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Monsignor Edward A. Pace, Diocese of St. Augustine, 1861-1938

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Title:
Monsignor Edward A. Pace, Diocese of St. Augustine, 1861-1938
Added title page title:
Priest, administrator, counsellor, educator
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[S.l
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s.n.
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Language:
English
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38 p. : ill., ports. ; 23 cm.

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Bishops -- Biography -- Florida ( lcsh )
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non-fiction ( marcgt )
individual biography ( marcgt )

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Cover title: Priest, administrator, counsellor, educator.

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University of Florida
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029801916 ( ALEPH )
10676913 ( OCLC )

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Florida Family and Community History

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DEDICATION
The first Catholic child born in Starke in 1861 was named Edward Pace in honor of Saint Edward. Eighty years later the first Catholic Church in Starke was named Saint Edward in honor of Edward Pace.
Doctor of Theology and Doctor of Philosophy, honorary Doctor of Laws and Doctor of Letters, honored by Popes, befriended by Presidents, classmate to Cardinals, this son of one of Starke's first families became loved and respected by all who were privileged to know him as Priest, Administrator, Counsellor and Educator.
The Parishoners of St. Edward's Church in Starke are deeply appreciative of the world-wide tributes of those who have recollected for us here their memories of Monsignor Pace, "who walked with kings, yet never lost the common touch".
We are most proud to join with His Grace, our Most Reverend Archbishop, who established our Parish, as he inscribes in our church today, the following commemorative plaque:
In Devoted Remembrance
of
MONSIGNOR EDWARD ALOYSIUS PACE
Born in Starke July 3, 1861
Died April 26, 1938
To whose Patron this Church was dedicated
October 13, 1941
This plaque is inscribed with the hope
that it will preserve for posterity
the memory of this humble Priest of God
who was also a learned Doctor of Philosophy April 26, 1963
The twenty-fifth anniversary of his death
*,Joseph P. Hurley Archbishop
Bishop of Saint Augustine [Three]




PACE THE PIONEER
It was not an uncommon sight for Middleburg, Florida, known then as Catholic University students of the Black Creek, Fort Harley had been late 1920's to see their astute Vice- established to fight off Indian atRector and Professor of Philosophy tacks. It was in that area in that riding about the University grounds same year, that George Edward'Pace, on horseback. To them it seemed, the father of Doctor Pace, was born, perhaps, a bit out of character. Their in the shadow of an army gar 'ri son, usual picture of Doctor Pace was and the fearful violence of Indianone of a dignified, slow-moving, slow- fighting. By 1835 the trouble with talking, slow-to-provoke intellectual, the Indians had erupted' into the whose classroom routine was invar- Florida Indian War, sometimes -reiable. Entering the classroom, he ferred to as the Seven Years War would say a brief prayer and take against the Indians. Skirmishes his seat. Then, with pencil, or a and bloody attacks by the well-orpiece of chalk which he rarely used, ganized Indian bands were frequent in his hand, he would proceed to lec- in this Middle Florida region, where ture for an hour or more without George Pace was raised. As a rebenefit of book or notes. His dry sult many of the settlers there behumor wove itself in and out of his gan to move away. talks, often taking his students by, Finally, in 1838, the famous Brigsurprise, and at the same time, giv-' adier General Zachary Taylor, later ing his classes more than just the President of the United States, asusual amount of academic interest. sumned command of the Army forces Had his students asked Monsignor in Florida. He soon became a familPace concerning his habit of horse- iar and re-assuring figure to the back-riding, he might have answered settlers. He was constantly in the that it was a carry-over from his saddle moving from post to post pioneer days, and they most likely throughout the Territory, positionwould have passed his reply off as ing his men so as to provide the best one of his many humorous remarks. possible protection for the settleBut in reality, horseback-riding ments.
and pioneering were certainly noth- The War with the Indians finally ing new to Edward A. Pace. To look came to an end in 1842, and the Conback into the beginning of the 'Pace gress of the United States passed in Story,' is to discover a tale of early that same year, the Armed Settlesettlers pioneering on the Florida ment Act. By this law, they had frontier. There is adventure in the hoped to encourage settlers who had story of the Indian Wars as his own left the Territory because of the Infather knew them, and, from his dians, to return to their land. 160 own boyhood, Edward Pace could- acres would be given to any man have told many a story about the who settled for 5 years in that strickhardships of his native Florida in en country south of the Palatka and Civil War days. Gainesville line, and carried arms in
In 1831, the Seminole, Mikasukie, defense of their homes. The law Tallahassee, and Creek Indians were had the effect, also, of encouraging marauding in bands throughout the new settlers from Georgia, the CarFlorida Territory. Garrisons had olinas, and other surrounding Terbeen erected in many areas to pro- ritories to move south into Florida. lfect the scattered settlers. Near Not far from the Middleburg set[Four]




element, there was a crossroads point house on the west, to the municipal for these pioneers pushing south- power plant on the east. ward. At this time, it was sparsely All the while, George Pace had populated, with only an occasional been pursuing his own business incabin here and there, belonging to terests in Middleburg, and had realsome of the travellers who had ized some degree of success. He
chosen to stop there, clear some was considered to be a prosperous
land, and grow cotton. A few others planter, and a manufacturer of turhad been induced to settle there by pentine. Together with his younger the fine dense forests of virgin pine, brother Augustus, (Gus), he made valuable for lumber and naval stores several trips to Savannah concerning products. his turpentine interests. On just
Among these migrants was a such a trip, in 1859, he met Margaret young farmer from Wayne County, Kelly, whose father was the CompGeorgia, by the. name of Drury Red- troller of the Ports of Halifax, Nova dish. In 1854 he obtained a grant Scotia. George, a Methodist by reof 40 acres of this land, now known ligion, and Margaret, a devout Cathas South Starke. Shortly thereaf- olic, were married a short time later, ter, it was announced that plans had that same year. Like many people been made to build a railroad that at that time, George and Margaret would connect the Atlantic Ocean decided to move onto Starke, the new
with the Gulf of Mexico, and and promising Railroad terminus. would be, called theFernandina to At about the same time, another
Cedar Keys Railroad. It was soon son of the Middleburg settlement dedetermined that the famed railroad cided to try his fortune in Starke. would pass through the crossroads Cai)tain John Charles Richard, who point, and knowledge of this fact had married a Middleburg girl, Mary gave impetus to a movement of set- Morgan in 1855 and moved to Jacktlers in that direction. By 1857, the sonville, appeared on the Starke number of people had grown signif- scene in the year 1859 also. There icantly enough to permit the estab- he and Pace met. Together they lishment of a Post Office, with Mr. decided to form a partnership, and George W. Cole as its first Post- built the first business house in master. Thus, the town of Starke Starke, next to the railroad, on the
became a reality. outside of Call Street. There the
One year later, in 1858, the, Fer- firm of Richard and Pace did a nandina Railroad reached Starke, and thriving business for nearly 33 years. the town served as its terminus for Starke reached the height of its more than a year, before construc- 'boom' in the year 1860. The first tion was resumed on the last leg of census of the citizenry was taken up the line to Cedar Key. During that and recorded in handwritten copy. year, a stage-line was established to It revealed that the population had connect the railroad to other south- now reached a total of 138 people; ern points. Soon, Starke was con- 137 white, and 1 colored boy, Thomas nected with Waldo, Gainesville and Williams, who made his home with Ocala by direct stage-coach routes on the Pace family. George E. Pace regular schedules. In. 1859, George was listed as one of the very few Cole, formerly the Postmaster, ob- citizens of Starke who could righttained title to 40 acres of land de- fully claim to be a native Floridian. scribed as the 'Original Town of Together with Cole, the first PostStarke'; an area which would now master, and Richard, his business comprise the heart of the town's partner, he was noted to have been
business section from the court- one of the three principal land own[Five]




ers at that time. In August of that ganization Officer for the Confedyear, George E. Pace was named the erate Army in that district, to accept third Postmaster of the town of his enlistment. Tliree times he was Starke. rejected because of tuberculosis.
Fortune seemed to have smiled Nevertheless, he exerted his strength
strongly on Starke, and on George and spent his fortune to help the E. Pace personally. But the smile Confederate cause in every way poswas all too brief. The following year, sible. In his efforts, he sacrificed 1861, saw the. mounting tensions be- his business and lost much of his tween the North and the South fi- property. He travelled back and nally develop into War. iCaptain forth from Starke to Gainesville and Richard immediately organized a mi- Waldo, raising money, supplies and litia. His troop, Company A, of the food for the Confederate forces. 100th Florida Infantry, served with And so, under circumstances not distinction throughout the four years unlike those surrounding the birth of civil strife. The memories of the of his father, with troops of the Indian War days still fresh in his Confederate Army garrisoned nearmemory, George Pace attempted to by, and the Civil War a terrible realenlist. He endeavored to persuade ity, Edward A. Pace *was born, July iColonel J. J. Daniels, the Or- 3, 1861.
A PIONEER CHURCH
As important as the years 1857 to would be 'for the use and benefit of 1861 were in the history of Florida, the Roman Catholics' of that section. of Starke, and of the Pace family, Two facts connected with this they were, as well, years of note- transaction stand out as especially worthy developments for the Church interesting. The transfer of the deed in Florida. January 9, 1857 saw the to the Rt. Reverend Michael Portier,. proclamation by His Holiness, Pope Bishop of Alabama and Florida, who Pius IX, erecting the state of Florida had ecclesiastical jurisdiction at as a Vicariate Apostolic. This ex- that time, was witnessed by a Mr. R. cluded, however, the land west of Dillon. Mr. Dillon, the husband of the Apalachicola River. That same Margaret Kelly Pace's older sister, year, the Church of the Immaculate was by marriage an uncle to 'our Conception was established in Jack- Monsignor Pace. In addition to sonville, with Father John Hamil- this, the property on which the Midton as its first Pastor. dleburg Church once stood, is within
Along with the establishment of the present day limits of our Starke the new Parish, it was decided to parish of St. Edward. build a church in the Middleburg Services were conducted there
settlement. This area, where George monthly by the Pastor of the JackPace was already an established and sonville Parish, until the progress of successful business man, could now the Fernandina to Cedar Keys R. R. boast a population of approximately began to have an adverse effect on 1,000 people. The property on which the success of the Middleburg misthe Church would be built was the sion. Starke, with the Railroad's gift of Benjamin and Mary Ann arrival in 1858, was now the 'hub'
Frisbee of Middleburg. The deed, of commerce for this section of the dated January 8, 1947, specifically Territory. A large number of Midstated that 'this land, comprising dleburg's population had been drawn about one and three-quarters acres, by this factor, and as early as that [Six]




same year, the settlement was suf- the pastorate of St. Michael's Church fering a population decrease that at Fernandina. His pastoral duties saw the iCatholic community there would include the Missions of Papractically dissolved. It was not too latka, Wilatka, and Starke. Then, long before services were no longer with the outbreak of the Civil War, held in the little church, and the he assisted in the care of the Cathbuilding fell into disrepair. olic men stationed at the garrison of
Late in 1858, St. Augustine wel- 2,000 iConfederate troops which was comed its newly consecrated Vicar established at Fernandina. Apostolic, the Right Reverend Au- The events that were to make July,
rustin Verot, D.D. The Bishop :found 1861, a significant month of an imhis cathedral in the very capable portant year, began with the birth hands of two French Priests of the of Edward Pace on July third; later Society of the Fathers of Mercy, in the month, Bishop Verot was the Very Reverend Edmund Aubril, transferred to Savannah as Bishop, who had administered the Cathedral while at the same time retaining since 1842, and his assistant, Rever- jurisdiction as Vicar Apostolic of end Benedict Maedore. These two the Florida territory; on the twentyPriests, together with Father Ham- third of July, the Confederate forces ilton at Jacksonville, comprised the scored their great victory in the total clergy of the State of Florida Battle of Bull Run, under the great at that time. As a matter of Rec- Southern general, Stonewall Jackord, Bishop Verot, in his report to son; about that same time the Very the Annals of the Propogation of the Reverend Father Edmund Aubril, Faith in 1859, stated: "Alto- Rector of the Cathedral in St. Augether, there are four churches out- gustine, set out on a visitation of the side of St. Augustine, three without Florida Missions, prior to the first a Pastor. Jacksonville has a frame Diocesean Synod to be held by Bishop building, and it has the fortune of Verot in October of that year. Thus a Priest for some time. Tallahassee on July 26th Father Aubril reached has a new church which is about to Starke, most probably on horseback. fall in, and no Priest. Key West has Staying there with the Pace's, he a church already for years, no Priest. baptized their son, Edward, the first Also, Middleburg has a church." Pace child. Except for this visit by
During the summer 1859, Bishop Father Aubril, Edward most likely
Verot travelled to France with the would have received the Sacrament hope of enlisting French Priests for of Baptism from his own Pastor, the missions of Florida. There he Father Clavreul on his regular visit met and talked with Father Henry to Starke. However, by this almost
Peter Clavreul, of the Diocese of An- prophetic co-incidence, Edward regers. As a result of that meeting; ceived this, the first of the SacraFather Clavreul asked for and re- ments, from the hands of the Rector ceived permission to sever his alleg- of the Cathedral church, he himself iance to his own Bishop, that he would one day serve as Pastor in his
might serve in Florida. Almost a first assignment as a Priest. year later, on October 13, 1860, Fa- Edward was given the middle name ther Clavreul, who was to become of his father, George Edward Pace.
one of early Florida's most zealous However, in naming their son, there and tireless missionaries, arrived in might have been a suggestion of St. Augustine. After serving a pride, on the part of his parents, in year there under the capable guid- their respective family ancestry. The ance of Fathers Aubril and Maedore, family of both Pace and Kelly he was assigned by Bishop Verot to could boast of notable personages.
[Seven]




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An uncle of Mrs. Pace's mother was the secretary to King Henry VIII of the Earl of Dunraven of England England.
and Ireland. It was he, incidental- But most significant of all, was ly, who was responsible for the ap- the fact that Edward Pace's patron pointment of Mrs. Pace's father as Saint was to be the great King EdMaster of the Ports of Halifax, 'a wrofelnd whs virtues, he position he held for life. Mr. Pace's would see tolad emulae i h er family boasted of their ancestor, toul co m mlt i h er
Richard Pace, who was at one time, t oe
STARKE AND EARLY BOYHOOD
The first four years of Edward During these war years, the Pace
Pace's life, were hectic days for his home served -as a. Mission station father. With Captain Richard away for the Priests as they moved about with his militia, George Pace was the territory caring for their people. left to care for the business himself. Father Clavireul, then in charge As the days of the war grew into of the church at Fernandina visited years, he saw his business dwindling, the Pace's first in December of 1861, and his personal fortune expended within~ a few weeks, he stopped in the Confederate cause. At one again and said Mass for the Cathotime, a raiding party of Union lics there in a shed about one-half troops swooped down on a Confeder- mile from the Pace home. In his ate supply train, standing at the Mission Diary he records, that Railroad depot at Starke. Several of Mrs. Pace and her Sister received the cars were burned with great loss Communion at that time. to the troop supplies that George By 1864, Jacksonville had felt the
Pace had himself played an import- force of the Union troops. The ant part in obtaining. church of the Immaculate ConcepOn January 1, 1963, the Emanci- tion,, which was the Parish Church pation Proclamation became a hard of the Paces after the Middleburg fact. George Pace called together the Church fell into disuse', was burned negro servants he owned and sup- to the ground in a raid by Federal ported, and who worked his land. He Troops. In the fire, the Rectory, too, told them they were now free, and was a complete and total loss, and he divided up his land into plots, most of the Parish records were, lost which he gave. to each of the colored in the f ire. families to be a means of support With the progress of the war, the
for their families in the difficult fu- difficulty the Missionaries encountture ahead. It was hard to make the ered in travelling from place to place, slaves understand they were free. In became greater, Bishop Verot, as later years, the older Pace was griev- he, administered to the vast Ternied to observe the lack of interest the tories of Florida and Georgia, was new owners took in making the land perhaps the most obstructed. On one productive enough to feed their occasion he was prevented from movchildren, it was a source of sad re- ing about his duties f or a period 'of flection for him, that he neither had ten days. Toward the end of the the land himself any longer to pro- war, he was administering in Atlanvide for them, nor was he able to ta at the time of its devastation, arouse in them a sense of industry from there he travelled to Augusta, and responsibility to meet their own ,anxious to re-assure his priests, needs. leave them some money, and exhort
[Nine]




them to remain at their posts until and a half years old. In that same the worst was over. He wanted des- year, the Sisters of St. Joseph arperately to return to his See city, rived in St. Augustine from France Savannah, as quickly as possible. to initiate a school system for the Lent was approaching, Ash Wednes- Catholics of Florida. Later that day only a week away. The Bishop same year, on May 3, Edward's aunt,
and his party of two priests were Miss Mary Kelly, sister to Mrs. Pace, unable to find regular transporta- was appointed Postmistress for
tion by stage. It became necessary Starke, which position she retainfor him to buy a team of mules and ed for a period of about four a small open carriage for the total years. She was later to be re-apsum of six thousand, two hundred pointed in 1870, and serve the comdollars. After a treacherous and te- munity again for a period of two dious journey of almost a week, years. Bishop Verot and his weary mission- With the opening of the school aries reached Savannah in time to term in 1867, Edward Pace startbless the Ashes, and issue the Lenten ed to school at the old Starke InstiRegulations on schedule as he had tute, where, as so often in the long done in years before. future ahead he proved to be
With the end of the war, life in a diligent and accomplished student. Starke settled down to Reconstruc- Looking through his 'copybook today, tion and regrowth with a determined one could not help but be impressed vigor. Once again, Pace and Richard with the writing exercises he so dilwere back in their store on Call igently practiced, and note that the street, and began to recoup some of phrases, written in meticulous and the losses they had sustained during beautiful script could well be ascribthe war. ed as tribute to their writer. 'A
By the end of 1865, and the first youth must be diligent and enter, months of 1866, their Parish Church prising; 'Do unto others as you had been rebuilt in Jacksonville, and would have them do unto you,' their Missionary-pastor, Father Clav- 'Great minds are always to be adreul lived there with Father Cham- mired,' 'Pride goes before a fall; bon, the new Pastor of Immaculate
Conception, and was now able to be humble- phrases prophetic of his make regular calls at his Mission future abilities, charity and humility. Stations. Bishop Verot, visiting Jack- In later years, Monsignor Pace sonville that year, divided the terri- would frequently refer to these days tory between these two priests, with at Starke Institute, where all the Father Clavreul in charge of all the grades were taught by one teacher. missions to the west of the St. John's Monsignor Pace often mentioned the river which besides Mayport and fact that there was one woman who
Fernandina gave him Palatka, Wil- stood out beyond all the others as laka, Starke, Middleburg, (which by he remembered the wonderful vistas now had been depleted of its Catho- that were opened to him when she lic population), Gainesville, New- would be able to tell him information nanville, Sand Point, Enter- that was not found in the book. prise, New Smyrna, Cedar Keys, These were the days when many
Tampa, Key West, Dry Tortugas, Florida teachers held only Second or Lake City, Madison and Tal- Third Grade certificates. At that lahassee. In his Missionary Diary, time, a teacher's certificate was rated Father ,Clavreul records another visit by the number of years a teacher to the Pace home on January 11, could teach, and not, however, by 1866, when Edward was about four the grades that were taught.
[Ten)




Just as he was taught in school surprising aplomb, as if the disaster days here in Starke with simplicity were an expected, everyday occurof language, he himself would later ence, the Conductor pulled the bell teach on the university level using rope and gave orders that the train the same simplicity of expression, was to go back and find the lost hat. Stressing the importance for teach- Back and back went the train it ers to explain the meaning of words seemed for miles, until success was to children, he is quoted by one of realized, and the new hat was again his students as saying. 'Where I put back on Edward's head with was brought up, we had beans, corn proper admonition from the fearful and potatoes, but trespasses-we master of the train, and to the ahad no idea what they were. musement and joy of the passengers.
In 1870, George Pace and his bro- In that same year, Pope Pius IX ther Augustus opened a business in called together the Bishops of the JaCksonville. Although the family world for the first Vatican Council. remained in Starke, they often jour- Bishop Verot attended as the Bishop neyed there for buying trips. On of Savannah, but upon his return he one such occasion, Edward was Out- became the first Bishop of the newfitted with a new suit and a gallant ly created Diocese of St. Augustine, straw hat, which on every import- an outgrowth of the results of the ant trip made by the Pace family, Vatican Council. It was Bishop VeEdward was sure to wear. At that rot, then, who himself had stayed time, everyone, who lived in the in- at the Pace home while visiting the terior wanted to spend a week or missions in Florida in 1867, who two in summer at the beaches, would be the Bishop who would have and so to Fernandina via the famous to accept Edward Pace as a student Fernandina Railroad they ticketed. for the Priesthood for the Diocese For Edward, this was the great ad- of St. Augustine. venture. Head out of the window, Atheaeo1,Ed rdfnsd
he watched the kaleidoscopic flight Atheaeo11Ed rdfnsd
of the pine forests, lakes and squat- his elementary school training at Old ter shacks. Suddenly a gust of wind Starke Institute. In March of 1872, swept his new straw hat to the vast Father Clavreul and Bishop Verot outside whereupon Edward let out a again stopped overnight at the Pace howl of dismay. The 'conductor pas- home.' There, sometime after Easter, sing by asked him what had hit him, the Bishop confirmed the Catholic to be greeted with the tale of woe children of Starke, Edward included, that Edward's new straw hat had and he took Aloysius as his confirtaken to the woods. With the most mation name.
HIGH SCHOOL AGE
The following school term saw Ed- Cardinal Gibbons for the preparation ward enrolled at the Duval County of all the important documents sent High School in Jacksonville. Among from the Archdiocese of Baltimore, other subjects, Edward had decided and from the lCatholic University to to take Latin, a subject in which Rome. he excelled. His early training here In 1874, the Duval High School in Latin, was most likely the foun- Journal, dated December 15, publishdation which helped him become so ed an address given by Edward, expert in Latin composition, that he thanking the public for their apwas,. subsequently relied upon by pearance at a High School presenta[Eleven]




