Citation
Cuba

Material Information

Title:
Cuba
Alternate title:
Cuba, the Pearl of the Antilles
Translated Title:
Cuba, la perla de las Antillas ( spa )
Creator:
Cuban Realty Co. (Toronto, Ont.)
Place of Publication:
Toronto, Ont.
Publisher:
Cuban Realty Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resource (28 pages) : illustrations, folded color map ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Real estate investment -- Cuba -- Bartle ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Cuba ( lcsh )
Agriculture ( fast )
Real estate investment ( fast )
Agricultura ( qlsp )
Fondos de inversión inmobiliaria ( abne )
Bartle (Cuba) ( lcsh )
Cuba ( fast )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title / Título de portada
General Note:
Caption title: Cuba, "La perla de las Antilles"--"The Pearl of the Antilles."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
UF Latin American Collections
Rights Management:
The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. This item may be protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. §107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
036100496 ( ALEPH )
1034988154 ( OCLC )
Classification:
HD1516.C9 C8221 ( lcc )

Full Text
D
1516 .Cl C8 2.21




-EX, LIBMs
UNIVERSITYIY Of 9FLopq
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T141S VOLUME HAS BEEN
micROFILMED SY THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES*




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Cuban Realty Company
LIMITED
Incorporated under the Laws of the
Province of Ontario.
CHARLES H. LAWRENCE.
F4et York Ofiee, 141 Evoadxay.
Authorized Capital $250,000




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OFFICERS.
President.
JJ.MAIN.
General Manager, Poison Iron Works, TORONTO, CANADA.
Vice-Presidents.
C. C. DOWNEY.
President, J. B. Brewster Co. Carriage Works, NEW YORK CITY. H. S. BRENNEN, Lumberman,
*Vice-President Standard Loan Co.
HAMIL.TON, CANADA.
Secretary- Treasurer:
THOS. R. PARKER.
TORONTO, CANADA.
Directors.
T. H. HAMILTON,
General Manager, Canadian Oil Company, TORONTO, CANADA. CHAS. B. COX Seigel Cooper Co.,
NEW YORK. W. P. BULL, Barrister,
TORONTO, CANADA.
Cuba Representative;
LUIS A. ABBOT, CAMAGUJEY, CUBA.
General Manager.,
D. 0. BULL, Jersey Cattle Breeder,
BRAMPTON, CANADA.




Solicitors
W. P. BULL & HOLLIS, Temple Building,
TORONTO, CANADA. HION. FRANK MOSS,
NEW YORK CITY. jULIO MARTINEZ DIAZ, CAMAGUEY, CUBA.
Bankers:
ROYAL BANK OF CANADA, HAVANA AND CAMAGUEY. ROYAL BANK OF CANADA, NEW YORK CITY. METROPOLITAN BANK, TORONTO, CANADA.
offices:
TORONTO, CANADA. 141, BROADWAY, N.Y. ]Bartle, HAVANA AND CAMAGUERY, CUBA.




CUBA
"La Perla De Las Antilles The Pearl of the Anttilles."
Cuba, a pearl indeed, a priceless pearl. It-, location and history are too well known to need repetition here. Its total length is over 700 miles, and its average width about 70, of which fully threequarters is susceptible of cultivation, and the greater part of which is extremely fertile.
The population is about 1,600,000.
The soil, aided by the climate, works not only while its owner sleeps, but also during the long months when American and Canadian farmers are busily employed in consuming the provender and fuel which they have laboriously gathered together in the other half of the year., In other words, there is no day in the year when stock cannot live, thrive and fatten on pasture, or when fresh vegetables and fruits may not be gathered from the garden. Cuba to-day is awakening to a new life, leaving behind the spell of darker centuries. Its wars for independence devastated the land, prostrated its industries and re.tarded its growth. This to-day is only history, and having gained its freedom from Spain, the island is entering, cn an era of prosperity unprecedented in any country.
With its wonderful and manifold attractions, its splendid resources and limitless possibilities, its marvelous climate and fertile soil, Cuba is a region worthy of serious consideration on the part of every person seeking a profitable field for operation or an ideal home. It is so easily reached from the United States and Canada that Americans and .Canadians are .beginning to realize Cuba's wonderful resources and it is small wonder that the demand for property continues to increase rapidly. Peace, contentment and prosperity are evident all over the island.




