF whose parents report thinking that oral health is important would have better oral health (II) there is a relationship between self-reported oral healthcare, and (III) there is an association between CF symptoms and children's anxiety about going to the dentist. While the findings of this study were not statistically significant, weak associations between each of the variables testing the hypotheses were found. All findings appear to support the hypothesis, but should be further investigated to offer concrete evidence of the relationship between beliefs of oral care and respiratory health in children with CF. - Center for Undergraduate Research, University Scholars Program

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Shina Patel. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Respondents comprised a convenience sample of the parents of children/teens with CF, at the University of Florida CF Center. Parents of all patients seen at the UF CF Center between the ages of 0 18 were considered eligible. This study was approved by the UF Institutional Review Board. Descriptive Statistics were ran. A Lambda measure of association was was utilized for analyzing dependencies between two categorical variables and how closely they were associated. Additionally, a Gamma measure of association was implemented when necessary to measure how closely two ordinal variables were associated. The instruments used were: (1) Interview: The interview consisted of quantitative and (2) a Medical Record Data Form: a chart review form to collect objective data Twenty one parents and children were approached to participate in this study thirteen accepted and eight declined. The majority of patients (8) were between 1 11 years of age and 5 patients were 12 18 years of age. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic, progressive illness affecting primarily the respiratory and digestive systems. Bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are commonly cultured in the lungs of children with CF. The primary method of invasion is aerobic respiration, particularly the mouth. Children with CF have high calorie needs. Individuals with CF must have a low prevalence of dental caries and low risk of carcinogenicity in order to consume adequate diets. Build up of plaque can contribute to new micro organisms being introduced to the vulnerable lungs ( Widmer 2010). Individuals with CF are more susceptible to oral plaque as they eat frequently to maintain sufficient energy levels. Plaque is rich in oral dextrans carbohydrates that are formed from the fermentation of sugars and polymers of glucose. Dextran based polysaccharides contribute to the bacterial adhesion of tooth surfaces, and micro organisms can be trapped in a long time build up of plaque ( Moryl 2015). CF and oral care can negatively influence each other in additional ways. Peckham et al. (2016). Pseudomonas and legionella can often be found in warm, moist areas including dental counters and the surfaces of dental tools and could be transmitted to people with CF. (Jensen et al., 1997). The purpose of this study was to investigate oral care in children with CF and aspects of the relationship between their oral and respiratory care. I hypothesized that (I) children with CF whose parents report thinking that oral health is important would have better oral health (as measured by no oral pain), (II) there is a relationship between self reported oral healthcare as measured by frequency of flossing, and CF health status, as measured by the number of hospitalizations in the last twelve months and (III) there is an association between CF symptoms and Oral Care in Children With Cystic Fibrosis Background Methods References Discussion and Conclusions Shina Patel and Susan C. Horky LCSW, MSW Jensen et al. (1997). Epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis and the Possible Role of Contamination by Dental Equipment. Journal of Hospital Infection 36,117 122. Moryl Magdalena (2015). Extracellular Matrix as a Microbial Virulence Factor in the Development of Human Diseases. Postepy Hig Med Dosw (online), 69, 1485 1498. Peckham et al. (2016). Fungal Contamination of Nebulizer Devices Used by People with Cystic Fibrosis. Journal of Cystic Fibrosis 15, 74 77. Widmer Richard P. (2010). Oral Health of Children with Respiratory Diseases. Paediatric Respiratory Reviews ; 11, 226 232. Pediatric Neurology [Digital image]. (2018). Retrieved March 11, 2018, from https:// childrens hospital.lomalindahealth.org /our services/pediatric neurology Parents held a range of views on the importance of dental care. The majority third of parents reported that their children currently had some dental/oral pain. This surprising finding suggests that pediatric pulmonologists should routinely ask about oral pain and make every effort to refer children with CF for dental care. parent believes in dental care, the more care the child will have, and the less pain guide predictions of oral pain in CF patients. (II) We found an inverse relationship between flossing and number of hospitalizations in the last 12 months. If a patient flosses daily it may be that the patient also brushes his/her teeth daily leading to fewer caries and oral bacteria, which could affect the lungs. With a healthy mouth, a patient with CF can continue to intake the necessary calories and nutrients needed to be healthy and minimize the effects of CF. Patients who are consistent with oral care may also be consistent with pulmonary care at home, leading to fewer hospitalizations. Physicians should emphasize that good oral care at home may have a positive impact on CF symptomatology. (III) We found a negative relationship between amount of coughing and anxiety about dental appointments. When receiving dental care the ability to breathe through the mouth is compromised. A child who has a high frequency of coughing may be nervous about attending dental visits. Due to a small sample size, we were not able to demonstrate statistical significance and findings cannot be used to make a generalized prediction. Further studies with larger sample sizes should be considered. The hypotheses of this studies were not confirmed, but weak associations were found. These must be viewed with caution due to small sample size and the possibility that parents gave responses they felt were socially desirable. Health professionals are advised to seriously consider the importance of oral care and in CF care and to recommend consistent dental care to patients. Results This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Hu man Services (HHS), under grant #T72MC00002/University of Florida Pediatric Pulmonary Center/PI: Wagner. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. ( and self reported oral health status, as measured by having or not having current pain produced a weak association. As demonstrated by the low percentage reduction in error in predicting oral health status that was achieved by taking perceptions of dental care into account: the percentage reduction in error was only 20% ( = 0.20). (II) The relationship between self reported oral care (as measured by flossing frequency) and number of hospitalizations in the last 12 months generates a weak negative, or inverse relationship with a = .25. (III) The relationship between the level of coughing each day as reported by the patient and anxiety felt before attending the dental appointment yielded a weak positive, or direct relationship with a = .125.