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tion, apparently the first by the in Jacksonville. scholars of that institution. One However, Edward seemed drawn paragraph of particular note stands in another, more sublime direction. out. It is a statement that would He. had learned to serve Mass at the verify Edward Palce's love for his Parish church in Jacksonville. On native Florida, and pride in his Flor- their monthly visits to Starke, he ida origins, although the events of had often served Mass for the misthe future would keep him away sionaries, which they offered using from his home state the. greater part the piano in the parlor of his home. of his life. At one time, Father Clavreul ask'And as we are individually t'ne ed Edward, "Would you like to come pets of our various homes, we hope with me around on the mission ?" in our collective capacity as a school, He said he would if his mother to be the, pet of our city. Not spoiled said he could go. by over-indulgence we want to have She replied, "Well, if you'd like to a school of which Jacksonville, Du- go, you may; you'll need a clean val County, and the whole State of shirt, so I'll get your things ready !" Florida may well be proud. And in He used to say in later years, that the near future, when your liberality this was his first Missionary trip. shall have provided us with the ne- It was this Missionary trip, and cessary facilities, we hope that it his joy at being able to serve the will be a sufficient passport to any Priests each month, that caused him place in business or position in so- to be greatly impressed with the work ciety; to say, 'I graduated at Duval of the Priests in Florida. Thus, his High School.' father, recognizing the sincerity of
It was here that his conscientious Edward's higher goal, himself brouand studious habits became crystal- ght him, at the age of f ifteen, to old lized, and brought to the attention St. Charles' College at Ellicott City, of his father, who earnestly hoped Maryland. There he came under the that upon the completion of his High direction of the 'Gentlemen of the School, Edward would choose the Seminary', the members of the Soprofession of law as the most suit- ciety of St. Sulpice, the most famous able profession for him. Convinc- being, perhaps, the blind poet-Priest, ed that law would be the young John Bannister Tabb. It was from scholar's choice, George Pace Father Tabb's room that Edward made arrangements with friends, the Aloysius Pace, seminarian, first Coopers, for young Edward to begin heard the strains of Beethoven's his legal studies in their law office "Moonlight Sonata."
SEMINARY DAYS
In June of the year that Edward his recovery.' One of his classmates was accepted as a Seminarian for at the Seminary, was the late Wilthe Diocese of St. Augustine, its liam Cardinal O'Connell, the Cardifirst Bishop, Augustin Verot was nal Archbishop of Boston, who, in his called to his eternal reward, with book, 'RECOLLECTIONS 0OF A Edward's pastor, Father Clavreul, HAPPY LIFE' recalls for us an inattending him. In his diary, Father teresting portrait of Edward Pace, Clavreul notes that the Bishop's ill- the Seminarian. ness was of short duration, and that 'Pace was at that time a tall gaunt his death most unexpected, 'even youth with blue eyes and a wealth the physician, (being) confident of of the reddest hair. He was extreme[Thirteen]




ly shy and rarely entered into any "The Snow, The Snow, The Beautiful of the boys sports or the boisterous Snow." In any event, this expresses games. His manners were gentle my feelings about Pace at that time:-, and he held rather aloof from the that he had a very superior caste of groups which distinguished them- mind and would be capable eventselves mainly by exuberance of ually of acquiring extraordinary inspirits. Even on the compus he was tellectual distinction, which, in fact, seldom seen without a book. This in he- soon proceeded to do. no wise means that he was of a con- 'In the company of such men as ceited disposition. On the 'contrary, Pace my earliest college years were he was, as I have indicated, of a passed. Their quiet influence upon shy and quiet character given entire- my character and my whole life was ly to the love of study. He indicated, to be simply incalculable, and it all even at that youthful age, that be- only goes to show how the personal hind the blue eyes and beneath the touch and contact with fine minds crop of red hair there was a very and great souls, which often manikeen and active brain at work, and fest themselves even in youth, may this became all the more evident as, impress themselves upon the imagmonth by month, he climbed to the ination and the memory of other highest places in class. His reci- youngsters who have the good fortations were delivered with a most tune to live for a while in such a amusing drawl, but the thought was beneficent atmosphere. Thus, one perfectly clear and the language ex- may be touched and formed and ceptionally correct. To me he became strengthened in ways too subtle for a brilliant antagonist in striving for youth to recognize, yet so potent in the prize. One month it would be their influence that they go along Pace; another month it would be with one through life.' O'Connell; yet, with all our scholas- While Edward was at St. Charles, tic competition, we were then, and in the year 1880, Pope Pius IX have remained ever since, the best of died. The Chair of St. Peter was friends. filled by the election of Pope Leo
JI remember distinctly one occa- XIII. It was this pontiff who would sion when, in a written examination, have such a bearing on the direction we were given an exceptionally dif- of Edward Pace's life. His Encyclical ficult page of Virgil to translate. In letter, Aeterni Patris, carried the the briefest possible time Pace made idea that modern problems, such as the translation into excellent Eng- the discoveries and findings of modlish Prose, and, while waiting for ern science, be confronted according the rest of the class, amused him- to the method of St. Thomas Aquinself by turning his prose transla- as, and answers for the questions tion into a remarkable bit of verse, posed by a rapidly advancing world He came to St. Charles from St. Au- be thusly found; 'not the new alone, gustine, Florida, and I remember the nor the old alone for its own sake, thrill he enjoyed at seeing his first but the new and the old together, snow storm. He looked at the fall- without ignoring either one'. And ing crystals of snow with boyish this would someday be the very task amazement and delight. I wonder if of Edward Pace. secretly he did not write, a clever An event of perhaps prophetic siglittle poem on the snow. He was nificance, was to take, place at St. certainly capable of doing it and, Charles. Edward Pace was assigned to my mind, it would have been far to engage in a debate with another more expressive of beauty than the student Michael Dinneen. The sublittle verse we all knew as children, ject of the debate was to be, 'Shall [Fourteen]




Latin and Greek be retained as the foundly influence the course of Edbasis of a liberal or collegiate edu- ward Pace's future in the church. cation?' With Pace as the affirma- The Gazette also announced that E. tive, and Dinneen as the negative. A. Pace, was one of seven who reThe old Baltimore Gazette, reporting ceived special premiums in the the Commencement exercises at awarding of their Bachelor of Arts
which the debate took place, states degrees. One of his fellow 'premium that, 'Father McColgan, the judge, winners' was his debate opponent, decided for the affirmative.' It might Michael Dinneen, who would become be called, perhaps, a preview of another and greater debate to take in time, the rector of the Seminary place in the not too distant future, from which they were both graduatthe outcome of which would pro- ing, that 29th day of June, 1880.
EDWARD PACE GOES TO ROME
Within months, Edward Pace was ing the immense Sala Clementina,
on his way to Rome, to continue his we took our places among the other studies in Philosophy and Theology. students of the city and awaited in In addition to his being a student of silence-and, for my part, in awemore than ordinary or average ac- the entrance of the great prelates complishment, the great debate or of the court and the numerous Card'disputa' takes predominance over inals cf the Curia, who entered, one all other narratives concerning Ed- by one, clothed in the voluminous ward Pace while a student in Rome. purple or crimson robes of their ofAgain, Cardinal O'IConnell's book fice and took their places in a great gives us a very living and vivid semi-circle, from the center of
portrayal of a very significant event which arose the throne of the Pope. in the life of Monsignor Pace. 'Among the prelates of lesser dig'Not long after my arrival at the nity were high ecclesiastics from the American College, the students were principal Sees of Germany, Austria, informed by the Rector that there France, and Spain. In a certain was soon to be an Academia or Dis- sense, that assembly represented the puta to be held at the Vatican by best that the world had produced some of the chosen students of philo- in our times and their faces did not sophy and that the Pope himself was belie their fame. There was a wonto preside. Of course, this an- derful mingling of strength and gennouncement thrilled me, and all the tleness in the expression of all of students of the college looked for- them and one saw, even at a glance, ward with the greatest expectation that their fame as scholars and to being present at this most inter- statesmen had only produced in them esting scholastic tournament in a deeper sense of genuine Christian which the judge was to be no less humility. I had seen many times a person than the Sovereign Pontiff pictures of great artists who had himself. So, when finally the day portrayed gatherings of high eccame, we filed forth in camerata clesiastics, but now I realized that
form along the narrow Roman streets while they had caught the beauty of which led to the great papal palace, their glorious historic robes, they had and there, climbing silently the Scala missed the fine spiritual character Regia, we passed the Swiss guards of their faces and their genuinely stationed at the doorway and, enter- princely simplicity. Surely, here be[Fifteen]




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fore me was a world gathering which Eddie Hanna of Rochester. Both of I doubt even the greatest artist could these young comrades of mine had faithfully depict. And, as might be distinguished themselves by very exexpected, the impression on my traordinary ability in Metaphysics. youthful mind was one too deep ever They not only knew extremely well to be forgotten. the doctrines of Saint Thomas, as
'Thegret hllwit it faoussummed up in his Contra Gentiles, 'Thsced greatin ha, whis faousre but they possessed also, in an extrafresoedceilng nd allscovredordinary degree, the greatest facility with decorations by the greatest ar- in expressing themselves in Latin, tists, gave a sort of medievil dignity the language in which of course, the to the whole setting. The cardinals iptwacrieon and prelates carried on their con-diptwacrieon versation in subdued whispers and 'Pace was a tall, thin youth with
an air of expectancy prevaded the an extremely intellectual face in whole gathering. The entrance of which shown two piercingly bright the noble guard from a side door blue eyes, and his fine head was was a sign of the arrival of the Pope, crowned with an abundant crop of and, as the sedan chair in which he red hair. He was deliberate, almost was seated was borne into the great pensive in his attack and defense, hall and the Pope leaving the chair and one could detect, even in his prowalked slowly and with the most dig- nunciation of Latin, something of the nified gravity up the steps of the musical drawl of the south land. throne, all arose in silence, and re- 'IthScolfPiospyae mained standing until the Pope, erect 'In thread SchoolnofiPhiosohyiPaef before the great throne-chair, gave Wasou aled distinguishing hiself.d a smiling glance over the whole as- Wi thot qalt dobt hent w c posese sembly and then was seated. The ofphatic quat of ntra whchmetgathering of cardinals, prelates, and physics anis arty fnu Latm osstudents resumed their places, and spered his a iityitations aon Leo, with his fragile. body learning osredintofmae his recitaos. an slightly forward, gave a gentle wave outstndightfear ofe the lsrI telhiectu a s rnmaen tor egi prise, for Professor Lorenzelli to find
tellctua tornmant o bein.this youthful product of American
'Naturally, my eyes were rivited training exhibiting indications of the on the majestic, yet frail figure on sort of qualities of mind which were the throne. He was clothed from hitherto considered the unique poshead to foot in creamy white soutane, sessions of Spaniards and Italians. a wide silken girdle at his waist, and Indeed, I sometimes wondered whehis intellectual head, crowned with ther the Paces of Florida might not hair of silvery white, Was covered have been of Spanish origin, or at with a closefitting white silk zuc- least an admixture. chetto, while his feet were incased 'anhscmaini rs
ith asldpen cfrosseve ecrae was quite an opposite type. Erect in
with golen coss.his -chair he was all alertness and
'The disputa between the students energy -the temperment of the began and was carried on by the north. His hair was jet black and
liveliest intellectual tilting between his eyes were alight with sprightly defender and objector. Two of the intellegence. He flung out his asserstudents selected to take part in this tions and denials with a quickness scholastic tourney were from our own and a vivacity which added to the college-Eddie Pace of Florida and decided contrast between him and
[Seventeen]




his American confrere. The contest ents, in such a very trying ordeal, lasted for over an hour, and while he was one of the most interesting -mowas proud of my two fellow-stud- ments of my scholastic life in Rome. ents and listenect with growing in- Pace and Hanna, on that great octerest to their scholastic passage at casion, won a triumph which was the arms with their opponents, never prophecy of later years when both the less, my eyes were so rivited of them would prove, as pr 'ofessors upon the centre of the picture, the and prelate, the verification of the Pope himself, and my mind was so glory of that day in the Vatican Palintent upon every gesture and move- ace in the presence of the great Pope ment of the great pontiff on his and his most distinguished court.. throne, that what the disputants Hanna, after a very successful cawere saying fell into a very second- reer as professor in the Seminary at ary place. Rochester, became, and still is the
learned and energetic and zealous
'As one of the disputants would Archbishop of San Francis-co.' launch out into a pointed and somewhat lengthy attack or defense, the When the Holy Father learned frail and majestic figure on the' that they both still had to take their throne would lean far forward in his doctoral examinations, he personally great gold chair, his piercing eyes dispensed them from it. would look from one to the other of
the disputants and his hands seemed In November of the same year that actually quivering with the expect- Edward Pace received a degree in ancy of the scholastic question and Theology, 1884, the Bishops of the answers. From time to time when United States of America held the some especially fine point was raised, third Plenary Council of Baltimore. and equally finely answered, his face It was this Council that approved the was lit with an approving smile and erection of the proposed Cathol ic he tapped gently the arm of his great University of America. And so it throne, in sign of approbation and was, as it seems to be always with applause. Divine Providence, another step was
taken that was significant to the
'The great Cardinals in, their places direction that Almighty God had ormanifested equal signs of interest dained for Father Edward Pace. and approval, bowing their heads to
one another, and whispering softly In 1885 when the ordination class their brief comments. In a word, was given audience by the Pope benothing seemed to be lost upon me in fore leaving for their homes, young this wonderful picture where, the Doctor Pace was asked by the Pope greatest minds in Christiandom were not to leave, but to remain in Rome.. sitting in kindly judgment upon the The young Theologian's answer was intellectual merits of the youth be- that his Bishop was expecting him fore them. It was kindly old age, as soon as possible in St. Augustine, with its wonderful experience of in- and he wished to give. his priestly tellectual and diplomatic life, look- blessing to his parents. Pope Leo ing at the rising youth of the ec- agreed that a visit to his home was clesiastical world, destined in time proper, but he urged him to return to fill the high places which now within 'six months. However, when they occupied. he got back to St. Augustine, there
was so much to be done. on the Mis'The whole scene is before me now sion., that no thought of a return to and the triumph of my fellow-stud- Rome was possible.
[Eighteen]




CATHEDRAL RECTOR
He was welcomed gladly by his cese, that the young Priest first had Bishop, the Right Reverend John the opportunity to put into practice Moore, D. D., second Bishop of St. his love for the Liturgy. RecollecAugustine. The Bishop kept the tions of his administration recall the young doctor of theology, not twen- beauty with which he conducted ty-four years old when he was or- the liturgical services at the Catheddained, at his side, and appointed ral. This love. for the work of God, him Rector of the Cathedral. Dr. as manifested in the liturgy was laPace was at the Cathedral Rectory ter to be evidenced in the Missal he when the tragic fire that destroyed would edit as well as an article he. the old Cathedral edifice broke out. later wrote entitled, 'Suggestions He said he was awakened in the mid- from the Ritual'. Here he makes a dle of the night with a crashing particular study of the blessings for noise, and as he looked out the win- such material things as eggs, butter, dow the whole sky was aglow. He hay, salt, barns,, bees, and bridges, quickly wakened the Bishop and as well as for Rosaries, Churches and rushed to the Cathedral to save the Church-bells. One could only surmise, Blessed Sacrament. The historic bap- with a smile, that his Florida tismal register and records of the pride still was very much a part of oldest church in the. United States him. Reading on through the article, survived. As he stood with the Bishop we could not help but smilingly relooking at the dying embers in the call the incident of the straw hat chill morning light, Mister Henry and the Fernandina Railroad, as he Flagler rushed over and pressed a describes the beauty in the blessings handsome check into the Bishop's for such things as railroads; a bleshand and said we must rebuild at sing in which God is asked to grant once. Dr. Pace never forgot that us the grace 'to run in the way of wonderfully generous act of that His Commandments,' and so arrive non-Catholic Millionaire. With the at our heavenly destination. morning sun came the realization Bishop Moore had received an apthat his task was now to restore peal for the release of Doctor Pace the Ancient Cathedral, an historic from the allegiance of the Diocese to symbol to the origins of the Church teach at the American University, not only in Florida but in the na- now known as the North American tion, as well. College at Rome. Bishop Moore, his
The Diocesean archives reveal sev- Diocesean responsibilities increasing, eral letters from the Bishop, who was could not grant the request at that away from the Diocese during part time. In 1888, however, Bishop of Father Pace's administration of Keane, the f irst Rector of the newly the Cathedral, in which arrange- established Catholic University of ments are made f or various projects America in Washington, D. C., was f or the restoring of the Cathedral informed by the Holy Father of the sidewalks, altars, and the organ. In abilities and unique philosophical one letter from the Bishop to the mind of Edward Pace of the Diocese young Cathedral Rector, the Bishop of St. Augustine. The Bishop had gives him the full faculties of the filled most of the vacancies of his Diocese, comparable to the authority staff of Professors. However, the devested in a Vicar General. It was partment of Philosophy offered the this short tenure, as Rector of the greatest challenge. The subject itCathedral of his beloved Florida Dio- self was one of contention and de[Nineteen]




DAL VATICANO, arch.. 30, 1963
04tERIA 1A
DI SUA SANTITX
No. 100918
Dear Father Dougherty,
By your letter of March 10, you informed me of the plans
to commemorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of the death of
the late Monsignor Edward A. Pace.
For many years I had known Monsignor Pace as a good and
pious priest and an eminent scholar, and I was in a position
to appreciate his meritorious and zealous labors as an
educator and philosopher, his fidelity to the true Thomistic
doctrine, and his valuable work which brought honor to the
Catholic University of America. Very gladly, therefore, do I join in spirit in this celebration at Starke, the birth-place of that worthy Prelate, and I pray that this commemoration of
his demise may induce many other young American clerics to follow in his footsteps in an intensive study of the philosophical and theological works of St.Thomas Aquinas.
With sentiments of high esteem and religious devotion, I
remain,
Yours sincerely in Christ,
K_-"
Reverend Cornelius Dougherty, St. Edward's Church, P.O. Box 566,
Starke, Florida
. . . .. ..... . . . . .
St. Peter's, Rome




