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Naples Florida weekly

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Naples Florida weekly : your news and entertainment source
Place of Publication:
Naples, FL
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Florida Media Group LLC
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weekly
regular
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English
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 41 cm

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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Dates or Sequential Designation:
V. 1 no. 1 (October 2, 2008) -

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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900873247 ( OCLC )
ocn900873247

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Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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HURRICANE SHERYL HIT CAPE CORAL AT 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 1. The Category 3 hurricane moved east across the state with sustained winds of 129 mph and gusts reaching up to 168 mph. The storm surge swelled to 12 feet in Fort Myers. Heavy rains measured 8to 10 inches in Broward County. The storm exited as a Category 2 hurricane near Port St. Lucie later that night. Two ensuing tornadoes were confirmed. Hurricane Sheryl was a fictional storm fabricated by the Florida Power & Light powers that be. The utility cooked up the virtual hurricane so FPL employees could hone their skills at post-storm power restoration. Roughly 3,000 employees participated in the weeklong simulated-storm drill, while thousands of others attended to the lightning strikes and power outages of real thunderstorms, which eerilyFPL preps for storm season with Category3 Hurricane SherylThis IS a drill . .BY ATHENA PONUSHISaponushis@ oridaweekly.com Nobody said life was a rose garden, and nobody said immigration reform by the U.S. Congress couldnt give well-off foreign home buyers a hand up in the fierce competition to get an American visa, either. Thats the aim of newly proposed laws now before Congress, laws designed in large part to make enforcement of immigration policy more effective. At the same time, those laws might also make American real estate markets more lucrative, especially in Florida. Sponsored by both Democrats and Republicans such as Floridas Sen. Marco Rubio, the new legislation aims well away from the tired, the poor and the huddled masses. Instead, it would open the American door wide to foreign buyers of properties valued at $500,000 or more. Such buyers would have to be 55, have health insurance, pass a criminal background check and maintain ownershipImmigration reform could boost real estate salesFPL / COURTESY PHOTOSMore than 100 Florida Power & Light Company employees worked in the companys Category-5 Command Center in Riviera Beach during FPLs annual storm drill. Statewide, about 3,000 FPL employees participated in the weeklong storm drill, preparing for hurricane season. SEE DRILL, A14 SEE IMMIGRATION, A14 BY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@ oridaweekly.com SPECIAL HURRICANE ISSUE: www.FloridaWeekly.com Vol. V, No. 34 FREE WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 OPINION A4 PROFILE IN PARADISE A6 HEALTHY LIVING A24 PETS A26 NETWORKING B5, 7 REAL ESTATE B8 OPEN HOUSE MAP B26 NANCY STETSON C8 PUZZLES C10 FILM REVIEW C11 ANTIQUES C14 CUISINE C23 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes App Store. INSIDE Jim ReifA15Weather app Important numbers Insurance infoA22Great gadgetsA22 A20 A18 Garden delightsA True Fashionistas to-do at the Garden of Hope & Courage, and more fun around town. C19-21 Drill, baby, drillLos Angeles company invests millions to tap into Southwest Florida oil. B1 Lights, camera, action!Area film festivals call for entries. C3 Fun with found objectsRauschenberg Gallery shows works by Lawrence Voytek. C1

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Six simple JuningsIf youre planning on dying anytime soon, dont do it now, in June. Pick July, or make it an August plan pick another year or decade, if you can. But not now when time grows giddy, when spring breath blows summer hot and dreaming might be doing. Now its time to speak. Now even words, like snow-melt streams sighing seaward from somewhere high, come dressed in light-washed finery, in greens and golds that bear this simple message: Speak, then forever hold your peace. But speak now, in June. Love is seasonless, but its kisses are not. Love is timeless, but its caresses are June. This is summers gilded entrance, when Mays polite flirtations boil into yearning. June is not about anything you have to do but everything you want to do, says my wife, Amy. Its summer. Its all about desire. The Romans, compelled to order the world according to their desires, offered us the words of their poet, Horace: Carpe diem! A June lover, Horace set that jeweled phrase in a crown of Latin: sapias vina liques et spatio brevi spem longam reseces. Dum loquimur fugerit invida aetas. Carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.Be wise and truthful, prepare the wine, trim your hope to the brief moment. While we speak, jealous time has fled. Seize the day, trusting little to tomorrow. Seize the day. If youre a farmer, kiss the fields with your nurture. If youre a parent or a teacher, do the same with your children. If youre an accountant, kiss the books with right numbers. If youre a lawyer or a doctor, kiss the law with clear reason or the patient with clean health. Dont wait; do it now. Its June, its time to speak, to kiss, to act out. My own suggestions for acting out are the earthy ones, the free of charge, the sensuous and elemental reminders of our assignment to the temporal, beyond which lies no time at all. At the very least, let me recommend these six simple Junings: The rain walk. Pick a park or forested place in a rainstorms path, go into the trees, and sit simply sit. Listen and breathe. Let the hard summer torrent clean your life of anything but water and woods. If you dont think that can happen, try it. The night chorus. Stop near woods in a late June dusk. Close your eyes, cup your ears and listen again this time to one of the most astounding vocal ensembles in North America. The Southern, the spadefoot, and the narrow-mouthed toads all join their brethren frogs to sing the summer gospel the Southern leopard, the spring peeper, the chorus frog and a quartet of natives in the trees (the birdvoiced, the squirrel, the barking and the pinewoods frogs). Each voices a tony trill or chirp, a begging bleat or bold bark, a quavering chirrup. Taken together they become a deafening celebration of desire Junes cacophonous night music. The morning swim. Pitch yourself off the beach or into the river, near sunrise. Nothing else reveals the promise of June like a morning swim. The longest light day, June 21. Spend the summer equinox watching daylight stretch toward umber dusk. Sumer is icumen in, wrote a medieval poet. Especially in Florida. The lunar night watch, June 23. Spend the full-moon midnight watching liquid silver pour from a pitcher universe, like a lunatic. The lunatic, the lover and the poet/are of imagination all compact, wrote Shakespeare. Especially in Florida. The overheat. And finally this: Give yourself one hard hours labor, one long days work, a physical assault to flood your hammering pump with June, then wash the effluent out your pores. I recommend driving railroad spikes, or sinking fence posts, or chopping wood to overheat, but if you wont do that, then run, bike or walk until you cant.Those six recommendations, those Junings, are essential for living here in full. But they probably dont appear on your bucket list of things to do before you die, do they?Your trip to Europe or New York City or the Hawaiian Islands. The pilgrimage to Notre Dame or the Taj Mahal or Machu Picchu. A retreat to Tennessee or North Carolina. A seat above the dugout at Fenway, or Wrigley Field, or Yankee Stadium. A frontrow perch at Lincoln Center, or Saratoga Springs. A jump from 10,000 feet complete with functioning parachute, a back-seat ride in an F-18 Hornet, a chance to ski Banff or Aspen or Grindelwald, or dive the Great Barrier Reef. A week at The Breakers-Palm Beach, or The Ritz-Carlton-Naples, or the Gasparilla Inn on Boca Grande. All lovely, but all certain to separate you from what you are at heart: a Florida homey branded by a dead Roman with just two unequivocal words: carpe diem! Hence my list. So let me leave you with that, along with a couple of reminders that you should get to it now, one of these days in June while time still flies. After all, said Andrew Marvel, The graves a fine and private place/But none I think do there embrace. And planning for another time, warned Robert Burns, will put you at grave risk: The best-laid schemes o mice an men/ Gang aft agley/An leae us naught but grief an pain/For promised joy. But if you choose to ignore my list, if you wait to live for another summer time, then I give you this: incandescent desire and good company, like those embraced by Arthur Symons. That Welsh writer knew June. Here is the second of two stanzas from his poem, In Fountain Court: A waiting ghost in the blue sky, the white curved moon; June, hushed and breathless, waits, and I Wait too, with June; Come, through the lingering afternoon, Soon, love, c ome soon. COMMENTARY t w d y rogerWILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA2 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 WOW!!!NEW PATIENT SPECIALPatient Consultation, Exam, Cleaning and Necessary X-Rays D0110, D0150, D0274PLUS FREE TEETH WHITENING$431 Value, You Save $338!ALL FOR $97.00 NOT VALID WITH THE PRESENCE OF PERIODONTAL DISEASE.MUST CALL BY 6/13/2013 FREE CONSULTATIONS AVAILABLE FOR BRACES CROWNS DENTAL IMPLANTS WHITENING EXTRACTIONS BRIDGES VENEERSCall 239-300-9693 & set an appointment www.gulfviewdentistry.com (239) 300-9693 501 Goodlette Road North, Suite B202, Naples Located in the French QuarterBRACES TECHNOLOGY THAT IS DESIGNED FOR BOTH ADULTS AND ADOLESCENTS! HALF THE VISITS & NEARLY HALF THE PRICE! TYPICAL TREATMENT COMPLETED 5 TO 10 MONTHS. MEET DR. GARY GORDON Dr. Gary Gordon graduated from the University of Michigan Dental School in 1978. He developed 3 practices in the Flint, Michigan area for over 20 years and was very active in the local dental community. In 2003 he, wife Linda and their 4 children moved to Naples to enjoy the year around warmer climate that they love, Dr. Gordon enjoys all phases of dentistry and his practice style/management skills have been a perfect t for Gulfview Dental. Dr. Gordon recently completed the Fast Braces continuing education program. Fastbraces have been designed to move teeth differently and safely shortening the time required achieving straight teeth.CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE A FREE CONSULTATION!

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TOUCH

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA4 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 PublisherShelley Hobbsshobbs@floridaweekly.comEditorCindy Piercecpierce@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ColumnistsKaren Feldman Artis Henderson Jim McCracken Athena Ponushis Jeannette Showalter Nancy Stetson Maureen Sullivan-Hartung Evan Williams Roger WilliamsPhotographersPeggy Farren Tim Gibbons Bernadette La Paglia Marla Ottenstein Charlie McDonald Bob Raymond Stephen WrightCopy EditorCathy CottrillPresentation EditorEric Raddatz eraddatz@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersChris Andruskiewicz Hannah Arnone Nick Bear Paul Heinrich Rebecca Robinson Natalie Zellers Circulation ManagerPenny Kennedy pkennedy@floridaweekly.comCirculationDavid Anderson Paul Neumann Greg TretwoldAccount ExecutivesNicole Ryan nryan@floridaweekly.com Cori Higgins chiggins@floridaweekly.com Aron Hubers ahubers@floridaweekly.com Sales and Marketing AssistantCarolyn AhoBusiness Office ManagerKelli CaricoPublished by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddis pgaddis@floridaweekly.com Jeffrey Cull jcull@floridaweekly.com Jim Dickerson jdickerson@floridaweekly.com Naples Florida Weekly 9051 Tamiami Trail North, Suite 202 Naples, Florida 34108 Phone 239.325.1960 Fax: 239.325.1964 Subscriptions:Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2013 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC.Call 239.325.1960 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $31.95 in-county$52.95 in-state $59.95 out-of-state richLOWRYSpecial to Florida Weekly OPINIONBeing Eric Holder amyGOODMANSpecial to Florida Weekly President Barack Obama has been mocked for learning about untoward conduct in his administration from the press. But hes on the ball compared with his attorney general, who wouldnt know about his own poor judgment without reading about it in the papers. Lets hope he has a Google alert set for Eric Holder. The website The Daily Beast interviewed the attorney general and Justice Department officials for a piece about how the AG is holding up in the firestorm over two controversial Justice Department leak investigations, one into The Associated Press, the other into Fox News reporter James Rosen. The Daily Beast piece pinpoints when Eric Holder had a crisis of conscience leading him to question his leak-investigating ways. The Washington Post had made inquiries at the Justice Department about the investigation into Rosen stemming from a 2009 leak, and the departments press office had begun to ready itself for the storm. For Eric Holder, though, the gravity of the situation didnt fully sink in until Monday morning when he read the Posts frontpage story, sitting at his kitchen table.Then, the awful realization hit him that maybe it wasnt such a great idea for him to sign off on an affidavit portraying a member of the press particularly one from a news organization scorned and attacked by the White House as practically an agent of a foreign power. Perhaps it wasnt so wise, after all, to identify Rosen as a co-conspirator in a crime. Come to think of it, it might have been ill-advised to track his movements in and out of the State Department building that he covered and to read his e-mails.Yes, Eric Holder was beginning to wonder whether Eric Holder had made the right call. It may get worse if Eric Holder gets around to reading in the papers that Congress is investigating whether Eric Holder lied to it under oath. It turns out that Eric Holder did indeed make a false representation about Eric Holder. Congressman Hank Johnson, D-Ga., pointed out to the attorney general that reporters could potentially be prosecuted under the Espionage Act of 1917, and closed his interrogation with the clear trap: Ill yield the balance of my time to you. Unable to find any way to wiggle free from this killer line of questioning, Eric Holder said, With regard to potential prosecution of the press for the disclosure of material, that is not something Ive ever been involved in, heard of, or would think would be wise policy. Eric Holder had plumb forgot that Eric Holder might have signed off on such a thing. Timing is everything: If only The Washington Post had published earlier! What Eric Holder has done is so troubling to everyone, including Eric Holder, that President Obama has ordered a review of Justice Department policy to be undertaken by the single most appropriate man for such a task: Eric Holder. An unidentified friend told The Daily Beast, Look, Eric sees himself fundamentally as a progressive, not some Torquemada out to silence the press. And why would he want to silence the press? Its how he keeps up with Eric Holder. Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review.Hammond, Manning, Assange and Obamas sledgehammer against dissentOne cyberactivists federal case wrapped up this week, and anothers is set to begin. While these two young men, Jeremy Hammond and Bradley Manning, are the two who were charged, it is the growing menace of government and corporate secrecy that should be on trial. Hammond was facing more than 30 years in prison, charged with hacking into the computers of a private security and intelligence firm called Strategic Forecasting, or Stratfor, when he agreed to a plea agreement of one count of computer hacking. Stratfor traffics in geopolitical intelligence, economic, political and military forecasting, according to its website. Yet, after Hammond and others released 5 million e-mails from Stratfors servers to WikiLeaks, it became clear that the firm engages in widespread spying on activists on behalf of corporations. Coca-Cola hired Stratfor to spy on the group PETA, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. Dow Chemical hired Stratfor to spy on the activists who were exposing Dows role in the cyanide chemical disaster in Bhopal, India, in 1984 that killed an estimated 8,000 and injured thousands more. Hammond is scheduled to be sentenced Sept. 6. His lawyers have asked for time served 15 months, some of which was in solitary confinement. He faces 10 years. Bradley Manning, meanwhile, will finally have his day in military court at Fort Meade, Md. He faces a slew of charges related to the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history. Manning pled guilty to mishandling the information, and acknowledged uploading hundreds of thousands of documents to the WikiLeaks website. But he denies the most serious charge, still pending, of aiding the enemy. Prosecutors are seeking life in prison; however, if Manning is found guilty, the judge could still impose the death penalty. Bradley Manning and Jeremy Hammond are among the highest profile in a series of cases that the Obama administration has been pursuing against whistle-blowers and journalists. Attorney Michael Ratner, president emeritus of the Center for Constitutional Rights, and an attorney for WikiLeaks and its founder, Julian Assange, said in front of the courthouse after Hammonds court appearance, This is part of the sledgehammer of what the government is doing to people who expose corporate secrets, government secrets, and really the secrets of an empire. Manning explained his actions and his motivation in a detailed statement in his pretrial proceedings. He said, I believed that if the general public, especially the American public, had access to the information ... it could spark a domestic debate on the role of the military and our foreign policy in general. The first public release by WikiLeaks of the material provided by Manning was the video (titled by WikiLeaks) Collateral Murder. The grainy video, taken from an attack helicopter, shows the cold killing of a dozen men on the ground in Baghdad on July 12, 2007. Two of those killed by the U.S. Apache helicopter gunship were employees of the Reuters news agency, cameraman Namir Noor-Eldeen, 22, and his driver, Saeed Chmagh, a father of four. After their violent, senseless deaths, Reuters sought answers and filed Freedom of Information requests for material relating to the attack, which were denied. Manning saw the video when stationed in Iraq, and researched the background of the attack. He saved the video file. He explained in court, I planned on providing this to the Reuters office in London to assist them in preventing events such as this in the future. Hammond and Manning, facing years in prison, have in common their connection to WikiLeaks and its founder, Assange. Assange is wanted for questioning in Sweden about allegations of sexual misconduct he has not been charged. After losing a fight against extradition in Britain, he was granted political asylum by the government of Ecuador, and has remained in Ecuadors embassy in London since last June. It was a leaked Stratfor e-mail that referenced a U.S. indictment against Assange, reading: Not for Pub We have a sealed indictment on Assange. Pls protect. This all happens amidst recent revelations about the Obama administrations extraordinary invasion of journalists privacy and the right to protect sources. The Associated Press revealed that the Justice Department had secretly obtained two months of telephone records of its reporters and editors in an effort to discover the source of a leak about a foiled bomb plot. Fox News chief Washington correspondent, James Rosen, may actually be charged in a criminal conspiracy for allegedly receiving classified information from a source about North Korea. President Barack Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder have used the Espionage Act six times to prosecute whistle-blowers more than all previous presidents combined. Obamas assault on journalism and his relentless war on whistle-blowers are serious threats to fundamental democratic principles on which this nation was founded. The job of journalists is to hold those in power accountable. Our job is to be the fourth estate, not for the state. Let us be. Denis Moynihan contributed research to this column. Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!, a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 1,000 stations in North America. She is the co-author of The Silenced Majority, a New York Times best-seller.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA6 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 $24.998212433 MFG# 6434 Weber Style Stainless Steel Vegetable Basket$149.008210502 MFG# 386002 Weber Q100 $749.008295289 MFG# 6511301 Weber GenesisEP-310 Gas Grill www.SunshineAce.com As always, Sunshine Ace offers FREE assembly and delivery in Southwest Florida.Fathers Day is I know of no one in my recent memory who has had a more profound and positive impact on the Paradise Coast, especially kids in need, than Don Gunther. Hes one of the early members of the Naples Winter Wine Festival and the Naples Children & Education Foundation, established in 2001 with the vision of making a profound and sustaining difference in the lives of underprivileged and at-risk children in Collier County. The wine festival has raised more than $110 million, which through annual grants and collaborative strategic initiatives has impacted the lives of more than 150,000 children via supporting the efforts of more than 35 local nonprofit agencies.Don also serves as chairman of the board of The Immokalee Foundation. For more than 20 years, TIF has been devoted enhancing the lives of Immokalees next generation by emphasizing education, vocation and life skills through programs that provide students with opportunities to grow, learn and advance to educational and professional heights they might never have dreamed possible. Don also is a patron of the arts, serving on the board of Gulfshore Playhouse. Regardless of the endeavor, he is an advocate for excellence. Hes also a terrific leader who makes work fun and who gets things done. Don was born in St. Louis. He lived with his family in the Catskills in New York for several years, but he returned to Missouri to finish high school and attend college. He received an athletic scholarship to college for basketball and an offer from the then Milwaukee Braves for baseball, which he declined in order to pursue an engineering degree at the Missouri University of Science and Technology (his favorite subjects were math and science in high school and dynamics, bridge design and concrete design in college). After college, he entered the U.S. Army as a second lieutenant and was recalled when Russia built the Berlin Wall at the start of the Cold War. He spent his entire career with the Bechtel Corp., the largest engineering and construction company in the world. He started as a field engineer in the refinery and chemical division and became a project manager and ultimately, president of that division in 1980. By 1984, he was running three more divisions of the company. In 1987, he was asked to go to London to run a major part of Bechtels international business. He returned to the U.S. in 1993 as vice chairman of the company and retired in 1999. He also served on the board of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, and of the U.S.-Russia Business Council. At the end of his career with Bechtel, Don was given a special award from the World Wide Engineering and Construcr w w Y t a bobHARDEN e-mail: bob@bobharden.com PROFILES IN PARADISEIn retirement, working to engineer bright futures for local youth Talking points with Don GuntherSomething youll never understand: Why we let Congress vote on their own salary and decide their own health plan. Something your mom was always right about: The importance of clean underwear. First job: At 12 years old, I was a caddie in the Catskills. One thing on your bucket list: I dont have anything on my bucket list. Ive been in more than 100 countries, and now I just like staying home and being with my grandkids whenever possible. Guilty pleasure: Harassing my fellow Bay Colony members on the golf course. Most recent vacation(s): Argentina for duck hunting and Scotland for golf (and good scotch!). Advice to grandkids: Work hard. Do your very best every day. Pray often. Best thing about grandkids: They dont argue as much as my kids do. What makes you laugh: Jokes on me or on my friends. Something people might be surprised to nd out about you: Im a pretty good ping-pong player. What are you most proud of? My career and being a reasonably good father and husband. Favorite thing about the Paradise Coast: The weather and the shing. What you miss about the Paradise Coast when youre away: My friends here. tion Organization honoring him as the industrys leading executive of the 1990s. Don and Mosey, his wife of 52 years, have four children and 12 grandchildren. When asked why he commits so much to the community, he says: To get to heaven, of course! I think hes well on his way. Bob Harden is the producer and host of The Bob Harden Show, airing from 7-8 a.m. weekdays at www.bobharden.com. providing quality healthcare for all since 1977www.healthcareswfl.org six convenient childrens care locations central 3425 10th Street North, Naples, 239.262.3669east 1755 Heritage Trail #601, Naples, 239.775.2220golden gate 5262 Golden Gate Parkway, Naples, 239.455.5105immokalee/FSU 1441 Heritage Boulevard, Immokalee, 239.658.3011marco 40 Heathwood Drive, Marco Island, 239.394.0693north 1265 Creekside Parkway #208, Naples, 239 .591.1755 healthy kids have more fun start your summer with a wellness visit

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FEATURE XFINITY CENTURYLINK YES YES YES NO NO NOThe fastest Internet More Internet protection included at no additional cost with Norton Security Suite, IDENTITY GUARD and Comcast Secure Backup & Share The fastest in-home Wi-Fi with the most coverage in your home NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 A7 Teens and older drivers can brush up behind the wheelCCSO and the Florida Sheriff's Association welcome Collier County kids to the Teen Driver Challenge, a course that provides information and handson experience to reduce young drivers chances of being involved in a crash. Instructors, who are certified law enforcement trainers, emphasize the same skills and techniques used by driving professionals. The two-day course consists of a four-hour block of instruction on the first day following by eight hours of vehicle operations the next day. Participants must be licensed drivers and must bring their own vehicle. A certificate will be awarded upon successful completion and could lead to a reduction in the cost of auto insurance. Two Teen Driver Challenge sessions are offered this summer: Thursday-Friday, June 13-14, and Thursday-Friday, July 11-12. Hours are 1-5 p.m. on the first day and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. the second. To sign up or for more information, call 793-9260.For older driversThe AARP offers classes to help older drivers refresh their driving skills and reduce their risk for tickets and accidents. Drivers older than 55 become eligible for a discount on auto insurance. Registration is $14 per person, $12 for AARP members. Reservations are essential. Two classes are offered this summer, on Tuesday, June 18, and Tuesday, July 16. Both take place from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Christus Victor Lutheran Church, 15600 Tamiami Trail. To sign up, call 269-6050. Schools set to serve free breakfast, lunchThe free breakfast and lunch summer program provided by Collier County Public Schools is offered to children 18 years old and younger. Service locations are limited to geographical areas where at least 50 percent of the children are classified as economically needy because they qualify for free or reducedprice meals during the school year. The summer program is open to all children under the age of 18 whether enrolled in a summer school or not, and regardless of race, color, sex, disability, age or national origin. Be sure to call the site in advance and ask for serving times. Here are the service locations and dates that summer meals will be offered: Pinecrest Elementary School Immokalee; 377-8000: Monday-Friday, June 10-July 26 East Naples Middle School; 3773600: Monday-Thursday, June 17-July 25 Lake Trafford Elementary School, Immokalee; 377-7300: Monday-Thursday, June 17-July 25 Avalon Elementary School; 3776200: Monday-Friday, June 10-Aug. 2 Big Cypress Elementary School; 377-6300: Monday-Friday, June 10-Aug. 2 Calusa Park Elementary School ; 377-6400: Monday-Friday, June 10-Aug. 2 Golden Gate High School; 377-1600: Monday-Friday, June 10-Aug. 2 Immokalee High School; 377-1800: Monday-Friday, June 10-Aug. 2 Immokalee Middle School; 3774200: Monday-Friday, June 10-Aug. 2 Lely Elementary School; 377-7500: Monday-Friday, June 10-Aug. 2 Manatee Middle School; 377-4400: Monday-Friday, June 10-Aug. 2 Parkside Elementary School; 3778900: Monday-Friday, June 10-Aug. 2 Poinciana Elementary School; 3778100: Monday-Friday, June 10-Aug. 2 Sabal Palm Elementary School; 377-8200: Monday-Friday, June 10-Aug. 2More assistanceMeals of Hope will be at each of the 14 schools offering free meals for children, and the adults who are with them, to take home to their families. For more information, call 537-7775. The Harry Chapin Food Bank will also provide assistance during the summer months in Immokalee and Everglades City. For more information, call 334-7007. Cool for teens: Hot Summer NightsEspecially for middle and high school students, Hot Summer Nights is part of the Collier County Sheriffs Office SUMMERfest lineup of activities for Collier County children of all ages. Hot Summer Nights begins on a weekly basis June 7 and continues through Aug. 3, with the free activities taking place from 6-9 p.m. every Friday at a different community park. The June 7 event is at Sun-N-Fun Lagoon. Hot Summer Nights continue as follows: June 14: Corkscrew Middle School June 21: Golden Gate Community Center June 28: Vineyards Community Park July 5: East Naples Community Park July 12: Immokalee Sports Park July 19: McLeod Park, Everglades City July 26: Fleischmann Park Aug. 2: Golden Gate Community Park For the complete SUMMERfest schedule, visit www.colliersheriff.org (click on We Can Help and then on Youth Relations/CCSO Summerfest).