Facts
The land of the Cuban Realty Company, Limited, is in the .healthiest part of the island.
The Cubans are quiet, sober, industrious and hospitable people.
The Cubans are very patriotic, and have an intense love of their country.
Cuban laws are good, justly administered and enforced.
The system of land titles and the execution and recording of deeds in Cuba is, in most respects, superior to the laws on the subject in the United States.
A clear title will be guaranteed by the Cuban Realty Company, Limited, to all purchasers of their lands.
Poultry is a big paying industry in Cuba, eggs retailing at 40 to 50 cents per dozen, and common chickens selling from 50 to 70 cents.
Honey bees are a prolific source of income.
The island is entirely free from poisonous reptiles.
Water is good all over the island.
The lands of the Cuban Realty Company, Limited, are rich, gently rolling and well watered, being practically on the height of land in Cuba.
Making banana flour promises to be a great industry in Cuba.
Land in Cuba will produce uplaDd rice averaging about 2,000 pounds per acre.
There is no country in the world more favorable for raising cattle than Cuba.
The climate renders shelter unnecessary, and away from the coasts, insects and other pests are rare.
There are no swamps or insect pests on the lands of the Cuban Realty Company.
Over $760,000.00 worth of barrels and boxes were imported into Cuba in the year ending June, 1890. Much of the timber on the lands of the Cuban Realty Company is suitable for this purpose.
Cattle require but little care if pasture and water are ample. A
*ery conservative estimate will give an annual increase of 80 per cent. on the number of cows in the herd.
6




The raising of hogs is also lucrative.
The classes of pasture on the island are, first, natural pasture of the indigenous grasses; second, Guinea grass (introduced into Cuba from Africa), and third. Parana grass (a native of South America.
Deer, wild quail, pigeons and guinea fowls are found in large numbers. There are many of these on the lands of the Cuban Realty Company, Limited.
Yucca, the great starch-producing plant, grows as easily as potatoes, and yields a large profit.
The soils of Cuba are heavy stiff red, light sandy red, heavy stiff black, light sandy black, gray, mulatto and chocolate.
The very richest and most fertile lands are owned and offered by the Cuban Realty Company, Limited.
Two or three crops of corn, potatoes, beans, melons and other products can be grown on one piece of land annually.
Strawberries, large and luscious, can be gathered seven months in the year.
Coffee and rice growing on the island will be immensely profitable. T he Cuban Realty Company has land specially adapted to coffee raising. Banana and plantain cultivation on the island is practically unlimited. The soil and climate are pre-eminently adapted to the cultivation of citrus fruits.
The most suitable soils for the cultivation of oranges and other citrus fruits will be found on the lands of the Cuban Realty Company.
There is room in Cuba for every farmer who will come prepared to do his share in the development of what is undoubtedly the richest island in the world, and, in return for his efforts in increasing her prosperity and importance among the nations, Cuba is ready to give him a pleasant life in a delightful climate, and a prosperity proper. tionate to that which his efforts will assist in giving her. The Cuban Realty Company offers unusual advantages to all who care to'embrace the opportunity.
The Cubans have shown an aptitude for self-government that has been the admiration of all studious beholders. They have increased their revenues and decreased their expenditures, while at the same time they have increased the efficiency of the executive branches of Government.
Life and property in Cuba are as safe as in any part of the United States or Canada.
7




The Cuban Realty Company offers a delightful home in an American and Canadian Colony.
"Antilla," on Nipe Bay, the shipping port for produce from the Cuban Re alty Company's lands, is many miles nearer New York than Havana.
Vegetables, such as tomatoes, cabbage, egg plants, potatoes, cucumbers, onions, okra, sweet peppers, etc., may be made to yield a profit of anywhere from $50.00 to $400.00 per acre, all depending upon the character of soil, convenience to good markets or transportation to markets, and intelligence in management and disposition of crop when made. All garden vegetables can be produced at the time when they command the highest price in the north.
The Cuban Realty Company's landshiave been specially selected and will bear inspection.Cuba's Government is wisely administered, a surplus of $11,000,000 exists in the Treasury, and commercially everything is on a sound financial basis.
TheCuban Railroad, of which Sir William Van EHorne is President, passes through the property.
Nowhere in the World is there a Finer or more
Salubrious Climate.
Cuba is a natural sanitarium, and a land of whose marvelous climate so much has already been written that more seems almost superfluous. Yet a few facts will not be amiss. The winter or dry season lasts from early December to May, and is a continual spring. with the bluest of blue skies and but little rain. The summer or rainy season lasts from May to December, and, although called the rainy season, it is a mistake to believe that the summers in Cuba are not agreeable. During this period it rains almost daily for from half an hour to three hours, after which the atmosphere is cooler and everything is refreshed. The island is an ideal place, not only for a delightful winter resort, but as a permanent residence. There are no extremes of heat and cold, and the constant trade winds, summer and winter, make a still, sultry day an impossibility in the eastern part of Cuba, where the Cuban Realfy Company's lands are. A strong north-easterly breeze coming from the broad Atlantic, laden with cool and refresh8




