Citation
Feasts And Famine: Modern Misconceptions Of The Ancient Roman Diet In The Bay Of Naples

Material Information

Title:
Feasts And Famine: Modern Misconceptions Of The Ancient Roman Diet In The Bay Of Naples
Series Title:
19th Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium
Creator:
Logeson, Zachary
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Undetermined

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Center for Undergraduate Research
Center for Undergraduate Research
Genre:
Conference papers and proceedings
Poster

Notes

Abstract:
There is a popular misconception of the diet of poor Romans. This belief is that the diet of the poor was unvaried and unhealthy, consisting of mostly porridge, cereals, and bread. It exists throughout all modern popular culture, from books and articles to television shows and movies. This misconception is the result of a lack of archeological and osteological evidence of the poor’s diet and the perceived dichotomy between the rich Romans and those who could not afford luxury. Without substantial archeological evidence, this misconception comes from literature. Food is a popular topic in Roman satire, but its use is often misunderstood. Rather than used as historical evidence, the food depicted in the satires should be read as symbolic of the character serving or consuming the food. The organic waste of a block of shops and apartments inhabited by poor Romans and the analysis of skeletons from Herculaneum suggest an alternative to the traditional assumption of the diet of poor Romans. The recent archaeological findings suggest that the working-class Romans inhabiting the Bay of Naples were in fact much healthier than is commonly believed. ( en )
General Note:
Research authors: Zachary Logeson, Jennifer Rea - University of Florida
General Note:
University Scholars Program
General Note:
Faculty Mentor: There is a popular misconception of the diet of poor Romans. This belief is that the diet of the poor was unvaried and unhealthy, consisting of mostly porridge, cereals, and bread. It exists throughout all modern popular culture, from books and articles to television shows and movies. This misconception is the result of a lack of archeological and osteological evidence of the poor’s diet and the perceived dichotomy between the rich Romans and those who could not afford luxury. Without substantial archeological evidence, this misconception comes from literature. Food is a popular topic in Roman satire, but its use is often misunderstood. Rather than used as historical evidence, the food depicted in the satires should be read as symbolic of the character serving or consuming the food. The organic waste of a block of shops and apartments inhabited by poor Romans and the analysis of skeletons from Herculaneum suggest an alternative to the traditional assumption of the diet of poor Romans. The recent archaeological findings suggest that the working-class Romans inhabiting the Bay of Naples were in fact much healthier than is commonly believed. - Center for Undergraduate Research, University Scholars Program

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Zachary Logeson. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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