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Lee Virtual School is a tuition-free K-12 education which uses the world renowned Calvert curriculum for Grades K. Why choose Lee Virtual School? Lee Virtual School S S Call (239) 337-8178 or visit LeeVirtualSchool.com Now accepting students from Lee, Charlotte and Collier Counties. l c o m www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA8 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 Andrew McElwaine, president and CEO of the Conservancy of Southwest Florida for the past eight years, has accepted the position of president with the American Farmland Trust and will depart at the end of June. Founded in 1980 as a link among farmers, conservationists and policy-makers, the Washington, D.C.-based trust is the only national conservation organization dedicated to protecting farmland, promoting sound farming practices and keeping farmers on the land. In communication with the Conservancy board of directors, Mr. McElwaine said, I came to the Conservancy to continue to build the strength of the organization and to protect our quality of life in the region. It has been exhilarating to see the growth of the entire organization, and to see the newly renovated 21-acre Conservancy Nature Center come to life. It has already begun to further raise awareness of the importance of protecting the water, land and wildlife in the region. Now it is time for me to seek another career challenge. Lynn Slabaugh, president of the board, expressed appreciation for the significant contributions Mr. McElwaine has made to the Conservancys Saving Southwest Florida campaign, which raised almost $40 million for the Nature Center renovation, environmental policy initiatives, education programs, science research and native wildlife rehabilitation, as well as an environmental education partnership with Florida Gulf Coast University, and an endowment to hire the organizations first fulltime veterinarian. Andrew is an articulate defender of conservation policy both locally and nationally, Ms. Slabaugh added. During his tenure at the Conservancy, he built the reputation of the Conservancy and assets from $10.5 million to $42 million. We wish him continued success. Ms. Slabaugh has appointed board member Tucker Tyler to lead a committee to launch a national search for a new president/CEO. Mr. Tyler has led two other successful executive searches for the Conservancy. Ken Krier, vice-chair of the board, will act as interim CEO until Ms. Slabaugh returns to Naples in the fall to take over the interim position. Rob Moher, the Conservancys vice president of development and marketing, will serve as COO to help lead the organization thorugh the transition while the search is carried out. Edison State College campuses in N aples, Fort M yers, Punta Gorda and LaBelle will host open house hours from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, June 13. Attendees are encouraged to register online for a fast-pass at www. edison.edu/openhouse. Visitors will receive information about the admissions process, academic programs, financial aid, scholarships and additional funding resources. Campus tours will be conducted, and current students, faculty and staff will be on hand to speak with potential students. To preview the fall class schedule, visit www.edison.edu/academics. To register for the open house and obtain a fast-pass through check-in, visit www.edison.edu/openhouse. Staff form the Collier County Clerk of C ourts of f ice will work Saturday, June 8, at three locations to help citizens complete passport applications. Hours and locations are: 8-11 a.m. in the clerks Recording Department in the main courthouse at the Collier County Government Center, corner of U.S. 41 and Airport-Pulling Road. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the North Collier Government Services Center on Orange Blossom Drive. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Collier County Government Golden Gate Services Center on Golden Gate Parkway. Visit www.collierclerk.com/Recording/Passports to review passport application requirements, required documentation and fees. Passport application forms can be found at www.travel.state.gov. Forms can be filled out in advance, but they must be signed in the presence of a clerk. Questions should be directed to the National Passport Information Center at (877) 487-2778. Conservancy CEO headed to Washington, D.C.Prospective students invited to ESC campusesHelp available for passport applicantsSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________McElwaine accepts post with American Farmland TrustMCELWAINE MOHER SLABAUGH

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ASSISTANT DIRECTOR of ADMISSIONS & COMMUNICATIONThis position assists prospective families PK 3 Grade 5 with the admissions process. Exemplar qualitiesundergraduate degree required, 1 4 years Independent School Experience Local Applicants Only JOB OPENING Please submit application online at: www.communityschoolnaples.orgAbout CSN Careers NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 A9 Copyright 2013, Miromar Development Corporation. Miromar Outlets is a registered service mark of Miromar Development Corporation.Voted the Best Shopping Center in Southwest FloridaUP TO 70% OFF RETAIL PRICESMIROMAR OUTLETS s06050613-1183 Over 140 Top Designer and Brand Name Outlets including SAKS FIFTH AVENUE OFF 5TH, NEIMAN MARCUS LAST CALL, BLOOMINGDALES THE OUTLET STORE UPCOMING EVENTSEL FACTOR X AUDITIONSaturday, June 8 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. In the Restaurant PiazzaLocal talent competes for a chance to appear on El Factor X The X Factor MOMS APPRECIATION DAYWednesday, June 12 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. a free coffee and dessert. FATHER/SON LOOK-ALIKE CONTESTSSaturday, June 15 Registration: 10 a.m. Contest: 11 a.m. Near Mens Wearhouse Float your boat in Recycle RegattaKeep Collier Beautiful invites children, families and business owners to take part in a Recycle Regatta on Saturday, June 15, at Sugden Regional Park. The rules are simple: Boats must be made of at least 70 percent recycled materials; the remaining 30 percent can be new materials that help keep the boat together or help it float. Teams will race their boats on a 50-yard course. We hope this challenge encourages creative ways to use recycled materials, says Larry Berg, KCB board member and senior district manager of Waste Management. Gordon Vanscoy and his staff at GreenCare landscaping company are up for the challenge. Although he is keeping the final design of GreenCares regatta entry a secret, Mr. Vanscoy will say his team is utilizing supplies from the company shop including recycled 55-gallon drums as well as pallets and supplies that have been cleaned and prepared. Employees have also been encouraged to add recycled materials from home to the company boat. This is a fun way for our team to work together and raise awareness about the importance of environmental stewardship, Mr. Vanscoy says. Though responsible landscape management is one piece of the puzzle we face daily, recycling is just as crucial, and recycling awareness is just as important. That being said, we are also looking forward to bringing home a trophy. Prizes will be awarded in the following age divisions: Grades 3-5 (race at 9 a.m.) Grades 6-8 (race at 10 a.m.) Grades 9-12 (race at 11 a.m.) Adults and open teams (race at noon) Registration for the Keep Collier Beautiful Recycle Regatta is $10 per person and includes snacks and a regatta T-shirt. Call 580-8319 or download a registration form at www.KeepCollierBeautiful.org. COURTESY PHOTOAt GreenCare with some of the recycled materials that will go inot the companys regatta entry are, left to right, Gorrdon Vanscoy Jr., Mahanaim Robles, Ryan Santos and Paul Long.

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FLORIDA WEEKLYA10 WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 Mite-y tasty The Food and Drug Administration proposed recently to limit the quantity of tiny mites that could occupy imported cheese, even though living, crawling mites are a feature desired by aficionados. (Cheese is absolutely alive! proclaimed microbiologist Rachel Dutton, w ho runs the cheese laboratory at Harvard University.) In fact, cheese is home to various molds, bacteria and yeasts, which give it flavor, and sellers routinely use blowers to expel excessive critters, but the FDA now wants to limit them to six bugs per square inch. However, according to a May report on NPR, lovers of some cheeses, especially the French Mimolette, object, asserting both an indifference to the sight of mites creeping around and a fear of taste-loss (since the mites burrow into the hunk, aerating it and extending the flavor). Perspective In May, the Florida House of Representatives adjourned for the year without assessing themselves even a nominal increase in health insurance premiums for their own taxpayer-funded deluxe coverage, which will remain at $8.34 per month for individuals ($30 for families). Several days earlier, the House had voted to reject several billion dollars in federal grants for extending health insurance coverage to about a million more poor people in the states Medicaid program. The House premiums are even lower than those of state senators and rank-and-file state employees, and lower than the premiums of Medicaid recipients who have the ability to pay. Ironies Energy West, the natural gas supplier in Great Falls, Mont., had tried recently to raise awareness of leaks by distributing scratch-and-sniff cards to residents, demonstrating gass distinctive, rotten-egg smell. In May, workers cast aside several cartons of leftover cards, which were hauled off and disposed of by crushing which released the scent and produced a massive blanket of odor over downtown Great Falls, resulting in a flurry of panicked calls to firefighters about gas leaks. The Ypsilanti, Mich., City Council voted in May on a resolution that would have required the members always to vote either yes or no (to thus reduce the recent, annoying number of abstain votes). The resolution to ban abstaining failed because three of the seven members abstained. Doctors told a newspaper in Stockholm in April that at least one of Swedens premier modeling agencies, looking for recruits, had been caught passing out business cards adjacent to the countrys largest eating-disorder clinic, forcing the clinic to change its rules on patients taking outside walks. The United Nations Conference on Disarmament, a multilateral forum on arms control agreements, was chaired beginning May 27 (until June 23) by Iran, which, for that time, at least, had the awkward job of overseeing resolutions on nuclear non-proliferation, which the country is widely thought to be ignoring. Compelling explanations Ruben Pavon was identified by surveillance video in Derry, N.H., in April snatching a grill from the front porch of a thrift store. Mr. Pavon explained to police that the stores name, Finders Keepers, indicated to him that the objects were free for the taking and admitted that he had previously taken items from the porch. In May, Los Angeles police bought back 1,200 guns in one of the periodic U.S. buy-back programs, but they declined to accept the pipe bomb a man said he wanted to sell. This is not a pipe-bomb buyback, said Chief Charlie Beck. Pipe bombs are illegal ... The man was promptly arrested. John Casey, 51, was caught by security staff at an Asda supermarket in Washington, England, last October after allegedly stealing a slab of beef. He was convicted in May even after offering the compelling explanation that he had concealed the beef underneath other purchases not to avoid paying for it, but only because the sight of the raw meat gave him flashbacks of his dead grandmother, who had passed away of a blood clot when Casey was a child. The litigious society Keith Judd filed a lawsuit in Iowa in May, in essence to invalidate the 2012 election by having President Obama officially declared a Kenyan and not an American. Mr. Judd filed the papers from a federal penitentiary in Texas, where he is serving 17 years for threatening a woman he believed to be a clone of the singer Stevie Nicks, because Ms. Nicks (or the clone) had tried to sabotage his home improvement company. (Bonus Fact: In the 2012 Democratic presidential primary in West Virginia, Mr. Judd, a write-in candidate, defeated President Obama in nine counties and lost the state by only 33,000 votes.) Edward Kramer, co-founder of the annual Atlanta fantasy-character convention Dragon*Con, was arrested in 2000 for allegedly having sex with underage boys, but has yet to stand trial in Georgia because he has engineered a never-ending set of legal delays if not because of his version of Orthodox Judaism that limits his diet and activities, then it his allegedly poor health. (As soon as he puts on an orange jumpsuit, said prosecutor Danny Porter, he becomes an invalid, requiring a wheelchair and oxygen tank.) In 2011, after managing to get house arrest, he violated it by being caught with an underage boy. Lately, according to a May Atlanta Journal-Constitution report, he files an average of three demands per day from his Gwinnett County, Ga., lockup, each requiring painstaking review before being rejected. Mr. Kramer still owns about one-third of Dragon*Con, whose current officials are mortified that they cannot expel a man they consider a child molester. NEWS OF THE WEIRDBY CHUCK SHEPHERDDISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

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Certied educators at Lee Health Solutions guide patients through diabetes, weight management care and other chronic conditions. We are here to help you manage your health in a supportive environment. Call 239-424-3120 to learn more about the program. www.LeeMemorial.orgDevoted to Excellence in Health Care Caring People, Caring for People L earnin g g h h o o w w t t o o m anage m m y y d d i i a a b b e e t t e e s s i mpr o v v e e d d m m y y q q u a a l l i i t y y o f l l i i f f e e

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121 percent increase from 1990 to 2010 alone. During that time, county leaders struggled with the challenge of managing that growth and building the infrastructure necessary to support it. That period of rapid development left us with key challenges that we still face today. Many of our regulations and permitting processes were originally designed in an environment where we had exponential growth and it was more important to manage the process rather than nurture it. The last seven years, however, have been one of the longest bust cycles we have ever experienced. In Southwest Florida, we have seen some 16,000 jobs vanish, and nearly 20,000 homes have been through some stage of foreclosure. Fortunately, the bust cycle appears to have ended and we are seeing a recovery under way. The question remains: Will we allow the recovery to diminish our efforts to build a healthy business climate? Or will we use the lessons of the past to work together, focused on nurturing smarter growth, job creation and economic sustainability for the future? Collier County government has already taken a number of steps to improve our local regulations and approval procedures. County Manager Leo Ochs, Growth Manager Nick Casalanguida and Director of Operations and Regulatory Management Jamie French have all reached out to the community to better understand the unique needs of both businesses and residents. They have followed their outreach efforts with actions. Tangible improvements being made to our business climate include: The ability to electronically submit permit applications and plans for approval. An office of economic and business development has been proposed by the county manager and unanimously approved by the County Commission. A new hearing examiner position is being created to improve the speed at which variances and minor PUD amendments can be addressed. These steps show a shift among our county government leaders toward a more service-oriented mindset. While we still have much progress to make, it is encouraging to see steady momentum as we learn from this recent downturn. Next month, we will consider some additional options that exist to streamline the regulatory process as well as unique opportunities for economic growth in Collier County. Michael Wynn, the president of Sunshine Ace Hardware, is chair of the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce and co-chair of The Partnership for Colliers Future Economy. He is a graduate of Leadership Collier and Leadership Florida 2012. Seeking to put Gods love into action, Habitat for Humanity brings people together to build homes, communities and hope. NEW LOCATION! www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA12 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 Sport Spree FOR THE SPORTS FAN 23106 FASHION DRIVECoconut Point Mall #101 Estero, FL 33928 239-495-9000 Sportspree17@gmail.com NFL MLB NBA NHL *SHOP HERE FOR ALL YOUR FAVORITE TEAMS APPAREL, NOVELTIES, COLLECTIBLES, AND GIFT ITEMS. Home Field ADVANTAGE 25 % OF F YOUR NEXT PURCHASE OF $50 OR MORE!TO CELEBRATE OUR OPENING PLEASE TAKE THIS COUPON IN STORE TO RECEIVEEXP. AUGUST 31, 2013Available exclusively atEAST INDIES HOME COLLECTION11985 US 41 N., Naples 34110 239-596-7273 Mon-Sat 10:00-5:00Cross the Road? Why?Hand Carved Birds BY MICHAEL WYNNSpecial to Florida WeeklyIn last months Chamber Matters, we defined what it means to have a healthy business climate and also examined the importance of making it a priority for Collier County. This month we take a look at how our history as a county has influenced our business climate and highlight some of our recent progress. During the last 30 years, our population increased five-fold. There was a CHAMBER MATTERSReflecting on our business climate, past and presentWynn FREE WITH A$30 Grocery OrderRex Goliath Moscato .750 ml.While supplies last. Limit one per customer, must have coupon at the time of purchase. Good thru 6/13/13 Serving Naples the finest products for over 70 years. GET 10% OFF YOUR TOTAL PURCHASEOn a Grocery Order of $50 or moreWhile supplies last. Excludes Tobacco items. Limit one per customer, must have coupon at the time of purchase. Good thru 6/13/13 $1Emergency Exam (D0140), X-Ray (D0220) and Photos (D0471)With Coupon Only. Expires 6/30/13$495Porcelain Crown (D2740),With Coupon Only. Expires 6/30/13 9960 Business Circle #14 Naples, FL 34112239-330-3666License Number DN14337Monday Saturday 7 am 7 pm Scan for more savings! The Patient Has The Right To Refuse To Pay, Cancel Payment Or Be Reimbursed For Any Other Service Or Treatment Which Is Performed As A Result Of, And Within 72 Hours Of Responding To The Advertisement For The Discounted Service. Same Day Crowns and Root Canals at Truly Affordable Prices *Starting At

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 NEWS A13 EVERYTHING IS ON SALE SAVE UP TO 50% OFF* PLUS, ENJOY ADDITIONAL SAVINGS ON CLEARANCE FLOOR SAMPLES OVERSTOCKSFLOOR SAMPLE SALE CLEARANCE MG+BW Liam Sofa$2,990 MRP $2,197 SALE CLEARANCE Vanguard Riverside Sofa$3,560 MSRP $1,897 SALECLEARANCE Henredon Cavalier King Sleigh Bed$5,899 MSRP $1,997 SALE CLEARANCE MG+BW Caffrey Dining Table $1,995 MRP $1,597 SALE CLEARANCE Stanley Continuum Trestle Dining Table $3,679 MSRP $1,997 SALE FORT MYERS:13170 S. Cleveland Avenue, Fort Myers, FL 33907 Phone: (239) 415-2800NAPLES:355 9th Street South, Naples, FL 34102 Phone: (239) 732-2400 Store Hours: Mon Sat: 10am 6pm, Sun: Noon 5pmwww.RobbStuckyIntl.comPROFESSIONAL INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICES LOW PRICE GUARANTEE CUSTOM WINDOW TREATMENTS & FLOOR COVERINGS WORLDWIDE DELIVERY AVAILABLE *Sale prices are marked off MSRP. RSI never sells at MSRP; our prices are always lower. Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, American Leather and other value collections excluded. RSI is not responsible for typographical errors. Youth Leadership Collier welcomes Class of 2013The Leadership Collier Foundation, in coordination with the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce, announces the Youth Leadership Collier Class of 2013. The program provides Collier County high school students the opportunity to learn more about themselves and their community through an intensive sevenday program during the summer before their senior year of high school. Members of the Class of 2013 are: Barron Collier High School: Alexander Nunner, William Rasmussen, Antonio Sorhegui and Christian Tormey. Community School of Naples: Victoria Diamond, Pierce Gleeson, Libby Harris-Jones and Rachel Wright. First Baptist Academy: Stephanie Cox Golden Gate High School: Kimberly Nguyen, Ember Warren and Anissa Williston. Gulf Coast High School: Lenie Cruz, Carmen Hoyt and Joy Lormeus Immokalee High School: Erika Hernandez Sanchez Lely High School: Areeb Chaudhry, Jesus Hernandez, Guerds Jean and Julie Kuper Lorenzo Walker Technical High School: Briana Allen, Elizabeth Hernandez, Indjina Jean and Daniela Munoz Naples High School: Sarah Ashby, Michaela Cherney, Sarah Geroy, Eleanor Reidy, James Sanders and Kristina Svatos Palmetto Ridge High School: Nick Borders and Adam Morrison St. John Neumann Catholic High School: Grant Ullrich The mission of Youth Leadership Collier is to develop ethical leaders committed to community involvement. During the program week, students learn team-building and communication techniques to help them become effective leaders. They tour area businesses and interact with leaders from businesses, government agencies and civic organizations, where they learn about career opportunities as well as the issues and solutions facing the Collier County community. For more information about Youth Leadership Collier and other programs of the Leadership Collier Foundation, e-mail Amanda Beights at Amanda@ napleschamber.org.

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FORT MYERS 11380 LINDBERGH BLVD | 239.561.7215 | HOURS MONFRI 7:30 AM5:30 PM | SAT 7:30 AM5 PM NAPLES 3747 TAMIAMI TRAIL NORTH | 239.687.7215 | HOURS MONTHUR 8 AM6 PM | FRI & SAT 8 AM8 PM ARTISAN GELATO BY NORMAN LOVE 239. 288.4333 | FORT MYERS HOURS MONSAT 11:30AM:00 PM www.NormanLoveConfections.com www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA14 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 of their properties while remaining in the U.S. for at least six months of the year to benefit from the more liberal new rules. If buyers meet those qualifications, temporary visas would be automatically granted, along with the opportunity to apply for permanent visas. Foreigners who buy or rent properties valued at $250,000 or more, meanwhile, could extend the 180-day visa which is now the maximum allowed by law, to 240 days. Canadians, in particular because of proximity, common language and a robust economy could take advantage, many Realtors predict. That might help everybody. As long as their currency stays at an even rate or is positive against the dollar, I think this has a huge potential upside for Southwest Florida, says Rowan Samuel, who with his wife, Karen Samuel, heads the Samuel Team at John R. Wood Realtors in Naples. Thats across all (economic) categories. Most Canadian buyers are looking here for a second home. A lot are condominium buyers in the $200,000 to $300,000 range. But there are also a lot of upperlevel executives purchasing multi-million-dollar properties who would like to spend more time here. That in itself would prove a huge benefit to retail businesses in the region, Mr. Samuel adds. The idea is that an extension of a visa is also a central revenue generator. People who stay here longer will spend more in restaurants and stores and in other various ways that have a tremendous benefit. All that sounds pretty good for everybody, in a Sunshine State where almost one out of five home purchases last year went to foreign buyers, about 80 percent of them paying cash. But that doesnt mean the law and the opportunities couldnt be even better, suggests Jim Green, a Lee County Realtor. Why do we want any of these investors to leave at all? With the age restriction we dont have the issue of workforce competition. We have people with what Ill call reasonable wealth who discover how delightful it is to live in America. To me, theyre storybook residents, people with money coming in and in effect creating jobs, not taking jobs. So I would (propose) even more leniency. Dont put them in a situation where theyre forced to go back for some amount of time, because thats money theyd spend here. That opinion is echoed by others from east and west and north to south. In such markets as Palm Beach Gardens and Jupiter, Naples and Marco Island, Bonita Springs and Fort Myers, or Punta Gorda and Venice Beach, Canadians and Western Europeans, with some buyers from the Americas, all have shown interest in the markets, Realtors say. Even Chinese nationals, whose home purchases in the U.S. amounted to 1 percent of the total two years ago, doubled that last year, picking up 2 percent of homes sold to foreign buyers, notes Mr. Samuel. (Coincidentally, a Chinese company, Shuanghui International Holdings, reportedly moved last week to buy the worlds biggest pork producer, Smithfield Foods Inc., headquartered along the James River in Smithfield, Va., for $4.7 billion, suggesting how deeply Chinas interest in U.S. products reaches.) In time, Chinese home buyers could become a huge factor here, too, although at the moment California and New York markets are (more attractive) to them, Mr. Samuels predicts. Wherever they come from, foreign buyers can help American sellers and the American economy. We definitely have seen an increase in foreign buyers, especially Canadians, and we personally know several who have said they would stay longer if their visas allowed them to, notes Curtis Mellon, a Realtor in the Multiple Listings Detective Group of ReMaxs Anchor Realty, in Punta Gorda. In Charlotte County, he adds, highend foreign buyers who can no longer find a fabulous turn-key deal at the half-million to $1 million range, are now looking for land on which to build special homes another way of powering up the American economy. Dave Kaster, who has been selling real estate in the Naples-Marco Island market for almost three decades (the third biggest market in Florida behind Sarasota-Bradenton-Venice and Miami-Fort Lauderdale for Canadian buyers), agrees that such legislation could give the market a boost maybe from the Europeans, whose business began to drop off a few years ago. I have seen a lot of Canadians buy, he notes, especially in the last 18 months. They want to be here for the weather. But the German and European market was bigger when I started my career, and thats dropped off. This could encourage them. From the perspective of David Fite of Fite Shavell & Associates in Palm Beach County, the current demographics of foreign home buyers breaks down this way. Besides the tri-state market up north (New York, New Jersey and Connecticut), Canadians are the biggest buyers. We do a lot of advertising in their magazines to give them a feel for the properties we have from the $2 million up to the $15 to $20 million range. And we have agents who make trips to Canada. The Germans, the English, the French most of the Western Europeans are represented here. The South Americans seem to stay more in Miami. We are seeing more Brazilians and Colombians coming up to Palm Beach. A lot of it is land banking. Theyre buying beautiful properties in the U.S., and putting their money into the U.S. because they feel safer here. Because they feel safer, theyre pumping money into the U.S. economy which is part of the goal, at least, of the newly proposed legislation. But if Congress is really interested in bringing money into the economy from overseas, Mr. Kaster has another suggestion. It would be nice if theyd get the corporate tax structure under control, he says. Its so confusing for American companies, and we have the highest corporate tax rate in the world I think thats a hindrance to bringing money back into the U.S. Partly as a result, American companies have shipped many jobs overseas, Mr. Kaster concludes. Thats why we need to do anything we can to bring foreign investment into Florida. IMMIGRATIONFrom page 1 Collier farm earns organic certificationCollier Family Farms in Ave Maria has earned the Certified Organic designation from the USDA National Organic Program. Certification indicates the farm meets NOP standards for cultural, biological and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance and conserve biodiversity. We began this process a long time ago, Lara Collier of Collier Family Farms says. Receiving this certificate is a badge of honor of sorts; it lies at the core of everything we do here on the farm. The Collier Family Farms farm stand is open Wednesdays and Saturdays this summer and is taking reservations for a Community Supported Agriculture program to begin in the fall. To sign up or for more information, call 398-4157 or visit www.collierfamilyfarms.com. Market hours, space expandThe indoor Farmers Market & Emporium at the Shoppes at Vanderbilt is expanding its hours and location. Effective Friday, June 7, the market moves to a new unit and extends its hours of operation to noon-6 p.m. Fridays and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. The market brings together as many as 40 vendors from Southwest Florida selling a variety of goods, including fresh fruits and vegetables, seafood, flowers, bakery goods and personal care items. The Shoppes at Vanderbilt are at the northwest corner of Airport-Pulling and Vanderbilt Beach roads in North Naples. For more information or a vendor application, contact Laura Sloat at 273-2350 or ltoals30@ gmail.com. MELLON KASTER GREEN COURTESY PHOTOKaren and Rowan Samuel in Naples.

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Lincoln Benefit Life Co., Lincoln, NE and American Heritage Life Insurance Co., Jacksonville, FL. 2011 Allstate Insurance Co. SAVE ON INSURANCE: Car Condo Renters Business Life Motorhome Motorcycle Boat And much more FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 HURRICANE GUIDE A15 The old adage says that time heals all wounds. In the world of hurricanes, that can be a good thing and a bad thing. As hurricanes Charley and Wilma fade further into history, it gets more difficult to see the scars. In Punta Gorda and Charlotte Harbor, a lot of the older growth trees are gone but newer greenery has filled in most of the gaps. Same for the neighborhoods in and around Naples. Hurricanes have a way of cleaning Mother Natures house out with the old and in with the new. If youve familiar with Upper Captiva on the Lee Island Coast, you probably remember what Charley did there. The power of the hurricane ripped the island in two and created a new pass between the Gulf of Mexico and Pine Island Sound. Today, you still might find a few Charley-downed trees on those beaches. But the breach has been healed like it never happened. There are very few signs that a Category 4 hurricane passed several miles offshore just nine years ago. So, whats the downside about a hurricane hit fading into history? Its the way that the passage of time causes our memories to fade. Some scientists and preparedness experts go so far as to call the process hurricane amnesia. In those first few years after Charley and Wilma, it didnt take much of a storm scare to stir the old memories. Everyone who was here back in 2004 and 2005 knew the drill. But something has changed something is different in the last season or two. I, for one, dont think were as ready for the next hurricane as we should be. Maybe the poor economy in recent years has created a mindset that preparedness is more a luxury than a necessity. Maybe folks have done the math and decided that the time frame between Donna (1960) and Charley / Wilma (2004-05) means were not due for another big storm for 30-35 years. One prominent hurricane scientist points out that a very large percentage of our residents did not feel the worst of these major hurricanes. They have false impressions of these storms and thus can dismiss the threat more easily. What can we do to combat this hurricane amnesia? Maybe a little bit of shock therapy. Lets start with a look at Florida on the map. We live on a 100-mile wide peninsula that extends out from the mainland United States some 400 miles. We are surrounded on three sides by warm seawater... and just dangle out there where hurricanes roam six months every year. Its no surprise that Florida gets hit by hurricanes more than any other state in the U.S.A. And not only are we vulnerable by virtue of geography, were vulnerable because of an ongoing climate cycle over the Atlantic. The AMO, or the Atlantic Multi-Decadal Oscillation defines a cycle where Atlantic ocean water temperatures alternate from warmer-than-normal to cooler-than-normal every 30-40 years. The warm phase of the AMO began in the mid-1990s, and has another 10 to 20 years where it can put hightest gasoline into the engine of a developing hurricane. Simply put, the climate cycle we are in favors busy hurricane seasons, stronger storms and more hurricane hits on our coastlines. But rather than shock therapy, maybe just some simple strategizing would counter this mild amnesia that has settled in. An hour of your time at the kitchen table with all of your family might be the cure. The subject preparedness. How would you ride out a hurricane? What would you need to stay safe in your home? Where would you go if a big hurricane forced you to evacuate? Put it all down to paper as detailed as possible and store your familys hurricane game plan in a safe place for future reference. And remember that the NBC-2 First Alert Storm Team will be there for you all hurricane season, and 24-7 during any weather emergency. Suffering from hurricane amnesia? Jog your memory, and get prepared BY JIM REIFNBC-2 Hurricane Guide rom the mainland e 4 00 mi les We n t h ree si d es by and j ust dan e re h urricanes every year. Its F lorida gets hit o re t h an n the a re y de f ines ocean w a nat e fr om to c o 3 0 p i COURTESY PHOTOHurricane Ivan from 2004.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYA16 HURRICANE GUIDE WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 seemed to be part of the show. FPLs Physical Distribution Center and Category 5 Command Center in Riviera Beach was the hub of activity. The main space conjured the image of some NASA-like room, where more than a hundred science-savvy mathematical minds moseyed around drinking coffee, ready to react to the consequential whims of Mother Nature, make-believe as they may be. The headquarters for NextEra Energy and FPL is in Juno Beach. More than 2,800 employees are based on the campus there. The media was invited to the Riviera Beach facility to watch these specialists live out their companys mantra: Ready, Respond, Restore. And though the storm was simulated, its conditions were not to be taken lightly: There were emergent scenarios and paycheck-signing executives looking for answers, so these specialists better have their heads in the game. Hurricane season starts June 1 and runs through October. This helps us prepare for what, eventually, we all know will happen, said FPL meteorologist Tim Drum. We want to get everybodys power back on as soon as possible. At the end of Floridas 2012 storm season, FPL started planning its 2013 storm drill. Mr. Drum was the meteorological wizard behind the Oz-like conditions of the virtual storm. His superiors came to him with specifics of what storm plans and tactics they wanted to test; he added in the weather details. I am one of those lucky individuals who knew what I wanted to do in the sixth grade, said Mr. Drum, who was the chief meteorologist for the ABC affiliate in Springfield, Mo., before joining FPL, where he now thinks up hurricanes in the Sunshine State. Its honestly much easier to deal with real data than trying to deal with made-up data, said the man who made the data up. Outside of the Distribution Performance and Diagnostic Center where Mr. Drum stood watching radar of real lighting strikes next to the fictional path of Hurricane Sheryl, FPL Vice President of Development and External Affairs Pamela Rauch led reporters on a tour of the rest of the command center, a space equipped with food, cots and showers. FPL has a plan and we are ready, Ms. Rauch said. We know no storm will be the same. It will never hit the same place, it will never hit with the same intensity. We have to be flexible. We have to be ready for it. In its focus and intent, she sees the drill as no different than a real storm. In either scenario, FPL employees must track outages, assess damages, communicate with customers and be ready to roll out crews as soon as its safe, so theres no time lost in their quest for power restoration. When a storms still hitting the east coast, our guys on the west coast are out restoring power, she said. Ms. Rauch led media into a situation room of sorts, to listen in on a key call among senior leadership. A flat-screen television played a pretend newscast of Hurricane Sheryl coverage. Another screen showed 1,176,558 fictional customers had no power, while another 674,558 customers had already had their power restored. Executives discussed closed bridges and open shelters, as well as accommodating visits from the president and governor. Employees held pens, clicking them on and off, for even though Sheryl was not a real storm, they still felt the stress of hoping they said the right thing. Its role play, but its very real, Ms. Rauch said. Power is one of the most critical things that must be restored after a storm in order to help people get back to normal. After the fanciful conference call, FPL President Eric Silagy addressed the media to announce the companys initiative to accelerate the strengthening of its electric system. From 2007 to 2012, FPL invested $460 million to strengthen its electricity-delivery backbone. Mr. Silagy said over the next three years, the company is looking to invest half a billion dollars more to further harden its infrastructure. As FPL is currently operating under a four-year rate agreement, Mr. Silagy said the plan does not impact customer rates during the three-year period of investments, after which time the Public Service Commission will reevaluate electric rates. Its an acceleration of our long-term plan, a compression of our time schedule more than anything else, Mr. Silagy said of the initiative. Now if there are no more questions, Im going to get back to storm drill. As he left the room, 987,558 fictional FPL customers were still out of power, but 852,078 customers had had their power restored. DRILLFrom page 1 Florida Power & Light Company Vice President of Development and External Affairs Pamela Rauch explains how the company prepares for storm season and restores service to customers. A total of 1,176,558 customers lost power during Hurricane Sheryl, the virtual storm. Florida Power & Light Company Meteorologist Tim Drum shows the path of Hurricane Sheryl, a virtual Category 3 storm. The storm made landfall in Cape Coral, moved across the state and exited at Port St. Lucie. FPL / COURTESY PHOTOSFlorida Power & Light Company President Eric Silagy (second from left) leads an operations call at the companys Command Center in Riviera Beach during FPLs annual storm drill. The drill focused on the restoration efforts after Hurricane Sheryl, a virtual Category 3 storm, made landfall on Floridas west coast.