ing drafts of pure sea air, blows for hours every day of the year, while the nights are so delightfully cool that one can sleep with a blanket over him every night, and awaken refreshed and invigorated for the labor of the coming day. The records of the office of the United States Weather Bureau at Camaguey, about fifty miles from the Cuban Realty Company's lands, for the six years ending September 30th, 1904, bear witness to the following facts:
F-trpme nmx;mrm temperature recorded, 98 3ePrPQ. Anqust
A PINEAPPLE PLANTATION.
24th, 1899. Extreme minimum temperature recorded, 47 degrees,
January 27, 1901. The temperature has been above 95 degrees during these six years only on the following dates:
June 1st, 1901 ...................... 96 degrees
September 1st, 1900 ................. 96 "
July 30th, 1899 ....................97
August 24th, 1899 .................... 98
.9




The mean temperature for the four hottest months of the year was as follows:
June............................. 80 degrees
July .............................. 80
August ............................ 81
September ......................... 80
On only five dates in the same time did the wind reach a velocity of over 35 miles an hour, the greatest velocity being 44 miles from the south-west on August 2nd, 1902. There is no record of a severe storm or hurricane. The heaviest precipitation recorded during 24 hours was 4.47 inches August 22nd, 1902. These official records speak for themselves..
The Chief Industries of Cuba
are agricultural, trop~4 fruit and cattle raising. Sugar is the chief product, with coffee, rice, oranges, lemons and other citrus fruits, tobacco, corn, bananas, plantains, pineapples, cocoanuts and other fruits following closely.
The Land of Cuban Realty Company,
Limited.
In any country, location is a very important factor in decid1ing upon a site for a colony. No matter how rich and fertile your land or how well watered, if you are without a market or suitable transportation to a market, your labor is in vain.
The selection of the Comp any's land was primarily made by Mr Luis A. Abbot, late Purchasing Agent for the right of way of the Cuban Railroad, and being found by other directors who went to Cuba to inspect and investigate thoroughly, to be equal to any, and superior to most available locations in every respect, the purchase was made. The property is situated in the Province of Santiago, about 50 miles east of Camaguey City, the capital of the Province of Camnaguey, a city of about 35,000 inhabitants in the heart of the
To




island, that is growing apace and where the Cuba Railroad has a splendid modernly-equipped hotel, the best on the island, for the accommodation of tourists and other travellers.
The Cuban Rcalty Company owns 25,000 acres, through which the Cuban Railroad passes, and which is within easy reach of
"Antilla" on Nipe Bay, from which point fast steamers will be carrying the products of Cuba to northern markets.
A saw-mill, planing-mill and box factory machinery are already on the ground, an artesian well has been bored in the town site, and work has begun on a hotel, store and several cottages which will be all completed in the fall of this year (1905). The land is very rich and fertile, and is well watered.
The country is gently rolling, assuring good natural drainage. At present it is mostly covered with a heavy growth of timber.
The Cuban Realty Company, Limited, has set aside ample lands throughout lavtle for the construction of parks, plazas, and also for churches and schools.
Mr. Win. N. Oldfield, who has made a lifelong study of horticulture, and who is an authority on the subject, has written as follows in regard to the lands of the Cuban Realty Company, L imited:
"As far as previous observations elsewhere in Cuba are concerned, I have seen no other body of lands averaging as high a quality. Perhaps I should initially emphasize as points of highest practical. value, aside from the fertile appearance of the soil, to which the dense general undergrowth, splendid forest trees and lofty royal palms most eloquently testify, first, the unusual friability and open character of the soil (not stiff and waxy as many rich soils on the island) illustrate at least as far as my investigation extended, nor of less importance is- the fact of most excellent natural resources of thorough drainage, due to the undulating contour of the land, which is everywhere in greater or less degree apparent: these conditions constitute wherever they are found the most admirable qualifications for commercial and general fruit growing, and I have no hesitation in committing myself to a broad statement of opinion that you may confidently offer them to the general public and intending settlers as highly desirable lands for diversified horticultural purposes. I say 'diversified' because a
-portion of the higher lands woild n- doubt produce excellent coffee,
II




