Citation
No-so-we-ea

Material Information

Title:
No-so-we-ea
Creator:
St. Petersburg High School (Saint Petersburg, Fla.)
Floridiana Collection
Place of Publication:
St. Petersburg, Fla
Publisher:
Students of St. Petersburg High School
Frequency:
Annual
regular
Language:
English
Edition:
v.7 1926
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8 (1927).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
UF Special Collections, Florida History
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
028840345 ( ALEPH )
56589949 ( OCLC )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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This item has the following downloads:


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NO-SO-WE-EA
SeS(jLli-Ce I I M Ill ii I I
N u niber
VOLI.711,II SEV'FN
1926
P PUBLISHED A NA'U.-I LL Y I? Y
THh" STUDFAYS
0/1'
sr. PHTERSBURG. HIGH SCHO()I,
ST. PETEIRSBUR(l, FLORA




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Dedication
To her whom Love hathi made our own,
LOIS C. GE IGER
We offer this little 1)ok in the hope that it may hold and bring to her a small part of our love, and gratitude, and admiration. To others it will be a book of memories, but to her it will be a book of Dreams; for in each face she finds here, she may foresee achievements yet to come, of which she was the inspiration!
NVine(




Foreword
"Tempus fugit," as the Romans said, and like the tide, waits for no man.
Accordingly, we know that sometime, perhaps often, in the future we will come to the end of a perfect day and find ourselves saying, "Backward, turn backward, oh Time, in your flight, and make me a child again just for tonight."
So we have compiled this little book, from the varied and interesting material which you yourselves have furnished us, and hope that when that day comes we shall haveThe No-So-TIWe-Ea with us yet, Lest we forget -lest we forget.




ORDER OF BOOKS
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The School
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Principal




JOSEPHINE ALTMAN, A. 13. GE1RT RUDE DAV\IS, A.B3., ILB. lBANLIS 1DO)l l. \I i.I
Nebraska University UT. of Chicago I' of S .
French Eng/ils/i, Lu/in iiID
ANNA APPLEB3Y, A. 13., A. M. I\'I AA.I)TIINA.V
Scarritt- Morrisville College Mbri Colg RAV1N NA A.l~lM D ETS1.N
Ifi s/or v Pg/is/i, La liii
ATTi( UST1A 13. CENTER, L1 1) 1ICIKSO N, 11. P). E ,
13. A., MV. A. Spriiigfield College
C'olumbnia P/ica THI rainiiii
MRS. XV. P. COFFEY MRS. E. XX'. I)ORAN West,
U. of Fla. Pe~ab)ody C(ol lege
history, Problems Libratriani
EDITH D)AVIS, B. L., B. S. VERA MADG(E D)UMAS, 1. Fv FRAN1K E. H )RTIER, BI.S.
WhTlitworth College H oward College U of 1\ainle
.cience' Lain .1la/li.




I/ 4
GLADYS GARDNER, A. B. SUE MAUDE KELLEY, B.S. KENNETH LEWIS, E. E.
Fla. State U. of Va. Syracuse U.
English Math. Math.
MARTHA ANN GIEG, A. B. BARBARA KING, A. B. ALEXANDER McGILL, A. B.
Goucher College Randolph-Macon Randolph-Macon
English English, Physical Training Math. Science
LOIS GEIGER, A. 1.CHARLOTTE L. KING, B.PD
Piedmiont College B. S. 'VINCENT L. MEAD, B. S.
Latin, English b S. Baldwin-Wallace College
Columbia U.Math. ATLEY TILGHMAN GLISSON Domestic Art
13. A. JENNIE E. MILLER, 13. S.
Vanderbilt, U. LaVERNE M. KOBLENZER, B.S. Miss. State College
Spanish, Histors, Western Reserve U. Science
English
L. A. HERR, B. S., M. A.
Columbia U. PRISCILLA LANE GERTRUDE COBB MILLER
Mechanical Drawing, Manual Fla. State Syracuse U.
Training School Secretary Music




METTA MVAE MITCHE~LL. LOIS STlI:XVART, A. BI. JAN F \VI11.I1,I1N PU. of 111. UI. of Ind(. BIowlingt ( rccil B(U'im"u,- 1.
Capt. Lynclh's Secretary Fre nchi BusvNcs.
I IARRY C. MORAN, A. 11. EDt'IT SU TTON XV. M. \VILIIA\IS
Wittenburg College Ui. of P~orto Rico Nebras ka 1'
Spanish, English Spa nish (ii 011 NU)C .
JAMES K. PFZTITTE, 13 S V ERNA V HBING, B. S. ~ .11.I L. WVILSO N
HTisnell Ind11(. St ate Normal hI gi) s(( hItt
his/or v ('omm~ercial Pept.In/5i
GERTRUDE R. PORTER, B. A., 1)ACE 1. WET,.H, \..\ILSON, A\. B.
M. A. FAC-,SLWETAB'\N..\slhur\- Collcgc
Vanderbilt U. Agnes S'ot t College Span~iuish, Sc> 1+11c
English .Science~
\I.\( .\ET (. \VII.R, A\. B.
LAUSON B. SKIDMORE, B. S MRS. HAZEL If. \VILLIlAXS Tenn. 1'.
Cornell, Syracuse Nebraska State Normi~l Iirector of Research,
History, Psychology Busbness I isili, 1'mcher




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Seniors
"We came, we toiled, we graduated."
As Shakespeare would say; there are four stages in the normal life of a high school student:
First, age of bliss and ignorance,
Second, age of downright impudence,
Third, age of joyful indolence,
And fourth, the age of independence!
For the last four years of our young lives we have worked toward this end, and now at last we have reached the goal -to have attained the superior height of upperclassmen, and to be looked upon with awe and respect as the most glowing examples of dignity and wisdom! This has always been our supreme ambition until we became Seniors. But the moment we discovered that the date we have been accustomed to writing after our respective names exactly coincided with that on the calendar, we were suddenly confronted with the fact that "our days are numbered." We don't mind saying that, being perfectly normal in spite of all the above virtues, it made us want to shed a parting tear or two. Now that we must bid good-bye to our Alma Mater, we find ourselves extremely loathe to leave old St. Pete High. We may have been terribly overworked and greatly incensed at the thought of being deprived of such divine rights as chewing gum and throwing notes, but though the first four years may be the hardest, and extremely trying ones, we want to say that we found them the most enjoyable and worthwhile years we have ever spent.
Seniors of '26.
SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS
TO
AM ,6 W1.WA&_




L()RA KERR
Entered '22, St. Petersburg, Fla.
"She adds richness to common things."
P. & P. 2 years. Annual I year.
A. A. 2 years. Jr. W. C.
Jr. C. of C.
V. Pres. Fresh. Class.
Honor Council '26.
CLYI)E 13INKLE1'
Entered '25. Columbia, Tenn. "Everv inch a man."
JEAN BELL AKIN
Entered '23.
Columbia, Tenn.
"With a glib tongue."
A. A. 3 years. Jr. W. C.
PAULINE" MICKLE Entered '22. Columbus, Ohio Rime and reason. P. & P. 2 years. Jr. C. of C. Jr. W. C. A. A. 2 years.
WILLIAM T. ERICKSON Entered '24. New York, N. Y. Ye gods! How he could lalk!"
Baseball '25. Swim '25. A. A. P. & P. 2 years.
MILDRED JUNE WALKER Entered '21. St. Petersburg, Flia.
"Life is a Jest."
Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C.
A. A. 4 years. Glee Club. P. & P. 2 years.
MARGARET ADAMS MEVIS Entered '22. Wellesly Hills, Mass. "All the world's a stage."
Be Square. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Glee Club. A. A. 4 years. P. & P.
DONALI) LaBRANT
Entered '22.
Oak Park, Ill.
" Here's a heart for every fate."
P. & P. A. A. 4 years.
Jr. C. of C.




JOHN A. BUCKLEY Entered '23. Elmira, N. Y. Ji7''Blest with that noble quality, reserve.''
A. A. I year.
BETTY ANNE HORNBAIKER Entered '25. Washington, D. C. "Pours sunshine o'er all our woes."
J r. C. of C. J r. W. C.
A. A.
SHELEN A. BOARDMAN Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. ~ "A kingdom where kindness resides."
Pres. Civic League 2 years. L..77Jr. WV. C. Jr. C. of C.
A. A. 4 years. P. & P. 2 years. Swim 4 years.
4 RICHARD RHEA
Entered '24. Pittsburgh, Penn. "Great men are not always wise."
A. A. 2 years. 'lot Hi-Y Pres. '25. Annual '26.
~ ~ MYRTLE HARRIS Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fia. ''Suc/h an unassuming young maid.''
CATHERINE COOK Entered '22. Minneapolis, Minn. i"Lively, capable, and full of pep."
A. A. 3 years. Be Square. Annual 2 years.
RICH ARD GIRARDEAUJ Enteredl '22. St. Petersburg, Fia. "A life that leads melodious days." /P. &P. A. A. 3years.
KITTY MEE Entered '23. Hollidaysburg, Penn. "She has a line."
A. A. 2 years. Jr. W. C.
Jr. C. of C.