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Whether out at the beach, out on the water or just out and about, you can put the power of First Alert Power Doppler in your pocket with the NBC2 Wx app for iPhone and Android. The simple-to-use application provides personalized weather reports whenever you want them. The custom-designed app gives you immediate access to the only Doppler radar in Southwest Florida so you can track the storms headed toward your location. First Alert Power Doppler is more accurate for our area than the radars coming out of Tampa and Miami those radars miss storms that are at lower levels of the atmosphere, where only a local radar will be able to find them. Animate the radar images just like to do on the computer, and zoom all the way down to your house if youd like. But local Doppler isnt the only feature. The NBC2 Wx app is tied into national radar, satellite and temperature data. It can also display warning boxes on the map indicating a threat for severe weather of various types. It has a full look at current conditions for where you are, but you can also specify other locations you want to track by ZIP code or city name. The forecast can show you the days high, low and rain chance, but you can also step through the day hour by hour to see the expected temperatures and conditions to better help plan your day. These features also work with all your saved locations. A powerful feature of the NBC2 Wx app is the Alerts setup. Turn the alerts on to warn you if storms are headed your way. Configure additional alerts for your home, office and school and have one for your current mobile location, no matter where you are at the time. The app is free and can be found by searching NBC2 in both the App Store and Google Play. Technology turns the weather report into a personal matterSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________ COURTESY PHOTOSThe free NBC2 Wx app allows you to receive weather alerts specific to your location or any zip code you choose. www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYA18 HURRICANE WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 Got Download?The iPad App Its Local. Its Entertaining. Its Mobile.Its FREE! Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.comiPad is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All rights reserved. Search Florida Weekly in the iTunes App Store today.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYA20 HURRICANE WEEK OF JUNE 12-18, 2013 Storm action timeline Early Summer Hurricane watch is announced Hurricane warning is issued After the storm During the stormDevelop your storm plan.Stock your hurricane supply kit. Create a checklist of items you will want to take with you if you have to leave. Take before pictures of your home for insurance purposes. Find out the elevation of your home. Make sure your street address is clearly marked on your home. Hurricane conditions are possible within the next 48 hours. Clear your yard of potential ying debris, including lawn furniture, toys, etc. Lower the water level in the swimming pool by one foot. Board up windows.Gas up the car. Check your oil and tire pressure. Get cash. ATMs and banks may not be open after a storm. Turn the refrigerator to the coldest setting. Store plenty of water. Hurricane conditions are possible within the next 36 hours. Gather important documents. Finish shuttering doors and windows. Evacuate if you are ordered to do so. If youre staying home, designate a safe room. Interior bathrooms or closets on the lowest level with no windows work best. Charge cell phones and other devices.Stay indoors. Stay away from windows even if theyre shuttered. Listen to media reports for the latest information. Stay inside even if it appears calm. Do not go out unitl the all-clear is given. The longest part of the process, recovery can take weeks. Move slowly and cautiously as you survey and clean up. Most injuries take place after the storm. Do not use public water until you are noti ed that it is safe. Avoid travel if possible. Do not connect generators to house wiring. Beware of downed power lines, wild animals and even domestic animals that may be frightened or lost. Take pictures of damage and contact your insurance agent. Agencies and organizations offer emergency helpHindsight is always a dishonest voice for the present. The storms have been quiet since Hurricane Wilma during the 2005 season, which was the last major hurricane to affect the Fort Myers area. But no one wants to walk down the street and see fallen trees and power lines scattered along the road, and wonder what to do next. Yet, this scenario is a reality we should prepare for during every hurricane season. Southwest Floridians know from experience that neighbors, churches and local businesses come together in unprecedented ways to help with recovery efforts. Nevertheless, weve compiled some of the contact information for the big organizations that can serve as a starting place for either volunteerism or for your own recovery once the weather system has passed. From reporting downed power lines to who to call about clean water, canned food and local shelters, these accredited contacts will help with your questions and needs. Whats in a name? Wind and rain2000 Keith 2001 Allison 2001 Iris 2001 Michelle 2002 Isidore 2002 Lili 2003 Fabian 2003 Isabel 2003 Juan 2004 Charley 2004 Frances 2004 Ivan 2004 Jeanne 2005 Dennis 2005 Katrina 2005 Rita 2005 Stan 2005 Wilma 2007 Dean 2007 Felix 2007 Noel 2008 Gustav 2008 Ike 2008 Paloma 2010 Igor 2010 Tomas 2011 Irene 2012 SandyThese names have been retired:Andrea Barry Chantal Dorian Erin Fernand Gabrielle Humberto Ingrid Jerry Karen Lorenzo Melissa Nestor Olga Pablo Rebekah Sebastien Tanya Van Wendy2013 STORM NAMESEvery year since 1953, the National Hurricane Center has generated an alphabetical list of names for the seasons tropical storms and hurricanes. At rst, the lists consisted of only female names; since 1979, the names alternate between male and female. There are six lists that continue to rotate, changing only when there is a hurricane so devastating that its name is retired. BridgesTravel across the areas bridges becomes unsafe once winds reach gale force, or in excess of 34 mph. Even if physical barricades are not present, drivers should exercise common sense when pre-storm travels involve crossing bridges. Evacuation orders for Southwest Floridas barrier islands will be issued well in advance of a storm, and those affected should promptly heed such orders, before travel across bridges becomes unsafe and roads are closed off. Important Phone Numbers American Red Cross 596-6868 www.redcross.org FEMA Disaster assistance (800) 621 www.fema.gov Florida Power & Light 262-1322 www.fpl.com/storm Emergency Management 252-3600 www.collierem.org The Salvation Army 775-9447 www.salvationarmy.org United Way 261-7112 www.unitedway.org

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYA22 HURRICANE GUIDE WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts a busy hurricane season. The news that Floridians could be in for an active hurricane season is nothing out of the ordinary. But just because we have been lucky the past few years with not having much more than a yawn and some spit from Mother Nature doesnt mean she might not storm our way this season. Aside from the essentials canned food, batteries, flashlights, extra supply of necessary meds, bottled water, cleaning supplies, radio and cell phone we have checked in on a few other gadgets that could make getting through hurricane season a breeze. Solar power packs and generator at Goal Zero: www.goalzero.comThose looking to keep the power on after a storm can just tap into another force of Mother Natures: sunshine. Solar-generated devices and gizmos offer power without batteries, fuel or other non-sustainable sources. Goal Zero features a variety of solar generators that will do anything from charge your cell phone to run a household. Prices range from around $120 to almost $1,800. Inflatable tent The Cave at Heimplanet: http://heimplanet.comThose finding themselves with a winddamaged home might need to camp out for a while until their home is secure and safe to reside. If you want to stay on your premises in your own back yard, so to speak, then you might consider getting a tent. The days of tedious tent set-ups are gone. There are many choices and types to suit your needs. Heimplanet features an inflatable tent called The Cave. All that is needed to set up this geodesic style tent is an air pump. The tent provides space for three people and baggage. Illumaguard home light battery backup: www.electrikusinc.comThere is no need be afraid of being in the dark after a storm with the Illumaguard device. Plug any table or floor lamp into this compact gadget and lights will stay on despite power loss. This handy gadget even works to keep lights on during extended power outages. The device runs $59.99. Energizer Energi battery backup for cell phone: www.energizerpowerpacks. com/us/If losing cell phone service during and after a major storm is not an option, check out Energizers mini portable charger. The AP750 is a tiny but mighty portable charger that fits on your key ring. It allows you to talk and recharge at the same time. And for the fashionista, the mini charger comes in metallic black or pink hues. The cost is $29.99. WaterBOB emergency drinking water storage: www.waterbob.comHaving drinkable water is vital after a major storm comes through. WaterBOB is an emergency storage system that makes use of your bathtub. The storage device is a plastic container made of heavy-duty food-grade plastic that can be filled with 100 gallons of fresh drinking water in a standard bathtub. The water stays fresh and clean for up to four weeks. The system comes with a siphon pump to deliver water into smaller containers. Cost is $21.95. Hurricane gadgets to get you through the stormBY ELLA NAYORenayor@ oridaweekly.com As storm season in the subtropics begins, insurance agents remind us to be sure our homes are covered from a hurricanes windy, watery attack. It usually takes about a month after changing or buying a flood or wind policy before it goes into effect. The biggest threat that hurricanes present to homes comes from tidal surge or rising water, said Ted Todd of Ted Todd Insurance, an Allstate Agency with agents serving the region, including Punta Gorda, Fort Myers, Bonita Springs and Naples. I think people should do their homework and do their due diligence in terms of flood insurance, said Bud Hornbeck, president and CEO of Lutgert Insurance, a Naples-based company that also serves the region. If you wait till the middle of hurricane season, youre rolling the dice. He recommends first securing your property by installing windows with impact glass, or any approved item that could reduce the likelihood your home will sustain damage. That will reduce premiums, and from a real estate standpoint, increases value, he said. Deductibles In general, the more you pay for your premium, the lower the deductible. Deductibles for coverage from such damage often vary between 2 to 5 percent of the value of a home. A 2 percent deductible, for instance, would be $2,000 for a $100,000 home. They should probably ask for quotations on different levels of deductibles, Mr. Hornbeck said. If the premium is reduced enough for them, they might want to take a little higher deductible, taking a little higher front end risk.FloodIf you live near a waterfront, you probably have flood coverage. But Mr. Todd warns that people further inland often assume that because theyre not in the highest risk area, theres no need for them to buy it. People say, youre in a flood zone/ youre not in a flood zone, Mr. Todd said. Really thats not accurate. When it comes to real storms, theres no line where the flooding is guaranteed to stop; instead, insurance companies use the zones to estimate your risk of a flood. Generally, those in the higher-risk area have more than a 1 in 100-year chance of being flooded. Those on the other side of it are less likely to flood. But that risk assessment wouldnt mean much, Mr. Todd says, if a storm that is big enough, and slow moving enough happens. He recalls reporters warning people that floodwaters could reach as far as Interstate 75 before one storm in the late 1990s. People called him upset, thinking they were in a no-flood zone. Their policies didnt require it and theyd heard from neighbors they didnt need it. They think it means they wont get flooded, he said. Youre still in a flood zone, its just a secondary flood zone. If youre in a secondary flood zone, flood insurance can run below $400 per year, and is also less costly for condominiums. Its something I think most people should have, Mr. Todd said. I always tell people, look, if its not your grocery money, buy it, because its just a prudent thing to do.WindHomeowners are often required to have wind insurance. Many buy it from the states program, Citizens Property Insurance, Mr. Todd said more people than he gauges the company could reasonably cover after a particularly bad storm. If youre a roofer and you can put on four roofs per month and all of a sudden you have to put on 100 roofs in a month, you just cant do it, he said. And I think thats a fair analogy for Citizens. The state program aimed to take on a large problem, he adds; in the past, private insurance companies often wouldnt cover wind. I think everyone knows that Citizens is a great benefit because when insurance companies wouldnt write insurance and people wanted to move to Florida they would write insurance, he said. Now thats changed. More private companies now offer it. That leaves homeowners with more options, such as consolidating flood and wind policies under one company. Its a good thing if we can reduce the exposure for the state, Mr. Todd said. The state doesnt want it, it doesnt need it.Filing claimsFinally, when it comes to filing claims, Mr. Todd advises, dont wait. Call right away. And while the insurance company calculates the cost of the damage, its a good idea to get your own estimates from vendors and begin assessing what youll need though wait to start the work until youve consulted with your insurer. Kind of think of it like getting in line, Mr. Todd said. Weve all had a situation where you have to get in line for something and if you wait too long youre in the back of the line.Coverage technologyIn addition to the rest of their hurricane war chest, Floridians can consider adding mobile applications and Internet tools to their prep list. Companies offer various ways to connect and quickly receive service from your agency. The Pocket Agent from State Farm for instance offers unique mobile insurance and banking features at your fingertips. With a push of a button, customers can access many unique features that will help them start the road to recovery using the State Farm Pocket Agent app, said Esterobased State Farm Agent Rich Mathews. The Pocket Agent app includes features that would come in handy following a storm, such as help with submitting an auto claim, your policy information at your fingertips, or contact your agent. If you had to evacuate the home, the app will even help you manage your bank account remotely. Measuring your risk for flood, windBY EVAN WILLIAMSewilliams@ oridaweekly.com Seasonal residents should make arrangements to have someone check their home in the event of a hurricane. And seasonal residents should not be content with a quick drive-by appraisal of their property. Even if the dwelling appears ne from the outside, there can be considerable damage mold and the like inside. Keep close at hand the telephone numbers of your insurance agent and the 800 number for your insurance company. When it comes to property insurance say, for a washer and dryer understand the ne print. Here are two technical terms to look out for. Replacement Cost policies offer full protection in a loss. It would replace damaged equipment with new equipment, without regard to its age and condition. Actual Cash Value policies cost less but, by taking into account age and condition, can reduce the amount youll be reimbursed.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA24 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 omas Quigley, M.D.Board Certi ed Eye Physician & Surgeonwww.doctorquigley.comFREEEYE EXAMFOR NEW PATIENTSNo Hidden Charges: It is our policy that the patient and or any other person responsible for payment or be reimburse by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of reimburse within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Offer does not apply to Avantica managed insurance plans including Freedom, Optimum and some Universal.CODE: FW00SP27823complete medical exam with one of our board certi ed eye doctors includes prescription for eyeglasses, and tests for cataracts, glaucoma and other eye diseases. Offer applies to new patients 59 years and older. Coupon Expires 6/30/2013Naples Bonita Springs Glimpsing the future, and anticipating an amazing journey We have seen the future of health care and it is in Kansas City. With CIO Helen Thompson as our guide, 10 of us from NCH recently enjoyed a wondrous tour of the vision center at our partner Cerners headquarters in the Midwest. We discovered some eye-opening things about the future of health-care delivery.The clear emphasis was on moving medical care out of the hospital and into physicians offices and patients homes. Our NCH Physician Group colleagues on the trip Dr. Karen Henrichsen, Allison Zablo, Eileen Connolly-McDermott, Cheryl Shaffer and Zach Bostock all were impressed with Cerners medical office information technology system, which is active in more than 55,000 offices across the nation and around the world. The benefits of this system are myriad: For patients, appointments can be made and lab results obtained securely online, and there is one seamless medical record (accessible from a hospital or an outpatient facility) and one set of billing/insurance records. For caregivers, this system provides easy access to information. At the same time, it enables collection of data about individual patients and populations that can lead to improvements in patient health through suggested preventive measures and early trendspotting in such areas as flu epidemics. We are excited about the potential ability to manage patients at home, especially those who would have been hospitalized in the past. This will be possible as wireless medical monitoring devices blood pressure cuffs, oxygen saturation measurement machines, thermometers, scales, and even seeing and talking with patients through Skype or Face Time become relatively inexpensive to install and integrate at home. Think how much more comfortable and secure an elderly patient with congestive heart failure or simple pneumonia will feel when he can be monitored safely at home. Future hospitalizations will be limited to major surgery and intensive care. Emergency rooms will send most patients home with wireless monitoring devices. At NCH, were continuing with such innovation with our Cerner partner, as we embark on Smart Emergency Rooms, using the same technology we have in our Smart Hospital Rooms. Ultimately, a sick persons bedroom becomes a private Smart Room at home. The rest of us on the Kansas City visit Chief Nursing Officer Michele Thoman, Chief of Staff Kevin Cooper, new Chief Financial Officer Mike Stephens and I were mightily impressed. I recalled a similar trip to Kansas City on my first day in my new NCH job 13 years ago. What I thought seemed like science fiction in the year 2000 (bar code medication administration, wireless integrated vital sign machines, digital documentation by nurses and physicians, secure online access to medical records, Smart Rooms, etc.) has become reality in Southwest Florida.NCH was recognized as a Most Wired system for 2012 and is among the top 250 health-care systems in the country for information technology. Thirteen years from now, well look back and realize that 2013 was just another step in realizing the immense benefits of the new world of health care. We look forward to an amazing journey. Dr. Allen Weiss is president and CEO of the NCH Healthcare System.Need for blood donors heats upDonations of blood slow to a trickle during the summer months in Southwest Florida, but the need for blood of all types does not. Donors are urged to take the time to donate at the Community Blood Center or its bloodmobile. The center is on the first floor of the NCH Medical Plaza Building at 311 Ninth St. N., next to the NCH parking garage. Complimentary valet parking is offered for all blood donors. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday. In Bonita Springs, the CBC bloodmobile makes a regular visit to the parking lot at Sunshine Plaza on the second Monday of the month. Look for it next from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on June 10. For the bloodmobile schedule and details about donating blood, visit www.givebloodcbc.org. Local practices merge operationsMillennium Physician Group and Naples Medical Center have merged operations in Collier County under the Millennium umbrella of services that include primary care, specialists, walk-in clinics, radiology, lab services, hospitalists and more. We dont expect our patients to notice a difference in our day-to-day business activities, Dr. Tom Parent, president of Naples Medical Center, says. The only major difference is that both Naples Medical Center and Millennium patients now have access to services offered by both groups. For more information, visit www. naplesmedicalcenter.com or www.MillenniumPhysician.com. allenWEISSallen.weiss@nchmd.org Breathing easyManaging triggers is key to controlling asthma THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTHWhether or not you can recall the details of your time in school, you can probably remember watching a fellow student reach for an inhaler while struggling to breathe. Perhaps youve even been there yourself. Asthma is a leading chronic respiratory disease in the United States, impacting as many as 25 million Americans. Approximately 7 million of these are children or teens under 18 years of age, and as many as three in every 30 students are affected by it. Inflammation in the lungs causes airway muscles to tighten and contract, which leads to excess production of mucus and swelling. This shift within the body is sometimes sudden and usually leads to chest tightening, coughing, wheezing and, in the most severe circumstances, death. Temporary airway obstruction, chest tightness, coughing and wheezing are all symptoms often detectable, yet sometimes overlooked. Learning about asthmas symptoms, triggers and management is essential for individuals with asthma so they can lead active, normal lives. Poorly controlled asthma often results in a childs inability to sleep or learn properly, factors that can seriously affect their development. It also causes lifethreatening situations that require emergency care. Watching a child experience an asthma episode is alarming, but it is crucial for the childs safety and health that caretakers act immediately. This is why every asthmatic child should have an Asthma Action Plan. Written by the childs physician or health-care provider, the plan should list any medications that must be taken to control the symptoms and overcome attack episodes, and is should be given to the childs teachers, babysitters, daycare workers and any other caregivers.Attack triggersThe following are leading triggers that can produce asthma flare-ups: Tobacco or second-hand smoke Seasonal changes and cold weather Many types of viruses and bacteria, such as the common cold and flu (viral infections are one of the most common triggers of asthma) Dust mites and molds Pets (if allergic to animal dander) Certain pests, especially cockroaches Chemical irritants such as those found in cleaners, paints, adhesives, pesticides, cosmetics and air fresheners Outdoor air pollutants such as car exhaust, smoke, road dust and factory emissions Odors from strong perfumes, harsh chemicals, potpourri, incense, etc. Exercise, such as running or playing Strong emotions, such as fear or anxiety Although the list of commonly encountered triggers is long and broad, asthma episodes can be prevented through preemptive tactics. Ensuring your children arent exposed to these triggers requires making sure that schools and teachers are fully aware of what can initiate an episode. Risk can be reduced by closely monitoring a childs area, ensuring it is free of dust, allergens and harsh chemicals. The Florida Department of Health encourages children to maintain an active and healthy lifestyle by controlling their illness, thus reducing the risk of other diseases such as obesity or diabetes. Yet, it is also important to recognize vigorous physical activity as an episode trigger. With careful strategies, your child can lead the normal, carefree life all young children deserve.For more information, visit: The Florida Department of Health, www.myfloridaeh.com/medicine/Asthma The Florida Asthma & Allergy Foundation of America, www.aafa.org The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, owww.cdc.gov/asthma The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, www.epa.gov/asthma HEALTHY LIVING

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Periodontal FACTPeriodontal Disease may be a contributing factor to: gum periodontal disease periodontal diseaseDr. Bradley Piotrowski, D.D.S., M.S.D.BOARD CERTIFIED PERIODONTIST Hurry offer expires 6/14/13 Dr. Shieh and the team at Surgical Healing Arts Centerare dedicated to your health and wellness. Our comprehensive approach to bariatric surgery begins with pre-op education and continues through postsurgical follow-up. Dr. Shieh has extensive experience in the most advanced, proven techniques including sleeve gastrectomy, gastric banding with LAP-BAND or Realize Band and gastric bypass. Plus, he is one of only a few bariatric surgeons nationwide skilled in corrective procedures. Discover life-changing body transformations and weight management at Surgical Healing Arts Center. Call (239) 344-9786 to schedule a consultation or visit surgicalhealingarts.com. Enance ou ife WITH COMPREHENSIVE WEIGHT MANAGEMENT. 6150 Diamond Centre Court #1300 Fort Myers, Florida (239) 344-9786 SurgicalHealingArts.comCall to attend our FREE monthly seminar! NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 NEWS A25 Physicians Regional donates $25,000 to Wounded Warrior Project BY RANDALL KENNETH JONESFlorida Weekly Correspondent On April 8, 2006, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Pauley and 17 men were on a routine dismount patrol through the City of Tal Afar, Iraq, when an IED exploded, injuring Sgt. Pauley and killing one of his men, 19-year-old PFC Jody Missildine of Plant City, Fla. Though his injuries would result in Staff Sgt. Pauleys medical discharge from the Army, the emotional impact of losing one of his men was far more debilitating. As a leader, you are not only taking responsibility for your own actions but for the actions of your soldiers. At the time, I could not help but feel that I had failed, he says. With the younger soldiers memory as his constant companion, Staff Sgt. Pauley would, like so many before him, fight to come to terms with the horrific explosion, the military life he left behind and the uncertain future that lay ahead. Despite receiving the Purple Heart and Combat Infantry Badge, he struggled to accept he even had a future, knowing that Missildine did not. By his own admission, Staff Sgt. Pauley was lost. On May 21 this year, with the Color Guard from Immokalee High School and the brass ensemble from Barron Collier High School on hand, Physicians Regional Healthcare System and parent company Health Management Associates presented a gift of $25,000 to the Wounded Warrior Project. There to accept the donation was Retired Staff Sgt. Pauley, now a spokesman for the project. This is the second consecutive year Physicians Regional and HMA have made a sizable donation to Wounded Warrior Project, an effort that began when several veterans and friends, moved by stories of the first wounded service members returning home from Afghanistan and Iraq, took action to help others in need. What started as a program to provide comfort items to wounded service members has grown into a complete rehabilitative effort to assist warriors as they recover and transition back to civilian life. In conjunction with the check presentation, Staff Sgt. Pauley met the family of his fallen soldier. PFC Missildines grandparents, Melvin and Shirley Missildine, and his sister, Nikki Missildine, were in attendance. I can honestly say that the Wounded Warrior Project saved my life. Even now, as I act as a spokesperson for the organization, my life has once again been changed forever, Staff Sgt. Pauley said about the meeting. Finally meeting Jodys family brought closure not just to me, but to them as well. He added that the elder Mr. Missildine hugged him and said he wished he had been able to tell me seven years ago that it was not my fault. Shirley Missildine said it best: Every day, Jeremiahs work honors Jodys life. That is what the Wounded Warrior Project means to me. For more information about the Wounded Warrior Project, visit www.woundedwarriorproject.org. Retired Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Pauley of the Wounded Warrior Project Nikki, Shirley and Melvin Missildine; Gary Newsome of Health Management Associates; Jeremiah Pauley; Rick LoCastro, Joe Bernard and Scott Campbell of Physicians Regional Healthcare System