and most likely cacao, whilst those of lighter texture, and in some places perhaps of a lesser depth of surface deposit, would be well qualified for pineapple, olive and grape growing, with many species of .nuts and a large variety of deciduous or semi-deciduous fruits, giving considerable commercial promise for those sorts, particularly those of Southern Europe, and especially again for such as are of Asiatic origin. As for citrus fruits, oranges, lemons, grapefruit, citrons, kumquats and the like, are well adapted to produce these successfully, 'but, from what I have seen of those parSUGAR CANE FIELD.
ticular soils on your broad property, classed as sugar lands, I am strongly inclined to believe that it would be hard to find anywhere a class of soils better suited to produce supreme results in respect to this class of fruits, this being due in my judgment to a combination of rich land of a friable, demi-open character owing to a fair mixture of sand and humus evident in its composition; as also to its su12




period drainage. I should not hesitate indeed to plant citrus frutrces, as well as certain varieties of nuts, on a commercial scale on those parts of the property classed as sugar land that are th3 most rolling and consequently the best drained, feeling confident of very superior returns from their early and aLundant fruitage; there can be no question either of the fine adaptability of-these same lands to the production of what are known as small fruits, strawberries and southern varieties of black- and dewberries, etc., as well as to a full line of vegetables, broom corn, and other field crops of more or less value, broom corn especially being already out of the experimental class in respect to its extra fine staple as well as superior profit derivable from its production in Cuba. In some instances the land of lighter character and higher lying would prove even better adapted to certain crops among those I have mentioned. To sum the matter up
you have in regard to the lands constituting your property, in my best judgment, apart from the sugar question altogether, as to which there is of course no possible room for doubt, a body of lands which are so well adapted for fruit raising, that, even if the sugar design were eliminated as a factor of your plans, ou would still have left a line of practical undertakings whose anticipatory return ought to be sufficient to invite a large number of intelligent people with at reasonable amount of means to settle and prosper there, though the sugar industry will surely be an important adjunct and incidentally in many ways a source of helpful aid to the settler."
Sugar Flourishes at 3artle.
The growth of the production of raw sugars in Cuba from about 200,000 tons in 1896-97 to nearly 1,000,000 tons in 1902-03, an in-' crease of nearly 400 per cent. in six years, in the face of a steadily falling market, shows conclusively the great adaptability of the island for that cultivation, and, now that the prices have doubled, the production of sugar has become a most profitable investment. Sugar can be produced more cheaply in Cuba than it has yet been done in any part of the world. Cane can be cut for grinding in about one year from the time of planting, or after a previous cutting. The dry season is the time for cutting cane and making sugar, principally because the juices are then more concentrated and richer in sugar,
13




and also because the fields are then in their best condition for cutting and hauling. These conditions limit the grinding season in most parts of Cuba to about 100 working days, which occur in the early part of the year.
ORANGES THREE~ YEARS OLD NEAR( HABANA.
While a capital of probably one to two millions of dollars is require 'd to equip a plantation and mill for the most economical pro-. duction of sugar, from the cane to the finished- product, the smallest
14




farm can dedicate at least a part of its area to the cultivation of cane, if situated within easy reach of economical transportation of its cane to a mill, with a certainty of receiving a net profit of from $30.00 to $40.00 per acre annually from the crop, according to the varying conditions of fertility, cost of transportation and market price of sugar.
The greatest expense in putting land into sugar occurs during the first year. It is therefore necessary to adopt the, cycle in calculaORANGE TREES THREE YEARS OLD, EASTERN CUBA.
tions of cost and yield, as otherwise no true average cost can be arrived at. It is probable that, on well selected virgin lands, such as those owned by the Cuban Realty Company, Limited, the economical cycle-that is, the period at the end of which it becomes true economy to abandon an old planting of cane and make a new one-may reach as high as seven to fourteen years or even more, but, in order that the calculation of cost may err rather on the side of excess than other-