BETTY HINCKLE
Entered '25.
Bloomington, Ill.
"It is good to be children at times."
A. A. Jr.WX. C.
Jr. C. of C.
JACK HALL Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. 'Show me a happier man thian I."'
J r. C. of C. A. A. 4 years. Swim. Capt. '26.
LIDA ELIZABETH CADIJGAN .9
Entered '24.
Jersey City, N. J. "Mirth, with thee I mean to live."
Be Square.
MARGARET CANNING Entered '23. McKeesport, Penn. ''Flirt, flirt, flirt!''
JOSEPH DAVIS
Entered '24. Savannah, Ga. 'Women do not dismay him."
Football. A. A. Jr. C. of C.
MARY BELLE FACIKLER Entered '25. Shelby, Ohio. "Never a better girl!"
PAULINE BLNNS Entered '23. Fairmount, W. Va. ''She'd rather walk with man than angel."
Jr. W. C. J r. C. of C.
LESLIE MILLER Entered '25. Minneapolis, Minn. "He nce, loathed Melancholyv.
J r. C. of C. A. A.




HARRIETT J. PROVOST Entered '23.
St. Petersburg, Fla. "With a stroke of genius."
s wim. 4 years P. & P. 2 years. A. A. 4 years. Be Square.
CLIFFORD PARDUE Entered '24.
Kansas City, Kan. "Little said is sooner mended."
Hi-Y.
MARINEZ HEITLAND, '1, Entered '22.
St. Petersburg, Fla. ~ ~'' ~ "I choose the stage."
J r. C. of C. Jr. W. C. P. & P. 1 year. Annual 2 years A. A. 4 years.
Ad& MARGARET EMMIE HART
Entered '22.
Albany, Ga.
"I love tranquil solitude."
A. A. 3 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Be Square.
LORE N JONES Entered '25.
~/ KBeloit, Ohio.
"Much ado about nothing."
JCor. C. oOhio
MARGARET HOOVER Entered '25.
"Thyartesswinning smile."
Orchetra.Glee Club. A. year.
oi
~ FLORENCE PRENTICE 1" Entered '23.
// Binghamton, N. Y.
"A thinking girl, a winsome lass."
TENNYSON FRECIK Entered '25.
Asheville, N. C. A N"The world was made for m zusic."
Orchestra '25.
OWNry-ou




MAY KIRK
Entered '22.
Akron, Ohio.
"A bold, bad man."
A. A.
LUtJI SE \VIL1,LSO N
Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Flit. .'ay no more, woman."
A. A. 4 years Sec. Treas. Civic League '25 Jr. XV. C.
MARTHA ELIZABETH CASE
Entered '22.
Newtown, Penn. "It Is to laugh."
A. A. 4 years. Annual 2 years. P). & P. I year.
JOE H. BANKS Entered '22. Atlanta, (Ga. "Ever ready."e
A. A. 1 year.
WILLIE ANIDERSON Entered '24. Fort Valley, Ga. "Life is too short for logic."
Jr. W. C. J r. C. of C.
OLIVE DOWNING Entered '24. I lanmpton, Va. "D~iligence is the mnotlher oj'good fortune."
A. A.
HERBERT ROSS Entered '24. Watertown, Mass. "Fore!"
JOSEPHINE GIFFRDI Entered '22. Indlianapolis, IndI. "'A likeable miss with (a frien dly sile.''
A. A. 4 years. J r. WA. C. J r. C. of C.




ROBERT ELLSWORTH Entered '25. Cleveland, Ohio. "Not what I am but hope to be."
A. A.l1year Jr. C.of C. Hi-Y.
MARY LOUISE SQUIRE Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "A captain of industry."
A. A.
Basket-Ball 4 years. Cap't. '26 Jr. W. C.
EDNA POTTER Entered '24. Denver, Colo. "Every one lays a burden on the willing one."
WALTER CLAYBERGER Entered '22'. Youngstown, Ohio. "Kills time but never works it to death."
A. A. 3 years.
CHARLOTTE CARRYL Entered '24. New York, N. Y. ~ "Gently to hear, kindly to judge."
~ "~, .'W ~Annual '26. A. A. 2 years.
Jr. W. C. Jr. C.of C.
GLADYS ABRAHAM Entered '23. Tampa, Fla. "Perseverance makes honor bright."
A. A. 2 years. Jr. W. C.
Be Square.
CHARLES LUKE
////~/4' ~ Entered '25.
North East, Penn. "A lad worth knowing."
MARY RUTH SANFORD Entered '23 Grand Rapids, Mich. "Me and my boyfriend."
Jr. W. C. P. & P. 2 years. A. A. 3 years. Swim. 2 years.




DORIS ELIZABETH L.ATIMER Entered '22. Jefferson, Ohio. "her eye was not the mistress of her hleart." i
A.A. Jr. W.C.
Jr. C. of C. Glee Club.
ALDEN PEMBLE. Einteredl '22. Stillwater, N. Y. "'I am as constant ais the northern star."
A. A. Hi-V.
HARRIET KENNEDY Entered '24. Brooklyn, N. Y. "Nothing succeeds like success."
A.A. Jr.W. C.
RHEA BROOKS Entered '25. Hendersonville, N. C. "She wears the rose of youth upon her."
JOE CARRAHER Entered '25. Boston, Mass. "As many fine points as a pack of pins."
GLADYS IRENE MULLIN
Entered '22. Indianapolis, Ind. "A good natured person is never out of place."
Jr. C. of C. Jr. WV. C. Orchestra 2 years. A. A. 2 y ears.
WINIFRED DAVIS Entered '22. Ehensburg, Penn. "Dates are my favorite fruit."
A. A. 3 years.
JOHN BODKIN, JR.
Entered '24. Evanston, Ill. "A silent mouth is musical."




RICHARD KNAPPER Entered '25. Greenville, Penn. "Still waters run deepest."
Basketball.
MARTHA OXFORD E ntered '2 2. St. Petersburg, Fla. "Words are women."
A. A. 4 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C.
MARIAN STEWART Entered '23. St. Petersburg, Fla. "Arrested for speeding -on a typewriter."
P. & P. A. A.
JACK CROW Entered '24. Niles, Ohio. "I'm not in the, role of common men."
Hi-Y.
/ELEANOR JONES '~~W~ ~;, / Entered '23.
Brockton, Mass. "On with the dance."
MADELINE BAILEY Entered '25. Ipswich, Mass. "Our delegate to Vassar."
7/9 /' ~EARL LEGGETT
4, / ~ ///// 7/ Entered '23.
'' //4~'~/7~4J ~'~ '~ Terre Haute, Ind.
/ / "Wisdom is kindness."
A. A. 2 years. Hi-Y 1 year. P. & P. 1 year.
EDNA FRANCES KEEFE
Entered '22. Painesville, Ohio. "A loyal heart."
A. A. 3 years. Jr. W. C. J r. C. of C.




DONNA LEIBY
Entered '22.W Akron, Ohio. ''Precious gifts come in smnail packages."
A. A. 4 years. j r. WV. C. Jr. C. of C. P. & P'. 1 yea r. H onor Council '26.
MERTON MURPHY Enteredc '23. St. Petersburg, Fla. "'I know Wvhat's right.''
Annual Photo. 3 years.
MARY PUGH
Entered '22.
Terre Haute, Ind. ''I would be a friend to all.''
A. A. 3 years. J r. C. of C.
MARTHA HENRY Entered '22. Sebring, Ohio. ''A studious mind is a/wa vs evident.''
P. & P. '24. A. A. 2 years.
WALTER JOHNSON Entered '22. Anetia, N. Y. "And he doesn't play baseball."
A. A. 4 years. Hi-Y 1 year. Orchestra 1 year.
SUSI E GALL(OWAY Entered '24. Atlanta, Ga. ''Oh, oh, oh, what a girl.''
FANNY MAUDE CAMERON
Entered '24. Largo, Fla. ''Dispels the sullen shade with her sweet influence.''
Jr. W. C.
J r. C. of C.
WALLACE NEELY Entered '23. St. Petersburg, Fia. "Longevity is the soul of wit."
A. A. 2 years. Annual 2 years. Jr. C. of C. Hi-Y.