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www.MillenniumPhysician.comPRIMARY CARE o LAB SERVICES o RADIOLOGY o DIAGNOSTICS o MEDICAL AESTHETICS o URGENT CARE Primary Care OcesMARIA DEL RIOGILES, M.D. ALEJANDRO PEREZTREPICHIO, M.D. LUIS POZNIAK, M.D. MICHAEL Y. WANG, M.D. 1735 SW Health Parkway Naples, FL 34108239-249-7800 239-249-7830 JULIA HARRIS, M.D. JAMES FAREMOUTH, D.O. NANCY BARATTA, MSN, ARNP 8803 Tamiami Trail E Naples, FL 34112239-732-1050JOHN DIAZ, M.D. KAE FERBER, M.D. JULIE DIAZ, FNPBC 671 Goodlette Road, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34102239-263-8222 CHARLES KILO, M.D. 1495 Pine Ridge Rd. Suite 4 Naples, FL 34109239-594-5456 www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA26 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 BY GINA SPADAFORIUniversal UclickHow do you help more cats with less money? Contrary to decades of conventional practice, some in the shelter community are now arguing that for municipal shelters, the answer is to leave free-roaming cats alone, and to ask communities nonprofit shelters to do the same. We help when a cat is in trouble, or is causing trouble, says Tracy Mohr, a 30-year shelter veteran who recently turned the California college town of Chico into one where cats are no longer routinely accepted at the citys tax-funded shelter. If thats not the case, we leave them alone and ask that others do, too. Chicos city shelter no longer accepts nuisance cats trapped and brought in by citizens, nor cats presumed to be lost pets. The city shelter also no longer accepts cats given up by their owners for adoption. Those animals now go to the Butte Humane Society, a local nonprofit that had already been pulling cats from the city shelter for adoption. By sending people looking to rehome a pet directly to the nonprofit shelter, the community has one-stop shopping for adopting cats while sparing the animals the stress of being moved from one shelter to another. The changes were put in place in February, and theyve resulted in fewer cats killed and, more surprisingly, fewer unhappy citizens. Mohr says thats because the shelters were all on the same page when it came to handling cats, and because the community outreach ahead of the change was extensive. We have a very active animal welfare community here, with a lot of organizations and a lot of very active, concerned people, says Mohr. The change made perfect sense. What didnt make sense was continuing with traditional sheltering methods when budgets are being slashed, says shelter medicine pioneer Dr. Kate Hurley of the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of California, Davis. Hurley points out that landing in a shelter is a good thing if youre a dog, but thats rarely the case for cats. People know when a dog is missing, and they know it right away, she says. The dog was here, and now hes not. Thats not true with cats. Its not uncommon for an owned cat to be missing for a while, and an owner wont start looking because the cat always came back before. With all our efforts in shelters to reunite cats with their owners, more commonly what were doing is killing peoples pets, says Hurley, noting that 67 percent of lost cats are reunited with their owners by returning on their own, but only 2 percent of shelter cats are reclaimed by their owners. In other words: Cities can save money by not dealing with lost cats or feral cat colonies, which are both situations that typically will resolve or can be resolved without official intervention. The change is in part a realization that free-roaming cats, whether pets or feral, have more in common with wild animals than with dogs. No one would ever suggest that there were enough money and man-hours to eradicate entire populations of wild species in urban areas. Instead, the strategy is to remove dangerous animals and help those wild animals in trouble. The same strategy works for cats, says Dr. Hurley, and Mohr agrees. Take people complaining that theres a cat in their yard, going to the bathroom in their garden, says Mohr. If they trap that cat, really, is that going to solve the problem? No, because there are probably more cats in the neighborhood. Trapping will be an exercise in futility. What were counseling people to do, the same way we counsel them with wildlife, is to use strategies that make a yard less attractive for a cat. The problem gets solved by leaving the animal alone in most cases, and were using our community to solve it. The bottom line, says Mohr, is a collaborative community effort aimed at problem-solving, using strategies that actually work with and for cats, while saving money for taxpayers. A paws-off approachTight budgets lead some city shelters to stop treating cats like dogsMost lost cats will find their way home if left alone, but only a tiny fraction of those taken to a shelter will be reunited with their owners. >>George is a loving and lovable 1-year-old domestic short hair whose bright yellow eyes shine against his black fur.>>Jordon is a handsome Parson Russell terrier mix. Happy, calm and great on his leash, hes about 18 months old and weighs almost 20 pounds.>>Lila is a lovely, well-behaved Maine coon mix whos about 4 years old. She lost her home through no fault of her own and longs for a new family. >>Molly is a friendly Labrador retriever mix who is about a year old and weight 60 pounds. She likes to play fetch, knows all the basic commands and is good on her leash.To adopt or foster a petThis weeks pets are from Collier County Domestic Animal Services. Adoption fees for cats are $60 and dogs are $85 and include sterilization surgery, vaccinations, pet license, ID microchip and a bag of food. Visit DAS at 7610 Davis Blvd. from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday. For more information, call 252-7387 or visit www.colliergov.net/pets. Pets of the Week

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 NEWS A27 DIVA DIARIESFlipping through Facebook while the jetsetters are awayIts the first week of June and I am officially the only person still in town Im convinced of this. Almost every friend I have is off somewhere fabulous. One is vacationing in Key West, another in Manhattan. Theres also Napa Valley, Chicago and even Istanbul. (I know two people who are vacationing in Istanbul right now, and they dont even know each other. What are the chances?) And lets not even talk about my friend who is in Paris. Tres ooh-la-la. None of these people are fancy jetsetters; theyve saved and planned for their well-earned excursions. And it certainly makes sense that this is when they make their escape from Southwest Florida for anywhere just like everyone else. Schools out, the snowbirds who stayed through May are finally back in Ohio, its the kickoff to hurricane season (its hard to gallivant all over the place when youre battening down the hatches, living in the Cone of Despair and Jim Cantore could be on his way into town at any time). Also, there are the love bugs (ugh). So, I get it the first week of June is otherwise known as The Mass Exodus. I just spent 30 minutes on Facebook scrolling through a friends album of photos from a road trip through Baltimore. Pictures from the interstate. Thirty minutes. Clearly, I am bored. (I am also jealous far more jealous of the friends who took a bicycling trip through Spain than the one who drove through Baltimore, but still ). Every year during the first week of June, I am a social butterfly with clipped wings, a reveler with no one to revel with, a diva with nowhere to flit. Case in point: On Saturday night, I was all dressed up with no place to go when I attempted to attend a progressive ladies night where no one showed up. Not a soul. Not even the organizers. After a perusal of the online invite, I discovered that myself and just two other people who happen to be in town this week were the only ones to RSVP. I ended up spending the evening on Facebook, clicking like on almost every picture of a long-lost friends photos from her vacation in San Antonio. Who knew you could take more than 60 photos of the Alamo? And who would guess that a random friend whom you havent seen since high school might spend her Saturday night actually looking at them because she has absolutely nothing better to do? Meanwhile, the rest of the month looks festive and fun with plenty of soirees, cocktail hours and sparkly events. For moi, the second week in June cant come soon enough. In the meantime, I may or may not liven up my life by posting photos on Facebook of my friends vacation to Ocala. Because even Ocala sounds exotic right about now.Grabbing the ringI did get to do one fun thing in the last few days. I joined public-relations pro Carolyn Rogers and Kellie Burns of NBC-2 to read over entries and choose finalists for the Mark Loren Designs A Ring Within Reach contest. We narrowed the field down to five contenders who now have the chance to win a diamond engagement ring by keeping their hand on a pedestal showcasing the pretty bauble. To root them on, be at Marks new Naples gallery next to Silverspot Cinema at Mercato on Friday, June 7. The fun starts at 4 p.m. and ends when only one contestant remains standing. Last year, a guy stood for 28 hours. Sounds like something worth staying around town for. Ciao for now, my lovelies! Stay tuned for another divalicious diary entry next week. stephanieDAVIS sdavis@floridaweekly.com STEPHANIE DAVIS / FLORIDA WEEKLYCarolyn Rogers, Kellie Burns, Jennifer McMillen and Susan Schuring

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Copyright 2013 Lennar Corporation. Lennar, the Lennar logo and Everythings Included Home are registered service marks of Lennar Corporation and/or its subsidiaries. CGC 1507191. 5/13 EVERYTHINGS INCLUDED HOMES SM More Sweet Savings! Luxury features & upgrades included at no extra charge! SWEET DEALS ON THESE FOUR IMMEDIATE-MOVE-IN HOMES. Lot # Model Description Was Now116 Trevi 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, tile in living areas, $280,155 $270,246 pool, spa, pool heater, 2,032 sq. ft. 117 Trevi 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, tile in living areas, $279,855 $269,946 pool, spa, pool heater, 2.032 sq. ft. 234 Alexandria 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, tile in living areas, $276,955 $267,849 pool, spa, pool heater, 1,904 sq. ft. 235 Trevi 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, tile in living areas, $278,955 $269,809 pool, spa, pool heater, 2,032 sq. ft. 7 Executive Homes now from only This is the last summer youll enjoy the sweet savings being offered right now at Orange Blossom Ranch. Executive Homes from $ 888-204-3475 Directions: I-75 to Exit 111 (Immokalee Road). East 9 miles to Oil Well Road/CR 858, turn right onto Oil Well. Community 1 mile on left.

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INSIDE Fore!Chamber members hit the links and more Networking photos. B5, 7 House HuntingNew construction in Old Naples for $3.995 million. B8 Ask the FoolIs there a limit to how many shares of a company one can buy? B6 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATENAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA GUIDE TO THE LOCAL BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE INDUSTRIES BSECTIONWEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 A COMPANY FROM LOS ANGELES HAS INVESTED millions of dollars in Southwest Florida mineral wells in the last six years, leading the way in reviving a local oil industry that dates back to the 1940s. After years of steady production that peaked in 1978, production slid down along with oil prices. It came to almost a standstill in the mid 2000s. As the cost of petroleum rose and new technology allowed for more accurate drilling, industry executives say, at least half a dozen oil companies have been issued permits in the region. Old wells are being tapped and new drilling has begun. L.A.-based BreitBurn Energy Partners drilled four wells in 2012, investing $46 million in its Florida operations a larger investment than in any of the other six states in which the company operates, aside from California. (There, it spent $47 million.) The Florida Department of Environmental Protection, which regulates drilling, has issued 24 permits in South Florida since 2009. Most were issued for BreitBurn Energy and for drilling in established fields like Raccoon Point in southeast Collier County, wrote Florida DEP spokesperson Mara Burger in an e-mail. For a comparison, from 2006 through the end of 2008 there were four drilling permits issued in Florida. All four were for northwest Florida. There are currently 31 active wells in South Florida, she added. The majority are found about 30 miles inland in Lee, Collier and Hendry counties, from Lehigh Acres to the Big Cypress National Preserve. They also BY EVAN WILLIAMSewilliams@ oridaweekly.com SEE OIL, B4 Oil companies come back to Southwest Florida COLLIER RESOURCES / COURTESY PHOTOOne of Collier Resources oil derricks at sunset. OIL FOR LOCAL DRILLING Le Ciel Venetian Tower Bua/Bua-Bell 866.884.8196 $2.125 Million Web#: N213011442 Lucarno at Mediterra Bua/Bua-Bell 866.884.8196 $1.499 Million Web#: N212015750

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB2 BUSINESS WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 We are a direct lender offering the following loan products: Making dreams come true...SW Floridas Fastest Growing Mortgage Bank! 239-434-0300 www.aemc.cc Insider trading is back in the limelightInvestors have a right to a level playing field in which they have confidence that: market prices are for real; that no one has unjust advantage; that proper disclosures are made timely; and that the game is not rigged in addition to price transparency and high degree of liquidity. While such attributes are true for all financial markets, there are characteristics of the securities markets that make them unique. They require special safe guarding the investors from securities fraud. Whether parading in traditional and newly disguised forms, securities fraud is very destructive to the long term integrity of the securities markets. There are two governmental legal bodies that can prosecute cases in which investors have been harmed: the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission. There are important differences in what they can do and how they enforce. According to the group Occupy the SEC, the DOJ is responsible for all criminal enforcement and for civil enforcement of the anti-bribery provisions with respect to issuers. The SEC brings civil enforcement actions, and can obtain injunctions, orders of disgorgement, and orders barring defendants from the securities industry. (And) often the DOJs criminal complaints track the civil complaints filed by the SEC. But the SEC cannot bring criminal charges. What is the flavor of recent DOJ prosecutions? Surely, there were crimes against investors in the mortgage crisis. What happened to the bad guys who harmed innocent investors? Not much of anything happened to them. Though well within the scope of the DOJ to have brought criminal charges against many of the corporate players in the mortgage crisis, the DOJ chose otherwise. Its enforcement pattern seems to be: big institutions and big fraudsters get a pass. Harsh assessment of the DOJ under Obama? Actually not, as this administrations own attorney general, Eric Holder, has offered reasoning behind too big to jail thinking, as follows: I am concerned that the size of some of these institutions becomes so large that it does become difficult for us to prosecute them when we are hit with indications that if you do prosecute, if you do bring a criminal charge, it will have a negative impact on the national economy, perhaps even the world economy. And I think that is a function of the fact that some of these institutions have become too large. Since that March 7, 2012 (grotesque) comment, Mr. Holder has been back pedalling big time. Beyond Holder and the DOJ, securities enforcement lays squarely with the SEC, the only government agency with the sole focus of protecting the investor. The SEC regularly brings enforcement cases involving: insider trading (unfair trading, later explained in detail); breaches of public trust (where a public official uses offices for personal gain); accounting fraud by publicly traded companies; Ponzi schemes, etc. The self-serving manipulations of some managements (e.g., excessive grants and payments of options, salaries, perks, severance and retirement packages) are surely repulsive and operate to shareholder detriment .but most often these actions are not illegal. The most interesting and impactful SEC cases are insider trading cases (trading based on material and nonpublic information.) Insider trading generally brings about unjust trading gains. Having inside information is not fraud, since insiders have it all the time. Information is nonpublic until it is widely disseminated by the company through, for example, press releases, 10Ks, 10Qs, etc. Insider trading takes many forms. It can involve information provided by a senior corporate officer to a neighbor, who traded; by an investment banker to a money manager, who traded; by a secretary who has read corporate documents and told household members, who traded; by an accountant of a publicly traded firm who tells a fellow country club member, who traded; by a scientist who has confidential information on drug clinical trials and now consults for a hedge fund, which traded. Every once a while, an insider trading case comes along that offers legendary Wall Street drama. (Sometimes the drama even makes its way into movie production.) The case(s) surrounding SAC, a multibillion dollar hedge fund (founded by reputed trader Stephen A. Cohen) has been in the cross hairs of SEC Enforcement for six years. According to the New York Times Dealbook, Nine former or current SAC employees have been tied to insider trading while at the (SAC) fund; four of them have pleaded guilty. Earlier this year, SAC agreed to pay $616 million to settle two civil cases brought against it by the SEC. Though there has been no case filed against the fund or its founder in the six years. There is good reason to believe that will soon change, since the five-year statute of limitations for charging SAC/Cohen based on a former employees, Matthew Martomas, insider trading will expire in July. The most developments in the case are that, SAC sent a letter to its investors indicating that their cooperation (with the SEC) is no longer unconditional. There are now five SAC executives (Cohen and four others) called to testify before the grand jury. Cohen is expected to take the Fifth Amendment and be silent. While seemingly an option for the other executives to take the Fifth, such might not be the case. If the DOJ really wants SAC and Cohen, then the DOJ might offer the four other executives immunity from criminal prosecution because, as the NYT explains, immunity supplants the Fifth Amendment, so the person must testify or risk being held in contempt, which usually means going to jail until the end of the grand jurys term. Such a case will be an interesting financial press drama and it might go down as a landmark in securities enforcement. Jeannette Showalter, CFA is a commodities broker with Worldwide Futures Systems, 571-8896. For mid-week commentaries, write to showalter@ww fsyst ems. com. e i p c T jeannetteSHOWALTER, CFAshowalter@ww fsyst ems.com MONEY & INVESTING

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To Schedule a Private Showing of Our 6 Luxury Model Homes, call ( 239) 494-5398 or visit LifeAtMediterra.comMEMBER OWNED CLUB. FROM THE $700s TO OVER $7 MILLION A London Bay Homes Community Development Enterprise Visit us daily at The Mediterra Sales Center 15836 Savona Way, Naples, FL 34110 Located on Livingston Road, approximately 2 miles north of Immokalee Road between I-75 and US 41. H A V E I T A L L ELORO at LUCARNO3,380 Total A/C By London Bay Homes $1,693,000 FEATURED MODEL HOME OF THE WEEK

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB4 BUSINESS WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 SAL PETRALIA, CFP, MBA2013 Five Star Wealth Manager* As seen in Gulfshore Life Magazine*Award based on 10 objective criteria associated with providing quality service to clients such as, credentials, experience, and assets under management among other factors. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the nal list of 2013 Five Star Managers239-596-78225621 Strand Blvd. Suite 102 Naples, FL 34110 sal.petralia@lpl.com www.lpl.com/sal.petraliaDesignations: CER TIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER Pr ofessional | Masters in Business Administration sal.petralia@lpl.com | www.lpl.com/sal.petraliaMember FINRA/SIPC Call today for more information or to schedule a FREE consultation. 239-596-7822239-596-78225621 Strand Blvd. Suite 102 Naples, FL 34110 sal.petralia@lpl.com www.lpl.com/sal.petralia Financial Planning for Individuals and Businesses M-F 8-5 and Sat 8-12239-775-6860 www.economybodyshop.com Email : economybodyshop@aol.com 2240 Davis Blvd., Naples, FL 34104Complete Collision Repair 24 hour Towing Rentals border the Florida National Panther Wildlife Refuge. Manager Kevin Godsea said the refuge has long monitored oil drilling, but there hasnt been serious cause for environmental concern. One new exploratory well proposed by Texas-based Dan A. Hughes Company would be only about 700 feet from the end of a subdivision near Naples, said Michael R. Ramsey, president of the Golden Gate Estates Area Civic Association. Although some wells like this will be new ones, most of BreitBurns activity is from already existing ones. Many are in Sunniland Trend; the oil field stretches from Fort Myers to Miami. Humble Oil and Refining Company (now Exxon) discovered the states first productive well in the area in 1943. Fields such as Sunniland are part of the larger South Florida Basin. That includes most of the southern part of the peninsula, as far north as Lake Okeechobee and as far south as the Keys, plus just off the western and southern shores. Exploratory oil wells were drilled in state waters just off Charlotte Harbor in the 1960s although no production came of it. BreitBurn and Dan A. Hughes Company lease the land they drill on from Collier Resources Company, which manages and owns the mineral rights (oil and gas) on more than 800,000 acres in Southwest Florida. Its the oil management wing of some of the areas most venerable landowners, Barron Collier Companies and Collier Enterprises.Golden GateGolden Gate residents were initially upset when they learned that an oil company wanted to drill just off their backyards and that state permitting requires oil companies to have a contingency plan if a hydrogen sulfide gas leak causes an explosion. Some residents expressed concern, read Dan A. Hughes press release. There has never been such an explosion, a major spill or any other serious mishap in the state, the DEP, oil producers and environmental conservation groups agreed. In roughly 70 years of oil production in Southwest Florida, there have been no major accidents, said Ms. Burger of the DEP. That may indicate a low risk, but stranger things have probably happened. Tom Jones, executive vice president of Collier Resources, suggests thats doubtful. I think the realistic possibility of having an explosion in an exploratory well is nonexistent, he said. Golden Gate Association president Mr. Ramsey also noted that oil drilling companies in Florida have a clean safety record. But he adds that its so close to the end of 24th Avenue SE that even the freak possibility of an explosion is a concern, as is oil trucks and noise. Im not convinced its as big a deal as some people think it is, said Nancy Payton with Florida Wildlife Federation in Naples. There may be community issues. The traffic Im not sure about that; Im not sure about noise. But were not uncomfortable with the concept of oil drilling.Barrel by barrel BreitBurn, a publicly traded company, produced 1,924 barrels per day in Florida in 2012. Thats behind Texas (3,482 barrels) and Michigan (the top producer with 9,026 barrels). We hope to be able to continue that process, assuming the oil is there, said Gregory C. Brown, the companys executive vice president. Even at Floridas peak production of 48 million barrels in 1978, thats only about an eighth of Texas production last year. Still, that ranked the state 8th nationally that year, the Florida Geological Survey says, showing the potential to produce a highly valuable yield. BreitBurn first leased mineral rights in the region in May 2007 and completed drilling on their first new well in May 2010. The company was attracted here because of the long record of moderate production and oil prices have remained constant, Mr. Brown said. Theyre certainly not at their historical highs but they are in the range that made us willing to spend the significant capital that it takes. These wells are deep, theyre expensive, and it takes some doing to get a drilling rig there. But newer technology has also made it easier. So-called directional drilling allows a single, compact well to reach miles in different directions underground from one spot. And Mr. Jones of Collier Resources noted surveying equipment offers real time data that can feed back to the surface so you can determine when youre right where you want to be. Even so, its an inexact science, said BreitBurns Mr. Brown. Unfortunately, while there is technology that tries to see whats down there, you never really know until you get there and even then youre only seeing what you can see from a very small hole, he said, adding that the first day of production from a well is generally the best Youre always fighting that decline and hoping to replace it and then some with new wells. The wells produce some natural gas in addition to oil, and although some companies have used it to run their equipment, its never been enough to sell commercially. Frack, you say?Most oil companies have said the technique called hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) isnt a method theyre considering using in Florida. It can release oil or natural gas held in underground rock formations by fracturing them with a high-pressure mix of water, sand and chemicals. Its been highly successful in places like Texas where tight underground shale deposits exist, but has also drawn criticism from environmentalists for polluting water and air. The relatively delicate, porous limestone rock below the Southwest Florida landscape does not lend itself to fracking, said Mike Cheeseman, a geologist and veteran Florida oilman based in Bonita Springs. You cant frack this zone at all, he said. If you get too rough with it itll go to water. Even so, Florida legislators in the House last month passed a bill that would regulate fracking by requiring companies to disclose chemicals and amount of water used. The Senate considered a similar proposal without success. Mr. Cheeseman said hes open to fracking if it can be done safely and profitably, and thinks it could be if companies drill more deeply, below the limestone aquifer. Me being an oilman, I dont see any problem with it personally, he said. Just the idea that it could be used here excites oil companies, said Mr. Cheeseman, even if they havent found a way to frack here. That (fracking) has got everyone all riled up, he said. So yeah, people are looking at South Florida. If theyre successful, itll go wild. Oil men are like a bunch of sheep. Theyll follow whatevers happening. Industry executives predict production will continue to climb with drilling methods, but downplay fracking as an unlikely possibility. Companies would have to be willing to spend money drilling more deeply below Floridas surface than they have before, said Dave Mica, president of the Florida Petroleum Council. He disputes the idea that fracking is controversial, saying that the economic benefits of jobs and oil independence outweigh risks. With recent successes using hydraulic fracturing, he adds, companies are fine-tuning ways to use it. Technology does evolve. Sometimes it evolves pretty quickly, he said. OILFrom page 1 GULF OF MEXICO ATLANTIC OCEAN Lake Okeechobee Naples Fort Myers West Palm Beach Ft. Lauderdale Miami SunnilandBROWARD BROWARD DADE DADE LEE LEE Everglades National Park Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge Big Cypress National Preserve Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge Oil Pipeline Bear Island Raccoon Point 41 75CHARLOTTE CHARLOTTE Lehigh Park Townsend Canal Felda West Felda Forty Mile BendGLADES GLADES Seminole Mid Felda Corkscrew Devils Garden Truck Loading Facility Baxter Island Pepper Hammock Lake TraffordPALM BEACH PALM BEACH HENDRY HENDRY COLLIER COLLIER MONROE MONROE 41 27 441 98 441 441 1 98 1 1 1 75 95 0 5.210.415.6 2.6 Miles Oil Fields in the Sunniland Trend of South Florida GENERAL NOTES1. This map is for estimate purposes only and should not be used for making final site specific land use decisions. Data provided are derived from multiple sources with varying levels of accuracy. LEGENDApproximate Oil Field Location COLLIER RESOURCES / COURTESY IMAGE COURTESY PHOTOA BreitBurn Energy Partners well in Collier County.

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Exceptional privacy. Natural beauty. Peaceful country living. Comfort and quality throughout. All yours to enjoy in this exceptional estate property. Custom designed and built for full enjoyment of the panoramic river views, the spacious home features classic architectural details, designer accents and finishes, and superb craftsmanship. Call Fred Burson @ 239.425.6024 for details & your private showing. Estate Home on the Caloosahatchee River in Alva, FL Custom built luxury home on 10 acres 1900' frontage on Caloosahatchee River, with direct access to Gulf 4 Bed / 5 Bath / 4 Car 5,446 SF of living areaReference company listing number for a virtual tour #002292 Dock & boat lift on sheltered oxbow Includes 56+ acres of citrus grove, pasture & equestrian facilities, approved by County for 66 units Offered at $8,999,000 COME AND JOIN THE FCB MORTGAGE TEAM!Florida Community Bank N.A. is seeking seasoned mortgage professionals to join FCB in Collier and Lee County: Area Sales Manager Senior UnderwriterSenior CloserVisitApply Online!FloridaCommunityBank.com contact us humanresources@fcb1923.com Stronger Than EverNAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 BUSINESS B5 NETWORKING Golfing at Grey Oaks with the Greater Naples Chamber of CommerceWe take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com. 1 1 Ed and Sheila Thompson, Cathie and Karl Williams 2 Mary Marshall, Debbie Sheperd, Sandy Kleiner and Mourine White 3 Scott Hansen, Brian Glaesen and Pat OConnor 4. Jim Goehler and Scott ODell 5. Allie Reynolds and Helen Cuda 6. Buddy Hornbeck, Electa Saker and Tim Philbrick 7. Mark Scarola, Zach Maciosek, Michael Milton and William Wade 8. Brenda OConnor and Lisa Wilson 9. Robin and Shannon HollandBOB RAYMOND / FLORIDA WEEKLY Lisa Wilson, Pat Schultz, Brenda OConnor and Kaleigh Grover 2 7 9 6 8 5 4 3