wise, a cycle of eight years has been adopted for the purposes of calculation.
COST OF SUGAR CANE.
1st year, clearing, planting and cultivation per acre....... $27 67 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th years cultivating at $8.30
per acre per year ................................... 58 10
1st to 8th year, depreciation of implements, etc ........ ..... 26 00
Total cost per acre of cane, cycle of eight years ........ $111 77 Average cost per acre for each year ...................... $13 97
YIELD OF SUGAR CANE.
36 carretas of 100 arrobas (2,500 lbs.) at $2.70 .............. $97 20
Cost of cutting and hauling same at $1.30 per arroba $46 80 Average cost of cane, clearing, planting, cultivation,
etc., as per above table ...................... 13 97
60 77
Net profit per acre ..................................... $36 43
Net profit on 40 acres ................................ $1,457 20
These figures as given are a xery conservative estimate, and it is confidently believed they will prove so.
Tobacco
Cuban tobacco is universally known as the best in the world. Although there are no accurate statistics on the subject, the amount of tobacco annually grown on the island is roughly estimated at about 50,000,000 pounds. It is impossible to estimate the total value of this crop, as the value per pound varies from a few cents to ten or twelve dollars. The total value of exports of tobacco, cigars and cigarettes is over $24,000,000 for year ending June 30, 1904. Very fine tobacco is raised on all parts of the island. Almost every farmer has his own patch of tobacco, from which he makes his own cigars and cigarettes.
16




C off ee
Notwithstanding the fact that large areas of Cuba (particularly in the Province of Santiago where the Cuban Realty Company's lands are situated) are admirably adapted to the raising of coffee, the island at present imports about $1,300,000 Worth annually. This condition of affairs, however, will not last long, as the Government has placed a heavy import duty on coffee in order to encourage its cultivation on the island. At present green coffee retails for 25 cents per pound, and the farmer can make a good income by planting at least a part of his land in this important article of consumption. Like the orange, however, the trees do not reach full bearing until the fifth year. Coffee trees must be planted where they will have sufficient shade, a good method being to plant them in a banana or plantain grove.
Rice
is largely consumed in Cuba, the imports reaching the sum of $3,646,000 annually. The Cuban Congress is likely to place a protective duty on rice, especially in the Province of Santiago, and as it can be successfully grown in many parts of the island, a large area is surebe utilized at an early date to raise this product for home consumption. It can be sown in Mayand harvested in September.
The raising, of oranges is profitable beyond a doubt. The Cuban Realty Company intends to have a nursery containing. young plants of the best varieties, which they will sell to settlers at a cost of from 20 to 25 cents each,, thus saving. them from 15, to,20 cents per plant, the price for Florida trees being 40 cents laid down. This will enable any one desiring to raise oranges either for his own use or for export to, do so at a much red uced cost, besides having-the advantage of getting the trees right on the ground.
17




The cost of a ten acre grove would be:
Cost of land, 10 acres at $25.00 per acre .................. $250 00
Clearing and'planting same at $20.00 per acre .............. 200 00
Team of oxen or mules, plow and other inpliements ........ 400 00 1,000 trees at 25 cents each ............................. 250 00
Cultivating, watering, and caring for same for six years.. 1,200 00
Total cost of 10 acre grove for six years ...........$2,300 00
Income 5th year (40 per cent. on your investment) .......$ 900 00 Income 6th year (65 per cent. on your investment) ........ 1,500 00 Incom e 7th year ...................................... 2,500 00
Incom e 8th year ....................................... 3,000 00
Income 10th year ..................................... 5,000 00
Income 9th year ....................................... 4,000 00
When you have sold your crop for the sixth year you have more than paid for your land, paid for the trees and all your labor, your grove is worth $500.00 per acre, and, in the succeeding years, all is profit outside of the little cultivation and care needed.
Pineapples
Pineapples can be planted between the rows of growing orange trees.
The trees will bear some in the fourth year, but in estimating the income, it is better to begin with the fifth year. Cost of pineapple slips or suckers (about 8000 to the acre)
for five acres at $80.00 per acre ...................... $400 00
Cultivating four years ............................... 700 00
Cost of five acres of pineapples for four years..........$1,100 00 Income 2nd year ............................ $ 800 00
Income 3rd year ............................... 1,200 00
Income 4th year ............................... 1,200 00
$3,200 00
Profit from five acres of pineapples in four years .......$2,100 0
It is thus seen that a wise farmer may have two prolific crops from
18