WILLIAM P. MULHOLLEM ~ Entered '22.
Altoona, Penn. "A bout evening a man is known."
Basket-Ball. P. & P. Jr. C. of C. A. A. 4 years.
MARY BULLARD Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "Feeling is deep and still."
Swim. 3 years. Cap't. '24. Honor Council 1 year. A. A. 4 years. Sec. 1 year. Be Square. Glee Club 1 year. Jr. W. C. Jr. C.of C.
SHIRLEY M. LOCKE
A- Entered '23.
Albany, Vermont. "Her foes has she any?"
A. A. 3 years. Be Square. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Annual '26.
CARLTON TELLER Entered '22. Lake Orion, Mich. "A blower of no mean note."
A. A. 2 years. Orchestra.
w ANNA REGINA ETHERIDGE Entered '24. Louisville, Ky. "Men have no charm for me."
A. A.
Be Square.
LYDAREENE MAJORS Entered '23. Columbia, Mo. "A winning smile, a happy way."
P. &P. A. A. 3years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C.
/GORDON WRIGHT Entered '22. Ithaca, N. Y. "For a saint thou art too much a sinner."
A. A. 4 years. Track. Jr. C. C. Pres. '26. V. Pres. Hi-Y '25. Students Council '25.
REBECCA WHITTICE Entered '25. Chattanooga, Tenn. "A plate of current fashion."




MARY HARRIET BIZE
Entered '24.
Tampa, Fla.
"The hearts of men adore thee."
A. A. 2 years.
Jr. WV. C.
See. Civic League 2 years.
HARRY McCARDELL, JR. Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fia. '"If lie had any faults, lie left uts in doubt."... ....
Pres. class 4 years Student Council 2 years Track '25 and '26 A. A. V. Pres. '26. Basket-Ball
MARGARET STRANGE PEARCE
Entered '22
St. Petersburg, Fla. "A comrade blithe and full of glee."
Swim. 1 year. A.A yas
Jr. WV. C.
V. Pres. class '25 and1 '26.
MARIE E. HOGAN Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Via. "Music hath charms."
P. & P. '26. A A. 4 years. Jr. WV. C. Orchestra. Honor Council 2 years. Sec. Fresh. and~ Soph. class.
JAMES L. PEARSON
Entered '24.
Cincinnati, Ohio
"Keep that school girl com plexion."
P. & P. 2 years.
Jr.C.ofC. MAGDALENA VANDERLYN
Entered '22. New Paltz, N. Y. "Fair to look upon and better yet to know.'
A. A. 4 years. Annual Editor '2(). Sec. and Treas. Tennis Club '26. X
Jr. WV. C.
V. P~res. Civic League '25.
MARTHA MCKIM Entered '22.Il Fallensbee, W. Va. "A true marksman with rifle and pen."
Jr. C. of C. Jr. WV. C. A. A. 4 years. P. & P. '26. o
GOULD CURTIS Entered '23. Newtown, Conn. "Time is but the stream I go fishing in."
A. A. 2 years.




POLLY BOREING Entered '24. London, Ky. "For she's a jolly good fellow."
KEITH SMITH Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "Imuse on joy that will not cease."
Football 1 year. Basketball. Baseball 1 year. A. A. 3 years.
DOROTHY ELIZABETH CROSS Entered '22. Silver Creek, N. Y. "Somewhat quiet, somewhat shy."'
A. A. 2 years. Jr. W. C. J r. C. of C.
INEZ E. HOGAN W-U Entered '22.
Micanopy, Fla. "One of the nicest girls we know."
AUSTIN WILDER Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "Our Lord Chesterfield."
4 A. A. 4years.
Jr. C. of C. Hi-Y 2 years. Class Treas. 3 years.
LOUELLA MONG
Entered '24. Shippenville, Penn. "Her manner is calm and pleasant."
A. A. 1 year. Jr. W. C. J r. C. of C.
MARGIE LUCILLE NORTHRUP Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "I dare do all that doth become a man."
A. A. 4 years. Swim. 2 years. Jr. W. C.
LEWIS COOK Entered '25. Columbus, Ga. "True blue."
Oorty-tw




DAVID ROSS Entered '23. Wellsville, Ohio. "Happy-go-lucky."
A. A. 2 years. Hi-Y 1 year. Football 1 year. Track 2 years.
KATHALEEN CARPENTER Entered '23. Grand Rapids, Mich.
"Sweet is every sound."
A. A. 2 years. P. & P.
Jr. C. of C. Jr. W. C.
GERTRUDE SOUERS Entered '23. Akron, Ohio. Not what her name implies."
A. A. 1 year. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C.
WAYNE ALLYN Entered '23. Tampa, Fla.
"Happy am I, from care set free."
Orchestra.
A. A. 3 years.
BETTY FRAZE Entered '22. Portland, Ind. "As sunny as her hair."
A. A. 3 years. Jr. C. of C. Sec. Civic League. Treas. Jr. W. C. P. & P.
BETTY TESSIER Entered '24. Washington, ). C.
"Live in my heart and pay no rent."
ROSS WILCOX Entered '25. Evanston, Ill. "Silent men are wise men."
Hi-Y.
EIDTH LOCKWX()D Entered '25. Danville, Va. "As a maiden should be, meek and mild."
Fariv-thr-




RUTH DALLY
Entered '25.
Lima, Ohio.
"Gentle and just."
LLOYD SWENSON Entered '25. Akron, Ohio. "One of those mermen."
CATHERINE BELLEN
Entered '25.
Glen Falls, N.Y.
"And rank for her meant duty."
VIRGINIA BROWN Entered '23. Elkins, W. Va. "I will drink life to the lees."
DUARD THOMPSON
Entered '25.
Greensburg, Pa.
"We wonder if it's permanent."
ZELLA FRANCES WALLACE Entered '24. Pittsburg, Pa. "Drink to me only with thine eyes."
A. A. I year. Jr. W. C. Glee Club 1 year.
RUTH HOHMAN
Entered '22.
Hammond, Ind.
// "A penny for your thoughts."
A. A. 4 years.
KENNETH JONES
Entered '22. East Liverpool, Ohio. "The witty man laughs least."
Sec. class 2 years. Hi-Y 2 years. Jr. C. C. treas. A. A. 4 years. Tennis club president.




,MARY ALLEN WALD)EN Entered '23. Dublin, Ga. "I love you more thian-.
A. A. 3 years.
ELVA VIVIAN TAGGART Entered '23. LaGrange, 111. '"What cannot art and industry perform.''
A. A. 2 years. Jr. C. of C. Jr. WV. C. P'. & P. 2 years. Annual '26.
HERBERT EDMONDS Entered '23. Denver, Col. "A law unto himself." 4
A. A. 3 years. Jr. C. of C.
LUCILLE PITTARD Entered '25. Athens, G;a. "A lady fair to look upon."
RUTH GRIMES Fp
Entered '25. 4
Gainesville, Fla. "What's all the attraction of Domestic Science?"
Jr. W. C. A. A. 1 year.
CURTIS WHEELER Entered '24. Kansas City, Mo. ''Let us then be up and doling."'
Hi-Y.
CATHRYN PENDERGRASS Entered '22. Argyle, N. Y. 'Tis only noble to be good."
A. A.
JAMES SANNER
Entered '20'. Grand Rapids, Mich. "A red head is far better 1/han ntitonite."
A. A. 3 years. J r. C. of C.