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 BUSINESS B6 Incorporated back in 1907, Im engaged in the manufacturing of vehicles (and related merchandise) and also in financial services. Warren Buffett has said that he favors companies like me that have customers so devoted that theyll tattoo my name on themselves. I introduced my Knucklehead back in 1936, with a famous teardrop-shaped gas tank. My products have been used in many wars, and lawenforcement and rescue folks use them, too. My logo is a bar and shield, I have a porcine ticker symbol, and I rake in more than $5 billion annually. Evel Knievel was a fan. Who am I? THE MOTLEY FOOLTo Educate, Amuse & Enrich Ask the Fool Fools School My Dumbest Investment The Motley Fool Take Name That Company Last weeks trivia answerDo you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, youll win a Fools cap! Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The Motley Fool. Sorry, we cant provide individual financial advice. Wisdom From OmahaSuperinvestors Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger recently held forth at their Berkshire Hathaway annual meeting in Omaha. Here are some paraphrased nuggets: On analyzing companies: Warren: We think of businesses, not stocks. Over the years, weve come to understand certain businesses. We estimate what the place will look like in five to 10 years. Sometimes we dont know; for example, auto companies. Weve watched that industry for 50 years, but we dont know what will happen in the future. Charlie: We can look at (railroad company) Burlington Northern and know that it will have a competitive advantage 15 years from now. On knowing your limits: Warren: Stocks will do well over time. You just need to avoid getting excited while other people are excited. Dont pretend to be a professional. If you are an amateur investor, you have a logical option to buy broadly into American business over time (via index funds). Dont overestimate your own abilities. Charlie: I think knowing the edge of your own competency is important. If you think you know more than you do, youre in trouble. That works particularly well in matrimony, too. On whether his charitable donations affect the company stock: Warren: I give away 4.75 percent of my stock every year. Thats $2 billion of stock. Thats less than 1 percent of Berkshire. Many stocks on the exchanges trade over 100 percent a year. One percent is absolutely peanuts. Charlie, joking: Theres nothing so insignificant as an extra $2 billion to an old man. Warren: Ive never given away a penny that has ever changed my life it has a lot more utility in the hands of other people than in my safe deposit box. On estate planning: Warren: I rewrite my will every five years or so, and I have my children read it. They should understand it, and they should be able to speak up if they feel something is unfair. (For more, read Buffetts letters to shareholders at www.berkshirehathaway.com.) 18,000 AchesI owned 18,000 shares of Conseco, a stable, conservative Indiana-based insurance company. In 1998, it bought Green Tree Financial, a commercial lender specializing in mobile homes. I had not set a stop-limit order to sell my shares when they fell to a certain level. I was not paying attention. Conseco ended up filing for bankruptcy protection. I got about a thousand dollars back, via litigation. It was a dead loss otherwise. There were many object lessons: No corporation is so solid that an ambitious CEO cannot drag it into bankruptcy. If its your money, better keep a sharp eye on it. Eighteen thousand shares each one still hurts. C.G.S., Warrenville, Ill.The Fool Responds: Consecos 2002 bankruptcy filing was the third-largest in corporate America when it happened, trailing just WorldCom and Enron. Lots of big mergers have turned out to be regrettable (remember Time Warner and AOL?), and CEO egos do contribute to plenty of corporate blunders. The Conseco of today is profitable again, but thats small consolation to many previous shareholders who got wiped out, as typically happens in bankruptcies. Dear DeereStock in Deere (NYSE: DE) has averaged annual growth of 14 percent over 30 years, and it seems to have plenty of room for further growth. Up more than 20 percent over the past year, Deere has been benefiting from strength in the agricultural industry in recent years. With spring planting pointing toward a solid season as farmers try to rebound from a drought-stricken 2012, Deere hopes to sell farmers the equipment they need to maximize their crop yields. It has faced some headwinds from the slowdown in Chinas growth, but other developments are promising. Global harvests of soybeans are expected by some to rise to an all-time high, pushing world crop inventories to new records, while corn inventories are seen rising to decade highs, too. Deere is facing growing competition from Japanese rival Kubota, which can benefit from the strong U.S. dollar that devalues Deeres international revenue. But Deere remains compelling in many ways. Its net profit margin has been trending up in recent years, as has its return on invested capital. It recently paid a 2.2 percent dividend yield, and has been upping its payout by about 15 percent, on average, annually over the past five years. Deere recently reported better-than-expected second-quarter earnings, but management tempered near-term growth expectations a bit. Give Deere some consideration. I was founded by two lawyers in Milwaukee in 1948. With a market value around $4 billion, Im a global workforce solutions company, offering services such as recruitment, training and development, and outsourcing. I oversee nearly 3,500 offices in more than 80 countries and territories. I went public via an initial public offering (IPO) in 1967. Over the years I was briefly owned by Parker Pen and Blue Arrow plc. My stock has grown by an annual average of 7 percent over the past 20 years, and I rake in more than $20 billion per year. Who am I? (Answer: ManpowerGroup) How Many Shares?QIs there a limit to how many shares of a company can be bought? J.L., Lake Charles, La.AYes, because companies dont have unlimited shares. They issue a certain number when they go public via an initial public offering (IPO), and they may issue more later, via secondary offerings.You could buy all the shares on the market, but by doing so, your sudden demand for the shares would drive up the price. (Thats why major investors dont like to publicize their trading, and why they try to buy gradually, in increments.) Once you own 5 percent of a voting class of shares, youll need to file a report alerting the Securities and Exchange Commission. It can be costly to buy up all of a company. Xerox, for example, has about 1.3 billion shares outstanding, and youd need more than $10 billion to buy them all. Remember, too, that a company may have only a portion of its value in shares trading publicly. If a firms founder, for example, holds 60 percent or 90 percent of the company, then she still controls it. ***QI want to invest in the stock market, but I dont have a huge pile of money. Is there some rule of thumb regarding how much I should invest when it costs me $7.99 per trade? T.C., Canton, OhioAIts good to aim to spend no more than 2 percent of your investment on commission costs. So if youre spending $8 on a trade, you should be investing at least $400.Also, if you plan to sell quickly, you might want to factor in your $8 selling commission, upping your minimum to $800. Learn about inexpensive brokerages at broker.fool.com.Got a question for the Fool? Send it in see Write to Us e b o tha n Ev e l W h o a BUSINESS MEETINGS The next presentation in the Meet Successful Entrepreneurs series sponsored by SCORE Naples and the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce takes place from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 8, at the chamber. Attendees will hear from Felix Lluberes, CEO of Position Logic Inc., a Naples-based Fortune 500 company. Cost is $25 (free for students and veterans). Sign up at www.napleschamber.org./events. For more information, call 262-6376. The Marco Island Chamber of Commerce hosts the annual Glory of the Grape, a wine tasting and auction event from 6-9 p.m. Sunday, June 9, at CJs on the Bay at the Esplanade. Cost is $50. For more information, call 394-7549 or visit www.marcoislandchamber.org. The Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Commerce hosts its next Wake Up for Young Professionals of Bonita Springs from 7:45-9 a.m. Tuesday, June 11, at Toast, 24600 Tamiami Trail S. Attendance is free; refreshments available for purchase. For more information, call 9922943 or visit www.bonitaspringschamber. com. The next Wake Up Naples hosted by the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce takes place from 7:30-8:30 a.m. Wednesday, June 12, at the Hilton Naples. Attendees will hear about the chambers recently completed annual business climate survey. Cost is $20 for members, $25 for others. Sign up at www.napleschamber.org/events. For more information, call 262-6376. The East Naples Merchants Association meets for Business After Business at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, June 13, at Physicians Regional-Collier Boulevard. For more information, call 435-9410 or 643-3600 or visit www.eastnaplesmerchantsassoc.com. SCORE Naples and the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce present The Inside Story at Sams Club with Jeff Williams, general manager of Sams Club in Naples, from 9:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 15, at Sams Club, 2550 Immokalee Road. Free. Sign up at www.napleschamber.org/events or call 262-6376 for more information. The Marco Island Area Chamber of Commerce holds its next Business After Five event from 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesday, June 19, at The Classics Club at Lely Resort. $5 for members, $10 for others (cash bar). For more information, call 394-7549, e-mail kate@marcoislandchamber.org or visit www.marcoislandchamber.org. The next Business After Five networking event for members and guests of the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce takes place from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, June 20, at Tiburon Golf Course. Cost is $8 for members, $25 for others. Sign up at www.napleschamber.org/events. A Job Search Support Group meets from 9:30-11:30 a.m. Mondays at the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce. Contact Karen Klukiewicz at kluk77@ comcast.net or visit www.napleschamber. org.

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Celebrating 34 Years of Service in Southwest Florida FREE INSPECTION How much will it cost? Request a FREE pest control evaluation today! NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 BUSINESS B7 NETWORKING Celebrating Collier Countys Golden Apple educatorsWe take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.ASHLEY KOEHLER / REAGAN RULE PHOTOGRAPHY Wayne Simons and Lois Thome Back row: Mike Watkins, Pascal Cote-Julien, Mary Tlachac, Dan Lavender, Greg Wendel, Brian Hamman, Dave Neill, Wayne Simons. Front row: Catherine Hunt, Sarah Nick, Khris Betten-Jutasi, Yudelka (Judy) Ramirez, Kathleen Weitzel, Andrew Klatzkow Omar Estevez, Mary Tlachac, Yorenny Horne, Kevin Snider and Dick Olds Steve Thorp, Hugh Hackett, Steve Micheli and Greg WendelGeorge Manztidis and Justin DamianoDan and Michele LavenderNancy Gray and Mary Ingram At Central Bank, we are proud to be a part of the Southwest Florida community. We offer innovative nancial products for all banking needs and even offer FREE nancial literacy courses for low to moderate income families and small businesses. Stop in to Central Bank to enjoy a higher level of service and convenience today! 1520 Royal Palm Square Blvd. Fort Myers, FL 33919239.274.19004099 Tamiami Trl N, Suite 100 Naples, Florida 34103239.430.2500 Building Lasting Relationships Equal Housing Lender

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AMERIVEST REALTY | NAPLES, FL 239.280.5433 | David@DavidNaples.com VISIT WWW.DAVIDNAPLES.COM FOR MORE DETAILS! Aqualane Shores Lot$2,745,000 ~ 81x151x139x159 Bay Colony Shores$4,400,000 Mediterra Villa$1,149,900 Mediterra Villa$1,850,000 SOLD PENDING 282 FIRST AVE., OLD NAPLESAlong one of Old Naples most charming mahogany tree-lined streets, this new island-style home is beautifully positioned on an expansive corner site. The resident offers 4,513 square feet under air and a total of 7,044 total square feet. There are five bedrooms, including a first-floor master suite, 4 baths and a study. Rooms are arranged to optimize the many surrounding sights over the pool and gardens. Interiors feature dark wood flooring, soft light tones, and extensive millwork on walls and ceilings. The outdoor area has a private pool and a fireplace. Close to the Gulf of Mexico and Fifth Avenue South for fine dining and shopping, this property is the perfect place to relax and bask in the downtown lifestyle. Its listed for $3.995 million, furnished. Call Celine Godof of Premier Sothebys International Realty at 404-9917 to arrange a showing. House hunting:REAL ESTATENAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA GUIDE TO THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY B8WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 COURTESY PHOTOS

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ANNUAL & SEASONAL RENTALSDont wait call today!The Name You Can Trust: We take care of the rest.{DO YOU OWN A HOME OR CONDO? howWe have quali ed guests and tenants ready to move in, and well take care of everything so your property earns income for you all year. Contact us today! unpack. 800-346-0336 239-482-8040www.RoyalShellAnnuals.com}

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Patti Fortune 239.272.8494 850 5th Avenue South #C Naples, FL 34102www.OwnInNaples.com pattifortune@gmail.com Private 1st O ffering This Sunday! Must Call!So many questions come up during construction and the onsite salesperson works for the builder, not for you. Having Patti Fortune as you personal representative will be priceless! Camden Lakes By Pulte Homes Taking pre construction deposits! Call Immediately for more information. This north Naples community will only have 150 homesites. By contacting Patti, she can be your representative to help you through the builders contract, negotiations, follow-up, walk-throughs and closing. She can take pictures for you, help with any construction questions and make cost saving suggestions during the building period. This does not cost you anything and you gain the knowledge and experience from a veteran On-Site Sales Agent with 18 years of Builder experience. Builders do not negotiate more if you dont have a Realtor. In other words, skipping your right to Realtor representation may even cost you in mistakes or missed opportunities. Before going into a new community, PLEASE contact Patti to represent YOU. Builders require you to be with your Realtor upon your rst visit to their location, even if you are Just looking.

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884 884 846 867 78 78 82 82 80Burnt Store RdAlico Rd Immokalee Rd Golden Gate Pkwy Oil W e Corkscrew Rd Veterans Pkwy Colonial Blvd Palm Beach BlvdPine Island Rd 951 951 951LEE COUNTY COLLIER COUNTYN. Fort Myers Fort Myers Fort Myers Cape Lehigh Acres Coral Sanibel Beach Springs Bonita 6 5 3 4 8 9 1 101. FIDDLERS CREEK Single-Family Homes from the high $300s** 9293 Campanile Circle Naples, FL 34114 (239) 304-8511 2. BUCKS RUN Single-Family Homes from the mid $300s** 7743 Bucks Run Drive Naples, FL 34120 (239) 354-0243 3. SUMMIT PLACE Townhomes from the $190s**14772 Sutherland Avenue Naples, FL 34119 (239) 919-3642 4. PALOMA Villas & Single-Family from the low $200s**26220 Prince Pierre Way Bonita Springs, FL 34135 (239) 949-8910 5. MIRASOL Carriage and Townhomes from the $170s**8570 Evernia Court Bonita Springs, FL 34135 (239) 405-7203 6. TERRA VISTA Carriage Homes from the $160s**3773 Pino Vista Way #101 Estero, FL 33928 (239) 689-8126 7. SOMERSET Townhomes from the mid $100s**19501 Bowring Road, #101 Estero, FL 33967 (239) 288-6480 8. VERIDIAN Single-Family Homes from the high $400s**Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 432-1520 9. BANYAN BAY Single-Family Homes from the mid $200s**8653 Banyan Bay Blvd. Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 432-1520 10. MOODY RIVER ESTATES Single-Family Homes from the low $200s**3050 Moody River Blvd. Fort Myers, FL 33903 (239) 599-2929 11. VERANDAH Single-Family Homes from the mid $200s**3800 Otter Bend Circle Fort Myers, FL 33905 (239) 288-4002 12. MAGNOLIA LANDING Villas from the high $130s**Single-Family Homes from the $170s** 3237 Magnolia Landing N. Fort Myers, FL 33917 (239) 567-2542 **Home and community information, including pricing, included features, terms, availability and amenities are subject to change and prior sale at any time without notice or obligation. Drawings, pictures, photographs, square footages, oor plans, elevations, features, colors and sizes are approximate for illustration purposes only and will vary from the homes as built. drhorton.com/swa2 11 12facebook.com/drhorton.SWFL k k k The Great AMERICAN H me Sale 3 DAYS ONLY JUNE 7,8 & 9, 2013 SAVE THOUSANDS ON MOVE-IN-READY HOMES! 2 7

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Broker Participation Welcome. Prices and availability are subject to change without notice. *Must be at least 18 years or older to register for prize drawing.Grand Opening.Pre-Construction Prices from the $190s.GREAT BIGHOMES. Phone: 239-300-5153 5000 Avila Avenue, Ave Maria, FL 34142 MapleRidgeFL.com Bro k er Participation Must b e at l east 18 y 50 Brand new homes $79Now thats big!per square footfrom just Grand Opening June 8th & 9th at our new Sales Center. Featuring fun & food for all. Plus, a $1,000 prize drawing!* CC Devco Homesa Codina-Carr CompanyItty bitty prices!Choose from beautifully designed and landscaped 3, 4, 5 and 6 bedroom homes with garages. All homes include: Granite countertops Stainless steel appliances Wood kitchen cabinets Paver brick drivewaysBrought to you by the developers of one of the top 10 fastest selling communities in the country, now building Maple Ridge at Ave Maria in Southwest Florida. Directions: North on Immokalee Rd. Turn right onto Oil Well Rd. Turn left onto Ave Maria Blvd. Turn right onto Avila Ave. Sales Center is on the right.

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Enjoy Resort Style Living at Village Walk and Island Walk of North Naples!Village Walk Town Center is the focus of the community's unique lifestylea lifestyle people dream about; meeting friends for a swim, a work out or a set of tennis..then grabbing lunch or dinner at the on-site restaurant...relaxing to the soothing sounds of fountains or taking a relaxing stroll back home around the many lakes and footbridges. Village Walk o ers a full array of activities, and full recreational facilities reserved exclusively for resident's use with no equity or membership fees! Extended 2BR, 2BA Capri with private pool located in the cul-de-sac of El Verdado Court, offers views of intersecting waterways and bridge, brand new A/C unit, hurricane shutters, and a long driveway that accommodates up to 8 cars! Must see prime location. $314,900 Pristine 3BR,3BA plus den is ready to MOVE RIGHT IN! The original owners used the home on a part time basis, home has been lightly lived in! Features new GE appliance package, new toilets,seamless shower in master bath, custom built wall unit, newer A/C and hot water tank, full hurricane protection, and screen lanai with lake view! $359,000 A Beautiful 3BR, 2.5BA Oakmont with heated pool, and convenient Benicia Court location with easy access to the gate and amenities. Furniture is available for sale. $389,900 Island Walk o ers luxury resort style living yets its the way of life enjoyed everyday by the residents! e Town Center is reserved for the exclusive use of the residents and there are no equity or membershipfees to enjoy the this unique lifestyle. e heart of the community is the unique Town Center that has an appealing country club feel and o ers meeting rooms, open air community pool and lap pool, state of the art tness center, putting greens, working post o ce, on site restaurant, lighted HarTru Tennis courts, gas pumps, beauty salon, nail salon, and so much more! Schedule a private tour of this award wining community today. Words can not describe this EXQUISITE 4 Bedroom 3.5 Bath home offering an array of upgrades throughout the entire home including plantation shutters, crown moldings, 20 porcelain tile, newer kitchen appliances, whole house water water POOL & SPA with water features, and paver brick lanai create the prefect place to entertain family and friends, HURRICANE shutters, and lush landscaping complete this prefect home! This is a must see home! $515,000 Call about the VISUAL TOUR! VILLAGE WALK PENDINGServing North Naples and surrounding area.STOP BY OUR ON-SITE NORTH NAPLES VILLAGE WALK OFFICE MON-SAT.All homes now on re-sale market and priced from the low 200s-500s. Illustrated PropertiesJoanne Ciesielski | 239.287.6732 Brian Carey | 239.370.8687 OPPORTUNITY NEW LISTING PENDING ISLAND WALK FEATURED PROPERTY

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B14 239.213.3311

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B14 239.213.3311

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www.JackiStrategos.comJacki Strategos GRI, CREN, SRES, e-Pro239-370-1222JStrategos@att.netRichard Droste Realtor239-572-5117rddsmd@comcast.net 633 Hernando Ct. $1,095,000 ON THE WATER4 BR/3 BA, great lanai, study/den, dining room, upper open air deck.Rare opportunity to live on the water at this price. 2 BR/2 BA. Model Village $195,000 TOTALLY UPDATED KITCHEN Deerwood Villas $234,900High ceilings, spacious, bright & cheerful. Garage, eat-in-kitchen. LOVELY VIEWS Subscribe online at www.FloridaWeekly.com or Call 239.325.1960 Get Florida Weekly delivered to your mailbox for only$3195PER YEAR*Rates are based on standard rate postage. A one-year in-county subscription will cost $31.95 to cover shipping and handling. Call for out-of-county and out-of-state postage and pricing options. Best kept secret in Naples Port of the Islands Alice Krick, Realtor239-404-7929 | napleskrick1@aol.comDont miss the opportunity to see these outstanding direct access, waterfront properties!Schedule a showing today! 239-404-7929 $349,000290 Stella Maris Dr. Direct access to the Gulf of Mexico. A short drive to both Downtown Naples and Marco. End unit with beautiful landscaping and fruit trees. $349,000254 Stella Maris Dr.is 2 bedroom plus den is nicely located with lanai facing south with Boat li and inground pool. Direct Gulf access. $249,900269 Sunrise Cay E., #6Beautiful corner lot with open water view. Lovely one story condo with room for your boat. Fish from your dock or take the $230,000221 Sunrise CayProfessionally decorated with water views. Assigned dock at your door step through a large and tiled lanai. Electric roll down shutters and sliding doors. $239,000334 S. Stella Maris Dr.Direct Gulf Access with a wide water view of Boats and Sealife. is 2 bedroom 2 bath villa has been freshly painted, and is move in ready. $49,00025000 E. Tamiami TrailCompletely Remodeled and Decorated. Shows like an upscale Hotel room. Leave the big house and relax in this PREVIEW THESE PROPERTIES AND GET A FREE ECOTOUR OUT TO THE GULF. REDUCED!bbbtntfr trttttt btnfrnfnftfrftftntnfffttfntffnftnfnbffn rrtffnfnnfnfnftnfrfrfrftrbftfrffnnfftrftnfnfn btnfrnfnfbtnfr fff b!nfnfnfnrn rntftffnfnbrfrfnnnftnfnfrnf"nfbnfrfnff#$%%&frfr'nf#$ ttrf(f !"#$% t$%t"

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 B23 Kelly Capolino has been named an Outstanding Community Leader by Doug Keating, president of Keating Associates. Ms. Capolino is honored for her continued volunteerism in Collier County that has made a positive impact on numerous charities over the past several years. She is the founder and presenter of the Diamond Volunteer Award series; a member of the board of directors for the Boys & Girls Club of Collier County; a newly appointed chair of the Junior Women of Initiative mentoring program; and a member of the steering committee of the Womens Initiative Network, a program fund of the Community Foundation of Collier County. She is also the co-founder and presenter of Thinking Outside the Box, an annual seminar for nonprofit. The following agents have joined McQuaid & Company in recent weeks: Linda Anderson has been a Realtor for 23 years and has been in the Naples area since 1990. Originally from Upstate New York, Molly Begor is a member of NABOR and the National Association of Realtors. Janet Carter obtained her real estate license in 1982 and is a member of the Naples Area Board of Realtors. A licensed Realtor for almost 40 years, Keith Davison previously owned a brokerage firm in Indiana. Gail DeFrancesca, a native of Wisconsin, obtained her real estate license in 1998. Judy Esdon, an Indiana native, will head the rental division for McQuaid & Company. Don Lasch, a Wisconsin native, has more than 35 years of experience in insurance and commercial lending. Sandy Lasch has worked in real estate since 2001. Scott Leiti, a native of Pennsylvania has been in the real estate business for more than 25 years and also has experience in general contracting. Pam Maher attended SUNYPlattsburgh in Plattsburgh, N.Y., and worked for more than 20 years for a Fortune 500 pharmaceutical company. An Illinois native and certified contractor, Rob Mauceli previously owned and operated a kayaking apparel company. Prudential Florida Realty, Real Estate Services announces the following award winners from the companys Park Shore and The Ritz-Carton offices. Honor Society: The Kikkert Group, Sandy Pastoor, Lauri Elliot, Steve Hayden, Sam Melley, Rosalie Munzo, Carol Purdum and Bud Kimbrough. Leading Edge: Al Smith and Matt Powers, the Grant Team and Dona Schrim. Presidents Circle: Beverly Fried. Chairmans Circle Gold: Tracey Young, Alan Levi, the Rawn Group and the Fioretti Team. The following new agents have joined John R. Wood Realtors: Vincent Branda joins the agencys Bonita Springs office as a sales associate. Originally from Queens, N.Y., Mr. Branda attended Florida State College of Jacksonville and previously worked in electronic gaming, software sales and consulting. He is a member of the Naples Area Board of Realtors. Sally Hering is based in the North Naples office as a sales associate. Prior to joining the real estate industry, Ms. Hering was a vice president of sales for Healthcare Technology Solutions. She is a member of NABOR and the Florida and National associations of Realtors. Lori Wright is based in the Old Naples office as a sales associate. Originally from Michigan, Ms. Wright holds a bachelors degree in business administration from Adrian College in Adrian, Mich. Mary de Groot joins the Old Naples office as a sales associate. Originally from Connecticut, Ms. de Groot attended Villanova and Des Moines universities. She is a member of NABOR. Rex Storter is based in the Old Naples office as a sales associate. Mr. Storter earned a bachelors degree from The Citadel and a masters from the College of Engineering at the University of Arkansas. Jill Dixon joins the central office as a sales associate and part of the Dixon Team. She earned a bachelors degree from Houghton College in Houghton, N.Y. Peter Dixon joins the central office as a broker associate and part of the Dixon Team. Mr. Dixon attended the Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales. He is a member of NABOR. Simon Dixon has joined the central office as a sales associate and part of the Dixon Team. He is a member of NABOR. CAPOLINO ANDERSON BEGOR CARTER DAVISON EDSON DON & SANDY LASCH LEITI MAHER WRIGHT HERING P. DIXON J. DIXON REAL ESTATE NEWSMAKERS *3-year homeowner warranty applies to existing new homes, not applicable on homes under construction or lot/construction purchases.Dont miss out on this limited time offer. Purchase our Genoa or Palermo homes and well give you a FREE designer furniture package. Our all-inclusive homes, where everything is included, come with a free golf membership and 3-year limited warranty. But dont wait too long as this offer ends June 30, 2013. Enduring. Luxury. Home. Values.Vineyards VineyardsNaples.com | 239-353-1920 | 800-749-1501 75 Vineyards Boulevard, Naples, FL 34119 Ask about our new No Initiation Fee Introductory Membership 239-353-1500 | VineyardsCountryClub.net 15 New Designer Models. 4 New Neighborhoods. Prices from $400s to over $3 million. 3 BR, 3 BA with formal living room and dining room. Plus large great room, heated pool and spa. Perfect for growing families! Genoa Just $599,900. Plus FREE designer furniture package. 3 BR plus Study, 3 BA with wet bar, breakfast room, heated pool and spa. Youll love this home! Palermo Just $690,000. Plus FREE designer furniture package. Theirs Ours Buy a New Home at Vineyards. Get a FREE Furniture Package.