the same field, i.e., oranges and pineapples, neither interfering with the rich growth of the other. The planting.-6f pineapples also assures an income while the orange trees are maturing., Pineapples mature in about fifteen months from the planting of the slips. Many advance
ORANGE TREES OVER FORTY YEARS OLD ON CUBAN REALTY LANDS.
the opinion that pineapples require no replanting. This is a mistake, as, after tlie third crop, they are not suitable for export, although they can be still used for preserves, sweetmeats, etc. Pineapples grow to a large size, and have been raised, weighing from'10 to 18 pounds, '9




by American colonists near Camaguey. Some have. been found to weigh as much as 24 pounds. They are very juicy and tender, and have a flavor and delicacy that is not found in the Florida pineapple.
Vegetables.
The outlook for Cuba as a market for the ordinary garden vegetables-potatoes, cabbages, cucumbers, tomatoes, egg plants, etc.-is very bright at present. While large areas are being cultivated and
A CHURCH AT PUER'I 0 PADRE NEAR CUBAN REALTY CO'S LANDS.
planted to great crops of oranges, bananas, pineapples and smaller fruits, the man who wishes to grow his own table supplies will find not only rich soil and fine growing climate, but, if he wishes to cultivate for profit, surely here is a great opportunity The relations, commercial and political, between Cuba and the United States and Canada are such that most excellent advantages are to be derived
20




from the export from Cuba during the cold winter months of the North-December and January-of fine table vegetables, and the k truck gardener, with the ready knowledge of such vegetables, coming
from these northern climates to the Cuban Realty Company's lan&,
may find a handsome living.
SUGAR CANE ON CUBAN REALTY LANDS.
Cocoa
In the Province of Santiago de Cuba are found large, cocoa
plantations. This is a very profitable crop, and like the coffee, may
21




be planted with other fruit. The cocoa is sometimes planted from seeds and sometimes from young plants, and after four or five year an abundant return is realized, while no re-planting is needed for from thirty to fifty years. The cost of cultivating the cocoa is $46.00 per acre. This includes the first expense of planting. The average profit is about $132 per acre. Thus we have:
Profit per acre ......................... $132 00
Expense per acre ...................... 46 00
Net profit .............................. $86 00
A MODERN RESIDENCE IN EASTERN CUBA.
Corn
Three crops of Indian corn are grown on rich lands, summer, fall and winter crops. The first usually produces about 60 bushels per acre, the second 50 and the third 25. The native variety, small, hard and rich, seems to thrive best. Corn is at present imported in large quantities.
22




Lemons
Lemons require about the same cultivation as do oranges, yielding a like profit. The Cuban Reality Company lands are admirably adapted to raise lemons.
Bananas
Bananas can be depended on yielding from $75.00 to $100.00 per acre yearly, first crop eighteen months from planting. They grow everywhere in Eastern Cuba, especially at Bartle.
As shown in another page nearly $2,000,000 worth of bananas were exported from Cuba in the year ending June 30th, 1904. These were almost entirely from Santiago Province, where the lands of the Cuban Realty Company, Limited, are situated.
Grape-Fruit
The grape fruit is cultivated in the same way as oranges. It: produces fruit earlier and gives even, greater returns than oranges, and will flourish at Bavtle.
23