St. Augustine Cathedral
DIOCESE OF ST. AUGUSTLNE
SAINT AUGUSTINE
FLORIDA
Apri l 13, 1963
Dear Father Dougherty:
of Monsignor Edward A. Pace was one of the most illustrious Catholics
of the South. A native of Starke, Florida, he was educated in some of the best schools of America and Europe. As a Priest, he served for a time in his native state, and even became Pastor of our historic Cathedral Parish in St. Augustine. But his great intellectual gifts made clear his special vocation to the University apostolate, and after a few years of parish life, he was invited to devote his talents to the Catholic University of America at Washington.
He -worked as Professor and Administrator at this great University for more than forty years. It was his life. His name is writ large in the annals of this Pontifical institution. Edward Pace influenced the formation of university policy; he communicated the best traditions of European learning to the new Athenceum at Washington; he wrote treatises and monographs on education and philosophy; above all, he taught thousands of students who later on had a large hand in the building of our American Catholic system of education.
I commend you highly for your good work in promoting this commemoration of the life and work of Monsignor Edward Aloysius Pace.
With sentiments of esteem and of kind regard, I am
Devotedly yours in Christ,
Ar isho
Bis p of Saint Augustine
To The Reverend Father Cornelius A. Dougherty
St. Edward's Rectory
Post Office Box 566
STARKE,
Florida




bate, with reputable philosophers tor, Bishop Moore finally relented, open to question on their articular and on April 25, 1888, the notation theses. Thus, with Papal indication is made in the Cathedral Accounts; made in favor of Edward Pace, it 'Account transferred to Rev. F. J. seemed that a particularly ticklish Lucke, Treasurer. With the signaproblem was settled. However, the
reluctance of Doctor Pace's Bishop ture, E. A. Pace, this young Doctor was again apparent, but in the light of Theology' terminated his- short of the manner in which Pace was term as Rector of the Cathedral of
brought to the attention of the Ree- St. Augustine.
BACK TO SCHOOL
It was now his first and foremost control. She was afflicted with nervtask to prepare for the job ahead as ous disorders which made movement Professor of Philosophy at the iCath- very difficult. Now under the cornolic University. He returned to Eu- mand of the hypnotist, she glided rope to pursue his studies. As a about with the greatest ease, wherePriest, he was primarily concerned upon the professor exulted, 'Voila, with an understanding of the human les miracles de Lourdes'. (Behold the soul, as the life-giving principle and miracle of Lourdes). But came the the rational and spiritual element time to release the subject, the in man. He decided, then, that Psy- professor had completely forgotten chology would be his major field of the signal which would be the key Scientific study. While in Paris, he for awakening her. In confusion he was browsing one day through the turned to the audience, but no one, book stalls so common along the only Doctor Pace had observed. He banks of the Seine. He came across told the professor to press his finger a work by the German Psychologist, on the base of the subject's nose. As Wilhelm Wundt, of the University the professor followed Doctor Pace's of Leipzig, at this time unknown to suggestion, and the subject was rePace even by name. However, the leased from the trance, Doctor Pace book showed him exactly what he was heard to murmur, "Voila les was looking for. He went straight Miracles de Lourdes !" to Leipzig where he was interviewed 'While in Germany, Doctor Pace and accepted by Wundt as a student. dressed as a civilian for at that time He was the first Catholic Priest to the Catholic Priest was not a restudy under the famous German spected person in the German CapPsychologist, "that fine German ital. He had for his room-mate at character," as he later described his that time, a young German Student. Professor. While at Leipsig, he con- Dr. Pace's rising hour was five a. tinued to travel to Louvain where m. and thence to Mass at the nearest he attended the lectures of the famed Church. The student had been obCardinal Mercier, as well as continu- serving him for some months. One ing his attendance at lectures offered night, arriving at the, room at a raby the Sorbonne in Paris. Two ex- ther late hour, he found Doctor Pace periences during his days in Europe very busy at the desk. He suddenly are signif icant. asked him, "Pace, what are you ?"
'At the Sorbonne, Mesmerism was Pace. a man of few words, simply the great excitement. One day, the replied, "A Priest !" Professor of Experimental Psychol- Immediately the young man grabogy put a subject under hypnotic bed his hat and fled.
[Twenty-two]




'Some months later, Doctor Pace Edward Pace, an American from the was summoned to a death-bed. On town of Starke, in the State of Florithat bed lay his former room-mate. da is awarded for his dissertation, Doctor Pace cared for him, received which has been written in a most him into the Church, and later saw laudable manner, the degree of Docto his burial.' troPhlspy, n atro
On November 16, 1891, he was Fine ArthlspMagnan Made Aore awarded a degree of Doctor of Phi-FieAtMgaCmLu.Arlosophy and of Master of Fine Arts. production of this degree is provided The degree is translated as follows: in another place in this booklet.
CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY
Back in America again, Doctor authorities in his field by the time Pace took hold of the task ahead of his doctorate was earned. If a perhim with his quiet, slow assurance, son for any reason fell below his transmitting to those who worked standards, it was his custom to look with him the same feeling of confi- far over the recalcitrant's head undence which governed all that he til amends were made. If a student did. His manner as a Professor, Lec- remained obtuse or indolent in thinkturer, Counsellor emulated the prin- ing a point through, it was Dr. ciples of his Master, the great St. Pace's way to say, "I 'couldn't accept Thomas Aquinas. that," rather than to say, as others
'It was characteristic of Dr. Pace, sometimes do, "You are wrong." Realike Thomas Aquinas, to get the son being uppermost as the distingquestion or problem asked clearly in uishing feature of man, persuasion mind first, before attempting to an- is an important technique, and skill swer. This was especially true in his in persuasion, a factor in leadership. personal guidance of the students Encouragement to go on, help in who were priveleged to write their strengthing powers, direction of cap&ssertations under his direction. abilities toward ever higher goals, He was never dictatorial nor arbi- these were characteristic of the trary on any matter, nor did he in- teaching of this master psychologist. sist that his own views be accepted He never took personal credit for in any authoritative display between the acheivements of any student, and superior and inferior. Instead, he ask- repudiated quickly any reference to ed the student for the verification or a student as a student of his. Inproof of the latter's fact-finding, stead, he would say that the student and pressed, in the Socratic manner, referred to had been a student at the continual question of why, with the university. It was humility in respect to conclusion. Why do you this sense that prevented Dr. Pace think this? Why did you reject from forming a school of personal that? Have you thought of this al- influence, as some other world faternative? Perhaps you may want mous educators have done, especialto look further into that aspect. Al- ly in Philosophy. In line with this ways he put the responsibility for same characteristic emphasis on conclusions on the student by lead- truth was his reliance on academic ing him to a selection or choice be- achievement for distinction, rather tween possible views. It was a "learn than on ecclesiastical rank. by doing" technique carried on so 'Academic robes were alone approskillfully that the student was well priate for University functions. prepared to take his place among Therefore, although he himself [Twenty-three)I




had been accorded the highest rank Catholic Welfare iCouncil was given as a Monsignor, he never wore pur- in the pastoral letter of the- Hierple vestments at University func- archy which was published late in tions, unless some very special digni- February, 1920. At the meeting of ty made it obligatory; and usually the bishops the previous September they were connected in some way Gibbons had appointed a c ommittee
with liturgical services. Even in giv- consisting of himself, Cardinal ing baccalaurate sermons, or ser- O'Connell, and Bishop Shahan to mo'ns at the Mass of the Holy Spirit supervise the writing of the first at the beginning of the Academic general pastoral of the hierarchy year, Dr. Pace wore academic cap since 1884. The actual drafting of and gown and hood.' the -document was turned over to
Two of his nieces, daughters of Monsignor Edward A. Pace, profeshis only married brother, George, sor of philosophy in the Catholic Unwere taught by him at Trinity Col- iversity of America. After he had lege, but he treated them with "su- finished the first draft, Pace sent it per-indifference" lest he be accused to the Cardinal of Boston who went of nepotism. One of them stated over it carefully and offered detailed that the painting in the Trinity lCol- criticisms, for which Pace thanked lege lobby of her Uncle Edward him in the name of Shahan and in
dressed in his monsignor robes was his own name. "Your approval of quite an unfamiliar sight. It was the document as a whole is most enmore typical', especially after his couraging," he said, "and I shall do horse riding days were over, to see my best to bring the last sections him walking across the campus into line with the rest." In the secwith his daily attire of rain coat, tion of the pastoral devoted to the rubbers and umbrella, philosophically N. C. W. C., it was stated that in and psychologically prepared for the view of the good results obtained elements. through merging Catholic activities
'Maryland and Virginia, which sur- for the time and purpose of war, the round the District of iColumbia, are bishops had determined to maintain still horse. country, and horseback for the. ends of peace the spirit of riding was considered a more enjoy- union and the co-ordination, of their able form of exercise than walking in forces. Although he had nothing to the early days before sidewalks pick- do with the preparation of the text, ed a way through the red mud. Dr. Gibbons signed the document in the McCormick, afterwards, like Dr. name o f all the Bishops as the dean Shahan, Rector of the University, of the American hierarchy. and a Bishop, recalled several rides 'In 1912 a rumor reached Edward he and Dr. Pace took together. The A. Pace, dean of the school of Philpractice was given up, however, after osophy, that he was to be made a they were : riding in San Francisco Monsignor in recognition of the disone day, and Dr. Pace's borrowed tinction he had brought to the Uniwestern 'horse tried to climb a tree.' versity as one of the principal ediAwareness of his value to the Uni- tors of the Catholic Encyclopedia versity, ,and the prestige his asso- which had been completed in 1912. ciations both within and without the Pace was strongly opposed to the Church, with lay as well as clerical honor and thought that it would do dignitaries, soon began to assert it- injury to his work. In his opinion self. there should be. only one Monsignor
'Formal notification to the Ameri- in the University, and he should be can Catholic people of the establish- the Re'ctor. It had cost a great deal ment and objectives of the National to attain something like unity among [Twenty-f our]




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the professors and Pace was fearful the meeting of the trustees which that a papal honor for him might preceded the jubilee celebrati 'on was offer a pretext f or what he called to make provision for the rectorship, "4a, new split !" He was grateful since Shahan had now reached the to Gibbons for the good will in his expiration of his first term of office. regard and he found the approval On the terna drawn up Shahan was which the Chancellor was pleased to given an unanimous vote for first give to his work most gratifying, but place, Pace was put second,an he begged to be spared the rumored Shanahan third. Gibbons forwarded dignity. Seven years later, however, the list to Benedetto Cardinal Lorenafter Pace had distinguished him- zella, perfect of the congregation of self anew by writing the original studies, with a strong re-commendadraft of the hierarchy's pastoral let- tion that Shahan sh6uld be reapter of September, 1919, he was rais- pointed, and within a few weeks the ed to the rank of Protonotary Holy See confirmed the Rector in Apostolic at the instance of Gibbons. office for another six years.' In thanking the Cardinal he said: The generosity with which the "In the honor which you have ob- shy Do'ctor, brilliant Pace went tamned for me, I am glad to recog- about the work Almighty God had nize a new evidence of the holy Fath- set before him to do, began to reer's good-will toward the University flect in the accomplishments which and a new reason for hoping for the seemed to flow from his hands. So work which means so much for Cath- numerous are these, together with olic education may speedly attain the honors which have been heaped the ideals which you have cherished upon him, that we 'have prepared a from the beginning." special place for them here, to list
'The principal item of business at them chronologically.
CAREER HIGHLIGHTS
1891 Became Professor of Psychology until 1891. 1892 Charter member of American Psychological Association. 1893 Welcomed to Washington the first Apostolic Delegate his former Teacher and friend in Rome, Archbishop Francesco Satolli, who
had recommended Edward Pace for the Professorship at C.U. 1894 Became Professor of Philosophy until 1935. 1895 Became Dean of the School of Philosophy until 1899. Delivered discourse at dedication of McMahon Hall. Helped establish the
Catholic University Bulletin.
1896 Lectured at Catholic Summer School despite questions raised about his Liberalism and Orthodoxy.
1897 Co-Founder of Trinity College for iCatholic Women. 1898 Delivered address "The College Training of the Clergy" at his Alma Mater on the 50th anniversary of St. Charles College.
1899 Co-founder and first Director at the Institute of Pedagogy later to become the department of Education.
1901 Editor of "Psychological Studies for the Catholic University of America.
[Twenty -six]




1904 Co-founder and editor of "The Catholic Encyclopedia." 1906 Second term of Dean of School of Philosophy until 1914. Delivered
sermon on 100th anniversary of Baltimore Cathedral.
1911 Co-founder and first Editor of "The Catholic Educational Review."~ 1912 Director of studies at Catholic University. 1914 Co-founder of Catholic Sisters College to train Teachers. Honored
with Papal medal, "Pro Ecclesia et Pontif ice.
1916 H-elped inaugurate Sisters College in ,,California. Helped in the
Modern Translation of the Roman Missal entitled: "Mass Every
Day of the Year."
1917 General Secretary at Catholic University until 1924.
1919 Prepared draft for Pastoral letter of American Bishops. Helped
establish the National Catholic Welfare Council.
1920 Honored on July 15 by Pope Benedict XV as Protonotary Apostolic
with title of Rt. Rev. Monsignor.
1922 Preached sermon on May 3rd at Consecration of Bishop Patrick
Barry as fifth Bishop of St. Augustine. Elected member of Excutive Board of the American Council of Education.
1923 Preached Sermon in commemoration of the deceased Alumni at
the celebration of the Diamond Jubilee of St. Charles College.
1924 Vice President of the American (Council of Education. Appointed
Vice-Rector of Catholic University.
1926 President of the American Council of Education. Co-founder and
first Editor of "The New Scholasticism." First editor of "Studies in Philosophy and Psychiatry." Co-founder of the American Catholic Philosophical Association. Lectured at School of Social Service in Washington. Co-founder of Catholic Sisters College in Washington.
1927 Elected President of American ECatholic Philosophical Association.
1929 Scholarship Burse founded at Sisters College in the name of Monsignor Edward A. Pace, by the International Federation of Catholic Alumnae recognition of his services as moderator of the Federation. Appointed by President Hoover to be a member of the National Advisory Committee to discuss relations between the Federal
Government and Education.
1931 American Catholic Philosophical Association honored Monsignor
Pace by making their entire convention a tribute to him and his work in Catholic Philosophy. A volume of essays on philosophical, psychological and education subjects written in his honor were presented at a testimonial dinner on the occasion of his seventieth
birthday.
1932 While convalescing from an operation he composed his well known
"Prayer for the Catholic University" which was later used on
*October 12, 1938 by Cardinal Dougherty as the invocation opening
the University's Golden Jubilee Year.
[Twenty-seven]




1933 On June 14 he presented President Franklin D. Roosevelt for the
Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws and composed the Citation
which was broadcast nationwide on the Radio.
1934 Third term as Dean of the School of Philosophy. Leg amputated in
January.
1935 Observed 50th anniversary as Priest on May 30. Received permission from Rome to say Mass sitting down. Congratulated by Pope PiuS XI on Jubilee. The Baltimore Catholic Review congratulated him with bold type headline: MONSIGNOR PACE YOU HAVE SERVED NOBLY Commemorative Issue of Catholic University Bulletin dedicated to him on his anniversary. Honored as ViceRector Emeritus Of University. Honored as Professor of Philosophy Emeritus. Received Honorary Doctor of Laws Degree from Catholic University, bestowed by Archbishop Michael Curley as a rarity on one not a head of state. In conferring the degree Archbishop Curley said, "Although as Chancellor of the .University I have bestowed degrees upon the heads of nations and distinguished prelates, no other occasion has brought me more personal pleasure than the present office of conferring this degree which honors a truly great educator and an outstanding prelate, my friend, Doctor Pace." Honored by Georgetown University on Founders day, by presentation of iCardinal Mazzela Award for achievement
in the field of Philosophy.
1938 Passed away on April 26 at Providence Hospital in Washington.
Memorial Issue of Catholic University Bulletin dedicated to Monsignor Pace included Eulogy by his close friend, Father Ignatius Smith, 0. P. and a final tribute by Monsignor Maurice Sheehy. Picture and Obituary carried in many secular newspapers including the New York Times; and in many Catholic Weeklies including the Baltimore Catholic Review. Apostolic Delegate Archbishop (later Cardinal) Cicognani, and Archbishop Michael Curley among prelates at his funeral in the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. Graveside prayers read by the bishop of his own Diocese,
Bishop Patrick Barry of St. Augustine.
1941 Dedication of Starke church on October 13, the Feast of St. Edward
by Bishop Joseph P. Hurley, Bishop of St. Augustine; dedication sermon by Monsignor Patrick McCormick Vice-Rector of Catholic University was a tribute to Monsignor Edward Pace, a native son
of Starke.
1961 Commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Edward
Pace in Starke observed by Catholic Philosophers in McMahon Hall
at the Catholic University of America.
1963 Dedication by his Grace, the Most Reverend Joseph P. Hurley,
Archbishop of St. Augustine of a Memorial Plaque in St. Edward's church to perpetuate for posterity the humility as well as scholarship of Monsignor Edward Aloysuis Pace of Starke, Florida, on
April 26, the twenty fifth anniversary of his death.
[Twenty-eight]




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THE LAST DAYS OF MONSIGNOR PACE.
Trips to Europe were necessary at of the statuta of the.University, and intervals of every five or ten years. the new curricula for the canonical On one trip he took documents over schools, at the request of the Rector, to Rome favoring the cause of Bless- Bishop Ryan. ed Elizabeth Seton, just recently On three different occasions the beautified by Pope John XXIII. On angel of death hovered near, but the another he carried the documents completeness of his Christian resigfor Kateri Tekawitha, the postulator nation to the will of Almighty God of her cause at the time being Dr. was a source of inspiration to those Pace's long time friend and colleague who attended him at those times. on the Catholic Encyclopedia editori- There is no more vivid a description al board, Father John J. Wynne, S. of this one of his many virtues, than J. With Father Wynne, Dr. Pace had "The Last Days of Monsignor Pace," anticipated the modern liturigical written by his close friend the Right movement by publishing in 1916 a Reverend Monsignor Maurice Sheecomplete English translation of the hy, Ph. D. for the memorial issue Latin Missal for every day in the of the Catholic University Bulletin. year. In 1920 he was in Rome when 'The first occasion of death was the appointment of Archbisop Curley when at an advanced age, Dr. Pace to the See of Baltimore was made, under went a major operation. The and he had the pleasure of sending rector of the University, Bishop Rythe telegram with the announcement an, was summoned from a sickbed to his Bishop in St. Augustine, who because it was feared Dr. Pace would had to be called from the field to not survive the operation. There was receive it. About ten years later, a challenge in his eye as he came with the approval of Archbishop Cur- from the operating table where mind ley, Dr. Pace composed, a beautiful sem tzrimh oer mte
prayer for the iCatholic University and he said, "I can teach my classes which bears Archbishop Curley's im- tomorrow." In a few days he was primatur. His last trip to Rome was back in his room, correcting dismade in 1932. sertations, giving lectures, and Z doing
The heat and the vexing task of detailed administrative work. When rewriting documents under pressure several years later, the doctors anof "deadlines," together with the ex- nounced that it would be necessary tra duties connected with the con- to amputate his leg, he bowed his secration of the Rector, Dr. Ryan, head in humble resignation. His hubrought back an old sore spot on his mor did not fail him even in such a foot, which became aggravated crisis and when he rallied from the enough to confine him to the hospital operation he announced to his after his return. He never recovered, friends: "My dancing days are over. but during the four years of suffer- No. I can still pirouette." Every pain ing that followed the amputation, he of body tortured him for months went back to the University two or but not once did he f linch or give his three times in attempts to resume callers the least sign of physical or teaching. From his hospital room he mental distress. In the summer of read proofs of a book by Dr. T. V. 1936, a serious relapse occurred, Moore, read and approved the doc- sumultanous with the death of his toral dissertation of the last student devoted friend, Monsignor Kerby. A to claim him as "major professor", few of his friends kept a death watch and worked over successive revisions at his door, expecting that every [Thirty]




hour would be his last. Late that cator, and Philosopher. night his nurse came upon him Among the many messages of
chuckling. "I'm not going to die." condolence received from leaders in he said, and when his recovery was Church, State, professional and edumore complete he upbraided his cational circles from all over the friends for their failure to trust in world, upon the death of the Vice his "physical vigor." By special dis- Rector Emeritus, the Right Reverpensation from the Holy See, Mon- end Edward A. Pace, are the followsignor Pace was permitted to say ing: Mass sitting until he became too "The death of Monsignor Pace
weak to attempt even that. Then he' leaves a large void in Catholic Edulooked forward eagerly to the Coin- cation. As a professor he was a vering of Our Lord in Communion. itable inspiration to a legion of
Every day of his life the will of God teachers. His academic ideals were grew dearer to him. It was a special high, and he maintained them by dispensation of Divine Providence word and act. His loyalty and dethat his faculties of mind, particu- voti-on to the best interests of the larly his memory, were as keen as church were intelligent and unflagever until the end. In many visits gring. His accomplishments in bepaid him during his four years' resi- half of every good cause, but partidence in the hospital I found such cularly in the fields of psychology, a profundity of faith and confidence philosophy and education were unin God that one might suppose his equalled by anyone in the American apostolate of teaching was in Gods' church. For 'in the midst of the plan to be crowned by his apostolate church he opened his mouth; and the of suffering. The loss of his sister, Lord filled him with the spirit of Miss Mary Pace, in February, was a wisdom and understanding; he clothgreat blow to him. The funeral serv- ed him with a robe of glory'. (Triice's for her were held in the chapel bute of the Most Reverend James of Providence Hospital so that Mon- H. Ryan, Bishop of Omaha and signor Pace might attend. No doubt Rector Emeritus of the University.) even then he sensed the imminence "Monsignor Pace, now in the peace of reunion with her. He died two and rest he so bravely won, leaves months after his sister. in God's this Catholic University of America mercy, there was little pain at the sorely bereft. I, as Rector would ofend for Monsignor Pace. On Monday, fer in these pall-hung days my haltApril 25, he had received a number ing tribute, far below his merit, to of his old friends, including Monsig- the memory of this fine leader who's nor O'tConnel of Toledo, a member welcoming encouragement and wise of the Board of trustees, and Mon- counsel never failed me since my signor Eugene Connolly, and old f irst visit to him after I became friend of the family. At two fifteen Rector of the University. He gladly Tuesday morning he rang for his opened his treasures of University nurse who saw that a hemorrhage lore always to find a helpful way and threatened and who summoned his a Prudent one in facing difficult devoted *brother and sister to his problems. it is easy for me to unbedside. The chaplain led this little derstand the trust Bishop Shahan group in prayer as Monsignor Pace and Bishop Ryan reposed in such a breathed his last about three A. M. counselor. What in life Monsignor
No tribute could be devised today, Pace was to this University, his livthat would surpass those which pour- ing memory must continue to be. ed in from around the world at the We, with whom this memory lives, news of the death of this great Edu- must accept as a compelling corn[ Thirty-one]