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41 41 41Bonita Springs Bonita SpringsNaplesImmokalee RoadLivingston RoadBonita Beach Road3 Oaks PkwyCoconut RdOld U.S. 41Old U.S. 41Pine Ridge Road Golden Gate Pkwy. Davis BlvdCollier Blvd Collier Blvd Airport Pullimg RdGulf Shore Blvd.Park Shore Dr. Rattlesnake Hammock Road Goodlette Frank RoadVanderbilt Beach Road Radio Road Marco Island Open Houses are Sunday 1-4, unless otherwise markedwww.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB26 REAL ESTATE JUNE 6-JUNE 12, 2013 >$100,0001 WYNDEMERE COMMONS Wyndemere Way #A304 $179,500 Premier Sothebys International Realty Susan Payne 239.777.7209 >$200,0002 TARPON COVE BARBADOS 770 Tarpon Cove Drive #103 $245,000 PSIR Pat Kennedy 239.537.0062 >$300,0003 PELICAN BAY GLENCOVE 5803 Glencove Drive #601 $345,000 PSIR Linda Ohler 239.404.6460 4 FOREST GLEN 3748 Jungle Plum Drive East $359,000 PSIR Jesse Moreno 239.405.0065 5 MERCATO THE STRADA 9123 Strada Place From $390,000 PSIR Call 239.594.9400 Open Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm & Sunday 12-8pm >$400,0006 PARK SHOREBELAIR 3602 Belair Lane #7 $419,000 PSIR Susie Culp 239.290.9000 7 COQUINA SANDS SURFSIDE CLUB 1065 Gulf Shore Blvd. North #209 $425,000 PSIR Phyllis ODonnell 239.269.6161 8 PELICAN BAY CHATEAUMERE 6040 Pelican Bay Blvd. #401 $499,900 PSIR Sue Black 239.250.5611>$500,0009 SATURNIA LAKES 1889 Isla de Palma Circle $529,000 PSIR Kathleen Forsman 239.404.1629 10 DELASOL 15834 Delasol Lane $545,000 PSIR Catherine Bordner 239.560.2921 >$600,00011 PELICAN MARSH OSPREY POINTE 9045 Whimbrel Watch Lane $650,000 PSIR Roya Nouhi 239.290.911112 PELICAN LANDING THE COLONY NAVONA 23540 Via Veneto Blvd. #1005 $658,000 PSIR Mark Leone 239.784.5686 13 THE MOORINGS LUCERNE 3100 Gulf Shore Blvd. North #604 $689,000 PSIR Larry Roorda 239.860.2534 >$700,00014 THE DUNES GRANDE PRESERVE 280 Grande Way From $799,000 PSIR Call 239.594.1700 Open Monday-Saturday 10am-5pm & Sunday 12-5pm>$800,00015 VANDERBILT BEACH PHOENICIAN SANDS 9155 Gulfshore Drive #502 $895,000 PSIR Beth McNichols 239.821.3304 >$900,00016 MARCO ISLAND SANDPIPER 850 Collier Blvd. South #501 $949,900 PSIR Cynthia Corogin 239.963.5561 >$1,000,00017 OLD NAPLES VILLA VERONA 259 4th Avenue South #103 $1,075,000 PSIR Marty/Debbi McDermott 239.564.4231 18 OLDE NAPLES SEAPORT 1001 10th Avenue South, #203 $1,190,000 Naples Estate Properties Emily K. Bua & Tade BuaBell 239.465.464519 OLD NAPLES VILLAS DEL MAR 425 2nd Avenue South $1,295,000 PSIR Paul Graffy 239.273.0403 20 BONITA BAY TAVIRA 26951 Country Club Drive From $1,306,000 PSIR Call 239.495.1105 Open MondaySaturday 10am-5pm & Sunday 12-5pm21 BELLEZZA AT MEDITERRA 14878 Bellezza Lane $1,685,000 Naples Estate Properties Emily K. Bua & Tade Bua-Bell 239.465.464522 THE MOORINGS 619 Bowline Drive $1,795,000 PSIR Susan Barton 239.860.1412 23 AQUA 13675 Vanderbilt Drive #610 $1,925,000 PSIR John DAmelio 239.961.5996 Also Available: #605 $1,695,000; #607 $1 ,625,000>$2,000,00024 THE MOORINGS 475 Putter Point Drive $2,000,000 PSIR Larry Roorda 239.860.2534 25 GREY OAKS ESTUARY 1220 Gordon River Trail From $2,049,000 PSIR Call 239.261.3148 Open Monday-Saturday 9am-5pm & Sunday 12-5pm26 PELICAN BAY ST. RAPHAEL 7117 Pelican Bay Blvd. #1005 $2,395,000 PSIR Jean Tarkenton 239.595.0544 Other Residences Available: $825,000 $1,795,00027 QUAIL WEST 4430 Wayside Drive $2,495,000 Naples Estate Properties Emily K. Bua & Tade Bua-Bell 239.465.464528 MEDITERRA 16045 Trebbio Way $2,498,888 PSIR Tom Gasbarro 239.404.4883 29 BANYAN ISLAND AT GREY OAKS 1659 Chinaberry Court $2,795,000 Naples Estate Properties Emily K. Bua & Tade Bua-Bell 239.465.464530 BAREFOOT BEACH 101 Dominica Lane $2,800,000 Naples Estate Properties Emily K. Bua & Tade Bua-Bell 239.465.464531 PODOVA AT MEDITERRA 15179 Brolio Way $2,849,000 Naples Estate Properties Emily K. Bua & Tade Bua-Bell 239.465.4645>$3,000,00032 THE MOORINGS 384 Mooringline Drive $3,695,000 PSIR Michael G. Lawler 239.261.3939 33 OLD NAPLES 282 1st Avenue North $3,995,000 PSIR Celine Julie Godof 239.404.9917 >$4,000,00034 ESTUARY AT GREY OAKS 1392 Great Egret Trail $4,595,000 Naples Estate Properties Emily K. Bua & Tade Bua-Bell 239.465.464535 PORT ROYAL 3060 Green Dolphin Lane $4,695,000 PSIR Frank Sajtar 239.776.8382 36 PORT ROYAL AREA LITTLE HARBOUR 224 Little Harbour Lane $4,875,000 PSIR Friley Saucier 239.293.3532 >$6,000,00037 PORT ROYAL 3630 Rum Row $6,750,000 PSIR Vincent Bandelier 239.450.5976 Florida Weeklys Open Houses 2 4 3 5 15 6 10 16 17 13 14 11 7 19 8 9 12 18 1 20 22 23 25 28 24 27 26 29 30 31 32 33 34 21 35 36 37

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Residential Commercial Mortgage Rentals Corporate Relocation Closing Services FLORIDAMOVES.COM ColdwellBankerFLORIDAMOVES .COM Naples, Windstar. $1,485,000 3/3.5 MLS#213014039 Bob Hiltonen 239-263-3300 Naples, Vanderbilt Beach. $799,000 2/2 MLS#213011134 Donna Stumpf 239-263-3300 Open Sun 1-4PM 9155 Gulfshore Dr 301 Naples, Oakes Estates. $479,900 3/3 MLS#213013031 Gabriele H. Vretta, PA 239-263-3300 Open Sun 1-4PM 5785 Spanish Oaks Ln Estero, Wildcat Run. $529,000 3/3 MLS#213016548 Carol Jones 239-992-0059 Naples, The Quarry. $425,900 3/2.5 MLS#211523034 Judy Eubanks 239-992-0059 Naples, Naples Park. $589,000 3/2.5 MLS#213015719 James Bates 239-262-7131 Naples, Cove Towers. $515,000 3/2 MLS#213016191 Joanne MacLeod 239-262-7131 Naples, Palm River. $359,000 3/2 MLS#213015482 Mooreeld Team 239-263-3300 Bonita Springs, Bonita Bay. $399,900 2/2.5 MLS#213015713 Yochi Melnick 239-262-7131 Naples, Madison Park. $379,900 3/3 MLS#213016485 Jean Adams 239-262-7131 While You Sleep,YourHome isTraveling theWorld. Our unrivaled Internet reach and 3,100 oces in more than 50 countries will showcase your house to buyers around the globe, 24/7. Relax! Well handle all the details. Annual rentals, vacation rentals, property management. .. Naples, Lausanne in the Moorings. $750,000. Spectacular gulf views! Decorator ready 2BR/2.5BA condo in Lausanne with on-site management, 24 hr security & more. MLS#213016026 Judy Hansen 239-262-7131 2013 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Previews International, the Previews International logo and Dedicated to Luxury Real Estate are registered and unregistered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verication.

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INSIDE A GUIDE TO THE LOCAL ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SCENE WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYARTS & ENTERTAINMENTCSECTIONBROUGHT TO YOU BY:The High-Rises at Bonita Bay 495-1105 Estuary at Grey Oaks 261-3148 The Strada at Mercato 594-9400 The Village 261-6161 The Gallery 659-0099 Broad Avenue 434-2424 Vanderbilt 594-9494 The Promenade 948-4000 Fifth Avenue 434-8770 Marco Island 642-2222 Rentals 262-4242 Wishes at WatersideA Make-A-Wish Month party, and more fun around town. C19-21 An upbeat romanceCricket Creek series continues to explore small-town charms and values. C12 Local flavorNew restaurant destined to become the darling of discriminating diners. C23 SummerJazz on the Gulf returns to the Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club for the 28th year starting Saturday, June 15, with music by The Alan Darcy Group. The series of free concerts on the Watkins Lawn continues Saturday evenings, July 20, Aug. 24 and Sept. 21. SummerJazz fans from years past will remember The Alan Darcy Group as the series opening act in 2009. The bands repertoire of jazz, pop, standards and R&B showcases Mr. Darcys smooth vocals and his skills on saxophone and flute. Often compared to David Sanborn, he will perform a combination of original jazz tunes from his four CDs along with covers of such crowd favorites by the likes of Sting, Billy Joel, Frank Sinatra and others. Late Night Brass, the headline act July 20, will also be familiar to SummerJazz veterans. This years appearance is the bands fifth at the series. Late Night Brass consists of a four-piece horn section (saxophone, trombone and two trumpets), a four-piece rhythm section (keyboard, guitar, bass and drums) andSummerJazz on the Gulf free concerts set for 28th season WEATHER VANES, USED BRUSHES WITH PAINT permanently crusted in the bristles, car fans, pieces of wood: what most people would instantly categorize as junk, Lawrence Voytek sees as something more. He sees their possibilities. And he creates visual magic with them. Twenty-eight of his pieces are on exhibit at the Bob Rauschenberg Gallery in Fort Myers, in a solo show. For maybe 12 years, weve hosted the annual Arts for ACT (artwork for auction), says Ron Bishop, director of the Bob Rauschenberg Gallery & Special Collections Gallery at Edison State College. And Lawrence would donate a piece that was one of the most interesting pieces in the show I know what an amazing fabricator he is, and how technically accomplished he is. I think everybody wanted to see more of Lawrences work. And this is a nice opportunity to do so. It fits well in that space, he says, referring to the gallery in the campuss Rush Library, where the gallery is temporarily housed. Its very good work. Its fun work. He thinks outside of the box, so its fun to see. When asked what he calls his works sculptures or assemblages or something else, Mr. Voytek replies, Bob (Rauschenberg) thought of things as combines, a combination of stuff. And thats what his work is BY NANCY STETSONnstetson@ oridaweekly.com Souped-up Strats, streamlined cars and found objectsVoytekLawrenceart offancifulTheSEE VOYTEK, C4 Super Strat by Lawrence Voytek. Under Pressure by Lawrence Voytek. Lassie Wondering Which Way to Turn by Lawrence Voytek. Its very good work. Its fun work. He thinks outside of the box, so its fun to see. Ron Bishop, director of the Bob Rauschenberg Gallery & Special Collections Gallery at Edison State College SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________SEE JAZZ, C5

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Im spending the summer in a remote mountain village in the south of France. Its the kind of place that can feel like paradise if you have the right temperament and an ability to juggle solitude and slow-paced village living. For more urban personalities, people who like the glitter and bustle of city life, this might be a kind of hell. Which is why I cant figure out why Christophe keeps coming back. Hes been here seven times in the last three years. A doctor from Belgium, he wears expensive loafers and well-cut Armani coats. I havent seen him go for a hike once since we got here. Hes the kind of man who enjoys high-priced restaurants, hard-to-find wine and topnotch theater, none of which exist in this village. We dont even have a place to buy a cup of coffee; a grocery truck comes in once a week with provisions. So what is this bourgeois city-dweller doing here? I spent the first week stumped, but a clue came early in the next. Christophe made plans to attend a jazz concert in a neighboring village and took several of the women from the retreat. The morning after the concert the women were all giggles, and when Christophe appeared in the kitchen, they doted on him. He is such a gentleman, one woman said. She rubbed his back as he poured himself a cup of coffee, and I thought: I should have known. But later in the week, when Christophe invited another woman and me to tour a nearby vineyard, I saw for myself that he was a complete gentleman opening car doors, adjusting the seat warmers so that we would be comfortable. There was nothing lecherous in any of it; just a charming attention. After the wine tasting, the three of us went to dinner in a nearby restaurant. Christophe kept us entertained over bottles of ros, and at the end of the evening, he picked up the check. On the way home, the three of us rode in companionable silence, and he seemed pleased with himself as he drove. I tried to imagine what he must be like in his other life, a dayto-day that includes a wife and teenage daughter, a large medical practice and all the stresses of daily living. It was hard to imagine he brought the same gentleness to that existence. What should we call you? the other woman asked from the back seat as we neared home. Our chauffeur? Our guide? She thought for a moment. Our hero. We both laughed, and Christophe beamed. Earlier in the week, after the jazz concert, I had taken him to be a grand seducer, the sort of continental lover who knows how to ply women with rich food and good wine. But now, as we neared our remote mountain village, I realized that the appeal for him has nothing to do with seduction. Here he is free to be his best self, a man stripped of the weight of the real world, suddenly capable of a kindness and generosity that I think surprises even him. Artis Henderson has joined the Twitterverse. Follow her @ ArtisHenderson. SANDY DAYS, SALTY NIGHTSA king in another world w a h s h I artisHENDERSONsandydays@floridaweekly.com l es, an d w h en C h ristop h e h e k itc h en, t h ey d ote d on a gent l eman, one woman b e d h is b ac k as h e p oure d o f co ff ee, and I thought: k n o wn. the week, when Chris a not h er woman an d me to vineyard, I saw f or mysel f a complete gentleman d oors, a d justing t h e seat h at w e w o uld be co m fo rtw as nothing lecherous in s t a charming attention. n e tasting, the three o f us e r in a nearby restaurant. k ept us entertaine d over s and at the end o f the c k e d up t h e c h ec k On t h e e three of us rode in l e silence, a nd pl ease d wit h dr o v e o imagine t be l i ke f e, a day n clud es t ee nr a i ma g ine h e b rou gh t t h e same g e n t o t h at e xi s t e n ce What should we call you? t h wo man a s k e d fr o m th e b a c k s we n e ar e d h o m e O ur c hau ffeu g uide? She thought f or a mome n he r o W e both laughed, and Chr i be am ed. E arlier in the week, a f ter t h concert, I had taken him to be a s educer the sort of continent a wh o k nows h ow to p l y wom e r ich f ood and good wine. But n w e neare d our remote mountain I realized that the appeal f or h n othing to do with seduction. H e f ree to be his best self, a man stri p the weight o f the real world, s u capable o f a kindness a n erosity t h at I t h i n p rises even hi m Artis derson has the Twitte Follow h ArtisHe son. www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 Transform your body without...diet, exercise or surgery! www.RiverchaseDermatology.com1-800-591-DERM (3376)Charles Camisa, MDBoard Certi ed Dermatology and Immunology Skin Conditions Appointments available in: Downtown Naples Fort Myers Cape CoralVoted One of Americas Top Doctors 12 Years in a Row Camisa Psoriasis Center Free Consultations 239-313-2553Fort Myers and Napleswww.riverchase-fatfreeze.com Treat-to-Complete with...Riverchase Dermatology now o ers guaranteed results with the Treat-to-Complete package featuring FDA-Cleared CoolSculpting *Guaranteed Results!Con dence in your treatment, Con dence in your clothes. North Naples 1015 Crosspointe Dr. Downtown Naples 261 9th St. S. 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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 C3 The sidewalks stir with local artists, musicians and street performers the 2nd Saturday of every month. Located just north of Vanderbilt Beach Road on U.S. 41Introducing a different take on street performance. SAMPLE the latest from Naples Beach Brewery. GROOVE to the tunes of The Ramos Brothers. BE HYPNOTIZED by Hung Phuc Ly's Native American flutes. BECOME SPELLBOUND by violinist Jeff Leigh, Kalyn Hamm's clarinet solos and the powerful vocals and piano of duo Lorena Vargas and Jesse Zavada. LATHER UP with locally handcrafted toiletries from Soap-A-Licious.Come one. Come all. An Event Not to Be Missed! EXPLORE the works of Bonny Hawley at the pop-up gallery from 6-9pm in Suite 7110. Text STOP MERCATO to 55800 to cancel. Msg. & Data rates may apply. 6 msgs max/month. One winner chosen every month at random. Winners can only win one time. Visit MercatoShops.com\rules for info.GoMobile with MercatoText MERCATO to 55800 to join.Youll automatically be entered to win a $100 gift card every month!Calling all filmmakersNaples, Fort Myers festivals seek entriesThe Naples International Film Festival and the Fort Myers Film Festival invite submissions for consideration. NIFF welcomes full-length features (fiction, at least 40 minutes), documentaries (non-fiction, at least 40 minutes), shorts (narrative or documentary films shorter than 40 minutes) and Florida films (any of the aforementioned, but with principal photography in Florida) exclusively through Withoutabox, the online submission platform, at www.withoutabox.com/login/7363. The fifth annual NIFF is set for Thursday-Sunday, Nov. 7-10. The opening night screening and gala take place at ArtisNaples; screenings of approximately 40 films will be held at Silverspot Cinema. The Film Society of NIFF presents its first summer screening on Tuesday, June 11. The doors at Silverspot open at 6:30 p.m. for food and drink, and Strictly Ballroom will begin at 7 p.m. The 1994 directorial debut of Australian Baz Lurhmann (Romeo + Juliet, The Great Gatsby), Strictly Ballroom tells the story of Scott Hastings, a champion ballroom dancer who outrages the dance community when he decides to choreograph his own steps. After his ambitious dance partner abandons him to increase her chances of winning the prestigious Australian Pan Pacific Championships, Hastings finds an unlikely supporter in Fran, an ugly duckling with little dance experience. Fran believes in Scotts unorthodox style and wants to dance with him in the championships, to show the ballroom dance community that theres more to dancing than just strictly ballroom. Rated PG. The summer series continues July 9 (The Sting), Aug. 13 (The Station Agent) and Sept. 10 (Sunset Boulevard). A discussion follows each screening. Tickets for $25 include refreshments. For more information about NIFF, call 775-3456 or visit www.naplesfilmfest.com.And in Fort MyersThe fourth annual Fort Myers Film Festival is set for Thursday-Monday, held March 19-23, 2014. Films for consideration can be submitted online at www.fortmyersfilmfestival.com. FMFF categories for 2014 are: features, documentaries, shorts, short shorts, student and Strictly Local. Through Aug. 1, entry fees will be waived for submissions from students and filmmakers living in Lee, Collier and Charlotte counties. FMFF starts its Missed It Mondays series on July 22. The six-week series brings back films from the 2013 festival. Screenings are at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 for happy half-hour) at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center, downtown Fort Myers. Tickets are $6. For more information about FMFF, visit the website above. Photography Award and Exhibition will feature recent work in color and black & white photography from photographers across the United States. Also on view Capturing Our World: Naples Daily News Photographers 2 Camera USA is generously sponsored by Physicians Regional Healthcare System, Naples Daily News, Publix Super Markets Charities, Media Vista Group and Heres Howe Catering. The von Liebig Art Center hours: Mon-Fri, 10 4. 585 Park St. Naples, Florida 239-262-6517 ~ NaplesArt.org Operated by the Naples Art Association, presentsCamera USA3rd AnnualPreview Reception Friday, June 14, 5:30 7:30 p.m. Free to members, $10 for nonmembersOn View Jun.17 to Aug. 23, 2013 Cindy L. Seip, Aqua VenusA cooperative effort funded in part by the Collier County tourist development tax. The Naples Art Associations exhibition Camera USA: National

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYC4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 too: odd, whimsical, unexpected combinations of various materials, often metals. We live on this planet, we have a relationship with stuff, materials, what things are made of, he says. We have certain tastes in what we love or are attracted to. I like to put unusual components together. Mr. Voytek, who worked as a fabricator for the internationally renowned artist for 30 years, says he divides his life into three sections: before Bob, during Bob, and after Bob. (Mr. Rauschenberg died five years ago, on May 12.) With Bob, I was lucky that we worked together on making his art and making sculptures, he says. He was a huge influence on what I thought about the world, and what matters. Mr. Voytek was also influenced by Marcel Duchamps Readymades, in which, for example, the artist used a bottle rack as a sculpture, and placed a bicycle wheel on a stool. And he loves the work of Swiss sculptor Jean Tinguely, who made motorized sculptures. Tinguely made a machine (Homage to New York in 1960), that was in the Museum of Modern Art garden, that destroyed itself, he says. It spewed out drawings, it started a fire. There were motors, things spinning, things breaking off. To hear Bob tell the story, he was one of the guys helping to make it. He made a machine that threw out 50-cent pieces. Mr. Voytek studied at the Rhodes Island School of Design and at the San Francisco Art Institute, but after school, much of his learning came from working with Mr. Rauschenberg. His impulse to tell stories with his work also comes from Mr. Rauschenberg, he says. He always linked unusual combinations of ideas in his work, so youd come up with your own fresh interpretation of whats going on, he says. But still, hearing background stories about some of the pieces on display can be fascinating. Super Strat, a violin with a model of a Chevy racing motor attached, belonged to his daughter Alexa. The violin is a student grade instrument he bought at a flea market for $50, he says. It was missing pieces and parts, he says, but it was perfect for his purposes. He added a figure at the top of the neck that he purchased in Nice, France a blue figure with a devil tail and a golden headpiece. This is like hot rodding stuff, he says, adding, The sound of a V8 engine is just as musical as the sound of a Stradivarius. A nearby piece, Titanium Toy, is a steam shovel. My son, Zachary, would play in the sand with this, he says. The cylindrical base of the machine is a titanium AMRAAM missile part. He bought it years ago when he saw an ad for scrap titanium in the American Society of Materials magazine. Though security is even more stringent now, back then he had to fill out a letter giving his name and address and explaining what he intended to use the material for. He said he wanted to make art and toys out of missiles. Ironically, though many of the works are interactive and have moving parts, signs in the gallery forbid touching the artwork. Lassie Wondering Which Way to Turn shows a titanium toy collie on top of a metal tower with a tire at the base. Mr. Voytek spins the piece, demonstrating that Lassie can indeed, turn 360 degrees. At the shows opening on May 17, Mr. Voytek drove a car to the gallery, which he then parked outside. Hes thinking of bringing it back on the shows last day, June 22. Its an art car, he says of the postal jeep he purchased for $1,000. After buying it, he removed as much as possible from the vehicle. The car, which includes titanium headlights and steering wheel, looks like the very definition of streamlined motion. Duchamp said a speeding automobile is as valuable a piece of art as is the Pieta, says Mr. Voytek.Captiva Relic LotteryOne of the more recent pieces on exhibit in the show is Captiva Relic Lottery, created in 2012. It has a mesh lottery tumbler in a wooden frame, with a base that includes a chunk of wood and a cooling fan from a car. A lot of the pieces and parts were Bobs, Mr. Voytek says. The wooden piece of wood, with bent nails and peeling white paint, came from his old fishhouse. The tumbler contains little objects: one of Mr. Rauschenbergs erasers, a welding torch head, a yellow light bulb, shells from right outside his Captiva studio. Theres also a toy alphabet block the artist kept on his table in the studio, as well as a small chunk of concrete from the studio itself. I backed into the studio by accident, Mr. Voytek explains. The tumbler also contains a small white feather that blew in when Mr. Voytek was assembling the piece. On top of the wooden frame holding the tumbler is a weather vane with a paint brush at one end, and atop that, a bird with outstretched wings and a light bulb for a head. Another recent piece in the exhibit, Maybelles Song, pays tribute to another Captiva artist: the late Maybelle Stamper, who referred to her own paintings and prints as songs. Created with brass and bronze, and an antique pressure gauge, the piece is a head with a giant conch shell and a slender, elegant leaf emerging from the brains, with an antique pressure gauge on top. From the round O of the open mouth extends a flower, with its stamens aggressively sticking out. Ms. Stamper was an artist in New York City in the s, he says, but her husband left her and she moved to Captiva, where she lived like a hermit. Her property abutted Mr. Rauschenbergs, and when she couldnt pay her property taxes anymore, the artist took care of them and paid them for her. Bob had immense respect for her, Mr. Voytek says, her prints, her drawings, her little sculptures. Her art was very spiritual, mysterious. She needed things fixed at her beach cottage. But during the day, she didnt wear clothes. She didnt hear well, so when you went there, you had to yell, Maybelle! Maybelle! Then shed wrap a towel or tablecloth around herself. She could tell if a storm was coming in two days time. She was a really mystical person. Shed walk the beaches, and shed give me pieces of metal that shed find. He looks at the work. It has a lot of Maybelles Captiva spirit going on, he says. He looks around at the gallery. I like mixing metals, he says. I like the nature of what metals are. Each metal for me has its own kind of engineered possibilities. I find things, I cut them up and use them (in different combinations.) I didnt want to make art to sell, I wanted to make high art. I wanted to go beyond and feel something that is close to who I am than what the market would support. VOYTEKFrom page 1 Lawrence Voytek solo exhibit>> When: Through June 22 >> Where: The Bob Rauschenberg Gallery at Edison State College, 8099 College Parkway, Fort Myers >> Cost: Dree >> Information: 489-9313 or WWW.rauschenberggallery.com COURTESY PHOTOSCaptiva Relic Lottery by Lawrence VoytekMaybelles Song by Lawrence Voytek

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The HEAT are getting WHITE HOT (239) 530-2225 Wear your Miami gear to any HEAT playoff game & receive a complimentary WHITE HOT SHOTupon entry!! YOUR NAPLES HEADQUARTERS at NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 C5 FATHER GRILLS BESTCOMPLIMENTARY CHEFS APRON + BBQ MITT FOR DADSHOP FRIDAY, JUNE 7 THROUGH SATURDAY, JUNE 15, PRESENT $500 IN SAME-DAY RECEIPTS TO THE MANAGEMENT OFFICE AND RECEIVE YOUR COMPLIMENTARY GIFTS.AVAILABLE WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER. WATERSIDE SHOPS a secret meant to be shared... MANAGEMENT OFFICE HOURSMONDAY FRIDAY 8:30AM 5:30PM SATURDAY 10AM 5:30PM SUNDAY 12PM 6PM WATERSIDESHOPS.COM SEAGATE DRIVE (PINE RIDGE) & TAMIAMI TRAIL N. (U.S. 41) NAPLES | 239-598-1605WATERSIDESHOPS a male and female vocalist. Theyve opened for Chicago, Chris Botti, Huey Lewis & The News, Michael Bubl and The Police, among others. Newcomers The Vodkanauts and The Betty Fox Band round this years SummerJazz concerts on Aug. 24 and Sept. 21, respectively. Concerts take place from 7-10 p.m. Park at Lowdermilk Park and hop aboard a free trolley for transportation to the hotel and back. Guests can bring lawn chairs or blankets for seating. Food and drink will be available for purchase; no outside food or drink allowed. For more information, call 2612222 or visit www.naplesbeachhotel.com. JAZZFrom page 1 PAT SHAPIRO / COURTESY PHOTO

