Citation
Preliminary Examination Of Clarity Processed African Spiny And C57Bl/6 Mouse Brain Tissue: A Side By Side Comparison

Material Information

Title:
Preliminary Examination Of Clarity Processed African Spiny And C57Bl/6 Mouse Brain Tissue: A Side By Side Comparison
Series Title:
19th Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium
Creator:
Brake, Alexis
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Undetermined

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Center for Undergraduate Research
Center for Undergraduate Research
Genre:
Conference papers and proceedings
Poster

Notes

Abstract:
Neuroprosthetic devices have great potential to improve the lives of amputees and those suffering from neurodegenerative diseases; however, one of the primary limitations of these devices is the foreign body response elicited at the tissue-device interface. This immune response ultimately leads to scarring of the surrounding tissue and a loss of functionality at the interface post-implantation. Recent efforts to mitigate this response and improve the longevity of these devices have involved the study of the body’s immune response to the device and design of the device itself. Making devices smaller and more flexible can impact the foreign body response, but the immune response that follows implantation is still of concern. Previous studies have found that the African Spiny (AS) mouse exhibits unique regeneration compared to that of other mammals. Showing rapid tissue regeneration, complete with vascularization, adipose tissue, hair follicles, muscle and nerve fibers, the Spiny mouse’s regenerative features are of interest to us in understanding neuroregeneration in the context of neuroprostheses. This project seeks to investigate the differences in foreign body response between the AS and C56BL/6 mouse species. Using immunohistological techniques and CLARITY tissue clearing, our preliminary work examines baseline morphological differences between the two species. ( en )
General Note:
Research authors: Alexis Brake, E. Atkinson, C. Simmons, K. Otto - University of Florida
General Note:
Faculty Mentor: Neuroprosthetic devices have great potential to improve the lives of amputees and those suffering from neurodegenerative diseases; however, one of the primary limitations of these devices is the foreign body response elicited at the tissue-device interface. This immune response ultimately leads to scarring of the surrounding tissue and a loss of functionality at the interface post-implantation. Recent efforts to mitigate this response and improve the longevity of these devices have involved the study of the body’s immune response to the device and design of the device itself. Making devices smaller and more flexible can impact the foreign body response, but the immune response that follows implantation is still of concern. Previous studies have found that the African Spiny (AS) mouse exhibits unique regeneration compared to that of other mammals. Showing rapid tissue regeneration, complete with vascularization, adipose tissue, hair follicles, muscle and nerve fibers, the Spiny mouse’s regenerative features are of interest to us in understanding neuroregeneration in the context of neuroprostheses. This project seeks to investigate the differences in foreign body response between the AS and C56BL/6 mouse species. Using immunohistological techniques and CLARITY tissue clearing, our preliminary work examines baseline morphological differences between the two species. - Center for Undergraduate Research,

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Alexis Brake. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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