mission the perpetuation of this no- condolences on the passing of the ble tradition of devotion to Catholic lamented Monsignor Pace. I have truth and culture. This is our her- had occasion to deal with him in itage from Edward Aloysius Pace. Rome and to admire his knowledge We had hoped to have him for our and his virtue, particularly his spirit Golden Jubilee. That occasion must of sacrifice and his devotion to the now serve to give his name and mem- cause of the University. I shall not ory lasting place upon this campus." fail to pray for his soul, especially (Tribute of the Right Reverend Jos- in the Holy Mass. eph Corrigan, Rector of the Catholic "Sincerely yours,
University of America.) "Francesco Roberti."
"Deeply grieved at news of pass- Rome, April 20, 1938. (His exceling of Monsignor Pace. May his lency, Rt. Rev. Francesco Roberti.)
noble soul rest in peace. My sin- "I think that every one at Notre
cerest condolences to the University Dame is deeply affected by the news and Faculty." (Patrick Cardinal of the death of Monsignor Pace. All Hayes, Archbishop of New York.) of us knew him and loved him. He
"Heartfelt sympathy in your great was the embodiment of the ideals of loss." (Most Reverend Edward J. the Catholic University during most Hanna, Titular Archbishop of Gor- of its existence, and I know that his tyna-Formerly Archbishop of San inspiration will be a living :force for
Francisco.) many years to come, not only in
"Deepest sympathy on death of Washington but throughout AmerMonsignor Pace. His work at the ica. We will have a Requeim Mass
University has been a great service for the Repose of his soul, and there to the Church in America." (Most will be many Masses and Holy ComReverend John J. Mitty, Archbishop munions for the same intention. of San Francisco.) Please give our condolence to his
"May God be praised for removing surviving relatives." (Very Rev. Monsignor Pace from his untold sufferings. This great and outstand- John F. O'Hara, C. S. C., Pres. Uniing educator in university training varsity of Notre Dame.) has been an unique figure for fifty "You have my deep sympathy in years. His heart was in the iCath- the death of Monsignor Pace, brilolic University at Washington and I liant scholar and cultured priest and
Gentleman, with the assurance of fear we shall not see his like again."
(Mos Reeren ThmasF. Lillis, Mass for the happy Repose of his (Most Reverend Thomas Fsoul." (Rev. Hugh O'Donnell, C.S.C., Bishop of Kansas City.) Vice President, University of Notre
"Permit me to extend to you in Dame.) behalf of the Diocese of Brooklyn as "The) well as in my own name our sincere "The Faculty of Mundelein Colsympathy in recognition of your re- lege toins me in extending deep symcent loss sustained through the apathy to you and to all the Cathodeath of Monsignor Pace who has lie University in the loss of Right r1y Rev. Monsignor Edward Pace, a disrendered for so many years capabde
and conscientious service to the Uni- tinguished priest and educator, whose versity. I shall be mindful of his influence was world-wide and whose soul in my Mass and prayers. May death has occasioned grief among
he rest in eternal peace and happi- Catholics through out the United ness." (Most Reverend Thomas E. States." (Sister Mary Consuela, SuMolloy, Bishop of Brooklyn.) perior, Mundelein College.)
"I extend to you and to the entire "It is with feelings of deepest symCatholic University my most earnest pathy that we have heard of the [Thirty-two]




MONSIGNOR PACE~ _YBl HAVE -SERVED NOBLY
VOL VaB-N.~. 29 BIALTIMORE. MD., FRI aEl 7. 193 FIVE CENTS
DATA SOUGHT AcbsoDeinesJe16SXSTU ENTS Monsignor Pace Is Force CATHOLICC PRESS
Arc~iho D sinaesJun 1 SInNaio'Inele u a l eefAe 'e
ON CONDITIONS For Peter's Pence Collection OFARCUDH CESE PeaeWo-oInNtn'IteecalLf IS NOT KNOWN
IN MEXICO HUS TO BE OR NED W Ha Meat ch ToChurch IN POOR MEXICO
Baltimoe Unit. Coofraillne Of M .CalsSteset They Will Be Axn4Figt Sainot w 'X -c, mn asi h fedo oiro~y Joseph Q Show. Trribhle
Jr. And Chistiazza, Seod.i Raittiare Md. Mary,. Revren attorEwr -Th Right ,185 he iralda Foe Lank
Reoluin To President isTo SolaiRie veerosMor of t ead A.lft oil of Philosophy. "A conerdired
ofA eiaand ome of the mosct ott.- follower of Saiot Thomas Aquianas," )O
DR. FINNEY .EES THE NEED To tki ret ad Pei of the Aniehdiaaess af Baltimore: .4C~H()p Tino dATE ysta holtc in ~dar tthe ieBsJamhes H. eeay.. etor neoften ef Hti TELLS
OF EXPOSE IN SYUATION D y ovd ATCSau.wowsodie otectoi nvriy a rteo HTLS A EN
_______ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A CATHDA c'RMN rethoo fifty ye ... agon tart Tacez- Maon-n Pare. he has Perhaps done WATLSSHSEN
Aoaw oemt ohoBil be made by the isaiog of thin letter at dop. woI reoive the hnoraydge itooeCaanttn oorn
Awts,o Ateir Fat=e To.-, ol the ltC Soodaly, 2- k 9t.1o the azs-0 ealleetito. fair our OhrensojsgIla FotDootor ef Lasor free theab atoIc Thoocs no- t loo ete the Arere,curod* Cathal, Pe, Anr.oUrge. "rideso nereat its onolcnmec-aoo y world the strong points of
VarousDeooaowtoo .d 'O a -H I. Ntice Of Florid. Shop ltto tGivieo Estimate -jyjT, Gorgia
0-e each yourawe e alled opoo an toeosheeo of the IfUrroaul Boe- at Starke. Fta.. Jaly 3. "al, As an sdoo ato, Bishap Ryane al,"
Wente. FJn Thrsig, I Chapala af Oar Bassi 1-de to give thought t. the oeeds of CMiom ,~ eior Por attended Sonto a writing in xeporn thIe ~olootl'orrt ro
3 ., of Geergetowno Uoivrsity. oIws Vicar toaoapohn the teenaodo.. work that ha. heroin hr to-lc l, ~hl., hmjb r aeh i
ldhis seechb an the Ptresent Coo- trusted to hi. cans,. To oar Saprerse Paooff today, ma Iss thoo.~ to eotr oalradttlo rooeoo J, cd "dtr fTe 'Vtho~
d eoi eia a o roo moet. Saiot Peter in. agiss poost Our Dieter, Savior diet thse wod. lion 000o three -aye tie ie. hoto aeo0 ttaoa oO r a
af tha memheroN of the caltee fausght with grave ee sidlity. "Feed My Lath wa.. Feed b hty be''' i,.r::a te orn'h stns heondlyeho isd oi loc o fl ...... Sa~a,
BSaabo .h Rtor Coofteoa ofpycue o h xcin oe s
Uar J. M1. T. Flimosy. or- of the aos. tae. oar Holy Father day after day. ouoth after atsonth, eth un- ed-tm1thanl hroon who has r.. t~ toh.d I -oel tatvira n
leoe- leaders in Haltiosores, aaked tietog enegy, deeitoa hiooelf to oor needs, aod to Io edaf of torr.od Mthaloahottetrtiol bottl orot0t lort
t oeprae -What ate wr goiog tot hi, Sock throsaghout the ot.He moot se to it that they are fed a n eer lihngso Therie, oP ad
do rton itV zo.ta okitrt ot oly sairai y with thom se g ta ok frthe godof th, o hi roorjlnlo e ta ete Againost tht, hahgrea..nd of the
Worn Plaudits tOf Nation sou, bu even. a a demand., eaterialy with the very ate, e a eroIho tn o ndete hrh tetttto Ceeit0or
Ut.er Y aa. httrasoiI tm o sejf otroo tts tarto Hr a a theorist force .r it., militant lifr. Feontot Zh
eePut.atoasaoobarsoo Hnentoeal wh haes halfi~te.bd She nttatar0 le
Bouodor'e Gsoorot with the Dotd- With tiea progress of the year., the demsand. uon the Hnt dtrord to the 0000 otthonight' the trw onpta o s n o onOoe
S tr Army MtdntCrsi eo ~ te oe~- ~ o l o.e ft totontartoaot of orhooldoog tot oo na thor 20 yr to 1,11 ter that 0
Hos ,t h on th boptoiaoo Chch. .4' he carried n efficiently, Claints Vicar maaus ,~hoe o s0 00 oates o foett anti the "too teaao.
isr trtth a rfi ars hit1a' diteia ofteagon otttoe to snoton fortfying th i, oota foce ofoa
Iat, o thouanods of wounod m *ir.j an, orgaoizatics capahle of meeting the aedo of three hundred mitFpcilvi W sig ro~a or O ate ae re nn-or
soldier., in additio to his ow ob o. Heo must he abte to =esea paternal jariotiretin am 100 at the CahlcUiest oil~tog thoeso of"' tloo ogo o h
none arlicjti n a sugo sci on pravide~foC the spiactoal oetaeesm of a v0.1 poptlAtior rerelythetefatlrtotnor fho da re tnotecRtar00 tocte
him hoh banor rod Ioooodea toeivCo e des
te h e Unt d t dt tivea tire. an get ass that ..f oar, os.. heloved esoostry.n Hera most hefloit ,h.m't '' 1frm ntdSttsG r iFinally, ho helltotl tao naoorone and to eas oo the setlali Pro w ch
He s t 1. nu ber of reay t al t rech ut:hishad t evry an feteogIo o ro of the ooat op ed,,oa- etaotit mctoloo, farce. nan rnottto
Hri.oeofteledngosftc eahateltho trsahot itho t erypete'Iegsh.oto h S hertttthoothfototote
tho. Preoyteeton Choeha t i Meeo- a;Id to aooiot these wo appeal to himt freo romegt ott the puppieso tto p". ao doeertid e oo a Ii to oefitoroot. torn
Frthee~~~~~~ Th4ig aaa1t edito I, secr ~ t. a t n. oor lotod an 0 efiaee po.
t. fthe earth. li n r u e. I e
seooht de red in Ma ad*-eo that to order that this vital aod ahoolutely essea work may' go a, eiri i tork. i 4. t eAsr onl since the nor.
th tttdo he iaia enr- Srcial and su"o he peeshlad. It is ifae thin pqrpo *Jserafoe tat the d0iatirimtetrtop~sItlol.
tee i arethnaoiolrea ad ~ 5j ~ ~ e ~ 7 o en Anr i n ctooldc Pap~oe Mthfptay
r-atoie. ia as~raeh sr. o a m the Hol oaja leie. tSt -.~tiOht"no. tgtatn opyo h ,h
ofps o i s -' I Iav srua toyu ot o y onmu in -g t o f onllo Am b,-ii s h old1-lsoih alr
a~~~ ~ ~ toe. hat ____ _____ %ti 4 Ftes ostt.I un adwd xlspso Headed CariJI;.,n f ls P)aa tr('
t~om o m toe fird yoo e eoo em .e the etr ea t00 0 a Iet. o e nrtent I,1toot
ohorwn~ saidah thrt ttnories whoir Archdoces d 'A I.
oranndtor ed that the ero tor caas, Christ Hiotnyt TO7 5 180- dhe -ter that >0iern 0 shs co.f wooi
of~~~~~~~~~~~ ~ tolnue i ietl n meitl o as uprigtei hnet- olg dn 1 -s Pn h0 too moo as heldg Its de=a e,
sudww fteSveeg onif.h reaj ~I u tOgirt. rhoe hy of t e i td ot of thi ntd oot ...l the,. leoto otalo.
thor con schoolte nd threligious -Whin tsriitsan eopl trbeshing, byJuhilar.ian ." ini.,II
edolto of their children, ace rior O riot o og prop pp twholr after his St.to tohe- a i mnSe h, Nioa a o t t tr-h tha ole htoo,oltorr t anet henoirisisardyous, .ieeey named a pen- Adtoocory Oomtoto on Edottuec i 0 Ottatna0 teohs aehm
ednoooofpln f heS esa (;'."- 0oeertot ta rgnoaroI Cath- has seied an editor ofat -0oloao 0011so,- to house, the geace 00
so --et order the pettlto of thI in Gandreso.y Son Stacy Cochdro
ochot t-og osddw io sherW a Fall Stor, done 15. ti nne ty ofAeoerooo. and, I or,tnyeholagy and t'at~hiotey oo Ps-ptndtr0000taehol
Ito. otedhon therretiososdeasocs.-*Fde oA~t...~.- LC-atie-The Re-, Pool A. Darh- Prprraict tot that weork, tpet thCSree ehotoooooa 1toonoogratoto f thr l to tetaw toot tolr. rnto
totot oo ee dtritrtd.aa ,n ~~, enonf. aCleno P. Uaos, Thomas ty rr fcono ortr-ttePt o tn o-ootyto has eootrohor n-woo toenoo oo es.haw
nttoost. C 2II toiodsoaCo2neotoeoItitoaein cooisadftp me locearned attteoto>aro.o i- celno h, -egesn h~e, ".- ...
ris ben disirnis4 (C o sog.don P,. thing the degree Ito"raa Phi poatt potlratte or the loo mirw ho eceltrod. The TahceW Oath CHINESE PAGAN MIE tsopyathe hrtaodt dl sttnoobrhahen calledi 000 o,e heIo:ltrooo
The spotsh~rne d the oath whiskI .ogo~0 ot N00ta MADE cocrot p' tooato otto ool .ooledttnrt aheoo
silBAPTIZES DYING FATHER rc'o anodrnt toe. th oooooteo 00000 o
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pt1,otgooog th iertr to dieosar ttoon in October. Ipqt. Iton firstanto tlOooeI 00 ttoaoe 0 1 o l oht ea o) fte ao or
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death of Monsignor Pace whose occasion of this anniversary, entitled,
long life has wrought so much for "In Thy Light", summarizes so beauthe Church and for Catholic Educa- tifully the totality of Monsignor tion. In Monsignor Pace's passing the Pace's dedication: Catholic University has lost one of 'He was a pioneer in almost everythe strongest vitalizing forces of its thing he undertook; extraordinary foundation and the Sisters of Chari- in his understanding of complicated ty of the Blessed Virgin Mary a most things; simple in his complete reliloyal and devoted friend whose in- ance on his Creator; meticulous in spiration and guidance has been exactness of detail; generous of himtheirs for thirty years." (Sister self to everyone; American and CathMary Antonia, B.V.M., Superior, olic to his finger-tips; dedicated sole;Clarke College, Dubuque, Iowa.) ly to following as closely as he could
"Hearfelt sympathy in the loss of in the footsteps of Christ, the perfect Monsignor Pace, devoted pioneer of Teacher, who, defining Himself as the Sisters College. He was a true "The Way, the Truth, and the Life", inspiration of our age, loved and said "Learn of Me", and, later, "Go revered for the greatness of his soul and teach." Father Smith, in his and the grace of his influence. Our eulogy of Dr. Pace at the Requiem Sisters unite in prayer for his be- attended by twelve Bishops, recalled loved soul." (Mother M. Vincentia that, "Years ago, when I mentioned and the Sisters of Charity of New something about the purple he had York.) earned but rarely wore, he said, "I
It is true, that Monsignor Pace want to die a good, old priest"; then, might have musingly referred to Father Smith went on to say, "Good
himself as being of pioneer stock, he was, as we all know; old,-in his and his students might have had oc- seventy-seventh year and a priest casion to smile. But a pioneer he he was, until the end, and forever." was. Dr. Miriam Rooney, the last Eternal rest grant unto him, 0 Lord, student to major under Doctor Pace's and let thy perpetual light shine direction, Research Professor, and
former Dean of the School of Law, upon him. No other American has Seton Hall University, in a special given greater testimony to the actdedication to Monsignor Pace on the uality of the Blessed Trinity.'
[Thirty-four]




FAMILY PORTRAIT
FATHER marriage to George Pace in 1859,
GEORGE EDWARD PACE was there were seven children, of whom
born on January 5, 1831. He was the two died at a very young age; Anne son of Richard Pace and Sara Ze- and Louis. Of the other five, Montour. The Paces were an old Southern signor Edward Pace was the oldest. family which had settled early in Four lived a long life, with one sisVirginia, moved to Georgia and even- ter Elizabeth, still residing in Washtually to northern Florida. There ington, D. C. George Lee at the age they acquired acres of pine land in of 33, died in a train accident. the Middleburg-S-tarke area, where Her two sisters had come to FloriMonsignor Pace's father was raised. da from Nova Scotia. Mrs. T. B. He was one of five children; John, Hoyte, called 'Auntie Hoyte' by the the oldest of the boys, Mary Eliza- family, was the widow of a Mr. R. beth, Augustus, and a half-brother, Dillon, one of the witnesses to the Jerry M. Blitch. His brother Augus- deed for the, property on which the tus, with whom he later went into Church in Middleburg was built. Her business in Jacksonville, served in other sister, Mary, was twice the the Florida militia company organiz- Postmistress of Starke, in 1866, and ed by George Pace's business partner, then again in 1870. She made her Captain John Charles Richard, as home with the Paces and together did his half-brother Jerry Buitch. An with the Reverend Edmund Aubril, early ancestor, Richard Pace, was at who baptized Edward, was one of one time secretary to King Henry Monsignor's godparents. VIII. Hie accompanied the Papal Le- Her obituary, which appeared in gate, Cardinal Campeggio, from the old Jacksonville newspaper, the Rome to England on the matter con- Mtooio uut2,10 e
cerning King Henry's Spanish mar- Mctrls, on maugudlies 20,n 190 sde riage. In London, he. became asso- hpit Itrher idiesrbein mors ciated with the circle of classical henappy.so Itfuth descries hermas
schoarstha surouned he eanerament, and a clear, vigorous mind, of St. Paul's in London, and remain- lovable in disposition and most kind ed as one of their number, and gentle in manner. Referring to
George Pace died February 2, her deep Catholic Faith, the descrip1902, and was buried in the Old City tion goes on to say, "she had strong Cemetery, in Jacksonville. religious inclinations, being a devout
MOTHER member of the Catholic Church, and
MARGRET ELLYPACE washer whole life was marked with goodMARARE KELLY PACenCofo el, was ness and love of God." Margaret KelMtheril of Oen Cort-ofto ell, thea ly Pace was buried, as was her husScotia, and a Miss Quin, the daugh- Cemeteryof JeaksotrnlleOdCt ter of an old and wealthy English Ce tryoJaknvl. family. Mrs. Pace's family history BROTHERS AND SISTERS reveals that her uncle, the Earl of GEORGE LEE PACE was the
Dunraven of England and Ireland, second son of George and Margaret was instrumental in securing the ap- Pace. He was born July 6, 1865. IHe pointment of Master of the Ports of was the only one of the Pace chilHalfaxforherFatera psiton dren to marry, and was the father which he held until death. Of her of two girls, Anna Lee, and Mar[Thirty-five]




guerite. Both nieces were students ducting the graveside services. of Doctor Pace at Catholic Univer- LOUIS F. PACE, like his sister sity. Marguerite, now Mrs. Arthur Annie, was to live only a short time A. Corcoran, who resides in Jack- here on earth. Born on May 3, 1870, sonville, is an honored guest at the he was baptized at Immaculate ConAnniversary Mass and Dedication ofcetoChrhnJue5180a the plaque. To her, we are sincerely refletedn trhe thJe arish0 reors grateful and deeply indebted for the Hefldied at the age ofaeih ancdws. wealth of personal memories she buried withe his sfister ind acsn has provided us, to make our Corn- buiedwti ite nJcsn
memorative Booklet a fitting tribute vle to her uncle. George. Lee Pace met CHARLES FRANCIS PACE was a tragic death, when, trying to re- to become one day a Financial Clerk trieve his hat, he fell from a train, of the United States Senate. Like sustaining a head injury which caus- Mary, he had moved to Washington e-d his untimely -death at the age of and made his home there, having 33, previously worked at the Bradford
ANNIE PACE was born on Feb- Bank for a time, as well as in Orruary 6, 1868, the third of the Pace lando. Monsignor Pace was 11 years children. However, she was destined old at the time of his birth. Charles to live only shortly, having died at was baptized also at the Immacuthe age of ten, December 21, 1878. late Conception Church and the date Like her mother and father, she is recorded in the Parish register as
too, is buried in Jacksonville. November 24, 1872, a month and
MARY TELL PAC wasborn three days afte-r his birth.
when Monsignor Pace was eight ELIZABETH CATHERINE PACE
years old. She moved to Washing- the youngest, of the Pace family, still ton in 1900 and lived there until resides in Washington, D. 'C. She her death in 1938, only three months was one of the first iCatholic girls prior to the death of her brother, from the North Florida area to atMonsignor Pace. The funeral serv- tend St. Joseph's Academy, at St. ices were held at Providence Hospital, Augustine, Florida, and is well rewhere Monsignor Pace had been membered by the Sisters there. Alconfined for sometime., so that he though, due to recent illness, Miss would be able to attend. H-er death Pace is unable to attend these rites was a great blow to him, and seem- honoring her brother, Monsignor ed to affect him deeply. His friends Pace, she is also an honored guest, fr om the .University came forward and shares in our prayers and our in -his grief to be at his side. The appreciation on this day. To her, al.six pallbearers were professors from so, we are grateful for her approval the University. His close friend, the of our efforts in honor of Monsignor Right Reverend Maurice, Sheehy, Pace, and indebted to her for her Celebrated the Requiem Mass, with thoughts which have helped us peranother life-long and famous friend, sonalize these memories of her ilFather Ignatius Smith, 0. P., con- lustrious brother.
[Thirty -six]




ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Most Reverend Fulton J. Sheen, D.D., National Director, Propogation
of the Faith.
Rt. Rev. Msgr. William Barry, P.A., V.F., Pastor St. Patrick's Church,
Miami Beach, Fla.
Rt. Rev. Msgr. James B. Cloonan, Pastor Church of the Assumption,
Jacksonville, Florida.
Rt. Rev. Msgr. Joseph B. McAllister, Vice Rector, Catholic University of
America, Washington, D. C.
Rt. Rev. Msgr. John J. McClafferty, Assistant to the Rector for University Development Catholic University of America.
Rt. Rev. Msgr. John K. Ryan, Dean, School of Philosophy, Catholic University of America.
Rt. Rev. Msgr. Maurice S. Sheehy, P.A., V.F., Ph.D., Pastor Immaculate
Conception Church, Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
Rev. Father Leo A. Foley, Sec'y., American Catholic Philosophical Association, Washington, D. C.
Rev. Father John Joseph Gallagher, Editor, The Catholic Review, Baltimore, Maryland.
Rev. Father Michael V. Gannon, Mission of Nombre de Dios, St. Augustine, Florida.
Rev. Father John F. Linn, S.S., President, St. Charles College, Catonville,
Maryland.
Rev. Father Patrick J. O'tCarroll, Bishop Moore High School, Orlando,
Florida.
Rev. Father Neil A. Sager, The Chancery, Diocese of St. Augustine, St.
Augustine, Florida.
Rev. Sister Regina, S.S.J., All Saints Home, Jacksonville, Florida. Mrs. A. A. Corcoran, Niece to Monsignor Pace, Jacksonville, Florida. Roy J. De Ferrari, Ph.D., Director, Program of Affiliation, Catholic University of America.
Henry J. Dubester, Chief, General Reference and Bibliography Division,
Library of Congress.
Hoyle F. Montgomery, Jr., Ass't. Humanities Librarian, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
Jane Quinn, Associate Editor, The Florida Catholic, Orlando, Florida. Miriam Theresa Rooney, M.A., Ph.D., Research Professor and Former
Dean, School of Law, Seton Hall University, Newark, New Jersey.
Susan Uebelacker, Interlibrary Loan Librarian, Catholic University of
America, Washington, D. IC.
R. E. Upton, Jr., B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Education Director, Florida State
Prison, Raiford, Florida.
Eugene P. Willging, Director of the Library, Catholic University of
America, Washington, D. C.
'The Right Pace' Group of Holy Name Men, Raiford, Florida.
[Thirty-sevenJ




THE PRIESTS OF STARKE
The six Bishops of the Diocese of St. Augustine, have all entered into the history of Edward Pace of Starke. But history will not reveal the number of Priests they have sent into our midst to offer the Sacrifice of the Mass, and administer the Sacraments for the honor and glory of Almighty God, and the salvation of souls.
Just as the labor of the early Missionaries of our Diocese has produced a humble and learned Priest, of whom this City, State and Diocese are so justly proud, we pray that the work of the more recent Missionaries of Starke, listed below, might be sprinkled with God's Divine grace, and produce future Priests like to Monsignor Pace, as he became like to Christ.
THE REVEREND FATHERS Thomas J. Murphy June 1941 to May 1943
Michael J. Fogarty June 1943 to May 1945
Raymond M. Amiro May 1945 to Sept. 1945
John O'Dowd Oct. 1945 to Dec. 1948
Larkin F. Connolly Jan. 1949 to Sept. 1949
R. T. Rastatter Oct. 1949 to Nov. 1950
William H. Neuhaus Feb. 1951 to May 1951
Francis T. Dunleavy July 1951 to Sept. 1951
Richard Lyons Oct. 1951 to Oct. 1952
Harry F. Turnier Oct. 1952 to Sept. 1954
Harold F. Jordan Sept. 1954 to Aug. 1956
John A. Skehan Aug. 1956 to April 1958
John X. Linnehan April 1958 to June 1958
Cornelius A. Dougherty Present Administrator
May Edward, the Priest who 'set the pace' for us in so many fields of endeavor during his lifetime, now rest 'in pace', for all eternity!
[Thirty-eight]




Edward
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Starke Church










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Full Text

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Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2018 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries https://archive.org/details/monsignoredwarda1963dioc

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DEDICATION The first Catholic child born in Starke in 1861 was named Edward Pace in honor of Saint Edward. Eighty years later the first Catholic Church in Starke was named Saint Edward in honor of Edward Pace. Doctor of Theology and Doctor of Philosophy, honorary Doctor of Laws and Doctor of Letters, honored by Popes, befriended by Presidents, classmate to Cardinals, this son of one of Starke’s first families became loved and respected by all who were privileged to know him as Priest, Administrator, Counsellor and Educator. The Parishoners of St. Edward’s Church in Starke are deeply appre ciative of the world-wide tributes of those who have recollected for us here their memories of Monsignor Pace, ‘‘who walked with kings, yet never lost the common touch”. We are most proud to join with His Grace, our Most Reverend Arch bishop, who established our Parish, as he inscribes in our church today, the following commemorative plaque: In Devoted Remembrance of MONSIGNOR EDWARD ALOYSIUS PACE Born in Starke July 3, 1861 Died April 26, 1938 To whose Patron this Church was dedicated October 13, 1941 This plaque is inscribed with the hope that it will preserve for posterity the memory of this humble Priest of God who was also a learned Doctor of Philosophy April 26, 1 963 The twenty-fifth anniversary of his death Joseph P. Hurley Archbishop Bishop of Saint Augustine [Three]

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PACE THE PIONEER It was not an uncommon sight for Catholic University students of the late 1920Â’s to see their astute ViceRector and Professor of Philosophy riding about the University grounds on horseback. To them it seemed, perhaps, a bit out of character. Their usual picture of Doctor Pace was one of a dignified, slow-moving, slowtalking, slow-to-provoke intellectual, whose classroom routine was invar iable. Entering the classroom, he would say a brief prayer and take his seat. Then, with pencil, or a piece of chalk which he rarely used, in his hand, he would proceed to lec ture for an hour or more without benefit of book or notes. His dry humor wove itself in and out of his talks, often taking his students by surprise, and at the same time, giv ing his classes more than just the usual amount of academic interest. Had his students asked Monsignor Pace concerning his habit of horse back-riding, he might have answered that it was a carry-over from his pioneer days, and they most likely would have passed his reply off as one of his many humorous remarks. But in reality, horseback-riding and pioneering were certainly noth ing new to Edward A. Pace. To look back into the beginning of the 'Pace Story,Â’ is to discover a tale of early settlers pioneering on the Florida frontier. There is adventure in the story of the Indian Wars as his own father knew them, and, from his own boyhood, Edward Pace could have told many a story about the hardships of his native Florida in Civil War days. In 1831, the Seminole, Mikasukie, Tallahassee, and Creek Indians were marauding in bands throughout the Florida Territory. Garrisons had been erected in many areas to pro tect the scattered settlers. Near Middleburg, Florida, known then as Black Creek, Fort Harley had been established to fight off Indian at tacks. It was in that area in that same year, that George Edward Pace, the father of Doctor Pace, was born, in the shadow of an army garrison, and the fearful violence of Indianfighting. By 1835 the trouble with the Indians had erupted into the Florida Indian War, sometimes re ferred to as the Seven Years War against the Indians. Skirmishes and bloody attacks by the well-or ganized Indian bands were frequent in this Middle Florida region, where George Pace was raised. As a re sult many of the settlers there be gan to move away. Finally, in 1838, the famous Brig adier General Zachary Taylor, later President of the United States, as sumed command of the Army forces in Florida. He soon became a famil iar and re-assuring figure to the settlers. He was constantly in the saddle moving from post to post throughout the Territory, position ing his men so as to provide the best possible protection for the settle ments. The War with the Indians finally came to an end in 1842, and the Con gress of the United States passed in that same year, the Armed Settle ment Act. By this law, they had hoped to encourage settlers who had left the Territory because of the In dians, to return to their land. 160 acres would be given to any man who settled for 5 years in that strick en country south of the Palatka and Gainesville line, and carried arms in defense of their homes. The law had the effect, also, of encouraging new settlers from Georgia, the Carolinas, and other surrounding Ter ritories to move south into Florida. Not far from the Middleburg set[Four]

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tlement, there was a crossroads point for these pioneers pushing south ward. At this time, it was sparsely populated, with only an occasional cabin here and there, belonging to some of the travellers who had chosen to stop there, clear some land, and grow cotton. A few others had been induced to settle there by the fine dense forests of virgin pine, valuable for lumber and naval stores products. Among these migrants was a young farmer from Wayne County, Georgia, by the name of Drury Red dish. In 1854 he obtained a grant of 40 acres of this land, now known as South Starke. Shortly thereaf ter, it was announced that plans had been made to build a railroad that would connect the Atlantic Ocean with the Gulf of Mexico, and would be called the Fernandina to Cedar Keys Railroad. It was soon determined that the famed railroad would pass through the crossroads point, and knowledge of this fact gave impetus to a movement of set tlers in that direction. By 1857, the number of people had grown signif icantly enough to permit the estab lishment of a Post Office, with Mr. George W. Cole as its first Post master. Thus, the town of Starke became a reality. One year later, in 1858, the Fer nandina Railroad reached Starke, and the town served as its terminus for more than a year, before construc tion was resumed on the last leg of the line to Cedar Key. During that year, a stage-line was established to connect the railroad to other south ern points. Soon, Starke was con nected with Waldo, Gainesville and Ocala by direct stagecoach routes on regular schedules. In 1859, George Cole, formerly the Postmaster, ob tained title to 40 acres of land de scribed as the ‘Original Town of Starke’; an area which would now comprise the heart of the town’s business section from the court house on the west, to the municipal power plant on the east. All the while, George Pace had been pursuing his own business in terests in Middleburg, and had real ized some degree of success. He was considered to be a prosperous planter, and a manufacturer of tur pentine. Together with his younger brother Augustus, (Gus), he made several trips to Savannah concerning his turpentine interests. On just such a trip, in 1859, he met Margaret Kelly, whose father was the Comp troller of the Ports of Halifax, Nova Scotia. George, a Methodist by re ligion, and Margaret, a devout Cath olic, were married a short time later, that same year. Like many people at that time, George and Margaret decided to move onto Starke, the new and promising Railroad terminus. At about the same time, another son of the Middleburg settlement de cided to try his fortune in Starke. Captain John Charles Richard, who had married a Middleburg girl, Mary Morgan in 1855 and moved to Jack sonville, appeared on the Starke scene in the year 1859 also. There he and Pace met. Together they decided to form a partnership, and built the first business house in Starke, next to the railroad, on the southside of Call Street. There the firm of Richard and Pace did a thriving business for nearly 33 years. Starke reached the height of its ‘boom’ in the year 1860. The first census of the citizenry was taken up and recorded in handwritten copy. It revealed that the population had now reached a total of 138 people; 137 white, and 1 colored boy, Thomas Williams, who made his home with the Pace family. George E. Pace was listed as one of the very few citizens of Starke who could right fully claim to be a native Floridian. Together with Cole, the first Post master, and Richard, his business partner, he was noted to have been one of the three principal land own[Five]

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ers at that time. In August of that year, George E. Pace was named the third Postmaster of the town of Starke. Fortune seemed to have smiled strongly on Starke, and on George E. Pace personally. But the smile was all too brief. The following year, 1861, saw the mounting tensions be tween the North and the South fi nally develop into War. iCaptain Richard immediately organized a mi litia. His troop. Company A, of the 100th Florida Infantry, served with distinction throughout the four years of civil strife. The memories of the Indian War days still fresh in his memory, George Pace attempted to enlist. He endeavored to persuade /Colonel J. J. Daniels, the OrA PIONEER As important as the years 1857 to 1861 were in the history of Florida, of Starke, and of the Pace family, they were, as well, years of note worthy developments for the Church in Florida. January 9, 1857 saw the proclamation by His Holiness, Pope Pius IX, erecting the state of Florida as a Vicariate Apostolic. This ex cluded, however, the land west of the Apalachicola River. That same year, the Church of the Immaculate Conception was established in Jack sonville, with Father John Hamil ton as its first Pastor. Along with the establishment of the new Parish, it was decided to build a church in the Middleburg settlement. This area, where George Pace was already an established and successful business man, could now boast a population of approximately 1,000 people. The property on which the Church would be built was the gift of Benjamin and Mary Ann Frisbee of Middleburg. The deed, dated January 8, 1947, specifically stated that this land, comprising about one and three-quarters acres, ganization Officer for the Confed erate Army in that district, to accept his enlistment. Three times he was rejected because of tuberculosis. Nevertheless, he exerted his strength and spent his fortune to help the Confederate cause in every way pos sible. In his efforts, he sacrificed his business and lost much of his property. He travelled back and forth from Starke to Gainesville and Waldo, raising money, supplies and food for the Confederate forces. And so, under circumstances not unlike those surrounding the birth of his father, with troops of the Confederate Army garrisoned near by, and the Civil War a terrible real ity, Edward A. Pace was born, July 3, 1861. CHURCH would be Tor the use and benefit of the Roman Catholics’ of that section. Two facts connected with this transaction stand out as especially interesting. The transfer of the deed to the Rt. Reverend Michael Portier, Bishop of Alabama and Florida, who had ecclesiastical jurisdiction at that time, was witnessed by a Mr. R. Dillon. Mr. Dillon, the husband of Margaret Kelly Pace’s older sister, was by marriage an uncle to our Monsignor Pace. In addition to this, the property on which the Mid dleburg Church once stood, is within the present day limits of our Starke parish of St. Edward. Services were conducted there monthly by the Pastor of the Jack sonville Parish, until the progress of the Fernandina to Cedar Keys R. R. began to have an adverse effect on the success of the Middleburg mis sion. Starke, with the Railroad’s arrival in 1858, was now the ‘hub’ of commerce for this section of the Territory. A large number of Middleburg’s population had been drawn by this factor, and as early as that [Six]

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same year, the settlement was suf fering a population decrease that saw the Catholic community there practically dissolved. It was not too long before services were no longer held in the little church, and the building fell into disrepair. Late in 1858, St. Augustine wel comed its newly consecrated Vicar Apostolic, the Right Reverend Aurmstin Verot, D.D. The Bishop found his cathedral in the very capable hands of two French Priests of the Society of the Fathers of Mercy, the Very Reverend Edmund Aubril, who had administered the Cathedral since 1842, and his assistant. Rever end Benedict Maedore. These two Priests, together with Father Ham ilton at Jacksonville, comprised the total clergy of the State of Florida at that time. As a matter of Rec ord, Bishop Verot, in his report to the Annals of the Propogation of the Faith in 1859, stated: ‘‘Alto gether, there are four churches out side of St. Augustine, three without a Pastor. Jacksonville has a frame building, and it has the fortune of a Priest for some time. Tallahassee has a new church which is about to fall in, and no Priest. Key West has a church already for years, no Priest. Also, Middleburg has a church.” During the summer 1859, Bishop Verot travelled to France with the hope of enlisting French Priests for the missions of Florida. There he met and talked with Father Henry Peter Clavreul, of the Diocese of An gers. As a result of that meeting;Father Clavreul asked for and re ceived permission to sever his alleg iance to his own Bishop, that he might serve in Florida. Almost a year later, on October 13, 1860, Fa ther Clavreul, who was to become one of early Florida’s most zealous and tireless missionaries, arrived in St. Augustine. After serving a year there under the capable guid ance of Fathers Aubril and Maedore, he was assigned by Bishop Verot to the pastorate of St. Michael’s Church at P^ernandina. His pastoral duties would include the Missions of Paiatka, Wilatka, and Starke. Then, with the outbreak of the Civil War, he assisted in the care of the Cath olic men stationed at the garrison of 2,000 Confederate troops which was established at Fernandina. The events that were to make July, 1861, a significant month of an im portant year, began with the birth of Edward Pace on July third; later in the month. Bishop Verot was transferred to Savannah as Bishop, while at the same time retaining jurisdiction as Vicar Apostolic of the Florida territory; on the twentythird of July, the Confederate forces scored their great victory in the Battle of Bull Run, under the great Southern general. Stonewall Jackson; about that same time the Very Reverend Father Edmund Aubril, Rector of the Cathedral in St. Au gustine, set out on a visitation of the Florida Missions, prior to the first Diocesean Synod to be held by Bishop Verot in October of that year. Thus on July 26th Father Aubril reached Starke, most probably on horseback. Staying there with the Pace’s, he baptized their son, Edward, the first Pace child. Except for this visit by Father Aubril, Edward most likely would have received the Sacrament of Baptism from his own Pastor, Father Clavreul on his regular visit to Starke. However, by this almost prophetic co-incidence, Edward re ceived this, the first of the Sacra ments, from the hands of the Rector of the Cathedral church, he himself would one day serve as Pastor in his first assignment as a Priest. Edward was given the middle name of his father, George Edward Pace. However, in naming their son, there might have been a suggestion of pride, on the part of his parents, in their respective family ancestry. The family of both Pace and Kelly could boast of notable personages. [Seven]

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An uncle of Mrs. PaceÂ’s mother was the Earl of Dunraven of England and Ireland. It was he, incidental ly, who was responsible for the ap pointment of Mrs. PaceÂ’s father as Master of the Ports of Halifax, a position he held for life. Mr. PaceÂ’s family boasted of their ancestor, Richard Pace, who was at one time, the secretary to King Henry VIII of England. But most significant of all, was the fact that Edward PaceÂ’s patron Saint was to be the great King Ed ward of England, whose virtues, he would seem to emulate in the years to come. STARKE AND EARLY BOYHOOD The first four years of Edward PaceÂ’s life, were hectic days for his father. With Captain Richard away with his militia, George Pace was left to care for the business himself. As the days of the war grew into years, he saw his business dwindling, and his personal fortune expended in the Confederate cause. At one time, a raiding party of Union troops swooped down on a Confeder ate supply train, standing at the Railroad depot at Starke. Several of the cars were burned with great loss to the troop supplies that George Pace had himself played an import ant part in obtaining. On January 1, 1963, the Emanci pation Proclamation became a hard fact. George Pace called together the negro servants he owned and sup ported, and who worked his land. He told them they were now free, and he divided up his land into plots, which he gave to each of the colored families to be a means of support for their families in the difficult fu ture ahead. It was hard to make the slaves understand they were free. In later years, the older Pace was griev ed to observe the lack of interest the new owners took in making the land productive enough to feed their children, it was a source of sad re flection for him, that he neither had the land himself any longer to pro vide for them, nor was he able to arouse in them a sense of industry and responsibility to meet their own needs. During these war years, the Pace home served as a Mission station for the Priests as they moved about the territory caring for their people. Father Clavreul, then in charge of the church at Fernandina visited the PaceÂ’s first in December of 1861, within a few weeks, he stopped again and said Mass for the Catho lics there in a shed about one-half mile from the Pace home. In his Mission Diary he records, that Mrs. Pace and her Sister received Communion at that time. By 1864, Jacksonville had felt the force of the Union troops. The church of the Immaculate Concep tion, which was the Parish Church of the Paces after the Middleburg Church fell into disuse, was burned to the ground in a raid by Federal Troops. In the fire, the Rectory, too, was a complete and total loss, and most of the Parish records were lost in the fire. With the progress of the war, the difficulty the Missionaries encount ered in travelling from place to place became greater, Bishop Verot, as he administered to the vast Terri tories of Florida and Georgia, was perhaps the most obstructed. On one occasion he was prevented from mov ing about his duties for a period of ten days. Toward the end of the war, he was administering in Atlan ta at the time of its devastation, from there he travelled to Augusta, anxious to re-assure his priests, leave them some money, and exhort [Nine]