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Theater Scooby-Doo! Live Musical Mysteries June 7 at Germain Arena. (800)745-3000 or www.germainarena.com.Stage 2 Improv Through June 22 by The Naples Players in the Tobye Studio at the Sugden Community Theatre. 263-7990 or www.naplesplayers.org. James and the Giant Peach Dramatized by Richard R. George and presented by FGCU Theatre Lab June 12-16 at the FGCU Arts Complex. $7 adults; free for under 12. 590-7268 or www.theatrelab.fgcu.edu. A Closer Walk With Patsy Cline Through June 22 at the Broadway Palm Theatre, Fort Myers. 278-4422 or www.broadwaypalm.com. Musical Shows BIG ARTS presents The Lillian Baxter Show and An Evening with John Vessels, June 11-16 at the Herb Strauss Theater, Sanibel Island. 395-0900 or www.BIGARTS.org. Thursday, June 6 Photography Presentation Journeyman Photography Gallery hosts Our Wild Gulf Coast-SWFL from 6-8 p.m. $10. Reservations required. 2220 J&C Blvd. 260-5771 or www.journeymangallery.org. Garden Tour Tour The Norris Gardens at Historic Palm Cottage at 10 a.m. $10 (free for members of the Naples Historical Society). Reservations required. 262-8164 or www.napleshistoricalsociety.org. Book Talk Headquarters Library hosts a discussion of Cheryl Strayeds Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail at 2 p.m. Free. 2385 Orange Blossom Drive. 593-3511 or www. collierlibrary.org. Music at Mercato The Randy Stephens Band performs as part of the Mercato Nights music series from 6-9 p.m. on the lawn across from MASA and AZN. 254-1080 or www.mercatoshops.com.Live Jazz Jebrys Jazz Jam performs from 6-9 p.m. at New York Pizza and Pasta House. 11140 Tamiami Trail N. 594-3500. Stand Up Guy Tom Cotter takes the stage tonight through June 9 at the Off the Hook Comedy Club, Marco Island. 389-6901 or www.offthehookcomedy.com. Friday, June 7 Craft Beer Tours Tour Naples Beach Brewery from 4-8 p.m. today and 3-7 p.m. June 8. $15 gets the guided tour and samples of six beers. 4110 Enterprise Ave. 304-8795. www.naplesbeachb rewery.com. Rock Out Konnie & Kirk perform from 6-9 p.m. by the pool at Jacks River Bar. 475 North Road. 213-1441 or www. floridamarinaclubs.com.Live Piano Lynn Carol entertains at the baby grand from 6-9 p.m. today and June 8 in the lounge at Capers Kitchen & Bar. 2460 Vanderbilt Beach Road. 431-7438.Exhibit Opening The Center for the Arts of Bonita Springs hosts an opening reception for The Eyes of the Beholder from 6-8 p.m. 26100 Old 41 Road, Bonita Springs. 495-8989 or www. artcenterbonita.org.Live Tunes The Lost Rodeo performs at Freds Food, Fun and Spirits from 7-10 p.m. 2700 Immokalee Road. 571-5567. Saturday, June 8 Curious Kids The Golisano Childrens Museum of Naples hosts a live concert and premiere of the newest Curious Kids TV episode from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Regular admission applies. 5140084 or www.cmon.org. Art, Music & More Mercato hosts a night with musicians, street performers and local artist Bonny Hawley from 6-9 p.m. Free craft beer samples provided by Naples Beach Brewery. www.mercatoshops.com. Farmers Market Stroll the open air market from 7:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. along Broad Avenue at 13th Avenue South. Doo Wop Blues The Blutones perform from 7:30-10:30 p.m. at Freds Food, Fun and Spirits. 2700 Immokalee Road. 431-7928 or www.fredsdiner.com. Marina Day Celebration Naples Harbour celebrates National Marina Day with a barbecue, entertainment by Konnie & Kirk, Segway rides, face painting and more from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 213-1441. Two to Tango Alicia Repun leads a tango class from 7-8 p.m. followed by milongo for all levels until 11 p.m. $15. 1673 Pine Ridge Road. 738-4184 or www. pablorepuntango.com. Rock & Pop Hits LiveWire performs from 8-10 p.m. under the stars at Gulf Coast Town Center. Free. 267-0783 or www.gulfcoasttowncenter.com. Sunday, June 9 Grill Time Sur La Table hosts the cooking demonstration Great Flavors for Summer Grilling from 9-10 a.m. 9105 Strada Place. $5. Reservations required. 598-1463 or www.surlatable.com. Dogs in the Garden Naples Botanical Garden opens its doors to dogs and their owners from 9-11 a.m. Free for Garden members and their canine companions, $12.95 and $7.95 for non-member humans and their dogs, respectively. 6437275 or www.naplesgarden.org. Foreign Film The Renaissance Academy of FGCU presents a screening and discussion of The Other Son (France, 2012) at 1 p.m. at the FGCU Naples Center. Rated PG-13, its the moving and provocative tale of two young men one Israeli, the other Palestinian who discover they were accidentally switched at birth, and the complex repercussions facing them and their respective families. $5. 1010 Fifth Ave. S. 434-4737. Organ Festival Organists from throughout Southwest Florida come together to perform a variety of music at 3 p.m. at ArtisNaples. 597-1900 or www.thephil.org. Drum Circle Enjoy the sounds or play along at the Vanderbilt Beach drum circle from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Monday, June 10 Nature Documentary Rookery Bay presents a screening of the documentary Living Waters: Aquatic Preserves of Florida at 11 a.m. $5 for adults, $3 for children (includes admission into the Rookery Bay Environmental Learning Center). 300 Tower Road. 417-6310 or www.rookerybay.org.All That Jazz Freds Food, Fun and Spirits hosts a jazz jam with Jebry and friends from 6-9 p.m. 2700 Immokalee Road. 431-7928 or www.fredsdiner.com.Movie Night The Center for the Arts of Bonita Springs hosts a screening and discussion of Four Days in September at 7 p.m. at the Promenade at Bonita Bay. $8. 495-8989 or www.artcenterbonita.org. Tuesday, June 11 Now Youre Cooking The Sauce Lady turns out specialty pizzas in a cooking class from 6-8 p.m. $35. Reservations required. 9331 Tamiami Trail N. 592-5557 or www.saucelady.com. Home Tour Clive Daniel Home offers a designer-led tour of the firms newest model home in Olde Naples at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Reservations required. 213-7844 or www.clivedaniel.com. Movie Night Catch a free screening of Where the Wild Things Are beginning at 8:30 p.m. under the stars at Gulf Coast Town Center. 267-0783 or www.gulfcoasttowncenter.com. Wednesday, June 12 Movie Matinee Headquarters Library presents a screening of Lincoln starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Tommy Lee Jones at 2 p.m. Free. 2385 Orange Blossom Drive. 593-3511 or www.collierlibrary.org. Coming up All About Orchids Biologist Mike Owens discusses the 27 native species of orchids inhabiting the Fakahatchee Strand at 2 p.m. June 13 at South Regional Library. Free. Registration required. 8065 Lely Cultural Pkwy. 252-7542 or www.collierlibrary.org. Jazz It Up The Naples Philharmonic Jazz Orchestra performs The Music of Dizzy Gillespie at 6 and 8 p.m. June 13. 597-1900 or www.thephil.org. Love That Dress! The Royal Shell Companies and Osetra Champagne & Caviar Bar host a dress collection party to benefit PACE Center for GirlsCollier from 5-7 p.m. June 13. Start by donating a dress at the Royal Shell office, 601 Fifth Ave. S., and continue via limo transportation to Osetra nearby. 280-7775 or staceyherring53@gmail.com. Concert Pianist Jodie DeSalvo performs classics from Bach to Gershwin at 7 p.m. June 13 at the Promenade at Bonita Bay. Bonita Springs. 495-8989 or www.artcenterbonita.org. Wine Tasting Decanted hosts a Locals Appreciation wine tasting from 5-7 p.m. June 14. Free for local residents, $5 for out-of-towners. Reservations required. 1410 Pine Ridge Road. info@decantedwines.com. SUP Race The Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club hosts a standup paddleboard race on June 14. 777-0412. Submit calendar listings and highresolution photos to events@floridaweekly.com. E-mail text, jpegs or Word documents are accepted. No pdfs or photos of fliers. The deadline for calendar submissions is noon Sunday. CATERING FOR ALL EVENTS Professional Chefs Exhibition Cooking Business and Residential CATERING Basic Omelette Party for 1st time Business Clients www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GOThe Renaissance Academy of FGCU presents a screening and discussion of The Other Son (France, 2012) at 1 p.m. June 9 at the FGCU Naples Center. Rated PG-13 for brief violence and scenes of drug use, its the moving and provocative tale of two young men one Israeli, the other Palestinian who discover they were accidentally switched at birth, and the complex repercussions facing them and their respective families. $5. 1010 Fifth Ave. S. 434-4737.

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L O T S A L O B S T E R ! Waterfront Dining Friday, Sunday Saturday, TWO 1 pound lobsters with Lunch, Dinner & Sunday Brunch Established 1976 263-9940 Established 1979 263-2734 fries and slaw or black beans and rice $26.95 Expires 6/30/2013 Not good with any other offer. www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 ARTS COMMENTARYPop quiz: All of the aboveI knew a guy in college who to say the least didnt apply himself. When it came time to writing term papers, Andy, the night before one was due, would sit down at the typewriter and, fueled with endless cups of coffee, just write whatever came to mind about the required subject. No outline, no topic sentences. No rewriting or self-editing. Im not even sure if the sentences had any connection or relationship to each other; they were like random strangers thrown into a room together. It drove the professors crazy. Andy also had a philosophy on how to beat the testing system: If a multiplechoice test had d) all of the above as a choice, that was the answer to pick, he said. You couldnt go wrong with d) all of the above. I dont know what happened to Andy after college. For all I know, he became a governor or the head of a multi-national corporation. But I do know this: Not even knowing one thing about the Philharmonic Center for the Arts and the brouhaha over its recent name change to ArtisNaples, Andy couldve aced this pop quiz: 1. The ArtisNaples name was picked because new CEO, Kathleen van Bergen, wanted a new, unique name for the organization, yet Artis is already a) the name of a zoo in the Netherlands b) the first name of a Hall of Fame basketball player c) the brand name of a treadmill d) all of the above 2. The name change was done a) in secret b) without any input from donors or founder and original CEO Myra Janco Daniels (who taught marketing in colleges and was an award-winning pioneer in the advertising field) c) without any regard to history d) all of the above 3. The name Philharmonic Center for the Arts was deemed too restrictive and confusing by CEO Kathleen van Bergen, despite the fact that a) Center for the Arts covers all of the arts b) no one really confuses the venue with the Naples Philharmonic Orchestra c) the original name is already known around the world and is associated with a variety of the arts d: all of the above 4. Part of the reason people are confused about the ArtisNaples name is because: a) they dont know how to pronounce it b) they think the first word is a misspelling of artist c) in Latin, the word artis means of art, so the name is nonsensical d) all of the above 5. People have said that Artis Naples sounds like the name of: a) a bread company b) a restaurant c) a tattoo parlor d) all of the above 6. Those protesting the name change have been characterized in the press and blogs as: a) just resistant to any change b) irrational and angry c) old and conservative d) all of the above 7. The ArtisNaples fiasco demonstrates that certainly not all adages are true all the time. Which adage does it disprove? a) All change is good. b) Theres no such thing as bad publicity. c) Theres a sucker born every minute. d) All of the above. 8. CEO Kathleen van Bergen has said that she wants to attract a younger audience to the venue. So instead of booking non-classical acts that would appeal to a younger audience and introducing a series of edgier programming, she a) made rush tickets available to orchestral performances b) allowed drinks to be brought into the main hall c) changed the name to ArtisNaples d) all of the above 9. One month after announcing the name change, CEO Kathleen van Bergen held a town hall meeting in the Daniels Pavilion during a Community Day. The meeting was a) not advertised to the public b) not really a town hall meeting, as no one could stand up and ask questions c) a carefully orchestrated PR event d) all of the above 10. CEO Kathleen van Bergen has said that transparency is one of the organizations mission values. Yet, what does she refuse to share with donors, subscribers and the rest of the community? a) what the rebranding cost b) what questions were on the surveys c) organizational bylaws and whether theyve been changed within the past two years d) all of the above 11. People are so upset about the name change that they are protesting with their pocketbooks. What is happening? a) donors are asking for their donations to be returned b) donors have decided to stop giving c) longtime subscribers are not subscribing to the next season d) all of the above 12. People upset by the name change are also protesting in other ways. In what ways are they protesting? a) by signing the petition requesting the original name be restored b) by writing letters to the editor and to CEO Kathleen van Bergen c) by wearing T-shirts that say The Phil to events at the venue d) all of the above 13. Some long-time subscribers are protesting by a) returning their subscription envelopes with nothing in them b) returning their subscription envelopes with two pennies enclosed c) returning their subscription envelopes with ArtisNaples crossed out and The Phil written in d) all of the above 15. Some surprising statements have been made over the past month and a half. Which of the following statements have been made: a) CEO Kathleen van Bergen commented that not even all of the board members knew about all the programming the Phil offered. b) CEO Kathleen van Bergen admitted a couple weeks ago that the 3,000 surveys which shed cited as part of the impetus for the name change did not actually ask patrons about a potential name change. c) CEO Kathleen van Bergen told patrons that they could still refer to the venue as The Phil if they wanted to. d) All of the above. 16. Three people from SavethePhil.org met with CEO Kathleen van Bergen, Chairman of the Board Ned Lau t enb ach and board member David Drobis on May 30 to present their petition of 12,000 names protesting the name change and asking that the original name be restored. Although Ms. van Bergen has previously publicly said she was reaching out to the group and sounded conciliatory, at the meeting she a) asked them for the list of names (including address, phone numbers and email addresses) so she could check them against their database of donors and subscribers. (They refused) b) told them she was not going to change the name back c) refused to call an emergency board meeting and told the men they could wait until October d) all of the above 17. Chairman of the Board Ned Lautenbach wrote in widely distributed guest editorial that the Phil was in such poor financial shape that We had not increased musicians pay for three years, even though contractually committed to do so, nor did the staff receive raises Yet, theyve spent undisclosed amounts of money on: a) a Brooklyn rebranding and marketing firms services b) signage and business cards as well as promotional items such as baseball caps, pens, notepads and T-shirts with the new name/logo c) full-page ads promoting the new name d) all of the above 18. Much has been said about the finances of the Phil. Which of the following statements have actually appeared in print? a) For more than a decade there have been annual operating losses of $23 million. letter from board chairman Ned Lautenbach published in local newspapers and also widely distributed, via e-mail and U.S. mail, by CEO Kathleen van Bergen b) Overall, though, Ms. van Bergen inherits a financially stable organization with exciting multidisciplinary potential. Barbara Jepson in June 30, 2011, article in The Wall Street Journalc) as the accurate financial statements show, the organization had a surplus for seven years of the 10 years cited and the Phil was never in jeopardy (financially) during my tenure, and it should not be now. Founder and former CEO Myra Janco Daniels d )all of the above nancySTETSONnstetson@floridaweekly.com

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 C9 T H E W W I N N N E L O F F T T The Mercato of Naples: 9118 Strada Place 239.598.5601www.thewineloftofnaples.comLunch Daily 11:30-2:30 Our features are o ered in addition to our regular menu. Tequila-Lime Mahi Mahi Salad Gatsby Sandwich Proscuitto-Wrapped Scallops & Ziti J U N E E E 6 9 9 Grill & Chill Summer Salad Chicken Parmesan Sandwich Almond-Crusted Tuna & Rice J U N N E 1 1 0 12 PUZZLE ANSWERS

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Your advice might be much in demand by family and friends this week. But reserve time for yourself to investigate a project that could have some unexpected potential. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Work-related issues demand your attention in the early part of the week. Family matters dominate Thursday and Friday. But the weekend is yours to spend as you please. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Try to keep your temper in check as you deal with someone who seems to enjoy showing disrespect. Losing your Leonine cool might be just what the goader hopes to see. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) A heated confrontation needs some cool-off time before it boils over. Better to step away than to try to win an argument where emotions overrule the facts. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Someone very special in your life finally sends that reassuring message youve been hoping for. You can now devote more time to the tasks you had put aside. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Job pressures begin to ease by the weeks end, leaving you time to relax and restore your energy levels before you face next weeks emerging challenges. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your spiritual strength helps calm a friend who might be facing an unsettling change in his or her life. An offer to help comes from a surprising source. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) By midweek you could learn some surprising facts about an associate that might cause you to reconsider a long-held view about someone in your past. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) One of those rare-for-you darker moods sets in in the early part of the week. But by Thursday, the clouds lift and youre back doing nice things for people in need. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Use that sharp Piscean perceptiveness to reel in more information about a promising offer so that you have the facts to back up whatever decision you make. ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your creative side is enhanced by indulging yourself in as much artistic inspiration (music, art, dance, etc.) as you can fit into your schedule. Take someone special with you. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Take a little restorative time out of your busy life. Go somewhere quiet this weekend. Or just close the door, turn on the answering machine and pretend youre away. BORN THIS WEEK: Although you prefer the status quo, you easily can adapt to change when its called for. 013 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved. 013 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved. PUZZLES HOROSCOPES INNER LANES By Linda ThistlePlace a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.Sponsored By: Moderate Challenging ExpertPuzzle Difficulty this week: SEE ANSWERS, C9 SEE ANSWERS, C9

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 C11 Naples Harbour475 North Rd., Naples, FL 34104 (239) 213-1441 GordonsOnTheRiver.com Enjoy a complimentary Mimosa or Champagne with Brunch *Offer is not valid with any other offers or discounts. Omelet StationAn extravagant display of vegetables, meats, seafood and assorted cheesesCarving StationFarmland Hickory Smoked Ham Bu etEggs Benedict DisplayHouse Salad Love that Dress June Collection EventAttend our Brunch & Donate 2 dresses Donors will Receive a complimentary membership valid thru AugustMust bring in dresses on day of your reservation* Naples Harbour is the best place for your Sunday Brunch Serving 10am 2pmReservations Appreciated NEW BOOKINGS BY AUGUST 31, 2013*Offers apply to new bookings made by Aug. 31, 2013 on select sailings. Subject to change and availability. Please contact us f or complete offer details. 2 FOR 1 CRUISE FARES* $500 SHIPBOARD CREDIT* FREE PRE-PAID GRATUITIES* FREE UNLIMITED INTERNET PACKAGE* 50% OFF DEPOSITS*Book early for best fares.Limited availability (239) 261-1177 (800) 523-3716www.preferrednaples.comSunTrust Building at Pelican Bay 801 Laurel Oak Drive Suite 300 Hablamos Espanol Wilma Boyd CEO Youre Invited!Please join us for an Oceania Cruise PresentationWednesday, June 19th 3:00pm Preferred Travel of Naples Guest Speaker Jill Hanlon, Oceania Cruises R.S.V.P. Space is limitedReserve your new Oceania cruise by July 3, 2013 and receive up to a $100 per suite Shipboard Credit* Is it worth $10? YesThe American dream is a helluva thing. It comes with such promise of opportunity and optimism for a better life that its easy to forget about the dream part of it and the fact that for many, the dream never becomes a reality. The Reluctant Fundamentalist takes things a step further: It grants its Pakistani-born main character the American dream, and then makes the dream impossible to keep. Based on the novel by Mohsin Hamid, it tells the story of Changez (Riz Ahmed) and his family, who moved to the United States from Pakistan when he was young. Even though they ran in wealthy circles, the family was not well off. Changez graduates from Princeton and takes a financial analyst job in New York City, where his boss (Kiefer Sutherland) quickly identifies him as a rising star. He meets Erica (Kate Hudson), who has issues of her own, and settles into a nice, comfortable life. Just like that, the American dream is a reality. And then, 9/11. Changez doesnt change, but the world around him does. Now hes subject to racial profiling. His office and office are raided; he undergoes an invasive body cavity search at an airport and is falsely arrested. We learn all of this via flashback. The structure is given by an older Changez, now a professor at a Pakistan university, talking to a reporter (Liev Schreiber) after one of Changezs colleagues is kidnapped. Because Changez teaches a course on revolutionary violence, its presumed he knows his colleagues whereabouts. Does he? Director Mira Nair (Monsoon Wedding) keeps us guessing about Changezs motivations until the very end, and the movie is better because of it. The story isnt really about whether Changez is guilty, its about the way hes treated post-9/11 and the impact that can have on an otherwise well-rounded, intelligent individual. Changez repeatedly says he loves America, but when Americans dislike you on sight because of your skin color and presumed beliefs, couldnt that love turn to hate? Certainly theres supposed to be a moral choice between good and evil, but when so much evil is imposed on you, there seemingly ceases to be a choice. In a post-9/11 and perhaps more importantly, a post-Osama Bin Laden world, let us hope Americans are ready for social realism that paints peaceful Muslims in a mostly positive light. Its ironic, of course, that Changezs job at the firm is to evaluate the worth of companies and suggest changes to increase profitability. In other words, few are better at assessing a situation, speculating potential outcomes and acting in the most prudent way possible. When applied to his own life, its interesting to watch Changez slowly rec ede into someone whos fearful, unsure of how the world will attack him next. In limited release and available On Demand, The Reluctant Fundamentalist is a challenging movie and a rewarding one. It prompts Americans to think about the immigrant experience and how its distorted/ruined by prejudice, and to an extent makes it understandable how and why individuals would go to extremes for revenge. LATEST FILMSThe Reluctant Fundamentalist t e o c i w danHUDAKwww.hudakonhollywood.com >> Author Mohsin Hamid was born in Lahore, Pakistan, graduated from Princeton and Harvard Law, and now lives in London. He discusses the book and his personal connections to it in an interview at www.harcourtbooks. com/reluctant_fundamentalist. FILM CAPSULESStar Trek Into Darkness (Chris Pine, Benedict Cumberbatch, Zoe Saldana) When a madman (Cumberbatch) attacks Star Fleet, its up to Captain Kirk (Pine) and the Enterprise crew to save the day. Funny, tense and full of surprises, its awesome to see director J.J. Abrams combine Trek lore with his own vision. Rated PG-13.The Great Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire, Carey Mulligan) Elusive millionaire Jay Gatsby (DiCaprio) uses the cousin (Maguire) of his former love (Mulligan) to get close to her once again. From director Baz Luhrmann (Moulin Rouge) its expectedly stylish and flashy, but its also too long and not especially engaging. Rated PG-13.Iron Man 1/2 (Robert Downey Jr., Don Cheadle, Ben Kingsley) Iron Man (Downey Jr.) faces off against the Mandarin (Kingsley), a terrorist whos killing innocent American civilians. There are a few nice action sequences and Downey is charming, but on the whole its a bit of a let-down. Rated PG-13.

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btn, frBoard Certi ed Plastic Surgeon of the Face and Body Physicians-Regional Medical Center Pine Ridge Campus 6101 Pine Ridge Road, Suite 15 Naples, FL 34119 btn, b, ff fbr btnJune 20th, 4-7 PMJoin us to see how artistry meets technology at our open house event Space is limited RSVP required.239.348.4357www.naples-csc.com FLORIDA WEEKLYC12 WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 FLORIDA WRITERSSmall town values are tested in upbeat romance Whispers Edge by LuAnn McLane. Signet Eclipse. 304 pages. $7.99.LuAnn McLanes fourth entry in her popular Cricket Creek series (and her 18th title overall) continues to explore the charm of a friendly riverfront town in the midst of change. While business ventures can enhance the town, they can also undermine its caring, relaxed, neighborly character. In this installment, the seniors community of Whispers Edge needs a financial rescue. Although the town has made a comeback from hard times, largely due to its minor league baseball team, Whispers Edge is struggling. And the land it sits on is valuable. Meet 29-year-old Savannah Perry, a transplant to the town who bears the emotional scars of growing up in the foster care system. Savannah is the social director of Whispers Edge and assistant to the manager, Kate. Delightful and compassionate, Savannah is the only under-55 resident of the community, whose elderly population has provided a team of parental figures for her. Attractive but insecure, she strives to create activities that liven up and bond the residents and she succeeds. A young lawyer, Tristan McMillan, has purchased the financially troubled community from his mean-spirited, judgmental grandfather and hopes to prove himself by turning the investment into a profitable enterprise. He is still researching the possibilities as he arrives on the scene. Hunky Tristan makes a big splash, literally, by helping Savannah rescue a residents floundering dog from the community pool. There is a spark between these two young adults, who carefully negotiate the power of that attraction. He finds her directness and common sense refreshing. She feels herself beneath the notice of this well-educated man but shes wrong. A self-described workaholic nerd, Tristan has his own self-esteem problems. For light reading, this novel takes on serious issues and themes with power and insight. The risks of change are everywhere: in personal habits, in relationships and in the future of the retirement community and the town. As the romance between Savannah and Tristan heats up, its c omplicated by the ebbs and flows of need and fear. And its echoed by the romance that develops between midW a t h h c philJASONpkjason@comcast.net LuAnn McLane Monday Saturday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.SoAll proceeds benet local Collier Charities239.597.9518886 110th Avenue North | North Naples, FL 34108(West o Tamiami Trail, 1 block south of Immokalee Road)St. Johns Shoppe An Upscale riftAn outreach ministry of St. Johns Episcopal ChurchAbsolutely beautiful clothing for the whole family and terric home furnishings at very aordable prices. www.stjohnsshoppe.com Go to the beach, then Go shopping!

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 C13 50s Kate and the handsome, 60ish widower Ben, whose wife has recently passed away. Kate, who divorced a cheating husband, wonders about opening herself to love again. Ben wonders if he is yet ready. Their dance of passion and hesitation is as intriguing and as nicely drawn as that between Savannah and Tristan. The author had to struggle to keep the romance of the older folks in the story. The publisher resisted this dimension, thinking Ms. McLanes audience would be turned off by it. Actually, it adds depth and realism, making the novel even more engaging. The plot hinges on Tristans ultimate decision. While falling in love with Savannah, he discovers the need to define himself in terms other than financial success. He also comes to understand the importance of Whispers Edge. An offer for the property made by investor Mitch Monroe, a town benefactor, would bring Tristan an easy and sizeable profit, but Mitchs plans for the property would shut Whispers Edge down. Tension builds as misunderstandings about Tristans evolving outlook threaten his relationship with Savannah and with others whose well-being depends on the seniors community. Whispers Edge persuades readers that one can grow up at any age. That is, one can find the strength and wisdom to choose a fulfilling life direction while accepting the risks of that choice. For all the anguish that the characters go through, Ms. McLane reveals a deft hand at good-natured humor that lightens the atmosphere. She builds marvelous everyday scenes a spirited get-together in a local restaurant, for example that blend characterization, dialogue and sensory detail in a highly effective balance. There is a lot to like about Whispers Edge.About the authorLuAnn McLane, who writes southernbent romantic comedy for NAL, is currently penning the sixth novel in her Cricket Creek series (the fifth comes out later this year). Her books have appeared on bestseller lists including Barnes and Noble, Rhapsody and Doubleday Book clubs. She recently collaborated with country superstar Wynonna Judd on the novel Restless Heart. Formerly from Florence, Ky., Ms. McLane moved to Southwest Florida a few years ago and now lives in Naples. When she isnt writing, she enjoys family, friends, cooking, reading, music, travel, University of Kentucky basketball and our local beaches. Catch up with her at www.luannmclane. com. Phil Jason, Ph.D., United States Naval Academy professor emeritus of English, is a poet, critic and freelance writer with 20 books to his credit, including several studies of war literature and a creative writing text. ITALIAN STEAK FEAST ~DINNER FOR TWO $29.95TENDER SIRLOIN STEAK SEASONED, GRILLED & TOPPED WITH MUSHROOM MARSALA WINE SAUCE ONE BOTTLE OF CK MONDAVI WINE, YOUR CHOICE OF CABERNET OR CHARDONNAY(served with mashed potatoes and fresh vegetables ) All early bird orders must be placed by 6 PM in order to receive promotional pricing.For more information call Seth or Tom 239.592.0050 1585 Pine Ridge Road, Naples, FL 34109www.NoodlesCafe.com N ITALIAN STEAKFEASTDI N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N ERFORTWO$2995 I T A L I A N N N S T E A K F E A S T D I N N N N N N N N N N N N N N E E R F O R T W O $ 2 9 9 5 Early Bird Special Oer expires 3, 2013ITALIAN STEAK FEAST ~ 2 FOR $29.95

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Dinner Daily at 5:00pm Open Sunday for Brunch 10:30-2:00pm Happy Hour 4-6pm Live Music in the Tavern~ THE CLAW BAR at TIERNEYS TAVERN ~OPEN ALL DAY239.591.3837 799 WALKERBILT RD., NAPLES Located off US 41, 1/4 mile North of Immokalee Rd.(239) 591-3837 WWW.BAYHOUSENAPLES.COM ON THE RIVER BEAUTIFUL UPPER NAPLES I will take pictures of your...Business Family Gathering Holiday or Birthda y Party Gala Ball Auction and mor e!(c) PAPARAZI / www.fotosearch.comEvent Photography239-821-9774MediaNaples.com Stephen@medianaples.comin Naples FLORIDA WEEKLYC14 WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 Trim and Tone SpaWhere Technology Meets Beauty. $300 value Consider political imagery in context of the times Political slogans and pictures from the past can sometimes be confusing because modern times suggest a different meaning. In the 1900 U.S. presidential campaign, William McKinley used the slogans Protection and Prosperity and Four more years of the full dinner pail. His campaign often pictured a workmans lunchbox as a symbol of jobs. One of his most famous buttons, if first seen today, would startle a 2013 voter. The button shows a strange boxlike container -the lunch pail of the day. Inside the pail is a building with smoke pouring from the smokestacks and the words: Do you smoke? Yes, since 1896. The smoking chimneys on the building represent work being done inside, just as the lunch pail means jobs. Today the smoke could be misinterpreted as pollution, and the answer given to Do you smoke? would suggest a health problem. The rare button sold for $1,948 at a recent Hakes Auction. Its a reminder that both language and symbols can change with time and events, so collectors should be careful not to interpret objects or words from the past through modern eyes. Q: My small electric mantel clock has a metal embossed design under the dial. The design includes a seaplane with a propeller that rotates when the clock is running. Theres also a sailing ship, a man standing near a tepee and the words Polar Bird. The case is Bakelite and like new. I cant find a manufacturers name. Do you know who made it and what its worth today? A: A clock matching yours auctioned last year for $119. Clocks like it, with extra parts that move when the clock is running, are called animated clocks. Yours probably dates from the 1930s, the decade following Adm. Richard Byrds first flights to both the north and south poles. Some sources say the clock was manufactured by the New Jersey Clock Co. of Newark, N.J., with an electric motor made by the Hammond Clock Co. of Chicago. Others say its a Chronart clock, which may have been a trade name used by the New Jersey Clock Co.Q: I inherited a ceramic tile mural made up of 24 4-inch tiles. The tiles are not cemented together, but when laid out they picture a large sailing ship, two smaller sailboats and a lighthouse. One tile is signed Pillsbury. I think the tiles came from a pottery in Ohio. Any information and present value would be appreciated.A: Hester W. Pillsbury (1862-1951) was a decorator who worked at Roseville and Weller, both Ohio potteries. Roseville Pottery was organized in RosKOVEL: ANTIQUES a T p i m terryKOVELnews@floridaweekly.com