LELA MAE DURANT Entered '23. St. Petersburg, Fla. "Would there were more like her."
P. P. A. A. 2 years. Jr. C.of C Orchestra.
JOHN HAYWARD Entered '23. G rand Rapids, Mich. "Let us no more contend."
ANNE ROBERTSON Entered '23. McKeesport, Penn. "Dine and dance."
CAMILLA SYLVESTER Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "A still, small voice."
Orchestra 2 years.
NEWMAN C. MARLETT Entered '23. Washington, N. J. ~ "A new one on us."
DELLA OLA MOORE
--w Entered '22.
Barbourville, Ky. "Because I love, I live."
A. A. 2 years. Jr. W. C.
J r. C. of C.
,~NAOMI RUTH WILLIAMS Entered '24. // . ./ Shoals, Ind.
"She's a bonny, bonny lass."
A. A. I year. Be Square.
EDWIN PRICE Entered '24. Uniatilla, Fla. "There's something fine in him."
J r. C. of C.
WoAysi




HELEN IKATHLEEN \VE7pLLS
Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fia. 'Follow events, -not lead them,"
A. A. 4 years. Jr. C. of C.
WNESLEY I AI)TE
Entered '24. Kansas City, IKan. "Experience is by industry a ch ieved.' Ili-Y. A. A. 2 years. J r. C. of C..
JOSEPHINE SHANK Entered '24. Findlay, Ohio. "My crown is in my heart, not on my head."
A. A. Be Square.
ETHYL MARIE VOSS Entered '21. Columbia, Tenn. ''A dancing shape, an image ga .''
Jr. WV. C. Jr. C. of C. A. A.
HARRY GREEN Entered '25. Brooklyn, N. Y. "le tickles wicked ivories!"
Orchestra.
MARION BRANNON Entered '22. Wellsville, Ohio. ''Pair hair and blue eyes."'
A. A. 4 years. J r. W. C. J r. C. of C.
NAOMI E. DECKER Entered '25. Mason City, Iowa. "Tender eyes that shrine."
H. BROWNING" EMPSON Entered '22. Springfield, Tenn. 0
"Outwardly unassuming."




MARGARET CATHERINE FITZSIMMONS
Entered '24.
Steubenville, Ohio.
"She doesn't need a trot."
JAMES BRANNON
Entered '22. Wilkville, Ohio. "He'll surprise you some day."
A. A. 3 years. Hi-Y.
MARY HOLLADAY
Entered '25
~ Guilford, N. C.
"An apt and capable miss."
RUTH 0. HALE Entered '24. Gardiner, Me. UP in Maine
Jr. Health Dep't.
DAN WORKIZER
_ Entered '22.
St. Petersburg, Fla.
"The fame a man wins himself is best."
Jr. C. of C. Hi-Y.
-#4!'Annual '25. A. A. 4 years.
Cheer Leader '26. P. & P.
DOROTHY ALLYN Entered '23. Tampa, Fla. "I would be a mermaid fair."
Be Square. Orchestra.
MARIAN WAKEMAN
Entered '32.
Syracuse, N. Y.
"Yes, I'll be brief this time."
Jr. W. C. Jr. C.of C.
GEORGE L. MONTEIRO, JR. Entered '22. Northport, N. Y. "Rejoice, oh youth, in thy youth."




MARJORIE BOWEN
Entered '22
Quincy, Mich.
"Make haste slowly."
A. A. 4 years
Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C.
ROBERT H. C. PANCOAST Entered '22 Pitmian, N. J. "lie who governs most makes least nls.
CAROL C. CUJSHMAN
Entered '23
Evanston, Ill.
"'Touched by a light that hati no nm.
P.'. P. A. A. 2 years
LOUISE BERRY Entered '25 Morganfield, Ky. ''Small in stature, not in mind."''
LLEWELLYN MOORE Entered '21 Detroit, Mich. ''W4ho walketh as in sleep.''
A. A. 2 years. Track 1 year
GLADYS MITCHELL Entered '22 St. Petersburg, FlIa. 'Her nose tip-tilted, like the petal ojf (i flower.'
A. A. 4years. Jr. W. C. J r. C. of C.
MARION ELIZABETH LINK Entered '24 Fennville, Mich. "Zealous and modest-some combination."
A. A. 1 year
JOHN P. LYNCH, JR.x
Entered '22 St. Petersburg, Fla. ''My mind to me a kingdom is."'
A. A. 5 years lli-Y 1 year




JOHN ROSS
Entered '23.
Wellsville, Ohio.
"Actions speak louder than words."
Football.
PHOEBE LONGMAN Entered '22. St. Petersburg,. Fla. "Calm and unruffled as a summer sea."
Swim 4 years. A. A.
Jr. W. C. P. &P.
ARDELLE LINDSEY
Entered '22.
St. Petersburg, Fla.
"Music waves eternal wands."
A. A. 4 years.
Orchestra 4 years.
Jr. W. C.
J r. C. of C.
WYATT EARL DAME
Entered '22. Hubbardsville, KY. 0/4 "Today is ours-what do we fear
A. A. 3 years. Hi-Y 2 years. Orchestra 2 years.
WINIFRED MAE WRIGHT
Entered '22.
St. Petersburg, Fla.
"I'd rather be right than presidentt"
A. A. 4 years.
Jr. W. C.
J r. C.of C. P. &P.
Civic League Treas. '25.
RUTH RIGGS Entered '22. Watertown, N. Y. "A capable lassie we all would say."
JAMES HORNER VUILLE, JR.
Entered '22.
Huntingdon, Pa.
"Taste the joy that springs from labor."
Tennis 3 years.
P. &P.
A. A. 4 years.
Hi-Y 2 years.
MARY VIRGINIA HUME Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "Such a racket!"
J r. C.of C. J r.W. C. A. A. 4 years. Glee Club. Vice-Pres. Tennis Club.




E. F. VINCENTA BOREING Entered '24. London, Ky. ''Let me live and love.''
LARRY POWERS Entered '22. West Field, N. Y.
"'One of the wonder-working Powers.,"
Annual '26.
MARY ELIZABETH RY-DER Entered '22. Knoxville, Tenn. "Oh, what a pal was Betty."
A. A. 4 years. Jr. WV. C.
IKATHEFRINE CLIFFORD MOODYX Entered '23. Clarkesville, Mo. "Merrily, merrily, merrily!"
A. A. 3 years. Basket-bali. J r. C. of C. J r. W. C.
JACK GREGORY Entered '25. Johnson City, Tenn. "I come not here to talk."
FRANCES E. WAGNER Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fia. hlow now! a rat?''
1P. &. 1P. A. A. 4 years. s
J r. NA7. C. Jr. C. of C. Civic League Pres. '26. Honor Council '25.
KATHERINE OSBORN Entered '22. Lawrenceville, Va. "Shy and retiring?"
A. A. 3 years.
DARRELL BURNS JORDON Entered '23. Portland, Me. "Make haste slowly."
one




PHILIP TAYLOR Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fia. "He's always been with us."
ETHEL FAYE NULL Entered '25. Vincennes, IndI. "None knew her but to love her."
Jr. W. C.
J r. C. of C.
GRAHAM LOVEJOY Entered '22. New York, N. Y. ~ ''Blow, blow, thou wintry wind.''
A. A. 4 years.
ELLEN LOUISE AVERY
4 '41Entered '25.
Columbus, Ohio. "'For it isn't any trouble just to s-rn-i-I-c."
GLORIA BULL Entered '25.
7 ~ /Astoria, N. Y.
9 ~ ~ 'Let knowledge grow fromn more to inore.
A. A.
DONALD PERSONS
Entered '22. Cleveland, Ohio. ''If at first you don't succeed, try, try aga in.'
7"' / / ROBERTS ROBINSON
~'/ ~Entered '23.
~4/ /7'Ak7 .// Winslow, N. J.
''The noblest mind the best contentment has.''
A. A. 1 year. Hi-Y 1 year.
JANET POUJLSON Entered '22. New Albany, Ind. "She was a shepherd's daughter."
I.& P. '25. A. A. 4 years. Jr. W. C. Pres. '26. Jr. C. of C.




FLORENCE JAMES
Entered '25 Cleveland, Ohio. "She sings sweetly as a nightingale."
Glee Club. A. A.
KENNETH REEl)
Entered '24.
Altoona, Pa.
"A good reputation is a fair estate.
Track '24. A. A.
I li-Y.
HARRY TURNER Entered '24. Gainesville, Fla. "He's just a plain good sport."
Football 1 year. Basket-ball 1 year. A. A.
MAXINE DEEM
Entered '22.
Dayton, Ohio.
"Lij'e is short and so am 1."
A\. A.
ADDISON JOHNSON
Entered,'24. Canandaigua, N. Y. "Oh, inconsistant man!
WARREN HAUK
Entered '21.
Springfield, Ohio.
"It's better to be lucky' than wise."
JOSEPHINE PAYNE
Entered '24. Owasso, Mich. "Who said blondes weren't vivacious?"
Orchestra. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C.
DEWITT WILKERSON, JR.
Entered '22.
London, Ky.
"Let me drift and dream--."
A. A. 4 years.
Jr. C. of C.
Fift y-thr'ej




LEONARD COOPERMAN
Entered '24.
Atlanta, Ga.
"Knowledge is power."
A. A.
DAVID DOWNING
Entered '24. Hampton, Va. "Experience joined with common sense."
A. A.
CHARLOTTE SMITH
Entered '25.
North Adams, Mass.
"Girl with the golden smile."
Orchestra 2 years.
A. A. 2 years.
RUTH HAZELTON COLE Entered '22. Ossining, N. Y. IV, "The path of duty is the way to glory."
Swim 3 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Be Square. f A. A. 4 years.
LAURA ATKINSON
Entered '25.
4., ~Winthrop, Mass.
'She has courage, gaiety, and a quiet mind."
CLYDE HAGERTY Entered '22. ~Youngstown, Ohio. "With a view point all his own."
Swim 2 years. Orchestra '23. A. A. 4 years.
~ // ~' HOLLIS PACKARD
/ / / /W Entered '24.
~ Magog, Quebec, Canada.
/6/7 7~X'~//j Here's a fine chap."
Hi-V.
EMILY FOSTER Entered '24. Sparrow's Point, Md. "You never find her with time to waste."
A. A.
.... .... ......




