Citation
Do Students Perceive That Participation In Hosa Develops The Skills Needed For Careers In Health Care?

Material Information

Title:
Do Students Perceive That Participation In Hosa Develops The Skills Needed For Careers In Health Care?
Series Title:
19th Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium
Creator:
Nair, Shalini
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Undetermined

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Center for Undergraduate Research
Center for Undergraduate Research
Genre:
Conference papers and proceedings
Poster

Notes

Abstract:
This research study analyzes the multifactorial relationship between participation in vocational preparation program Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) and students’ perceived readiness to enter various fields of health. As a division under the Florida Department of Education, HOSA’s primary aims involve (1) promoting interest in health careers and (2) enhancing the delivery of quality health care to all people. A comprehensive survey addressing aspects of family background, demographics, and preparedness/perception of entering the field of health was distributed to all chapters of Florida HOSA via online platform Qualtrics. Over 15,000 student members of HOSA were invited to participate and at the end of data collection approximately 400 completed surveys were analyzed. The major limitation of this study was the low response rate (2.7%). Results proved the program to be highly effective with 90% of students feeling prepared to enter the field of health. However, when it came to assessing students’ awareness of concepts such as cultural competence, answers were far more scattered---suggesting a potential gap in real world application of program knowledge. While the results did not yield statistically relevant findings, results may serve as a foundational basis for evaluating the effectiveness of similar programs. ( en )
General Note:
Research authors: Shalini Nair, Laura K. Guyer - University of Florida
General Note:
University Scholars Program
General Note:
Faculty Mentor: This research study analyzes the multifactorial relationship between participation in vocational preparation program Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) and students’ perceived readiness to enter various fields of health. As a division under the Florida Department of Education, HOSA’s primary aims involve (1) promoting interest in health careers and (2) enhancing the delivery of quality health care to all people. A comprehensive survey addressing aspects of family background, demographics, and preparedness/perception of entering the field of health was distributed to all chapters of Florida HOSA via online platform Qualtrics. Over 15,000 student members of HOSA were invited to participate and at the end of data collection approximately 400 completed surveys were analyzed. The major limitation of this study was the low response rate (2.7%). Results proved the program to be highly effective with 90% of students feeling prepared to enter the field of health. However, when it came to assessing students’ awareness of concepts such as cultural competence, answers were far more scattered---suggesting a potential gap in real world application of program knowledge. While the results did not yield statistically relevant findings, results may serve as a foundational basis for evaluating the effectiveness of similar programs. - Center for Undergraduate Research, University Scholars Program

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright SHALINI NAIR. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Discussion After cross tabulating data on reasons for joining HOSA and level of preparedness, approximately 90% of students who joined for career purposes say that the program adequately prepared them to enter the field of health. Data obtained from students who joined from disciplines outside of health still showed high rates of preparedness, with 79.3% of students saying they felt either somewhat or extremely prepared. As illustrated in Figure 2 below, the percentage of students reporting a more diversified view of the United States decreases significantly at the undergraduate level. This suggests that earlier exposure to topics of diversity in health, as can be achieved through long term participation in HOSA, may be necessary for progressive development of future health professionals. Results A 26 question survey was distributed via online Qualtrics link to all chapters of Florida HOSA including middle school, high school, and collegiate levels The survey contained questions regarding : Length of participation in HOSA Reasons for joining HOSA Perceptions of the field of health Level of education Sociocultural aspects such as race and primary language Responses were collected for approximately two months between December 2017 and February 2018 Introduction Shalini Nair, Dr. Laura K. Guyer, PhD, Med, RDN Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) Student organization recognized by the Department of Education Open to all students and reaches over 200,000 members Students participate in a variety of health related academic competitions while acquiring professional skills and networking with potential mentors Florida division is the second largest association with over 15,000 members Purpose: (1) Promote interest in health careers (2) Enhance the delivery of quality health care to all people By surveying student participants, this study aims to: 1. reported level of preparedness in relation to the 2. Provide insight into the strengths and weaknesses of similar vocational student programs 3. On a broader level, these results will be used to draw conclusions about whether or not current foundational education is adequate to produce health providers that are socially and culturally adapted to effectively serve diversifying populations Outcomes Although this study had a research pool of approximately 15,000 students, a major limitation in this analysis was the low response rate of 2.7%. With such a rate, this study cannot be argued as being representative of the target population, however can instead be used as a foundational tool for assessing both the effectiveness of similar vocational/technical programs, as well as field specific academic interventions necessary to promote the development of future health providers. Future Implications Although students report high rates of satisfaction with the program, based on even just these limited responses many of them did not have a very accurate idea of the state of diversity when in terms of growing minority populations. Future studies should focus on interpreting this variance and perhaps finding ways to better integrate knowledge about real patient populations into vocational material. In vocational programs, the real world application of information should be assessed to determine whether they aid students in real environments or solely in the context of academic competitions. Conclusion Methodology As recognized by the U.S. Department of Education, the purpose of career and technical student organizations remains to promote total student development which provides students with the skills necessary to assume successful roles in society through leadership, citizenship, and service of special populations. Therefore, these standards and this preliminary data may be used to further assess the effectiveness of other career programs such as Business Professionals of America or DECA. Further research is necessary within the scope of HOSA in order to definitively characterize this program as effective in producing successful health care providers. The ever changing nature of patient populations and health standards leads to the need for adaptable and inclusive practices that can meet the needs of diversified populations. Application of such measures relies firstly on adequate foundational exposure and education in said topics --the overall goal of which is to enhance the delivery of quality health care to all people. Level of Preparedness Extremely Well Prepared Somewhat Prepared Not prepared 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 6th-8th Grade 9-10th Grade 11-12th Grade Undergraduate College Perceptions of Diversification as Dependent on Grade Level White/Caucasians Blacks/African Americans Asians Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Alaska Native/American Indian SOURCES: About Us. (n.d.). Retrieved March 11, 2018, from http://www.flhosa.org/about us