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 C15 agavenaples.com I 239-598-FIRE (3473)Corner of Airport & Vanderbilt Sunday & Monday 11:30 am 10 pm Tuesday -Saturday 11:30 am Midnight CONTEMPORARY SOUTHWEST CUISINE Introducing the new 2 for $49 menu!For only $49*, Choose an appetizer and dessert to share with two entres. With such great value, why wait? Hurry in today! *plus tax & gratuity HAPPY HOUR beverages daily, 11:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m., throughout restaurant! 2012 Board Certi ed Plastic Surgeon 239.348.7362 www.dr-pena.com6370 Pine Ridge Road, Suite 101 Naples, FL 34119 239.348.7362 6370 Pine Ridge Road | Suite 101 Naples, FL 34119www.dr-pena.comFRAXEL LASER RESURFACING NO DOWNTIME, LOOKS LIKE YOU SPENT THE DAY IN THE SUN! CAN BE USED TO TREAT GENERAL SKIN TONE, FINE LINES, ACNE & GENERAL SCARRING, HYPERPIGMENTATION (BROWN SPOTS) MEDIAS # 1 SKIN REJUVENATION TREATMENTFREE CONSULTATION OFFERED TO LEARN MORE. Board Certi ed Plastic Surgeon my smile lines the least bit funny. Campaign buttons from the past can be misleading. This McKinley button from the 1900 campaign is about jobs, not pollution. Made by W&H, it sold in 2012 for $1,948 at Hakes Americana & Collectibles of York, Pa. eville, Ohio, in 1890 and opened a plant in nearby Zanesville in 1898. Roseville made pottery until 1954. Weller Pottery started out in Fultonham, Ohio, moved to Zanesville in 1882 and closed in 1948. Hester Pillsbury began working in about 1904 and worked at Weller after 1918. A tile picture like yours, made up of 24 signed tiles, could be worth $1,000 or more. Q: I just bought a piece of Brooklin Pottery. I thought it was from New York but I am told it is Canadian. Do you know anything about it? Are there many popular collectibles from Canada that arent well known in the states? A: Of course. Collectors in the United States and Canada started looking at their own countries after soldiers saw all the antiques in Europe during World War II. The first books and publications about collecting in the United States concentrated on English porcelains and furniture, Georgian silver, prints, Staffordshire figures and Chippendale furniture that could have been made in many countries. American pieces were wanted by very few. Our trip to Eastern Canada from Ohio in the late 1950s was disappointing because we hoped to see Canadian things in antiques shops. We found a few in Nova Scotia selling early Canadian furniture, but shops in the large cities looked like ours -they were filled with mainly English or Asian pieces. But by the 1970s, Canadians had become interested in their own antiques and history and there were Canadian publications and shows. Brooklin Pottery was founded in 1952 by Theo and Susan Harlander. They had emigrated from Germany. Some of their best-known studio pottery is made with incised pictures of people and geometric designs in pale earthtones. The business was closed by 1987. Tip: Dont use water on turquoise objects or jewelry because water is destructive to turquoise. Instead, wipe turquoise with a microfiber cloth. Brush jewelry crevices that have become filled with debris. Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Florida Weekly), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

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The Show www.bobharden.comNews and commentary you can use to help you enjoy life on the Paradise Coast.Streamed live, Monday-Friday, 7-8 a.m. The show is archived for your listening convenience. Brought to you in part by w w w w w w News and c o N n use to hel ca n o n t h e Par a M Th e B like us on facebook FLORIDA WEEKLYC16 WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 CONTRACT BRIDGEAn unusual safety playBY STEVE BECKERThere are times when declarer must make what appears to be a senseless play in order to give himself the maximum chance for his contract. The play might seem foolish if it later turns out to be unnecessary, but when the play proves to be essential, declarer has something worth talking about. Take this case where West leads a club against four hearts. South wins with dummys ace, returns a low trump and, after East plays the eight, finesses the jack! The finesse appears absurd, considering that South possesses 10 trumps headed by the A-K-J. But, oddly enough, it is the right play not because the finesse succeeds in the actual deal, but because it assures the contract against any distribution of the opposing cards. To appreciate the advantage of the finesse, lets assume that declarer makes the more normal play of the ace on the first round of trumps. After West shows out, South must go down one, losing a trick in each suit. Now lets assume that when South finesses the jack, it loses to the queen. This is not cause for alarm, because the contract is still fully under control. The best the defenders can do in that case is to cash a club and shift to a diamond. South wins the diamond return, draws the one missing trump and plays the king of spades. West takes his ace, but thats the end of the line for the defense. South later crosses to dummys nine of trumps and discards his diamond loser on the queen of spades. In effect, the trump finesse is a safety play to guard against a 3-0 trump division. Quite often it will cost declarer a 30-point trick, but that is a very small price to pay for ensuring a vulnerable game. Call (239) 649-2275 for Reservations www.NaplesPrincessCruises.com Naples Princess Naples P rin cess The Best Way to Experience Naples from the Water. Naples Princess...UPCOMING SPECIAL EVENTS Tropical Steel Pan Sounds with J Robert Call (239) 649-2275 for ReservationsTuesday, June 18th SUMMER SPECIALSBUY ONE GET ONE1/2 PRICEWednesday Dinners Saturday 12:30 & 3pm Sightseeing Sunday Hors doeuvresBased on availability. Valid on adult tickets. No other coupons or discounts apply.

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BARBECUE IS WHAT WE DO LET US DO IT FOR YOU!In Lee & Collier Counties Call Our Catering Manager at (239) 209-0940 Catering Services from 25 5,000 www.ribcity.com Catering! Our Award Winning Baby Back Ribs, Chicken, Pork and Beef accompanied by our homemade Cole Slaw and Baked Beans can be brought to your event by our mobile char-grill. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 C17 THIS WEEK ON WGCUTV THURSDAY, JUNE 6 8 p.m. Magic Moments The Best of 50s Pop This program brings back the happiest hits from the days of poodle skirts and penny loafers. 10 p.m. Super Brain Dr. Rudy Tanzi Dr. Tanzi demonstrates techniques for keeping the brain youthful and dispels myths including those that aging in the brain is irreversible and that the brains hard wiring cannot be changed. FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 10 p.m. Country Pop Legends Country pop legends perform their biggest hits fom the 1950s, s and 0s. SATURDAY, JUNE 8, 11 p.m. Ed Sullivans Comedy Legends This special brings back the stars who defined the history of comedy. Included are classic bits from Jack Benny, Bob Hope, Red Skelton and Jackie Gleason, among others. SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 7 p.m. American Masters Johnny Carson Explore the life and career of The Tonight Show host through unprecedented access to Mr. Carsons personal and professional archives and interviews with family. MONDAY, JUNE 10, 11:30 p.m. Active with Arthritis Dr. Vijay Vad Renowned sports medicine specialist Dr. Vad empowers arthritis sufferers with techniques to help them manage their condition so they can enjoy an active lifestyle. TUESDAY, JUNE 11 8 p.m. Big Band Vocalists Relive the big-band era with the crooners and canaries of the 1940s featured with rare, vintage footage of Louis Armstrong, Perry Como, Doris Day and more. 10 p.m. Protect Your Memory Dr. Neal Barnard The best-selling author offers groundbreaking research involving ways to protect against memory loss and offset the risks for dementia and Alzheimers disease. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 8 p.m. Nature Hummingbirds: Magic in the Air Hummingbirds are the tiniest of birds, yet they qualify as some of the toughest and most energetic creatures on the planet. This program showcases their remarkable abilities. Subscribe online at www.FloridaWeekly.com or Call 239.325.1960 Get Florida Weekly delivered to your mailbox for only$3195PER YEAR*Rates are based on standard rate postage. A one-year in-county subscription will cost $31.95 to cover shipping and handling. Call for out-of-county and out-of-state postage and pricing options. Pre-Owned Womens, Mens & ChildrensDesigner Fashions with Impeccable Style & Sophistication Resale! Consignment! Trade!Anne Taylor | BCBG | Chanel Tory Burch Gucci Jimmy Choo Louis Vuitton Michael Kors Theory | True Religionand many more!At the Shoppes at Vanderbilt2355 Vanderbilt Beach Road #178 | Naples(239) 596-5044www.truefashionistasresale.com $5.00OFFa Purchase of $50Coupon required at time of purchase. Limit one coupon per day per person. Not valid with any other offers or specials. Expires /3 /13 FW $10.00OFFa Purchase of $100Coupon required at time of purchase. Limit one coupon per day per person. Not valid with any other offers or specials. Expires /3 /13 FW We have EXPANDED... We now have more space to offer you extraordinary FABULOUSNESS!

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FLORIDA WEEKLYC18 WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 As a way of saying thank you to all of our customers we want to make the following specials available. $5.00 OFF Your Market Purchase! (Minimum purchase of $25.00) Limit one per customer, must have coupon Buy One Market Sandwich GET ONE FREE! Limit one per customer, must have coupon A VERY UNIQUE MARKET, RESTAURANT, DELI, CATERING FOOD PLACE 968 Second Avenue North in Naples MonSat, 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. 239.434.7115 www.optionsnaples.org owned & operated by:Condential 24-hour crisis line: www.naplesshelter.orgFREE Pick-Up of Furniture Donations.NEW ARRIVALS DAILY!Donation or PurchaseWE RELY ON YOUR GENEROSITY TO CHANGE LIVES.INVENTORY SALEfor the month of June Furniture, Clothing, Accessories...50% OFFGet an additional 10%off on your entire purchase with this ad.May not be combined with any other offer. Available exclusively atEAST INDIES HOME COLLECTION11985 US 41 N., Naples 34110 239-596-7273 Mon-Sat 10:00-5:00At Your ServiceCharleston Hunt Board Hand Carved Solid Teak Sideboard COME SEE WHAT EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT! KITCHEN & BAR 2$2999Includes choice of homemade soup, House salad or Caesar salad Includes One Glass of House Wine EachCHOICE OF ENTREE: A CAPERS DESSERT TO SHAREServed 4:00pm to 5:30pm daily. Must be seated by 5:15pm and must order by 5:30pm. Not valid with any other discount or promotion. No substitutions without adding upcharge. EARLY BIRD EXTRAVAGANZA FOR ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTS AND COUPONS PLEASE VISIT: www.CapersKitchen.com All forms of media are being considered for the Hotworks Estero Fine Art Show. The bi-annual juried show takes place Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 16-17, and Jan. 4-5, 2014. Entry deadlines are Saturday, June 15, and Monday, Aug. 5, respectively. Applications are at www.Zapplication.org. The show takes place at Miromar Outlets. The International Society of Experimental Artists welcomes submissions for jurors to consider for its 2013 International Juried Art and ISEA/ NWS Wales International Exchange exhibits, which will be on display at BIG ARTS on Sanibel Island Oct. 19-Nov. 28. Experimental art means the work is innovative in concept, attitude, technique or materials. Works must have been created within the last three years and cannot have been shown in previous ISEA exhibits. Deadline for online entries is Monday, July 1, at www.iseaartexhibit.org. ArtFest Fort Myers has launched a new poster/T-shirt competition for the 2014 festival. The competition is open to all professional artists. The artist whose work is selected for the poster/T-shirt will be featured in a broad range of print, online and VIP promotions preceding festival weekend and continuing throughout the year. The winner will also get free booth space at ArtFest Fort Myers 2014, a three-night stay at the events host hotel and an invitation to join ArtFest Fort Myers 2015. Submissions for the contest must represent original artwork in a theme that denotes Southwest Florida and is appealing to a broad audience. Entries will be accepted via e-mail through Tuesday, Aug. 20. For more information, call 768-3602 or visit www.ArtFestFortMyers.com and click on Poster Contest. ArtFest Fort Myers 2014 takes place Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 1-2 in downtown Fort Myers. CALLS TO ARTISTS

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 A & E C19 SOCIETY A True Fashionists to-do for the Garden of Hope & CourageWe take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com. resocietyandnetworkingphotosatareaeventsthanwecantinthenewspaperSoifyouthinkwemis 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 8Brittany Miller 1 Polly Whiteside and Kimberly Barrett 2 Tricia Borges 3 Roberta Niewiadomski and Charnele Tate 4. Robyn Mathias and Miriam Ross 5. Teddi Langlois and Linda Desmarais 6. Danielle Black and Melissa Kieffer 7. Erica Alessandri and Kathi Zencuch 8. Melissa Cunningham and Jon Phillips 9. Cynthia Bennett 10. Amy Pescetto and Jama Dock 11. Jennifer Johnson and Amy LaneBERNADETTE LA PAGLIA / FLORIDA WEEKLY 239.431.6341 NaplesDesignerDivas.com The Shoppes at Vanderbilt Suite 136 2355 Vanderbilt Beach Road, Naples naples designer divas No Appt. NecessaryM-F 10-6 Sat 9:30-5:30 Sun 11-4 Resale Cash on the Spot We Buy & Consign Items in Mint Condition 12-18 Months Young 15% OFF with this ad. Expires 6-13-13 now buying and selling all fashion trendy clothing DESIGNERS ANTHROPOLOGIE BCBG BURBERRY CACHE CHANEL COACH FENDI FREE PEOPLE GUCCI JIMMY CHOO JUICY COUTURE KATE SPADE LILY PULITZER LOUIS VUITTON MICHAEL KORS TIFFANY & CO. TORY BURCH VERA BRADLEY WHITE HOUSE BLACK MARKET New Items Below Wholesale Prices! (excludes sale items)

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC20 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 SOCIETY The ninth annual Hodges University Scholarship GalaWe take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.COURTESY PHOTOS 1 Christen Collins, Dave and Cheryl Copham, John Finstrom and Sandy Stilwell 2 Patricia Bell, John Pollock, Gay and Gary Trippe 3 Wayne and Sharon Smith, Phil Memoli 4. Keith and Carol Ann Arnold, Bill and Marilyn Miller, Cecil Pendergrass 5. Mandy Greenstein, Tom and Elaine August, Steve Greenstein 6. Linda Sylva, Kitty Thompson and Melody Snyder 7. Bill Baxter, Wanda Wood, Stephan Humphrey Bogart, Mary Jane Baxter and John R. Wood 8. Lindsay Hurley, Brian Stock, Susan and Terry McMahanWaterside Shops hosts Make-A-Wish Month party 1 4 7 8 6 5 2 3 1 2 4 3 5 6SUE HUFF / COURTESY PHOTOS 1 Brenda OConnor, Stacey Herring, Dylan Sanders and Nannette Staropoli 2 Amanda Jaron, Leslie Colantonio and Lynette Coffey 3 Judith Yevick, Pete Rossi and Taylor Marini 4. Paula and Tom Falciglia with Pamela Price 5. Shannon Livingston, Amber de Lisser and Carmen Taylor 6. Joshua, Robin, Maria and Rose Rosario, a Make-A-Wish family

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C21 facebook.com/ KeyWestExpress twitter.com/ KeyWestExpress youtube.com/ TheKeyWestExpress www.keywestexpress.us 1-800-593-7259 $ 99ROUND TRIP!* FOR ONLY*Advance purchase, non-refundable fare for travel July 4th through July 7th, 2013 only. Cannot be combined with other offers. Expires June 30, 2013. SOCIETY A thank-you party for patrons of the NCH Healthcare FoundationWe take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.COURTESY PHOTOS CORI HIGGINS / FLORIDA WEEKLYHeres to a Macallan scotch dinner at Shulas at the Hilton Naples Claire Stocking, Eileen and Bill Kopp, Becky and Scott Sharon Dolph von Arx, Kay Gow and Bill Allyn Brian Hamman and Taylor Chestnut David and Cecile Wang, Mariann and Bob MacDonald 1 Katie OBrien, Bud Russell and John Buehler 2 Randolph Adams and Tom Donahue 3 Seated: Barry Higgins, Lois and Dick Sabatino. Standing: Jeff Jerome, Diego Alba and Cori Higgins 4. Patrick Neale and Karen Klukiewicz 1 3 2 4Nick and Jessica Lyons

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC22 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 National Marina Day First 50 kids receive free hotdog and cupcake Sea Tow & NAPLES HARBOUR invites you to celebrate! 239-213-1441 | Naples Harbour PAST REPASTSHere are some capsule summaries of previous restaurant reviews:Cloydes Steak & Lobster House, The Village of Venetian Bay, 4050 Gulf Shore Blvd. N., Naples; 261-0622 With a stunning view of Venetian Bay and entrees that come with potatoes and, in some cases, vegetables and salads, this steakhouse breaks away from the herd. After changing hands in 2012, Cloydes dining room and menu have been refreshed. The kitchen knows how to handle seafood, as evidenced by a starter of steamed Prince Edward Island mussels and a blackened mahi entree that was well seasoned but not overly so. The oven-roasted Angus prime rib with natural juices was excellent, made even better by sides of pure horseradish and a creamy horseradish sauce. Baked potatoes, lightly b utter ed julienned vegetables and well-chilled salads were just right, too. For dessert, consider the chocolate fudge mousse cake or, even better, the coconut-encrusted vanilla bean ice cream with chocolate sauce. Service was as good as the food. Full bar. Food: Service: Atmosphere Reviewed August 2012Margaritas Mexican Restaurant, 8971 U.S. 41, Naples; 431-6206 Margaritas is an offshoot of a Mexican restaurant by the same name thats been on Marco Island since 2005. Succulent hand-pulled meats and fresh seafood are tucked into tender tortillas, served with brightly flavored house-made salsas and sauces. Bracing margaritas in fruit flavors such as watermelon and pomegranate are served on the rocks or frozen, headlining a tequila-heavy cocktail list that goes on for days. The rustic charro beans, whole pintos laced with oregano and chunks of pork, are a revelation and theyre just a side dish. The taco trio miniature corn tortillas overflowing with shredded beef, chicken and pork is a good way to start, as is the ridiculously sumptuous queso fundido, a fondue of warm, silky white cheese garnished with diced scallions, jalapenos and chorizo. Available with three stuffings, the tamales are exemplary. A seafood-packed Cancun burrito was big enough for two, and its ingredients all perfectly cooked. Full bar. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed December 2011 Masa, Mercato, 9123 Strada Place, Naples; 598-0887 Masa successfully bridges old-world Mexican cooking and modern approaches and ingredients. A venture of the DAmico Family of Restaurants, which includes Campiellos and Caf Lurcat in Naples, Masa has only one other location, in Minneapolis. But the concept, from drinks to dessert to decor, is so clearly defined and seamlessly executed that it would be a welcome addition to any citys dining scene. Expect to find a range from traditional to trendy: richly flavored cocoa-infused chicken mole, say, as well as a ceviche pairing snapper and shrimp with bits of fried plantain and diced mango. Even chili rellenos gets a new twist courtesy of a roasted jalapeno filled with crumbled chorizo, apples and Chihuahua cheese. A sampler platter of tacos, sopes and tamales would be a welcome addition; the tamales alone were redolent of fresh-ground corn and came with rave-worthy frijoles churros studded with pork. For dessert you cant go wrong with lush tres leches cake or churros dipped in molten chocolate. Masas modern Mexican food, stylish atmosphere and stellar service will leave you wanting mas. Full bar. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed January 2013Roys, 26831 South Bay Drive, Bonita Springs; 498-7697 No matter how many times Ive eaten at Roys, I still look forward to a great meal and royal treatment by the impeccable wait staff. With entrees in the $25-$30 range, its not inexpensive, but I doubt anyone leaves here complaining about the bill or the food or the service. Youll see some familiar appetizer offerings at Roys, such as carpaccio, calamari and ribs. But they are reconceived with the Asian-Pacific influences the chain is famous for think Wagyu beef with pears or minty fried squid rings with curry sauce. If the ocean of fish options leaves you floundering, theres a smart solution: Roys Trio consists of small portions of three entrees. The grilled salmon came with zesty ponzu sauce; the mahi-mahi was crusted with macadamia nuts and paired with lobster essence; and the miso-marinated butterfish had a lemon-ginger beurre blanc. Full bar. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed February 2012 Swan River Seafood Restaurant and Fish Market, 3741 Tamiami Trail N., Naples; 403-7000 North meets South at Swan River, which has been serving the best of New Englands catch beside the treasures of Southwest Florida waters for more than 10 years. It captures the spirit of the Cape, with its nautical blue and white interior, oars and sh utters on the walls and menu offerings of whole belly clams, broiled scrod and lobster rolls. Florida stone crab claws (in season), Gulf grouper and Southern oysters complement those offerings. Appetizers of fried oysters and steamed clams were both good. And you wont find food buried under piles of fruity salsas and painted with colorful drizzles of infused oil or creamy coulis; its seafood cooked simply in order to showcase the quality of the main ingredient. Nowhere was that more evident than with the Maine gray sole, which was broiled to perfection with only white wine lemon and butter. Full bar. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed April 2012 Key to ratings Superb Noteworthy Good Fair Poor MiraMareRistorante4360 Gulf Shore Blvd. N. shseafoodrestaurant.com 11:30AM 10PM SUN THURS 11AM 11PM FRI SAT www.miramarenaples.com WELL MARTINIS, HOUSE WINE & BEER$5EVERYDAY 3 6PM BAR ONLY$10 CHOOSE FROM 12 DIFFERENT PASTAS$10 $ 4 6PM$1 PLATE, 2 COURSES & 1 SOFT DRINKEVERYDAY 11:30AM 3PM 11:30AM 10PM SUN THURS 11AM 11PM FRI SAT3 6PM AT THE BAR WEDNESDAY EXCLUDES RAINBOW, CATERPILAR, LOBSTER & SPIDER 2 LOBSTERS $28.00 Watefront Dining at Its Best Miramare Celebrates The Belmont Stakes June 8th 4-8pm with St. George Gin & SpiritsSTEAMED W/BUTTER & PARMESAN TRUFFLE FRIES FISHRESTAURANT

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CUISINEThe Local proves a welcome addition to the neighborhoodThe Local takes a straightforward and delicious approach to dining. The concept: Farmand sea-to-table food, meaning most products are grown on area farms and harvested from local waters. Many of the wines are organic or sustainable. The beers are crafted in small breweries, several of which are in Florida (such as Monk in the Trunk from Tampa). Situated two doors down from Steamers in the Bed Bath & Beyond Plaza, The Local is run by two Culinary Institute of America alums, one of whom has also spent time at The Ritz-Carlton. The other has thoroughly explored his Italian heritage and shares some of it in the dishes served. These two creative souls have conjured up a simple but elegant menu served in an unfussy setting by a friendly, accommodating staff. Whats not to love? After an impressive dinner there, I cant imagine and I cant wait to go back again. Chef/owner Jeff Mitchell and chef Richard Demarse demonstrate deft hands in the kitchen, creating dishes that have relatively few ingredients, but what they do have are fresh and bursting with flavor. Its an approach as forthright as the restaurants motto: Eat. Drink. Be Local. The current menu (it will change as product availability does) boasts Pine Island clams, Gulf-caught fish and organic produce from Worden Farms in Punta Gorda as well as Inyoni and Wild Heritage farms in Naples. Local items are signified in bold print on the menu so diners immediately know whats what. Management and staff clearly understand the importance of attention to detail and customer service. When we told our server that my companion eats no meat products, he quickly responded that virtually any menu item could be made with or without meat. There are also several vegetarian items on the menu and a daily vegan special. And, although organic foods tend to be more expensive than non-organics, prices at The Local are quite reasonable. That includes the wines, most of which are priced at less than $75 a bottle. The Paul Hobbs Crossbarn chardonnay ($50) we ordered arrived properly chilled and with an ice-filled (and leak-proof) plastic sack to keep it that way. Light on oak, big on melon and pear flavors, it went splendidly with our meal. The restaurant doesnt take reservations, but we easily landed a booth by arriving at 6 p.m. on a recent Saturday. It was a good thing, because by 7 p.m. the place was full, with parties ranging from families with small children to younger couples and groups of retirees. The dining room is attractive, with a whimsical mix of industrial and agricultural touches. The high ceiling is unfinished but has large wooden panels with small lights suspended from it. Theres a bar on the back wall, with what looked like brick on either side (but could have been painted). Side walls are clad in white wood up to about waist level topped by slategrey paint and mirrored faux windows. Framed citrus labels add color. From the outset, its clear that the management is serious about its food. Creamy white bean dip and veggies arrive first, followed by fresh rolls tender sunflower seed and pumpernickel onion on this night served from a large basket. There are four flatbread options on the menu, any of which would make a fine meal with a salad on the side. They also work well as starters that easily serve two. The clam flatbread ($15) was a platesized pie possessing a thin, yeasty crust, local tomatoes and herbs, Parmigiano cheese and Pine Island clams. Chewy, gooey, crusty delicious. We had to force ourselves not to finish it. (Our server packed the remains into a small box made of recycled cardboard.) Snapper ceviche ($14) piled atop a crisp tortilla round contained a soulful mlange of fish, serrano peppers, avocado, red onion, cilantro, golden grape tomatoes and citrus, all locally grown. The menu isnt huge there are about a dozen entre choices, plus a few specials but it was still hard to decide. We both opted for nightly specials: the grilled Gulf-caught cobia ($28) with tomato confit and grassfed short ribs ($30). Both came with a choice of two sides (calabaza squash, chard and smashed potatoes on our night). The fish was perfectly cooked, topped with tomatoes rendered sweet and delicious from slow roasting. I normally avoid short ribs because they tend to be fatty, but The Locals version proved lean yet fork tender, the result of long, slow braising. All of the sides were outstanding. Chunks of orange-fleshed calabaza were sweet and smooth. The chard was lightly crunchy with no bitterness. And the chunky potatoes were enhanced with just a touch of crme fraiche and garlic chives. Portions are moderate, enough to satisfy but not to overfill, thus leaving just enough room for a bit of dessert. The Local delivers here, too, with a selection of small sweets each priced at a downright reasonable $1.50. The bread pudding was creamy and redolent of fragrant cinnamon. Even better was the Key lime panna cotta, the silky pudding imbued with the distinctively tangy Key lime flavor. There wasnt a single thing I would change about any dish we sampled. I only regret being unable to try more of the dishes. The vegan special Mediterranean red rice with tofu and vegetables looked delicious, as did the clams in white wine sauce over linguini, both of which were served to a nearby table.The Local might have an unpretentious name, but its a sure bet it wont be long before its the darling of discriminating diners throughout the area. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 6-12, 2013 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C23 The Berkshire Breed of pigs dates back over 300 years to the swine herd of the Royal House of Windsor in England, where they were prized for their exceptional avor. From British royalty to Asian emperors Berkshire pork was preferred for its Exceptional taste and tenderness. Now they are recognized all over the world for their perfect combination of juiciness, avor and tenderness. Come in and try our Berkshire Pork dish which is grilled to perfection and served with housemade Pear Mostarda and Dijon Sauce.Would you like to taste this delicious Berkshire Pork Tenderloin with Pear Mostarda and get the recipe?Email at vergina@comcast.net to let us know when you are coming.DID YOU KNOW? 700 Fifth Ave. S., Naples, FL 34102 | 239.659.7008 | www.VerginaRestaurant.comThe Star of Italian/Mediterranean Cuisine on Fifth Avenue. Reservations Recommended The Local>> Hours: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. daily >> Reservations: Not Accepted >> Credit cards: Accepted >> Price range: Appetizers, $4-$15; entrees, $18-$30 >> Beverages: Beer and wine served >> Seating: Booths, conventional tables and at the bar >> Specialties of the house: Local and sustainable fare >> Volume: Moderate to high >> Parking: Free lot >> Website: www.thelocalnaples.comRatings: Food: Service: Atmosphere: 5323 Airport-Pulling Road, Naples; 596-3276 Superb Noteworthy Good Fair Poor karenFELDMANcuisine@floridaweekly.com The Locals sign proclaims its message: Eat. Drink. Be Local. Snapper ceviche is a colorful blend of fish, golden tomatoes, cilantro and serrano peppers. Grilled gulf-caught cobia with tomato confit with smashed potatoes and chard. Clam flatbread contains locally grown tomatoes and herbs plus Pine Island clams.KAREN FELDMAN / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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492 property shops in 37 countries on 6 continents492 property shops in 37 countries on 6 continents Mallorca SpainPrice Upon RequestClearwater Beach FloridaPrice Upon Request 25 property shops in South Florida 239 692-9449 www.evnaples.com475 Seagate Drive Naples, FL 34108 North Naples 837 Fifth Avenue South Naples, FL 34102Downtown NaplesYour Local Guide to Worldwide Real Estate.