MILD)RED SHAINLINE~
Entered '22.
St. Petersburg, Fla.
'"Life is real, life is earnest.
A. A. 4 years.
Jr. C. of C.
D)AVII) C. TRAFT()N Entered '22. Lynn, Mass. '"All his paths are peace."
A. A. I year. 1- V.
GERTRUDE E. ('URN
Entered '25.
Steubenville, Ohio.
''A gracious manner and a mind well stored.'
MABEL EL.,ZABE~F'1i' ROBINSON Entered '22. Soughtuck, Mich. Which twin is this?''
Annual 2 years. j*& P
HEWITT TAYLOR
Entered '22.
St. Petersburg, Fla. le catches the flies."
Baseball 2 years. Football.
A. A.
(GERTRUDE WELLS Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "'Steadyv, willing, readyv.' Jr. C. of C.
MARGARET PARDUEl,Entered '25. Atlanta, Ga. ''A lady of quality.''
ROBERT CARE" Entered '25. Indianapolis, 11n(. ''The little corporal.''
Football. Basketball. Baseball.




AUGUSTUS MAXWELL Entered '24. t Tallahassee, Fla.
"A man diligent in 1his business."
RUTH DONOVAN Entered '22. Boston, Mass. "Musically bent."
SAMUEL MELVIN SHANNON
Entered '22. ~ Grenada, Miss.
"Nimble with thy feet, not thy hands."
Basket-ball 2 years. Baseball. A. A. 2 years.
WILLIAM GAMBLE Entered '24.
__ Wayland, N. Y.
"A specimen of human happiness."
Hi-Y. A. A. 2 years. j r. C. of C.
Entered '25. Cleveland, Ohio. "She who succeeds."
LOUILSE ERMA BOWEN Entered '22. Cordele, Ga. "Laugh and the world laughs with you."
Be Square 3 years. A. A. 2 years.
jackAK BRANDT Entered '25. Buffalo, N. Y. "Lo, the conquering hero comes!"
A. A.
ROLAND HEDBERG Entered '23. Ishpening, Mich. "A boy who's out to surely win."
A. A. 2 years.
qitv-i




ROBERT L. SAYLOR, JR.
Entered '23. Orlando, Fla. "Fire in each eye, papers in each hand." A. A. 3 years. Ii-Y 2 years. Annual '25. P. & P.
EDNA KNOWLTON Entered '25. Elmira, N. Y. "Goodness dwells with Beauty."
ROBERT E. BURKLEW Entered '23. Oberlin, Ohio. "Alas, the love of women!"
P. & P. Hi-Y. Orchestra 3 years. A. A..
CLAUDE H. MELTON Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "Childhood-life's happiest days."
Hli-Y.
A. A. 3 years.
MARGARET K. FASSETT Entered '23. St. Louis, Mo. "We love her for her quiet ways."
TOM FRECK Entered '25. Ashville, N. C. "A star in the orchestral firmament."
Orchestra '25.
RAYMOND H. ROBINSON Entered '25. Cobleskill, N. Y. "Scholarly and wise."
ELIZABETH JANE WILLIAMS Entered '25. Cleveland, Ohio. "Maidenly charm and pleasing grace."
Glee Club. A. A.




GEORGE T. GOODRIDGE Entered '24. Oak Park, 1l1. "A lady's man."
Annual.
MARSHALL MANSFIELD Entered '22. New York, N. Y. "Dignity, thou too art here."
Hi-Y.
Baseball.
AZA ATWOOD Entered '25. Cambridge, Mass. "Before her smile all s adness flies."
BIRDIE ALEXANDER Entered '22. Summerville, Ga. "Do or dye!"
A. A.
ROBERT DEEM Entered '22. Dayton, Ohio. "An optimist is he."
HELEN LOOP Entered '22. Syracuse, N. Y. ?"High up in the world."
B. B.'2 years. A. A. 3 years.
Entered '25. Shreveport, La. "Mitey and fine."
ROYCE GOODBREAI) Entered '22. 7711 Crystal River, Fia.
"I hate to see a thing, done by halves."
Football 3 years. Track 3 years. Capt. '24.
AA.2 years.HiY




GEORGE McBRIDE Entered '25. Bay City, Mich. "A good name is better than riches."
BETTY MILLER Entered '22. Norwalk, Conn. "Absolutely adorable."
A. A. 4 years. Jr. HW. C. Jr. C. of C. P. & P. Editor.
FAY SMITH Entered '24. Covington, Penna. "1To be grave exceeds all power of the face."
GEORGE KILGEN, JR. Entered '25. Long Beach, N. Y. "A nothing for a quiet life."
MARIAN WHEAT Entered '25. Elmira, N. Y. "Dignity thou too art here."
DOROTHY STOVALL Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "To be awake is to be alive."
Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Sec. '26. A. A. 4 years. V. Pres. Soph. class. 1'. & P. 2 years. Annual '25.




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juniors
President, Louis Adcock Secretary, Jay Wilson
Vice- President, Catherine Batts Treasurer, Marion Stenacher
Class of '27.
The journey of our Sophomore year was made in a flivver, but we have now advanced to a ship. Louie Adcock, the helmsman is still at the wheel, steering the, ship carefully through the troubled waters. Beside him sits Miss Edith Falkenstein, our pilot, whose perseverance, energy and self-sacrifice have guided us through all our trials. The rest of us are scattered in different parts of the ship, each pursuing his own interests.
At the first of this year we had a class picnic. It was the first social event of the year and was so greatly enjoyed by everyone that we began to make plans for another. Next came the campaign for class dues. When we had all paid them, we settled down for a nice long journey. There followed a series of entertainments given by various members of the class at our class-meetings. We enjoyed these thoroughly but gradually lost our interest in them when we began to plan for the greatest event of the whole year, the junior-Senior banquet. At that time we invited the Seniors to accompany us on our voyage. 'They accepted our invitation and were our guests for the rest of the journey. We have enjoyed our voyage this year. Now we are at the end of it and, although we are sorry to leave, we are looking forward with eager anticipation to our expedition of next year.




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Sophomores
President, Ben Greene Secretary, Keith Myers
Vice-President, Laura Ann Rowell Treasurer, George Shattle
Class Advisor, Miss Vera Dumas
Yea! Sophomores, how about telling the rest of our fellow students why they should be proud of us. Our class first began to experience events such as might be called history in the year 1923-24 when we spent many happy days in the old Southern Methodist Sunday School Building.
The following year, 1924-25, we were the first class to graduate from the New junior High School Building.
This year we have entered the realms of the Senior High and have shown a helpful, cooperative spirit by taking part in all the school activities. Already, as a class we have accomplished four things worthy of mention: first, in the pay-up campaign for dues the Sophomores excelled the Juniors and Seniors with 80 per cent paid up; second, at Hallowe'en time we all had a delightful party which was a howling success and was said to be the best Hallowe'en Party ever staged by any class in the High School; third, the Beach party held at St. Petersburg Beach recently was enjoyed by everyone; and fourth, in the Inter-class Swimming Meet the Sophomores swam away with highest honors. The wonderful success of each of these was due to the excellent spirit of cooperation exhibited by each individual.
Now we hope that all who may chance to look upon this page will say in '28 that the graduating class of this year was the liveliest, most scholarly, most athletic and best all round class ever graduated from the Senior High School of St. Petersburg.