Freight Charges Between Cuba
and New York
Appended is a list of freight charges, etc.:
Duty on Cuban fruit, per box ................. 50c
Average freight to New York, per box ,..........35c.
Total freight and duty, Cuban fruit to New York,
per box ......... .................... 85c.
Average freight, California to New York, per box. 90c.
While you may observe from the foregoing table that the cost of~ freight and duty between Cuba and New York is less than the cost of freight between California and New York, it may be also added that there is a considerable difference in time in favor of the Cuban fruit. The time of transportation from California to New York is 10 to 12 days, while that from Cuba to New York is three days.
The average freight rate from Florida may be taken at 75 cents per box, giving it the advantage of about 10 cents over the Cuban fruit. Florida, however, is usually out of the race owing to the frosts which occur with such unpleasant regularity.
The Cuba Railroad Special Rate No. Forty-nine, in effect September 1, 1904, until further notice will grant a rebate of fifty per cent. (50 per cent.) of the fare and the freight charges on personal and household effects paid by settlers or colonists on coming to settle in the district served by this road, to be applied for from Santa Clara, Santiago de Cuba, Antilla, Camaguey and Ciego de Avila to all stations of the Cuba Railroad.
In order to receive the amount of this rebate the settler will require the ticket agent to give him a receipt for the amount paid for the ticket and will keep this receipt with the receipt for freight charges paid, to be delivered or forwarded to the General Traffic Agent, the Cuba Railroad, Camaguey, who will liquidate after investigation.
(Signed) D. A. GALDOS,
Agente General de Trafico.
Camaguey, August 24th, 1904.




Some of the Exports of Cuba Fiscal Year Ending June 30th, 1904.
Sugar........................... 97,737,846
Tobacco.......... .... ........ 12,078,379
Iron ore..........................1,4,7
Mahogany........... ...............76,5
Cedar ........................... 1,405,964
Other fine woods .................... 54,627
Cigars .......................... 12,155,804
Cigarettes......................... 474,819
Molasses .......................... 885,850
Bananas ..........I.,............. 1938,085
Chocolate beans...................... 565,540
Pineapples ....................... .. 620,231
Sponges ........................... 433,1308
Hides............ I..............~ 8,5
Wax............... ............... 426,012
Honey............................... 276,254
Guana bar~k........................ 64,511
ManganeseI or .e....................... 104,300
Rum. ............................ 207,313
V ~Cocoanut oil....................... .. 17,600
Cocoanuts .......................... '245,208
Copra............................. .13,451
Potatoes ............................ 4,436
Oranges and lemons.................... 2,376
Starch .......................... . ..686
Cotton .............................. 1,459
25




Some of the Imports of Cuba Fiscal Year Ending June 30th, 1004.
Beef, cattle ................... ......*5,403,382
Beef, salt, fresh and jerked ............ 1,916,264
Pork, ham, bacon, etc ................. 1,125,930
Lard and its imitations .............. 2,776,133
Condensed milk ...................... 538,662
Butter ............................... 1158,106
Oleomargarine........................ 35,029
Cheese.........................364,034
Rice............................... 3,675,806
Wheat flour ........................2,574,602
Peas ................................ 391,297
Corn ................................ 851,672
Beans............................... 682,342
Potatoes ............................. 625,593
Onions .............................. 311,994
Canned vegetables ....... ............. 178,403
Soap fat............................ 160,293
Common soap ........................ 344,908
Eggs............................... 169,390
Oats ................................ 167,574
Barley............................... 72,543
Hay .............. ..................42,035
Coffee............................. 1,337,618
Olive oil ............................ 734,252
Barrels.....................498,505
BoxqS............................... 262,074
Cotton and its manufactures .......... 6,381,053
26




41
A
List of Articles Admitted into Cuba Free of Tariff Duties.
ARTICLES, personal, having been in use one year or more. This
includes clothing, furniture, bicycles, cameras, musical instruments, etc. (These, however, are subject to duty if brought in Jk with the expectation of selling same.)
AUTOMOBILES, under certain conditions.
BARBED WIRE, BRICKS (unglazed), undressed common pine lumber, coal and coke.
BOOKS of instruction, and maps.
BEES, alive, and beekeepers' supplies.
CARRIAGES, etc.
CATTLE, under certain rules.
FURNITURE, belonging to prospective settlers, having been in use
one year or more.
IMPLEMENTS for agriculture, excepting machinery.
STALLIONS, under certain rules.
WEARING APPAREL, toilet articles, etc., bearing traces of use.
27




At Bartle you will find a healthy settlement.
Call or write to Cuban Realty Co. and find out about those who have already bought lands and settled at Bartle.
tFor further information, price of lands, the way to get there, etc., etc., apply to
Cuban Realty Co., Limited TORONTO
or 141 Broadway, New York.
28




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