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them to remain at their posts until the worst was over. He wanted des perately to return to his See city, Savannah, as quickly as possible. Lent was approaching. Ash Wednes day only a week away. The Bishop and his party of two priests were unable to find regular transporta tion by stage. It became necessary for him to buy a team of mules and a small open carriage for the total sum of six thousand, two hundred dollars. After a treacherous and te dious journey of almost a week. Bishop Verot and his weary mission aries reached Savannah in time to bless the Ashes, and issue the Lenten Regulations on schedule as he had done in years before. With the end of the war, life in Starke settled down to Reconstruc tion and regrowth with a determined vigor. Once again. Pace and Richard were back in their store on iCall street, and began to recoup some of the losses they had sustained during the war. By the end of 1865, and the first months of 1866, their Parish Church had been rebuilt in Jacksonville, and their Missionary-pastor, Father Clavreul lived there with Father Chambon, the new Pastor of Immaculate Conception, and was now able to make regular calls at his Mission Stations. Bishop Verot, visiting Jack sonville that year, divided the terri tory between these two priests, with Father Clavreul in charge of all the missions to the west of the St. John’s river which besides Mayport and Fernandina gave him Palatka, Willaka, Starke, Middleburg, (which by now had been depleted of its Catho lic population), Gainesville, Newnanville. Sand Point, Enter prise, New Smyrna, Cedar Keys, Tampa, Key West, Dry Tortugas, Lake City, Madison and Tal lahassee. In his Missionary Diary, Father Clavreul records another visit to the Pace home on January 11, 1866, when Edward was about four and a half years old. In that same year, the Sisters of St. Joseph ar rived in St. Augustine from France to initiate a school system for the Catholics of Florida. Later that same year, on May 3, Edward’s aunt. Miss Mary Kelly, sister to Mrs. Pace, was appointed Postmistress for Starke, which position she retain ed for a period of about four years. She was later to be re-ap pointed in 1870, and serve the com munity again for a period of two 3^ears. With the opening of the school term in 1867, Edward Pace start ed to school at the old Starke Insti tute, where, as so often in the long future ahead he proved to be a diligent and accomplished student. Looking through his copybook today, one could not help but be impressed with the writing exercises he so dil igently practiced, and note that the phrases, written in meticulous and beautiful script could well be ascrib ed as tribute to their writer. ‘A youth must be diligent and enter prising; ‘Do unto others as you would have them do unto you,’ ‘Great minds are always to be ad mired,’ ‘Pride goes before a fall; be humble-’ phrases prophetic of his future abilities, charity and humility. In later years. Monsignor Pace would frequently refer to these days at Starke Institute, where all the grades were taught by one teacher. Monsignor Pace often mentioned the fact that there was one woman who stood out beyond all the others as he remembered the wonderful vistas that were opened to him when she would be able to tell him information that was not found in the book. These were the days when many Florida teachers held only Second or Third Grade certificates. At that time, a teacher’s certificate was rated by the number of years a teacher could teach, and not, however, by the grades that were taught. [Ten]

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Just as he was taught in school days here in Starke with simplicity of language, he himself would later teach on the university level using the same simplicity of expression. Stressing the importance for teach ers to explain the meaning of words to children, he is quoted by one of his students as saying: “Where I was brought up, we had beans, corn and potatoes, but trespasses—we had no idea what they were. In 1870, George Pace and his bro ther Augustus opened a business in Jacksonville. Although the family remained in Starke, they often jour neyed there for buying trips. On one such occasion, Edward was out fitted with a new suit and a gallant straw hat, which on every import ant trip made by the Pace family, Edward was sure to wear. At that time, everyone, who lived in the in terior wanted to spend a week or two in summer at the beaches, and so to Fernandina via the famous Fernandina Railroad they ticketed. For Edward, this was the great ad venture. Head out of the window, he v/atched the kaleidoscopic flight of the pine forests, lakes and squat ter shacks. Suddenly a gust of wind swept his new straw hat to the vast outside whereupon Edward let out a howl of dismay. The conductor pas sing by asked him what had hit him, to be greeted with the tale of woe that Edward’s new straw hat had taken to the woods. With the most surprising aplomb, as if the disaster were an expected, everyday occur ence, the Conductor pulled the bell rope and gave orders that the train was to go back and find the lost hat. Back and back went the train it seemed for miles, until success was realized, and the new hat was again put back on Edward’s head with proper admonition from the fearful master of the train, and to the amusement and joy of the passengers. In that same year, Pope Pius IX called together the Bishops of the world for the first Vatican Council. Bishop Verot attended as the Bishop of Savannah, but upon his return he became the first Bishop of the new ly created Diocese of St. Augustine, an oiitgrowth of the results of the Vatican Council. It was Bishop Ve rot, then, who himself had stayed at the Pace home while visiting the missions in Florida in 1867, who would be the Bishop who would have to accept Edward Pace as a student for the Priesthood for the Diocese of St. Augustine. At the age of 11, Edward finished his elementary school training at Old Starke Institute. In March of 1872, Father Clavreul and Bishop Verot again stopped overnight at the Pace home. There, sometime after Easter, the Bishop confirmed the Catholic children of Starke, Edward included, and he took Aloysius as his confir mation name. HIGH SCHOOL AGE The following school term saw Ed ward enrolled at the Duval County High School in Jacksonville. Among other subjects, Edward had decided to take Latin, a subject in which he excelled. His early training here in Latin, was most likely the foun dation which helped him become so expert in Latin composition, that he was. subsequently relied upon by Cardinal Gibbons for the preparation of all the important documents sent from the Archdiocese of Baltimore, and from the iCatholic University to Rome. In 1874, the Duval High School Journal, dated December 15, publish ed an address given by Edward, thanking the public for their ap pearance at a High School presenta[Eleven]

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1 J J j: Ki y^ fc’l iA y^ I.* y* k* k k &f y* i.,i *•,* y* > fe,# % .* / / Notre-Scigneur a m !e Mediateur de noire R4dleinp Uon en saii^ifaisant ft DiEC !e Pftre pour nos p^ch^s par %  ’ N'oiis4iions redeva’-^iouique nous sa roorl. Ma^s ce n’ot: hies ft PfEH d'lin HO pouvions I’adorar, d'Christ a coniime de 'ar, Jescspour la %  o utoi ’•jont, ‘'se ms* VEu gbr so;e: sa rnag et !i fiiu; qii rer Dux' oi le ^ gelt; (h^rulim mu-iq'.xt,,... eUmant : SaHCTi'S. Sasorrs iii.it ^./ 'y /r ii< y 'im*! %  - i (t tU^ i>./ 7i*. // ' y / Ooelle^ mx enseigDemente de TEgHse/ie feme les jeax et par la Fol, je vois et j'adore dans rEucrjarls^e : Uses, Fils feterael de Dieu, incanid pour uotre amour dans le sein de la Viei^e Marie.,*. Jt%u8 t^uweJesus peoitentI,... Jesus vicfimel,.,. Jesus Itbdrateur f„. Jesus ami, p^re, dpouxl,>, Jesus, nourriture et vie Et si lu'ceii. DE LA, Foi est si superieur ft I’ceil de la ebair, et nous morure des verlies si douces, qoe dire de I (Mil dt Vamour^ qui peiddre le sens da tous ces myst^rea et se les approprie!,,,.. O profondeur de la sagesse et de I’ainour Infini d'ttu Dieu pour sa creature ddebue,... O divics artifices de so* Justice I'oblis '*'Rur, Sans —...jAfttsuEf 2'ctui ne [lien ^ / i-i. if, r
PAGE 15

tion, apparently the first by the scholars of that institution. One paragraph of particular note stands out. It is a statement that would verify Edward Pace’s love for his native Florida, and pride in his Flor ida origins, although the events of the future would keep him away from his home state the greater part of his life. ‘And as we are individually the pets of our various homes, we hope in our collective capacity as a school, to be the pet of our city. Not spoiled by over—indulgence we want to have a school of which Jacksonville, Du val County, and the whole State of Florida may well be proud. And in the near future, when your liberality shall have provided us with the ne cessary facilities, we hope that it will be a sufficient passport to any place in business or position in so ciety; to say, ‘I graduated at Duval High School.’ It was here that his conscientious and studious habits became crystal lized, and brought to the attention of his father, who earnestly hoped that upon the completion of his High School, Edward would choose the profession of law as the most suit able profession for him. Convinc ed that law would be the young scholar’s choice, George Pace made arrangements with friends, the Coopers, for young Edward to begin his legal studies in their law office in Jacksonville. However, Edward seemed drawn in another, more sublime direction. He had learned to serve Mass at the Parish church in Jacksonville. On their monthly visits to Starke, he had often served Mass for the mis sionaries, which they offered using the piano in the parlor of his home. At one time. Father Clavreul ask ed Edward, “Would you like to come with me around on the mission?” He said he would if his mother said he could go. She replied, “Well, if you’d like to go, you may; you’ll need a clean shirt, so I’ll get your things ready!” He used to say in later years, that this was his first Missionary trip. It was this Missionary trip, and his joy at being able to serve the Priests each month, that caused him to be greatly impressed with the work of the Priests in Florida. Thus, his father, recognizing the sincerity of Edward’s higher goal, himself brou ght him, at the age of fifteen, to old St. Charles’ College at Ellicott City, Maryland. There he came under the direction of the ‘Gentlemen of the Seminary’, the members of the So ciety of St. Sulpice, the most famous being, perhaps, the blind poet-Priest, John Bannister Tabb. It was from Father Tabb’s room that Edward Aloysius Pace, seminarian, first heard the strains of Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata.” SEMINARY DAYS In June of the year that Edward was accepted as a Seminarian for the Diocese of St. Augustine, its first Bishop, Augustin Verot was called to his eternal reward, with Edward’s pastor. Father Clavreul, attending him. In his diary. Father Clavreul notes that the Bishop’s ill ness was of short duration, and that his death most unexpected, ‘even the physician, (being) confident of his recovery.’ One of his classmates at the Seminary, was the late Wil liam Cardinal O’Connell, the Cardi nal Archbishop of Boston, who, in his book, ‘RECOLLECTIONS OF A HAPPY LIFE’ recalls for us an in teresting portrait of Edward Pace, the Seminarian. ‘Pace was at that time a tall gaunt youth with blue eyes and a wealth of the reddest hair. He was extreme[Thirteen]

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ly shy and rarely entered into any of the boys sports or the boisterous games. His manners were gentle and he held rather aloof from the groups which distinguished them selves mainly by exuberance of spirits. Even on the compus he was seldom seen without a book. This in no wise means that he was of a con ceited disposition. On the contrarj^ he was, as I have indicated, of a shy and quiet character given entire ly to the love of study. He indicated, even at that youthful age, that be hind the blue eyes and beneath the crop of red hair there was a very keen and active brain at work, and this became all the more evident as, month by month, he climbed to the highest places in class. His reci tations were delivered with a most amusing drawl, but the thought was perfectly clear and the language ex ceptionally correct. To me he became a brilliant antagonist in striving for the prize. One month it would be Pace; another month it would be O’Connell; yet, with all our scholas tic competition, we were then, and have remained ever since, the best of friends. T remember distinctly one occa sion when, in a written examination, we were given an exceptionally dif ficult page of Virgil to translate. In the briefest possible time Pace made the translation into excellent Eng lish Prose, and, while waiting for the rest of the class, amused him self by turning his prose transla tion into a remarkable bit of verse. He came to St. Charles from St. Au gustine, Florida, and I remember the thrill he enjoyed at seeing his first snow storm. He looked at the fall ing crystals of snow with boyish amazement and delight. I wonder if secretly he did not write a clever little poem on the snow. He was certainly capable of doing it and, to my mind, it would have been far more expressive of beauty than the little verse we all knew as children, “The Snow, The Snow, The Beautiful Snow.” In any event, this expresses my feelings about Pace at that time: that he had a very superior caste of mind and would be capable event ually of acquiring extraordinary in tellectual distinction, which, in fact, he soon proceeded to do. Tn the company of such men as Pace my earliest college years were passed. Their quiet influence upon my character and my whole life was to be simply incalculable, and it all onJy goes to show how the personal touch and contact with fine minds and great souls, which often mani fest themselves even in youth, may impress themselves upon the imag ination and the memory of other youngsters who have the good for tune to live for a while in such a beneficent atmosphere. Thus, one may be touched and formed and strengthened in ways too subtle for youth to recognize, yet so potent in their influence that they go along with one through life.’ While Edward was at St. Charles, in the year 1880, Pope Pius IX died. The Chair of St. Peter was filled by the election of Pope Leo XHI. It was this pontiff who would have such a bearing on the direction of Edward Pace’s life. His Encyclical letter, Aeterni Patris, carried the idea that modern problems, such as the discoveries and findings of mod ern science, be confronted according to the method of St. Thomas Aquin as, and answers for the questions posed by a rapidly advancing world be thusly found; ‘not the new alone, nor the old alone for its own sake, but the new and the old together, without ignoring either one’. And this would someday be the very task of Edward Pace. An event of perhaps prophetic sig nificance, was to take place at St. Charles. Edward Pace was assigned to engage in a debate with another student Michael Dinneen. The sub ject of the debate was to be, ‘Shall [Fourteen]

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Latin and Greek be retained as the basis of a liberal or collegiate edu cation?’ With Pace as the affirma tive, and Dinneen as the negative. The old Baltimore Gazette, reporting the Commencement exercises at which the debate took place, states that, ‘Father McColgan, the judge, decided for the affirmative.’ It might be called, perhaps, a preview of an other and greater debate to take place in the not too distant future, the outcome of which would proEDWARD PACE Within months, Edward Pace was on his way to Rome, to continue his studies in Philosophy and Theology. In addition to his being a student of more than ordinary or average ac complishment, the great debate or ‘disputa’ takes predominance over all other narratives concerning Ed ward Pace while a student in Rome. Again, Cardinal O’iConnell’s book gives us a very living and vivid portrayal of a very significant event in the life of Monsignor Pace. ‘Not long after my arrival at the American College, the students were informed by the Rector that there was soon to be an Academia or Dis puta to be held at the Vatican by some of the chosen students of philo sophy and that the Pope himself was to preside. Of course, this an nouncement thrilled me, and all the students of the college looked for ward with the greatest expectation to being present at this most inter esting scholastic tournament in which the judge was to be no less a person than the Sovereign Pontiff himself. So, when finally the day came, we filed forth in camerata form along the narrow Roman streets which led to the great papal palace, and there, climbing silently the Scala Regia, we passed the Swiss guards stationed at the doorway and, enterfoundly influence the course of Ed ward Pace’s future in the church. The Gazette also announced that E. A. Pace, was one of seven who re ceived special premiums in the awarding of their Bachelor of Arts degrees. One of his fellow ‘premium winners’ was his debate opponent, Michael Dinneen, who would become in time, the rector of the Seminary from which they were both graduat ing, that 29th day of June, 1880. GOES TO ROME ing the immense Sala Clementina, we took our places among the other students of the city and awaited in silence—and, for my part, in awe— the entrance of the great prelates of the court and the numerous Card inals cf the Curia, who entered, one by one, clothed in the voluminous purple or crimson robes of their of fice and took their places in a great semi—circle, from the center of which arose the throne of the Pope. ‘Among the prelates of lesser dig nity were high ecclesiastics from the principal Sees of Germany, Austria, France, and Spain. In a certain sense, that assembly represented the best that the world had produced in our times and their faces did not belie their fame. There was a won derful mingling of strength and gen tleness in the expression of all of them and one saw, even at a glance, that their fame as scholars and statesmen had only produced in them a deeper sense of genuine Christian humility. I had seen many times pictures of great artists who had portrayed gatherings of high ec clesiastics, but now I realized that while they had caught the beauty of their glorious historic robes, they had missed the fine spiritual character of their faces and their genuinely princely simplicity. Surely, here be[Fifteen]

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JOURNAL JACKSONVILLE FLA., DECEMBER 15 1874 Nucnbar 3 The Journal Mt Ri^iivmr, HfGH SCHOOL, POELISIlEi) VIl-MOxN'THLY I LEiilee and 0nJl#ieii. Permit me I i n D^half of tlie sebolars of jJuval Hchool, to returti our iiart>" timuka ;'c to 3 fN')u, for jour klri^liieae ami liberj| -fii^ piliiil very glad, imJ are greatly etteoiimg1 %  ili; |||i|ii=:ptiii|. ; epg ;ife f preparation for e8T0ted 10 the iaterest of l 7 uvl High BehooL Tile Jitflvatiilagea r-Writing, j Knowledge dws one tmt little good; unless mime practical u*e is inatie of] It. We go to Hehool and work har
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fore me was a world gathering which I doubt even the greatest artist could faithfully depict. And, as might be expected, the impression on my youthful mind was one too deep ever to be forgotten. ‘The great hall, with its famous frescoed ceiling and walls covered with decorations by the greatest ar tists, gave a sort of medievil dignity to the whole setting. The cardinals and prelates carried on their con versation in subdued whispers and an air of expectancy prevaded the whole gathering. The entrance of the noble guard from a side door was a sign of the arrival of the Pope, and, as the sedan chair in which he was seated was borne into the great hall and the Pope leaving the chair walked slowly and with the most dig nified gravity up the steps of the throne, all arose in silence and re mained standing until the Pope, erect before the great throne-chair, gave a smiling glance over the whole as sembly and then was seated. The gathering of cardinals, prelates, and students resumed their places, and Leo, with his fragile body learning slightly forward, gave a gentle wave of his hand as a signal for the in tellectual tournmaent to begin. ‘Naturally, my eyes were rivited on the majestic, yet frail figure on the throne. He was clothed from head to foot in creamy white soutane, a wide silken girdle at his waist, and his intellectual head, crowned with hair of silvery white, was covered with a closefitting white silk zucchetto, while his feet were incased in slippers of red velvet decorated with a golden cross. ‘The disputa between the students began and was carried on by the liveliest intellectual tilting between defender and objector. Two of the students selected to take part in this scholastic tourney were from our own college — Eddie Pace of Florida and Eddie Hanna of Rochester. Both of these young comrades of mine had distinguished themselves by very ex traordinary ability in Metaphysics. They not only knew extremely well the doctrines of Saint Thomas, as summed up in his Contra Gentiles, but they possessed also, in an extra ordinary degree, the greatest facility in expressing themselves in Latin, the language in which of course, the disputa was carried on. ‘Pace was a tall, thin youth with an extremely intellectual face in which shown two piercingly bright blue eyes, and his fine head was crowned with an abundant crop of red hair. He was deliberate, almost pensive in his attack and defense, and one could detect, even in his pro nunciation of Latin, something of the musical drawl of the south land. ‘In the School of Philosophy Pace was already distinguishing himself. Without a doubt, he was possessed of that quality of mind to which met aphysics is a sort of natural atmos phere, and his facility in Latin con spired to make his recitations an outstanding feature of the class. It was the delight, and indeed the sur prise, for Professor Lorenzelli to find this youthful product of American training exhibiting indications of the sort of qualities of mind which were hitherto considered the unique pos sessions of Spaniards and Italians. Indeed, I sometimes wondered whe ther the Paces of Florida might not have been of Spanish origin, or at least an admixture. ‘Hanna, his companion in arms, was quite an opposite type. Erect in his chair he was all alertness and energy — the temperment of the north. His hair was jet black and his eyes were alight with sprightly intellegence. He flung out his asser tions and denials with a quickness and a vivacity which added to the decided contrast between him and [Seventeen]

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his American confrere. The contest lasted for over an hour, and while he was proud of my two fellow-stud ents and listenea with growing in terest to their scholastic passage at arms with their opponents, never the less, my eyes were so rivited upon the centre of the picture, the Tope himself, and my mind was so intent upon every gesture and move ment of the great pontiff on his throne, that what the disputants were saying fell into a very second ary place. ‘As one of the disputants would launch out into a pointed and some what lengthy attack or defense, the frail and majestic figure on the throne would lean far forward in his great gold chair, his piercing eyes would look from one to the other of the disputants and his hands seemed actually quivering with the expect ancy of the scholastic question and answers. From time to time when some especially fine point was raised, and equally finely answered, his face was lit with an approving smile and he tapped gently the arm of his great throne, in sign of approbation and applause. ‘The great Cardinals in their places manifested equal signs of interest and approval, bowing their heads to one another, and whispering softly their brief comments. In a word, nothing seemed to be lost upon me in this wonderful picture where the greatest minds in Christiandom were sitting in kindly judgment upon the intellectual merits of the youth be fore them. It was kindly old age, with its wonderful experience of in tellectual and diplomatic life, look ing at the rising youth of the ec clesiastical world, destined in time to fill the high places which now they occupied. ‘The whole scene is before me now and the triumph of my fellow-stud ents, in such a very trying ordeal, was one of the most interesting mo ments of my scholastic life in Rome. Pace and Hanna, on that great oc casion, won a triumph which was the prophecy of later years when both of them would prove, as professors and prelate, the verification of the glory of that day in the Vatican Pal ace in the presence of the great Pope and his most distinguished court. Hanna, after a very successful ca reer as professor in the Seminary at Rochester, became, and still is the learned and energetic and zealous Archbishop of San Francisco.’ When the Holy Father learned that they both still had to take their doctoral examinations, he personally dispensed them from it. In November of the same year that Edward Pace received a degree in Theology, 1884, the Bishops of the United States of America held the third Plenary Council of Baltimore. It was this Council that approved the erection of the proposed Catholic University of -America. And so it was, as it seems to be always with Divine Providence, another step was taken that was significant to the direction that Almighty God had or dained for Father Edward Pace. In 1885 when the ordination class was given audience by the Pope be fore leaving for their homes, young Doctor Pace was asked by the Pope not to leave, but to remain in Rome. The young Theologian’s answer was that his Bishop was expecting him as soon as possible in St. Augustine, and he wished to give his priestly blessing to his parents. Pope Leo agreed that a visit to his home was proper, but he urged him to return within six months. However, when he got back to St. Augustine, there was so much to be done on the Mis sion, that no thought of a return to Rome was possible. [Eighteen]