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Alumni News
Paul Boardman is literally like a fish out of water, for there is no swimming pool up at the UT. of F. and alas! he can neither swim nor fish, Sure must be tough on Paul.
Lincoln Bogue graduated in Law last February and is now back in town with Lane and Bussy.
Helen Lynch is still making a name for herself in athletics -on the Hockey team, Varsity Basketball team, as well as Junior Basketball team. And Olivia Ann Swift has also made the Hockey team. Raymond Borstel is still swapping fords. Walter Braden has an orchestra of his own, plays the banjo in it, and has acquired the poetic name of "Banjo Bandidi." Gretchen Geiger has taken up fencing. Wanita Walters is first violinist in the college orchestra. She also plays for the Y. W. meetings, and various social functions. Billy Buhner has joined the Chili Clough Club, but does not offer to spell or pronounce it.
And of course Joe Fickling is still making his trips to Tallahassee. Ain't it grand? Elizabeth Girardeau plays the violin at social functions. She and Keller Harris both took part in the minstrels. Martina McKim is struggling with Latin, and plans to be a teacher as soon as she has finished 'being a student. Dick Fraze is a member of the Y. M. C. A. cabinet. Preston Johnson has changed his name to Tom. Margaret Yaryan is still showing her ability as begun on the P. & P. and the No-So-We-Ea. She is now on the Flambeau and Fiascino Staffs. H. K. Wallace is having dates now. Polly Buhner is going to Europe this summer. Burdette White is quite as studious as ever, and is also planning a trip to the other side of the "big pond". Morrison Pearce's activities up at Gainsville are somewhat interrupted lby his frequent visits to St. Pete.
Powell Majors is running for editor of the F. book. A group of the home girls have organized the Beta Woman's Club Margaret Peeler, president, Gladys Brooks, Erma Lee Klutts, Dorothy Cook, Joan Foxworthy, and Nellie Mae Meisson are all active members. Jimmie Riddle is at an aviation school in Kansas City, Mo. Stuffy Livingston is manager of one of the boarding houses. Oliver Hewitt and Hazel Wallace are married. Don Cushman, Dick Fraze, and H. K. Wallace are room-mates -- and cook their own meals!




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(7
Football
In the minds of those who love the Green and White, the football season of 1925 will stand undimmed forever. An uncrossed goal line, a superb record of clean sportsmanship and a team that is unsurpassed in the annals of high
____school football combine to form an enduring monument.
A great team is produced only by a great coach. To "Mac" McKinney belongs the credit for putting St. Petersburg High School at the top of the list. It must also be remembered that "Mac" gave much of his valuable time and much hard work to accomplish this remarkable success.
In his work McKinney was ably assisted by Jack Wahl, Kenneth Smith, and the great Eddcie Hart.
St. Pete vs. Arcadia ------------ 13-0.
Sarasota -------------59-0
West Palm Beach-.--42-O Key West -----------94-0
Tampa --------------30-3
Lake City -----------55-0
Miami --------------21-0
Duval------------- 3-0
Ft. Myers ----------_28-0
Atlanta----------- 13-0
(Post season)
11! w)




D~on Ferguson, a newcomer, at right tackle showed up to be not only a hard hitting defensive man, but a plunging (lemon on offence. t
Clarence "Tubby" Kirchner at fullback proved to be the main cog of our (defensive machine, and no small part of the offense. His ability to back uI) the line in time of danger, and to break up passes that would have meant long gains, placed him in line for all state honors.
George Presstman, left guard, another last year's man, p~layed~ a consistently good game throughout the season.
Lynn Darby, at right guard, proved a tower of strength. Though this was his first year of football, he played with the best, and records show that few gains were made against right guard.
Royce (Goodbread, fleet-footed left half, carried1 the brunt of the attack, and gained more yardage than any other man on the team. He was also high point man. His sweeping end runs, his pass receiving ability and his powerful tackling won honorable mention for him on the all Southern team.




Frank Hodgkinson at right end round~( ed out the best line in the state. On the receiving end of Johnnie's long passes, Frank was a valuable asset. Harry "Speedy" Hewitt at right half, was a consistent ground gainer. When two or three yards were needed for first down, "Speedy" could be depended on to put it across.
Clement Coss, Captain Elect, and letter man of last year, held the key position at center. His accurate passing and his brilliant defensive work stamp him I' as a star.
144
Clarence "Scabby" Pheil filled the vaP"-- cancy left by his brother "Hops" at left
tackle, and filled it well. His work, tho' not brilliant was steady, the kind that makes for a great linesman.
* Howard Warner played left Iend and
succeeded in holding down that difficult position with remarkable ability. His playing in the Tampa game was exceptionally goodl.
John Ross, Captain and quarterback, can not be given too much praise and honor for the skillful manner in which -S he handled the team. He himself was a triple threat man with no little ability.




There's a high school down in southern Florida,
And we love, yes, love it well, Every year we gather there, a happy For we love, yes love it well;
Everybody comes to see S. P. H. S., Tis our own dear high school home, And we never shall forget S. P. H. S. wheresoever we may roam; We are the boys S. P. H. S. We are the girls S. P'. H-. S. We are the students of the Sunshine City High School Oh, clear and high ring out the cry, S. P. H. S. ~ Ready all to shout the call, S. P. H. S.
Clear the way, prepare the fray, S. P. H. S. We are marching on to victory.
/?,4 /+ /?A- 1
Old St. Pete High, how proudly we honor and praise you, Time will not change you, your spirit will never die; We're here to boost you, in classrooms, on gridiron, and field, too, You are to us our own, our wonderful St. Pete High./ 9
Rah, rah, for St. Pete, i
St. Pete will win,
Fight to the finish, never give in; Rah, rah, rah,
You do your best boys, We'll do the rest, boys, Rah, rah for St. Pete High.
love
jock.! v-seve




Boys' Basketbal
Living up to traditions of former years and striving to equal the record of our victorious football heroes, the basketball boys started the 1926 season with a rush. Although last year's team was sadly depleted, there it was far more material on hand this year than ever before and with a
0 few of last year's stars as a nucleus, the prospect was very encouraging.
A regular coach was not secured until our first two games had been played and then the squad was fortunate in securing Fred W. Stewart of this city, an expert player and coach, to take them under his guardianship. To Mr. Stewart's credit goes a great part of the Team's accomplishment.
After a fairly successful season, having been beaten only by Tampa and South Florida Military Academy, the Green Devils entered the State tournament at Gainesville, determined to win in spite of all odds. Here they defeated Hastings, Graceville, and Tallahassee, thereby placing themselves in the semi-finals.
Then on the eve of victory came Duval, our old and bitter rival, (in a friendly way, of course.) To make a long story short, we came o ut on the short end of the score. This defeat eliminated us from the tournament.
The boys playing on the squad were Captain Frank Hoclgkinson, G. / Severance, W. Mullhollem, H. Hewitt, C. Kirchner, J. Ross, H. Turner,
P. Wilbur, T. Costello, and W. Mullendore.
"Green Devils, we are proud of you!" St. Pete vs. Largo------------------------ 45-11 St. Pete vs. Tampa----------------------- 12-18
Florida Military Academy- -- -33-12 So. Fla. Academy ------------- 24-28
B~radenton ------------------- 14-9 Wachula--------------------- 22-13
So. Fla. Military Academy----- 28-31 Arcadia---------------------32-11
Miami Aggies ---------------- 17-7 So. Fla. Academy ------------- 27-26
Tarpon Springs --------------- 14-9 Tampa ---------------------- 16-22
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Girls' Basketball
Girls' Basketball during 1926 proved a repetition of 1925. The Green Angels under the supervision of Miss Barbara King, and under the
* leadership of Captain Mary Louise Squier, went through the season
without suffering one loss. They won every game with ease and their trouble again proved to be lack of stiff enough competition. A singular honor came to the girls this year in that three girls were placed on the All State team. This is an achievement never before equalled in St. Petersburg High and one that will stand for many years. Our dauntless Captain was chosen as chief. The two players chosen for this mythical team, besides Mary Louise, were Olivia Grimes and Celia Lowe. These girls are two of the best basketball players who have ever donned the Green and White. The girls then put on their fighting togs and went to the State tournament at Deland with a spotless slate and with high hopes of coming home with a State Championship. Their first opponent, Delray, was disposed of in short order, 30-5. The second game of the tournament, however, was played with Palatka, who proved 'our undoing last year. Playing desperately and encountering stiff opposition all through the game the girls were forced to lose the game by the close score of 20-18. This is the second time the girls' hopes have been dashed against the rocks on the eve of victory.
The girls who played on the team and made this enviable record possible were Celia Lowe, Ethel Kelly, Catherine Batts, Dolly Palmer, Olivia Grimes, Clifford Moody, Idella Hersmer and Ruth Beverly. St. Petersburg High is proud of the wonderful record set by these girls, and wishes next years' team a successful year.
St. Pete vs.
Bradenton -----------------------------67-4
Arcadia -------------------------------5 1-13
New Smyrna ---------------------------34-16
Clearwater------------------------------ 25-9
Wachula ---------------------- I---------18-14
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Clearwater ------------------------------ 34-6
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Boys' Swimming
After nailing last year's State Championship to our flagpole, our mermen determined to make it two straight and secure a strangle hold on the swimming cup. Led by Jack Hall, coached again by T. J. Howland, who is one of the foremost swimming experts in the United States, and managed once more by Bradford A. Lawrence, the owner of the Spa, the boys have one of the best chances in the state of winning the title. The other 'members of the team are Clayton Clark, Willis Yeamans, Clyde Hagerty, Dudley Hall, Archie McClatchie, Ernest Humphries and Harold Clizbe. Every one of these water pushers are swimmers of exceptional talent and absolutely necessary in order to win the meet. Perhaps the most notable member on the team is the versatile captain, Jack Hall. Jack, as everyone knows, won several firsts in the meet last year. After a trip through the north last summer where he entered in many amateur contests, and acquitted himself with highest honors, he came back here for his Senior year prepared to do or die. We know that he will not die. At the A. A. U. Meet held at Miami in March of this year, Jack won first place in the hundred yard backstroke, and placed in several other events. Co-operation of the swimmers, coach and manager of the team, along with the enthusiastic support furnished by the student body again gave St. Petersburg High the unexcelled record of 1926.
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Girls'S~wimiii
St. Petersburg High School has always been famed for its mermaids. You know, those sun-browned, wind-tanned Florida beauties who may be seen almost any day in the year sporting on the beach at the Spa or gliding with ease through the water in the pool, under the eagle eye of Coach Howland. The girls had hard luck last year at the meet, but acquitted themselves in true St. Petersburg High fashion. This year, however, the girls have the best chance in the State of bringing home the bacon. A double championship is the goal of the swimming teams this year and we know that we are not going to be'disappointed.
Coach T. J. Howland who has coached the girls along with the boys for several years, is the man who has made swimming a major sport in the High School, has sacrificed practically all his time, and given himself in unstinted effort to make our teams the best in the south.
Harriett Provost is captain of the girls team this year. She is one of the greatest swimmers in the State, but last year was unable to enter the meet on account of illness. Great things are to be expected from Harriett this year. The personnel of the team includes Maude Dew, MR.HOLANDLouise Hitchner, Mary Bullard, Jewel Mills, Phoebe Longman, Mary
MR HOLANDRuth Sanford, Claire Quick, Helen Boardman and Betty Miller.
Maude Dew and Marjorie Provost, a coming high school, star, journeyed down to Miami with Jack Hall to the A. A. U. meet. Here they captured several first and second places, swimming against many amateur champions.
With these results already tucked away, there is no doubt as to the ability of our mermaids. At any rate, we know that they will hold up the flag for old St. Petersburg High as have all the teams which have gone before. May those of future years uphold the standards that the girls of '26 have planted.
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Baseball
With Marshall Mansfield as their doughty captain, Seth Whitmore their official newspaperman, F. M. Stewart their coach, Walter Wells their manager, and the entire Student Body their ardent supporters, the baseball nine of St. Petersburg High embarked on its maiden voyage of 1926, prepared to meet the heaviest gales and lightest winds that blow. The men who signed the 1926 roster were Marshall Mansfield, captain, Irvin Balgeman, Price Goldsmith and William Muihollem, pitchers, Hewitt "Red" Taylor, catcher; Tom "Splinter" Costello, Frank White, Fred Redfield, Ben Green, infielders; Norman Derr, Paul Brown, Clarence Pheil and Graham Severance, outfielders, and William Erickson and Charles Templeton, utility men.
Baseball has always been a fairly popular sport in the High School and this year was no exception to the rule. There was no dearth of material ready for the coach, F. M. Stewart, to look over and never have the prospects for a State Championship looked brighter.
Up to this time the team has played Bradenton, Sacred Heart, '~ WSt. Leo, Clearwater and Tampa though we are sorry to record that all of these games have not been overwhelming victories.
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Track
Although track has been of the minor sports in St. Petersburg i gh, it is rapidly gaining the popularity it deserves. Despite the fact that the team had no proper equipment and did not even have an adequate training ground, they turned in a record which meant much credit and is in keeping with the splendid results achieved by the other athletic teams.
The team was ably coached by Mr. H. M. lBuland, who has had considerable experience in that line, and aided by the perserverance and determination of the boys who made up the team, he succeeded in making 1926 a banner year.
This year the team went up to Gainesville and faced the greatest aggregation of track athletes that has ever been gathered together in Florida. Ocala High, due solely to the exceptional prowess of one boy, who captured four firsts in as many events, won the meet, Miami was second and Lakeland third; St. Petersburg High tied with Duval for fourth place. This in view of all the difficulties encountered is a records of which we can be justly proud and we are confident that in the future the State Championship cup will reside permanently in our trophy case.
The St. Petersburg team placed well in several events, including the relay. The personnel of the team includes Dave Ross, John Ross, Royce Goodbread, Clement Coss, Clyde B~ozeman, James Sanner, Paul, ~
M~aurer, Herman Peterson, and Joe Carraher.
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L Tennis
Tennis, one of the sports which has held minor interest in St. Petersburg High School has come into prominence in the last two years with an ever A increasing rush. The suitable climate of our southland makes this an all year round sport, and tennis is rapidly coming to the front in High School Athletics.
This year, a tennis club was formed early in the season. Kenneth Jones was elected president, Mary Hume, vice-president, and Magdalena Vanderlyn, secretary and treasurer. The club started off with a bang, an inI.: tensive membership campaign was
put over and interest in tennis reached its zenith in the High School. Elimination tournaments among the players were held at intervals in order to determine the team to represent the school.
The team played Clearwater, Sacred Heart College, and Tampa-defeating them all.
The players who represented the school in the matches were Jim Vuille, our William Tilden 11, William Barnes, Henry Kelly, Kenneth Jones, Howard Eggleston and Ralph LeNeave. Every one of these net demons are stars of the first magnitude and it is due to them that we again gained fame on the athletic field during 1926.
Tennis is one of our national sports and is coming into its true place in High School athletics. In future years we hope that the boys and girls of St. Pete High will secure many State Championships in tennis.
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No-So-We-Ea
The Annual Staff of '26 has tried to make this year's No-So--We-Ea the best that S. P. H. S. has ever had. We have endeavored to give you a book, representative of the whole school. We hope that it may bring to each and everyone, memories of the years spent at S. P. H. S.
If we have succeeded, it is only because of the wonderful spirit and cooperation manifested by all the students who have been connected with the staff and its work.
WXe wish to use this little space to thank our helpers; those who have so kindly lent us their home Annuals, those who have spent many long and weary hours in research work, our ad-go-getters, our advertisers, and finally every person who has contributed anything toward making the No-So-We-Ea of 1926 a success.
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ANN UAL S TZA1.
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Palmetto and Pine Staff
This year the Palmetto and Pine has endeavored primarily to please the discriminating public and to be entirely representative of the school at large in its social, athletic and scholastic world. A new feature added to the paper this year has been the Notes on Notables column. Its purpose was to acquaint the student body with the names and personalities of the students who dominate in the various activities of the school. The attendance at High School this year was so large that it was difficult for everybody to know everyone else and so the staff through our columns hoped to mi'ake many introductions.
At the beginning of the year there were many Sophomores, juniors and Seniors working on the P'. and P., but now at the end of the year, there are a few hard-working Seniors and juniors. We want to thank them for their untiring efforts.
Without Miss Gardner' s able assistance, we fear that many times the paper would not have come out at all. Some of Miss Gardner's pet phrases, and long words have helped to lengthen many an article. The editors of the special sections have done their work exceedingly well.
We hope that we have made an improvement on the former years' papers and wish the staff of '27 the greatest success and prosperity in their publication.
The following p~eole 'omp~osedl the staff of the '26 Palmetto andl Pine:
Advisor, Miss Gardner. Notes on Notables, Helen Boardman.
Managing Editor, B~ob Saylor. Exchange Editor, Mary Ruth Sanford.
Staff Editor, Betty Miller. Assistant Exchange Editor, Virginia Scales.
Assistant Manager, D)onald Lal~rant. joke Editor, June Walker.
Student's Pen Advisor, Miss G. D~avis. Cartoonist, Lela Mae Durant.
Student's Pen Editor, Lora Kerr. Reporters, Marie Hogan, Jack Lentz, Betty
Sport Editor, Jim Vuille. Hinckle, Betty Hornbaker.
Sport Reporters, Bill Erickson, Lecighton Typists, Marian Stewart, Edna P ike.
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Athletic Association
President, Bob Saylor Secretary, Mary Bullard
Vice-President, Harry McCardell Treasurer, Jay Willson
This year has undoubtedly proved to be the most fruitful in the history of the Athletic Association, both as to finance and size of membership, which have effected a substantial increase.
The purpose of the organization is to sponsor the athletic contests between the various schools with which S. P. H. S. competes. It conducts the financial part of the games and furnishes the teams with supplies, uniforms, and other accessories. It might be added that this year's Athletic Association has kept the teams better outfitted than ever before, due in a great measure to the cooperation of the student-body, which, with outside aid has contributed eight or ten thousand dollars.
OiFFICERS