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CATHEDRAL RECTOR He was welcomed gladly by his Bishop, the Right Reverend John Moore, D. D., second Bishop of St. Augustine. The Bishop kept the young doctor of theology, not twen ty-four years old when he was or dained, at his side, and appointed him Rector of the Cathedral. Dr. Pace was at the Cathedral Rectory when the tragic fire that destroyed the old Cathedral edifice broke out. He said he was awakened in the mid dle of the night with a crashing noise, and as he looked out the win dow the whole sky was aglow. He quickly wakened the Bishop and rushed to the Cathedral to save the Blessed Sacrament. The historic bap tismal register and records of the oldest church in the United States survived. As he stood with the Bishop looking at the dying embers in the chill morning light. Mister Henry Flagler rushed over and pressed a handsome check into the Bishop's hand and said we must rebuild at once. Dr. Pace never forgot that wonderfully generous act of that non-Catholic Millionaire. With the morning sun came the realization that his task was now to restore the Ancient Cathedral, an historic symbol to the origins of the Church not only in Florida but in the na tion, as well. The Diocesean archives reveal sev eral letters from the Bishop, who was away from the Diocese during part of Father Pace’s administration of the Cathedral, in which arrange ments are made for various projects for the restoring of the Cathedral sidewalks, altars, and the organ. In one letter from the Bishop to the young Cathedral Rector, the Bishop gives him the full faculties of the Diocese, comparable to the authority vested in a Vicar General. It was this short tenure as Rector of the Cathedral of his beloved Florida Dio cese, that the young Priest first had the opportunity to put into practice his love for the Liturgy. Recollec tions of his administration recall the beauty with which he conducted the liturgical services at the Cathed ral. This love for the work of God, as manifested in the liturgy was la ter to be evidenced in the Missal he would edit as well as an article he later wrote entitled, ‘Suggestions from the Ritual’. Here he makes a particular study of the blessings for such material things as eggs, butter, hay, salt, barns, bees, and bridges, as well as for Rosaries, Churches and Church-bells. One could only surmise, with a smile, that his Florida pride still was very much a part of him. Reading on through the article, we could not help but smilingly re call the incident of the straw hat and the Fernandina Railroad, as he describes the beauty in the blessings for such things as railroads; a bles sing in which God is asked to grant us the grace ‘to run in the way of His Commandments,’ and so arrive at our heavenly destination. Bishop Moore had received an ap peal for the release of Doctor Pace from the allegiance of the Diocese to teach at the American University, now known as the North American College at Rome. Bishop Moore, his Diocesean responsibilities increasing, could not grant the request at that time. In 1888, however. Bishop Keane, the first Rector of the newly established Catholic University of America in Washington, D. C., was informed by the Holy Father of the abilities and unique philosophical mind of Edward Pace of the Diocese of St. Augustine. The Bishop had filled most of the vacancies of his staff of Professors. However, the de partment of Philosophy offered the greatest challenge. The subject it self was one of contention and de[Nineteen]

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DAL VATICANO,.March. 30, 1963 *%> DI SuaSantita' No. 100918 Dear Father Dougherty, By your letter of March 10, you informed me of the plans to commemorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of the death of the late Monsignor Edward A. Pace. For many years I had known Monsignor Pace as a good and pious priest and an eminent scholar, and I was in a position to appreciate his meritorious and zealous labors as an educator and philosopher, his fidelity to the true Thomistic doctrine, and his valuable work which brought honor to the Catholic University of America. Very gladly, therefore, do I join in spirit in this celebration at Starke, the birth-place of that worthy Prelate, and I pray that this commemoration of his demise may induce many other young American clerics to follow in his footsteps in an intensive study of the philo sophical and theological works of St.Thomas Aquinas. With sentiments of high esteem and religious devotion, I remain. Yours sincerely in Christ, / Reverend Cornelius Dougherty, St. Edward's Church, P.O. Box 566, Starke, Florida St. PeterÂ’s, Rome

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DIOCESE OF ST. AUGUSTENE SAINT AUGUSTINE FLORIDA Apri 113, 1 963 Dear Father Dougherty: Monsignor Edward A. Pace was one of the most illustrious Catholics of the South. A native of Starke, Florida, he was educated in some of the best schools of America and Europe. As a Priest, he served for a time in his native state, and even became Pastor of our historic Cathedral Parish in St. Augustine,. But his great intellectual gifts made clear his special vocation to the University apostolate, and after a few years of parish life, he was invited to devote his talents to the Catholic University of America at Washington. He worked as Professor and Administrator at this great University for more than forty years. It was his life. His name is writ large in the annals of this Pontifical institution. Edward Pace influenced the formation of university policy; he communicated the best traditions of European learning to the new Athenoeum at Washington; he wrote treatises and monographs on education and philosophy; above all, he taught thousands of students who later on had a large hand in the building of our American Catholic system of education. I commend you highly for your good work in promoting this commemoration of the life and work of Monsignor Edward Aloysius Pace. With sentiments of esteem and of kind regard, I am Devotedly yours in Christ, 9 gwJ Arcmbishop BisQop of Saint Augustine To The Reverend Father Cornelius A. Dougherty St. Edward's Rectory Post Office Box 566 STARKE Florida

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bate, with reputable philosophers open to question on their articular theses. Thus, with Papal indication made in favor of Edward Pace, it seemed that a particularly ticklish problem was settled. However, the reluctance of Doctor Pace’s Bishop was again apparent, but in the light of the manner in which Pace was brought to the attention of the Rec tor, Bishop Moore finally relented, and on April 25, 1888, the notation is made in the Cathedral Accounts; ‘Account transferred to Rev. F. J. Lucke, Treasurer. With the signa ture, E. A. Pace, this young Doctor of Theology terminated his short term as Rector of the Cathedral of St. Augustine. BACK TO SCHOOL It was now his first and foremost task to prepare for the job ahead as Professor of Philosophy at the Cath olic University. He returned to Eu rope to pursue his studies. As a Priest, he was primarily concerned with an understanding of the human soul, as the life-giving principle and the rational and spiritual element in man. He decided, then, that Psy chology would be his major field of Scientific study. While in Paris, he was browsing one day through the book stalls so common along the banks of the Seine. He came across a work by the German Psychologist, Wilhelm Wundt, of the University of Leipzig, at this time unknown to Pace even by name. However, the book showed him exactly what he was looking for. He went straight to Leipzig where he was interviewed and accepted by Wundt as a student. He was the first Catholic Priest to study under the famous German Psychologist, “that fine German character,” as he later described his Professor. While at Leipsig, he con tinued to travel to Louvain where he attended the lectures of the famed Cardinal Mercier, as well as continu ing his attendance at lectures offered by the Sorbonne in Paris. Two ex periences during his days in Europe are significant. ‘At the Sorbonne, Mesmerism was the great excitement. One day, the Professor of Experimental Psychol ogy put a subject under hypnotic control. She was afflicted with nerv ous disorders which made movement very difficult. Now under the com mand of the hypnotist, she glided about with the greatest ease, where upon the professor exulted, ‘Voila, les miracles de Lourdes’. (Behold the miracle of Lourdes). But came the time to release the subject, the professor had completely forgotten the signal which would be the key for awakening her. In confusion he turned to the audience, but no one, only Doctor Pace had observed. He told the professor to press his finger on the base of the subject’s nose. As the professor followed Doctor Pace’s suggestion, and the subject was re leased from the trance. Doctor Pace was heard to murmur, “Voila les Miracles de Lourdes!” ‘While in Germany, Doctor Pace dressed as a civilian for at that time the Catholic Priest was not a re spected person in the German Cap ital. He had for his room-mate at that time, a young German Student. Dr. Pace’s rising hour was five a. m. and thence to Mass at the nearest Church. The student had been ob serving him for some months. One night, arriving at the room at a ra ther late hour, he found Doctor Pace very busy at the desk. He suddenly asked him, “Pace, what are you?” Pace a man of few words, simply replied, “A Priest!” Immediately the young man grab bed his hat and fled. [Twenty-two]

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‘Some months later, Doctor Pace was summoned to a death-bed. On that bed lay his former room-mate. Doctor Pace cared for him, received him into the Church, and later saw to his burial.' On November 16, 1891, he was awarded a degree of Doctor of Phi losophy and of Master of Fine Arts. The degree is translated as follows: Edward Pace, an American from the town of Starke, in the State of Flori da is awarded for his dissertation, which has been written in a most laudable manner, the degree of Doc tor of Philosophy, and Master of Fine Arts, Magna Cum Laude. A re production of this degree is provided in another place in this booklet. CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY Back in America again. Doctor Pace took hold of the task ahead of him with his quiet, slow assurance, transmitting to those who worked with him the same feeling of confi dence which governed all that he did. His manner as a Professor, Lec turer, Counsellor emulated the prin ciples of his Master, the great St. Thomas Aquinas. Tt was characteristic of Dr. Pace, like Thomas Aquinas, to get the question or problem asked clearly in mind first, before attempting to an swer. This was especially true in his personal guidance of the students who were priveleged to write their ^ssertations under his direction. He was never dictatorial nor arbi trary on any matter, nor did he in sist that his own views be accepted in any authoritative display between superior and inferior. Instead, he ask ed the student for the verification or proof of the latter’s fact-finding, and pressed, in the Socratic manner, the continual question of why, with respect to conclusion. Why do you think this? Why did you reject that? Have you thought of this al ternative? Perhaps you may want to look further into that aspect. Al ways he put the responsibility for conclusions on the student by lead ing him to a selection or choice be tween possible views. It was a “learn by doing” technique carried on so skillfully that the student was well prepared to take his place among authorities in his field by the time his doctorate was earned. If a per son for any reason fell below his standards, it was his custom to look far over the recalcitrant’s head un til amends were made. If a student remained obtuse or indolent in think ing a point through, it was Dr. Pace’s way to say, “I couldn’t accept that,” rather than to say, as others sometimes do, “You are wrong.” Rea son being uppermost as the disting uishing feature of man, persuasion is an important technique, and skill in persuasion, a factor in leadership. Encouragement to go on, help in strengthing powers, direction of cap abilities toward ever higher goals, these were characteristic of the teaching of this master psychologist. He never took personal credit for the acheivements of any student, and repudiated quickly any reference to a student as a student of his. In stead, he would say that the student referred to had been a student at the university. It was humility in this sense that prevented Dr. Pace from forming a school of personal influence, as some other world fa mous educators have done, especial ly in Philosophy. In line with this same characteristic emphasis on truth was his reliance on academic achievement for distinction, rather than on ecclesiastical rank. ‘Academic robes were alone appro priate for University functions. Therefore, although he himself [Twenty-three]

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had been accorded the highest rank as a Monsignor, he never wore pur ple vestments at University func tions, unless some very special digni ty made it obligatory; and usually they were connected in some way with liturgical services. Even in giv ing baccalaurate sermons, or ser mons at the Mass of the Holy Spirit at the beginning of the Academic year. Dr. Pace wore academic cap and gown and hood.' Two of his nieces, daughters of his only married brother, George, were taught by him at Trinity Col lege, but he treated them with ''super-indifference" lest he be accused of nepotism. One of them stated that the painting in the Trinity Col lege lobbj^ of her Uncle Edward dressed in his monsignor robes was quite an unfamiliar sight. It was more typical, especiaHy after his horse riding days were over, to see him walking across the campus with his daily attire of rain coat, rubbers and umbrella, philosophically and psychologically prepared for the elements. ‘Maryland and Virginia, which sur round the District of Columbia, are still horse country, and horseback riding was considered a more enjoy able form of exercise than walking in the early days before sidewalks pick ed a way through the red mud. Dr. McCormick, afterwards, like Dr. Shahan, Rector of the University, and a Bishop, recalled several rides he and Dr. Pace took together. The practice was given up, however, after they were riding in San Francisco one day, and Dr. Pace's borrowed western horse tried to climb a tree.' Awareness of his value to the Uni versity, and the prestige his asso ciations both within and without the Church, with lay as well as clerical dignitaries, soon began to assert it self. ‘Formal notification to the Ameri can Catholic people of the establish ment and objectives of the National Catholic Welfare Council was given in the pastoral letter of the Hier archy which was published late in February, 1920. At the meeting of the bishops the previous September Gibbons had appointed a committee consisting of himself. Cardinal O'Connell, and Bishop Shahan to supervise the writing of the first general pastoral of the hierarchy since 1884. The actual drafting of the document was turned over to Monsignor Edward A. Pace, profes sor of philosophy in the Catholic Un iversity of America. After he had finished the first draft. Pace sent it to the Cardinal of Boston who went over it carefully and offered detailed criticisms, for which Pace thanked him in the name of Shahan and in his own name. “Your approval of the document as a whole is most en couraging," he said, “and I shall do my best to bring the last sections into line with the rest." In the sec tion of the pastoral devoted to the N. C. W. C., it was stated that in view of the good results obtained through merging Catholic activities for the time and purpose of war, the bishops had determined to maintain for the ends of peace the spirit of union and the co-ordination of their forces. Although he had nothing to do with the preparation of the text. Gibbons signed the document in the name of all the Bishops as the dean of the American hierarchy. ‘In 1912 a rumor reached Edward A. Pace, dean of the school of Phil osophy, that he was to be made a Monsignor in recognition of the dis tinction he had brought to the Uni versity as one of the principal edi tors of the Catholic Encyclopedia which had been completed in 1912. Pace was strongly opposed to the honor and thought that it would do injury to his work. In his opinion there should be only one Monsignor in the University, and he should be the Rector. It had cost a great deal to attain something like unity among [Twenty-four]

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the professors and Pace was fearful that a papal honor for him might offer a pretext for what he called '‘a new split!’' He was grateful to Gibbons for the good will in his regard and he found the approval which the Chancellor was pleased to give to his work most gratifying, but he begged to be spared the rumored dignity. Seven years later, however, after Pace had distinguished him self anew by writing the original draft of the hierarchy’s pastoral let ter of September, 1919, he was rais ed to the rank of Protonotary Apostolic at the instance of Gibbons. In thanking the Cardinal he said: “In the honor which you have ob tained for me, I am glad to recog nize a new evidence of the holy Fath er’s good-will toward the University and a new reason for hoping for the work which means so much for Cath olic education may speedly attain the ideals which you have cherished from the beginning.” ‘The principal item of business at the meeting of the trustees which preceded the jubilee celebration was to make provision for the rectorship, since Shahan had now reached the expiration of his first term of office. On the terna drawn up Shahan was given an unanimous vote for first place. Pace was put second, and Shanahan third. Gibbons forwarded the list to Benedetto Cardinal Lorenzella, perfect of the congregation of studies, with a strong recommenda tion that Shahan should be reap pointed, and within a few weeks the Holy See confirmed the Rector in office for another six years.’ The generosity with which the shy Doctor, brilliant Pace went about the work Almighty God had set before him to do, began to re flect in the accomplishments which seemed to flow from his hands. So numerous are these, together with the honors which have been heaped upon him, that we have prepared a special place for them here, to list them chronologically. CAREER HIGHLIGHTS 1891 Became Professor of Psychology until 1891. 1892 Charter member of American Psychological Association. 1893 Welcomed to Washington the first Apostolic Delegate his former Teacher and friend in Rome, Archbishop Francesco Satolli, who had recommended Edward Pace for the Professorship at C.U. 1894 Became Professor of Philosophy until 1935. 1895 Became Dean of the School of Philosophy until 1899. Delivered discourse at dedication of McMahon Hall. Helped establish the Catholic University Bulletin. 1896 Lectured at Catholic Summer School despite questions raised about his Liberalism and Orthodoxy. 1897 Co-Founder of Trinity College for Catholic Women. 1898 Delivered address “The College Training of the Clergy” at his Alma Mater on the 50th anniversary of St. Charles College. 1899 Co-founder and first Director at the Institute of Pedagogy later to become the department of Education. 1901 Editor of “Psychological Studies for the Catholic University of America. [Twenty-six]

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1904 ;Co-founder and editor of “The Catholic Encyclopedia.” 1906 Second term of Dean of School of Philosophy until 1914. Delivered sermon on 100th anniversary of Baltimore Cathedral. 1911 Co-founder and first Editor of “The Catholic Educational Review.” 1912 Director of studies at Catholic University. 1914 Co-founder of Catholic Sisters College to train Teachers. Honored with Papal medal, “Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice. 1916 Helped inaugurate Sisters College in California. Helped in the Modern Translation of the Roman Missal entitled: “Mass Every Day of the Year.” 1917 General Secretary at Catholic University until 1924. 1919 Prepared draft for Pastoral letter of American Bishops. Helped establish the National Catholic Welfare Council. 1920 Honored on July 15 by Pope Benedict XV as Protonotary Apostolic with title of Rt. Rev. Monsignor. 1922 Preached sermon on May 3rd at Consecration of Bishop Patrick Barry as fifth Bishop of St. Augustine. Elected member of Excutive Board of the American Council of Education. 1923 Preached Sermon in commemoration of the deceased Alumni at the celebration of the Diamond Jubilee of St. Charles College. 1924 Vice President of the American Council of Education. Appointed Vice-Rector of Catholic University. 1926 President of the American Council of Education. Co-founder and first Editor of “The New Scholasticism.” First editor of “Studies in Philosophy and Psychiatry.” Co-founder of the American Catho lic Philosophical Association. Lectured at School of Social Service in V^ashington. Co-founder of Catholic Sisters College in Washing ton. 1927 Elected President of American Catholic Philosophical Association. 1929 Scholarship Burse founded at Sisters College in the name of Mon signor Edward A. Pace, by the International Federation of Catho lic Alumnae recognition of his services as moderator of the Federa tion. Appointed by President Hoover to be a member of the Na tional Advisory Committee to discuss relations between the Federal Government and Education. 1931 American Catholic Philosophical Association honored Monsignor Pace by making their entire convention a tribute to him and his work in Catholic Philosophy. A volume of essays on philosophical, psychological and education subjects written in his honor were presented at a testimonial dinner on the occasion of his seventieth birthday. 1932 While convalescing from an operation he composed his well known “Prayer for the Catholic University” which was later used on October 12, 1938 by Cardinal Dougherty as the invocation opening the University’s Golden Jubilee Year. [Twenty-seven]

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1933 On June 14 he presented President Franklin D. Roosevelt for the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws and composed the Citation which was broadcast nationwide on the Radio. 1934 Third term as Dean of the School of Philosophy. Leg amputated in January. 1935 Observed 50th anniversary as Priest on May 30. Received permis sion from Rome to say Mass sitting down. Congratulated by Pope Pius XI on Jubilee. The Baltimore Catholic Review congratulated him with bold type headline: MONSIGNOR PACE YOU HAVE SERVED NOBLY Commemorative Issue of Catholic University Bulletin dedicated to him on his anniversary. Honored as ViceRector Emeritus Of University. Honored as Professor of Philoso phy Emeritus. Received Honorary Doctor of Laws Degree from Catholic University, bestowed by Archbishop Michael Curley as a rarity on one hot a head of state. In conferring the degree Arch bishop Curley said, “Although as Chancellor of the University I have bestowed degrees upon the heads of nations and distinguish ed prelates, no other occasion has brought me more personal pleas ure than the present office of conferring this degree which hon ors a truly great educator and an outstanding prelate, my friend. Doctor Pace.'’ Honored by Georgetown University on Founders day, by presentation of Cardinal Mazzela Award for achievement in the field of Philosophy. 1938 Passed away on April 26 at Providence Hospital in Washington. Memorial Issue of Catholic University Bulletin dedicated to Mon signor Pace included Eulogy by his close friend. Father Ignatius Smith, 0. P. and a final tribute by Monsignor Maurice Sheehy. Pic ture and Obituary carried in many secular newspapers including the New York Times; and in many Catholic Weeklies including the Baltimore Catholic Review. Apostolic Delegate Archbishop (later Cardinal) Cicognani, and Archbishop Michael Curley among pre lates at his funeral in the National Shrine of the Immaculate Con ception. Graveside prayers read by the bishop of his own Diocese, Bishop Patrick Barry of St. Augustine. 1941 Dedication of Starke church on October 13, the Feast of St. Edward by Bishop Joseph P. Hurley, Bishop of St. Augustine; dedication sermon by Monsignor Patrick McCormick Vice-Rector of Catholic University was a tribute to Monsignor Edward Pace, a native son of Starke. 1961 Commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Edward Pace in Starke observed by Catholic Philosophers in McMahon Hall at the Catholic University of America. 1963 Dedication by his Grace, the Most Reverend Joseph P. Hurley, Archbishop of St. Augustine of a Memorial Plaque in St. Edward's church to perpetuate for posterity the humility as well as scholar ship of Monsignor Edward Aloysuis Pace of Starke, Florida, on April 26, the twenty fifth anniversary of his death. [Twenty-eight]

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THE LAST DAYS OF MONSIGNOR PACE Trips to Europe were necessary at intervals of every five or ten years. On one trip he took documents over to Rome favoring the cause of Bless ed Elizabeth Seton, just recently beautified by Pope John XXIII. On another he carried the documents for Kateri Tekawitha, the postulator of her cause at the time being Dr. Pace’s long time friend and colleague on the Catholic Encyclopedia editori al board, Father John J. Wynne, S. J. With Father Wynne, Dr. Pace had anticipated the modern liturigical movement by publishing in 1916 a complete English translation of the Latin Missal for every day in the year. In 1920 he was in Rome when the appointment of Archbisop Curley to the See of Baltimore was made, and he had the pleasure of sending the telegram with the announcement to his Bishop in St. Augustine, who had to be called from the field to receive it. About ten years later, with the approval of Archbishop Cur ley, Dr. Pace composed a beautiful prayer for the Catholic University which bears Archbishop Curley’s im primatur. His last trip to Rome was made in 1932. The heat and the vexing task of rewriting documents under pressure of “deadlines,” together with the ex tra duties connected with the con secration of the Rector, Dr. Ryan, brought back an old sore spot on his foot, which became aggravated enough to confine him to the hospital after his return. He never recovered, but during the four years of suffer ing that followed the amputation, he went back to the University two or three times in attempts to resume teaching. From his hospital room he read proofs of a book by Dr. T. V. Moore, read and approved the doc toral dissertation of the last student to claim him as “major professor”, and worked over successive revisions of the statuta of the University, and the new curricula for the canonical schools, at the request of the Rector, Bishop Ryan. On three different occasions the angel of death hovered near, but the completeness of his Christian resig nation to the will of Almighty God was a source of inspiration to those who attended him at those times. There is no more vivid a description of this one of his many virtues, than “The Last Days of Monsignor Pace,” written by his close friend the Right Reverend Monsignor Maurice Sheeh}^ Ph. D. for the memorial issue of the Catholic University Bulletin. ‘The first occasion of death was when at an advanced age, Dr. Pace under went a major operation. The rector of the University, Bishop Ry an, was summoned from a sickbed because it was feared Dr. Pace would not survive the operation. There was a challenge in his eye as he came from the operating table where mind seem to triumph over matter and he said, “I can teach my classes tomorrow.” In a few days he was back in his room, correcting dis sertations, giving lectures, and doing detailed administrative work. When several years later, the doctors an nounced that it would be necessary to amputate his leg, he bowed his head in humble resignation. His hu mor did not fail him even in such a crisis and when he rallied from the operation he announced to his friends: “My dancing days are over. No. I can still pirouette.” Every pain of body tortured him for months but not once did he flinch or give his callers the least sign of physical or mental distress. In the summer of 1936, a serious relapse occurred, sumultanous with the death of his devoted friend. Monsignor Kerby. A few of his friends kept a death watch at his door, expecting that every [Thirty]

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hour would be his last. Late that night his nurse came upon him chuckling. “Fm not going to die.” he said, and when his recovery was more complete he upbraided his friends for their failure to trust in his “physical vigor.” By special dis pensation from the Holy See, Mon signor Pace was permitted to saj" Mass sitting until he became too weak to attempt even that. Then he looked forward eagerly to the Com ing of Our Lord in Communion. Every day of his life the will of God grew dearer to him. It was a special dispensation of Divine Providence that his faculties of mind, particu larly his memory, were as keen as ever until the end. In many visits paid him during his four years’ resi dence in the hospital I found such a profundity of faith and confidence in God that one might suppose his apostolate of teaching was in Gods’ plan to be crowned by his apostolate of suffering. The loss of his sister, Miss Mary Pace, in February, was a great blow to him. The funeral serv ice’s for her were held in the chapel of Providence Hospital so that Mon signor Pace might attend. No doubt even then he sensed the imminence of reunion with her. He died two months after his sister. In God’s mercy, there was little pain at the end for Monsignor Pace. On Monday, April 25, he had received a number of his old friends, including Monsig nor O’lConnel of Toledo, a member of the Board of trustees, and Mon signor Eugene Connolly, and old friend of the family. At two fifteen Tuesday morning he rang for his nurse who saw that a hemorrhage threatened and who summoned his devoted brother and sister to his bedside. The chaplain led this little group in prayer as Monsignor Pace breathed his last about three A. M. No tribute could be devised today, that would surpass those which pour ed in from around the world at the news of the death of this great Edu cator, and Philosopher. Among the many messages of condolence received from leaders in Church, State, professional and edu cational circles from all over the world, upon the death of the Vice Rector Emeritus, the Right Rever end Edward A. Pace, are the follow ing: “The death of Monsignor Pace leaves a large void in Catholic Edu cation. As a professor he was a ver itable inspiration to a legion of teachers. His academic ideals were high, and he maintained them by word and act. His loyalty and de votion to the best interests of the church were intelligent and unflag ging. His accomplishments in be half of every good cause, but parti cularly in the fields of psychology, philosophy and education were un equalled by anyone in the American church. For ‘in the midst of the church he opened his mouth; and the Lord filled him with the spirit of wisdom and understanding; he cloth ed him with a robe of glory’. (Tri bute of the Most Reverend James H. Ryan, Bishop of Omaha and Rector Emeritus of the University.) “Monsignor Pace, now in the peace and rest he so bravely won, leaves this Catholic University of America sorely bereft. I, as Rector would of fer in these pall-hung days my halt ing tribute, far below his merit, to the memory of this fine leader who’s welcoming encouragement and wise counsel never failed me since my first visit to him after I became Rector of the University. He gladly opened his treasures of University lore always to find a helpful way and a prudent one in facing difficult problems. It is easy for me to un derstand the trust Bishop Shahan and Bishop Ryan reposed in such a counselor. What in life Monsignor Pace was to this University, his liv ing memory must continue to be. We, with whom this memory lives, must accept as a compelling com[ Thirty-one]

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mission the perpetuation of this no ble tradition of devotion to Catholic truth and culture. This is our her itage from Edward Aloysius Pace. We had hoped to have him for our Golden Jubilee. That occasion must now serve to give his name and mem ory lasting place upon this campus.” (Tribute of the Right Reverend Jos eph Corrigan, Rector of the Catholic University of America.) “Deeply grieved at news of pass ing of Monsignor Pace. May his noble soul rest in peace. My sincerest condolences to the University and Faculty.” (Patrick Cardinal Hayes, Archbishop of New York.) “Heartfelt sympathy in your great loss.” (Most Reverend Edward J. Hanna, Titular Archbishop of Gortyna—Formerly Archbishop of San Francisco.) “Deepest sympathy on death of Monsignor Pace. His v/ork at the University has been a great service to the Church in America.” (Most Reverend John J. Mitty, Archbishop of San Francisco.) “May God be praised for removing Monsignor Pace from his untold suf ferings. This great and outstand ing educator in university training has been an unique figure for fifty years. His heart was in the Cath olic University at Washington and I fear we shall not see his like again.” (Most Reverend Thomas F. Lillis, Bishop of Kansas City.) “Permit me to extend to you in behalf of the Diocese of Brooklyn as well as in my own name our sincere sympathy in recognition of your re cent loss sustained through the death of Monsignor Pace v/ho has rendered for so many years capable and conscientious service to the Uni versity. I shall be mindful of his soul in m.y Mass and prayers. May he rest in eternal peace and happi ness.” (Most Reverend Thomas E. Molloy, Bishop of Brooklyn.) “I extend to you and to the entire Catholic University my most earnest condolences on the passing of the lamented Monsignor Pace. I have had occasion to deal with him in Rome and to admire his knowledge and his virtue, particularly his spirit of sacrifice and his devotion to the cause of the University. I shall not fail to pray for his soul, especially in the Holy Mass. “Sincerely yours, “Francesco Robert!.” Rome, April 20, 1938. (His excel lency, Rt. Rev. Francesco Robert!.) “I think that every one at Notre Dame is deeply affected by the news of the death of Monsignor Pace. All of us knew him and loved him. He was the embodiment of the ideals of the Catholic University during most of its existence, and I knbw that his inspiration will be a living force for many years to come, not only in Washington but throughout Amer ica. We will have a Requeim Mass for the Repose of his soul, and there will be many Masses and Holy Com munions for the same intention. Please give our condolence to his surviving relatives.” (Very Rev. John F. O’Hara, C. S. C., Pres. Uni versity of Notre Dame.) “You have my deep sympathy in the death of Monsignor Pace, bril liant scholar and cultured priest and gentleman, with the assurance of Mass for the happy Repose of his soul.” (Rev. Hugh O’Donnell, C.S.C., Vice President, University of Notre Dame.) “The Faculty of Mundelein Col lege joins me in extending deep sym pathy to you and to all the Catho lic University in the loss of Right Rev. Monsignor Edward Pace, a dis tinguished priest and educator, whose influence was world-wide and whose death has occasioned grief among Catholics through out the United States.” (Sister Mary Consuela, Su perior, Mundelein College.) “It is Vv^ith feelings of deepest sym pathy that we have heard of the [Thirty-two]

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MONSIBNOB PACE. YOU HAVE SERVED NOBLY VOL XXII—No. 29 DATA SOUGHT ON CONDITIONS IN MEXICO tahimore Unit. Conferenc Jews And Christi.ns. Se> To Presider Archbishop Designates June 16 For Peter's Pence Collection SIX STU OFARCHDpCESE TOBEORIfAlNED lonsignor Pace Is Force CATHOLIC PRESS In Nation’s Intellectual Life Prelate Who Has Spent 50 Years In Priesthood With The Catholic University Since its 1 Has Meant Much To Churc IS NOT KNOWN IN POOR MEXICO

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death of Monsignor Pace whose long life has wrought so much for the Church and for Catholic Educa tion. In Monsignor Pace’s passing the Catholic University has lost one of the strongest vitalizing forces of its foundation and the Sisters of Chari ty of the Blessed Virgin Mary a most loyal and devoted friend whose in spiration and guidance has been theirs for thirty years.” (Sister Mary Antonia, B.V.M., Superior, Clarke College, Dubuque, Iowa.) ‘‘Hearfelt sympathy in the loss of Monsignor Pace, devoted pioneer of the Sisters College. He was a true inspiration of our age, loved and revered for the greatness of his soul and the grace of his influence. Our Sisters unite in prayer for his be loved soul.” (Mother M. Vincentia and the Sisters of Charity of New York.) It is true, that Monsignor Pace might have musingly referred to himself as being of pioneer stock, and his students might have had oc casion to smile. But a pioneer he was. Dr. Miriam Rooney, the last student to major under Doctor Pace’s direction. Research Professor, and former Dean of the School of Law, Seton Hall University, in a special dedication to Monsignor Pace on the occasion of this anniversary, entitled, “In Thy Light”, summarizes so beau tifully the totality of Monsignor Pace’s dedication: ‘He was a pioneer in almost every thing he undertook; extraordinary in his understanding of complicated things; simple in his complete reli ance on his Creator; meticulous in exactness of detail; generous of him self to everyone; American and Cath olic to his finger-tips; dedicated sole ly to following as closely as he could in the footsteps of Christ, the perfect Teacher, who, defining Himself as “The Way, the Truth, and the Life”, said “Learn of Me”, and, later, “Go and teach.” Father Smith, in his eulogy of Dr. Pace at the Requiem attended by twelve Bishops, recalled that, “Years ago, when I mentioned something about the purple he had earned but rarely wore, he said, “I want to die a good, old priest”; then. Father Smith went on to say, “Good he was, as we all know; old,—in his seventy-seventh year and a priest he was, until the end, and forever.” Eternal rest grant unto him, 0 Lord, and let thy perpetual light shine upon him. No other American has given greater testimony to the act uality of the Blessed Trinity.’ [Thirty-four]

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FAMILY PORTRAIT FATHER GEORGE EDWARD PACE was born on January 5, 1831. He was the son of Richard Pace and Sara Zetour. The Paces were an old Southern family which had settled early in Virginia, moved to Georgia and even tually to northern Florida. There they acquired acres of pine land in the Middleburg-Starke area, where Monsignor Pace’s father was raised. He was one of five children; John, the oldest of the boys, Mary Eliza beth, Augustus, and a half-brother, Jerry M. Blitch. His brother Augus tus, with whom he later went into business in Jacksonville, served in the Florida militia company organiz ed by George Pace’s business partner. Captain John Charles Richard, as did his half-brother Jerry Blitch. An early ancestor, Richard Pace, was at one time secretary to King Henry VHI. He accompanied the Papal Le gate, Cardinal Campeggio, from Rome to England on the matter con cerning King Henry’s Spanish mar riage. In London, he became asso ciated with the circle of classical scholars that surrounded the Dean of St. Paul’s in London, and remain ed as one of their number. George Pace died February 2, 1902, and was buried in the Old City Cemetery, in Jacksonville. MOTHER MARGARET KELLY PACE, was the child of Owen Crofton Kelly, the Master of the Ports of Halifax, Nova Scotia, and a Miss Quin, the daugh ter of an old and wealthy English family. Mrs. Pace’s family history reveals that her uncle, the Earl of Dunraven of England and Ireland, was instrumental in securing the ap pointment of Master of the Ports of Halifax for her Father, a position which he held until death. Of her marriage to George Pace in 1859, there were seven children, of whom two died at a very young age; Anne and Louis. Of the other five. Mon signor Edward Pace was the oldest. Four lived a long life, with one sis ter Elizabeth, still residing in Wash ington, D. C. George Lee, at the age of 33, died in a train accident. Her two sisters had come to Flori da from Nova Scotia. Mrs. T. B. Hoyte, called 'Auntie Hoyte’ by the family, was the widow of a Mr. R. Dillon, one of the witnesses to the deed for the property on which the Church in Middleburg was built. Her other sister, Mary, was twice the Postmistress of Starke, in 1866, and then again in 1870. She made her home with the Paces and together with the Reverend Edmund Aubril, who baptized Edward, was one of Monsignor’s godparents. Her obituary, which appeared in the old Jacksonville newspaper, the Metropolis, on August 20, 1900 de picts her married life as being most happy. It further describes her as being a person with a bright temp erament, and a clear, vigorous mind, lovable in disposition and most kind and gentle in manner. Referring to her deep Catholic Faith, the descrip tion goes on to say, "she had strong religious inclinations, being a devout member of the Catholic Church, and her whole life was marked with good ness and love of God.” Margaret Kel ly Pace was buried, as was her hus band two years later, in the Old City Cemetery of Jacksonville. BROTHERS AND SISTERS GEORGE LEE PACE was the second son of George and Margaret Pace. He was born July 6, 1865. He was the only one of the Pace chil dren to marry, and was the father of two girls, Anna Lee, and Mar[Thirty-five]

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guerite. Both nieces were students of Doctor Pace at Catholic Univer sity. Marguerite, now Mrs. Arthur A. Corcoran, who resides in Jack sonville, is an honored guest at the Anniversary Mass and Dedication of the plaque. To her, we are sincerely grateful and deeply indebted for the wealth of personal memories she has provided us, to make our Com memorative Booklet a fitting tribute to her uncle. George Lee Pace met a tragic death, when, trying to re trieve his hat, he fell from a train, sustaining a head injury which caus ed his untimely death at the age of 33. ANNIE PACE was born on Feb ruary 6, 1868, the third of the Pace children. However, she was destined to live only shortly, having died at the age of ten, December 21, 1878. Like her mother and father, she too, is buried in Jacksonville. MARY STELLA PACE was born when Monsignor Pace was eight years old. She moved to Washing ton in 1900 and lived there until her death in 1938, only three months prior to the death of her brother. Monsignor Pace. The funeral serv ices were held at Providence Hospital, where Monsignor Pace had been confined for sometime, so that he would be able to attend. Her death was a great blow to him, and seem ed to affect him deeply. His friends from the University came forward in his grief to be at his side. The six pallbearers were professors from the University. His close friend, the Right Reverend Maurice Sheehy, celebrated the Requiem Mass, with another life-long and famous friend. Father Ignatius Smith, 0. P., con ducting the graveside services. LOUIS F. PACE, like his sister Annie, was to live only a short time here on earth. Born on May 3, 1870, he was baptized at Immaculate Con ception Church on June 5, 1870 as reflected in the the Parish records. He died at the age of eight and was buried, with his sister in Jackson ville. CHARLES FRANCIS PACE was to become one day a Financial Clerk of the United States Senate. Like Mary, he had moved to Washington and made his home there, having previously worked at the Bradford Bank for a time, as well as in Or lando. Monsignor Pace was 11 years old at the time of his birth. Charles was baptized also at the Immacu late Conception Church and the date is recorded in the Parish register as November 24, 1872, a month and three days after his birth. ELIZABETH CATHERINE PACE the youngest of the Pace family, still resides in Washington, D. C. She was one of the first Catholic girls from the North Florida area to at tend St. JosephÂ’s Academy, at St. Augustine, Florida, and is well re membered by the Sisters there. Al though, due to recent illness. Miss Pace is unable to attend these rites honoring her brother. Monsignor Pace, she is also an honored guest, and shares in our prayers and our appreciation on this day. To her, al so, we are grateful for her approval of our efforts in honor of Monsignor Pace, and indebted to her for her thoughts which have helped us per sonalize these memories of her il lustrious brother. [Thirty-six]

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Most Reverend Fulton J. Sheen, D.D., National Director, Propogation of the Faith. Rt. Rev. Msgr. William Barry, P.A., V.F., Pastor St. Patrick's Church, Miami Beach, Fla. Rt. Rev. Msgr. James B. Cloonan, Pastor Church of the Assumption, Jacksonville, Florida. Rt. Rev. Msgr. Joseph B. McAllister, Vice Rector, Catholic University of America, Washington, D. C. Rt. Rev. Msgr. John J. McClafferty, Assistant to the Rector for Univer sity Development Catholic University of America. Rt. Rev. Msgr. John K. Ryan, Dean, School of Philosophy, Catholic Uni versity of America. Rt. Rev. Msgr. Maurice S. Sheehy, P.A., V.F., Ph.D., Pastor Immaculate Conception Church, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Rev. Father Leo A. Foley, SecÂ’y., American Catholic Philosophical Asso ciation, Washington, D. C. Rev. Father John Joseph Gallagher, Editor, The Catholic Review, Balti more, Maryland. Rev. Father Michael V. Gannon, Mission of Nombre de Dios, St. Augus tine, Florida. Rev. Father John F. Linn, S.S., President, St. Charles College, Catonville, Maryland. Rev. Father Patrick J. OÂ’lGarroll, Bishop Moore High School, Orlando, Florida. Rev. Father Neil A. Sager, The Chancery, Diocese of St. Augustine, St. Augustine, Florida. Rev. Sister Regina, S.S.J., All Saints Home, Jacksonville, Florida. Mrs. A. A. Corcoran, Niece to Monsignor Pace, Jacksonville, Florida. Roy J. De Ferrari, Ph.D., Director, Program of Affiliation, Catholic Uni versity of America. Henry J. Dubester, Chief, General Reference and Bibliography Division, Library of Congress. Hoyle F. Montgomery, Jr., Ass't. Humanities Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Jane Quinn, Associate Editor, The Florida Catholic, Orlando, Florida. Miriam Theresa Rooney, M.A., Ph.D., Research Professor and Former Dean, School of Law, Seton Hall University, Newark, New Jersey. Susan Uebelacker, Interlibrary Loan Librarian, Catholic University of America, Washington, D. iC. R. E. Upton, Jr., B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Education Director, Florida State Prison, Raiford, Florida. Eugene P. Willging, Director of the Library, Catholic University of America, Washington, D. C. 'The Right PaceÂ’ Group of Holy Name Men, Raiford, Florida. [Thirty-seven]

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THE PRIESTS OF STARKE The six Bishops of the Diocese of St. Augustine, have all entered in to the history of Edward Pace of Starke. But history will not reveal the number of Priests they have sent into our midst to offer the Sacrifice of the Mass, and administer the Sacraments for the honor and glory of Al mighty God, and the salvation of souls. Just as the labor of the early Missionaries of our Diocese has pro duced a humble and learned Priest, of whom this City, State and Diocese are so justly proud, we pray that the work of the more recent Missionaries of Starke, listed below, might be sprinkled with God's Divine grace, and produce future Priests like to Monsignor Pace, as he became like to Christ. THE REVEREND FATHERS Thomas J. Murphy June 1941 to May 1943 Michael J. Fogarty June 1943 to May 1945 Raymond M. Amiro May 1945 to Sept. 1945 John O'Dowd Oct. 1945 to Dec. 1948 Larkin F. Connolly Jan. 1949 to Sept. 1949 R. T. Rastatter Oct. 1949 to Nov. 1950 William H. Neuhaus Feb. 1951 to May 1951 Francis T. Dunleavy July 1951 to Sept. 1951 Richard Lyons Oct. 1951 to Oct. 1952 Harry F. Turnier Oct. 1952 to Sept. 1954 Harold F. Jordan Sept. 1954 to Aug. 1956 John A. Skehan Aug. 1956 to April 1958 John X. Linnehan April 1958 to June 1958 Cornelius A. Dougherty Present Administrator May Edward, the Priest who ‘set the pace' for us in so many fields of endeavor during his lifetime, now rest ‘in pace', for all eternity! [Thirty-eight]

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Starke Church