Hi-Y
This year marks the close of the greatest successful season in the annals of the St. Petersburg Hi-Y. The club has as its purpose the creation, maintenance and extension of high standards of Christian character, throughout the school and community.
Members holding office during the year were: Richard Rhea, G."ordon Wright. John Lynch, Edward IKearney, Dan Workizer, Kenneth Reed, Alden Pemnble, Walter Johnson, David Ross, Wesley Pardue and Leslie McEwan.
Six of the boys were sent to the Florida Hi-V Congress at Lakeland, which p)rovedl to be a marked improvement over that of last year, as every club in the state was represented.
The club also manifested its interest in civic affairs by taking people without, cars to register for the Sunday movie vote.
Mr. Alexander, as adviser, helped greatly in all undertakings.




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Junior Chamber of Commerce
One of the most outstanding organizations of the St. Petersburg High School is the Junior Chamber of Commerce. The organization is composed of the Public Speaking classes, headed by Miss Center. It is closely connected with the Chamber of Commerce of St. Petersburg. The idea of a Junior Chamber of Commerce originated in St. Petersburg, and our example has since been followed by many schools.
It has been the purpose of the Club to sponsor those activities which will aid the school as well as the city and it has the, reputation of making a success of whatever -it attempts to do. Probably this is due largely to the dependable officers of the organization; Gordon Wright, the president, has already shown his ability as an executive leader, and Austin Wilder, Dorothy Stovall and Kenneth Jones, our Vice-president, Secretary and Treasurer, have also proved their ability in the work.
One of the many school activities of the Junior Chamber of Commerce is the chapel program given every Friday which is always well worked-out and very interesting.
Besides this, there are many more accomplishments of the Club, which, in its history, has never failed to carry out its obligations.




Full Text

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AID I HMD i ADDED FLAVO) i US I— MEKOR Y'S HELLOY Wilt TOT SOLD SCHOOL DAYS OFMiME

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Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2018 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries https ://arch i ve. org/detai ls/nosoweea7192stud

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NO-SO-WE-EA Sesqui-centennial Number VOLUME SEVEN 1926 P UB LISITED A NN UA LLY BY THE STUDENTS OF ST. PETERSBURG HIGH SCHOOL ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA

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Dedication To her whom Love hath made our own LOIS C. GEIGER We offer this little book in the hope that it may hold and bring to her a small part of our love, and gratitude, and admiration. To others it will be a book of memories, but to her it will be a book of Dreams; for in each face she finds here, she may foresee achievements yet to come, of which she was the inspiration! Nine

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Foreword “Tempus fugit,” as the Romans said, and like the tide, waits for no man. Accordingly, we know that sometime, perhaps often, in the future we will come to the end of a perfect day and find our selves saying, “Backward, turn back ward, oh Time, in your flight, and make me a child again just for tonight.” So we have compiled this little book, from the varied and interesting material which you yourselves have furnished us, and hope that when that day comes we shall have — The No-SoWe-Ea with us yet Lest we forget — lest we forget. Ten

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ORDER OF BOOKS Today and Yester-Year The School Classes Athletics Activities Ravel ings i Eleven

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(s>ofttui tmd gc0tcr-your.

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Fourteen

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Fifteen

PAGE 20

Sixteen

PAGE 21

Seventeen

PAGE 23

She School.

PAGE 24

T wenly

PAGE 25

Twenty-one

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Twenty-two Architect's Drawing of the New Senior High School

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City Superintendent of Schools Twenty-three

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Twenty-four

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JOSEPHINE ALTMAN, A. B. Nebraska University French ANNA APPLEBY, A. B„ A. M. Scarritt-Morrisville College History AUGUSTA B. CENTER, B. A., M. A. Columbia Public Speaking MRS. W. P. COFFEY U. of Fla. History Problems EDITH DAVIS, B. L., B. S. Whitworth College Science GERTRUDE DAVIS, A.B., PH.B. U. of Chicago English, Latin MARTHA A. DETCHON, A. B. Oberlin College English, Latin II. L. DICKSON, B. P. E. Springfield College Physical Training MRS. E. W. DORAN Peabody College Librarian VERA MADGE DUMAS. A. B. Howard College Latin BAYLIS RUDOLPH EARLE, I). B IJ. of S. C. 11 i story RAVENNA ECKELS, B. S. Columbia Pome stir Science EDITH F \LKENSTEIN, \ B W est V irginia Math. FRANK E. FORTIER, B. S. II. of Maine Math. Twenty-five

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GLADYS GARDNER, A. B. Fla. State English MARTHA ANN GIEG, A. B. Goucher College English LOIS GEIGER, A. B. Piedmont College Latin, English ATLEY TILGHMAN GLISSON B. A. Vanderbilt, U. Spanish, History L. A. HERR, B. S„ M. A. Columbia U. Mechanical Drawing, Manual T raining SUE MAUDE KELLEY, B.S. U. of Va. Math. BARBARA KING, A. B. Randolph-Macon English, Physical Training CHARLOTTE L. KING, B.PD., B. S. Columbia U. Domestic A rt LaVERNE M. KOBLENZER, B.S. Western Reserve IJ. English PRISCILLA LANE Fla. State School Secretary KENNETH LEWIS, E. E. Syracuse U. Math. ALEXANDER McGILL, A. B. Randolph-Macon Math. Science VINCENT L. MEAD, B. S. Baldwin-Wallace College Math. JENNIE E. MILLER, B. S. Miss. State College Science GERTRUDE COBB MILLER Syracuse U. Music Twenty-six

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METTA MAE MITCHELL U. of Ill. Capt. Lynch's Secretary HARRY C. MORAN, A. B. Wittenburg College Spanish, English JAMES K. PETITTE, B. S. Bucknell U. History GERTRUDE R. PORTER, B. A., M. A. Vanderbilt U. English LAUSON B. SKIDMORE, B. S Cornell, Syracuse History, Psychology LOIS STEWART, A. B. U. ofInd. French EDITH SUTTON IJ. of Porto Rico Spanish VERNA WEBKING, B. S. Ind. State Normal Commercial Dept. FRANCES L. WEST., A.B., A .M. Agnes Scott College Science MRS. HAZEL H. WILLIAMS Nebraska State Normal Business JANE WILLIAMS Bowling Green Business U. Business W. M. WILLIAMS Nebraska U. Vocational Sub jects JESSIE L. WILSON Davenport College English I). P. WILSON. A. B. Asbury College Spanish, Science MARGARET G. WILDER, A. B. Tenn. U. Director of Research, Visiting Teacher Twenty-seven

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"Maw 0 Wapl_" Miss Mitchell Have you SEEN MY HAT?" — PARED, or_ Unprepared?' Do J 5 7 FA Ml RE sfi A —T* Let us all DO WELL ON THIS--Bassett s P ROTEGj One more “Vy/o-fL-RrD VounQ man 1 — AND--well, you Haven’t seen ME AT MY Wo^r f. jm "Now class. jffm flp^ p|| THERE WILL BE iSamv NO MOI^E TESI5T%> .Till To-my^ c> Twenty-eight

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Senior^.

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SD-ME-EA Seniors “ We came we toiled we graduated ” As Shakespeare would say, there are four stages in the normal life of a high school student: First, age of bliss and ignorance, Second, age of downright impudence, Third, age of joyful indolence, And fourth, the age of independence! For the last four years of our young lives we have worked toward this end, and now at last we have reached the goal — to have attained the superior height of upperclassmen, and to be looked upon with awe and respect as the most glowing examples of dignity and wisdom! This has always been our supreme ambition — until we became Seniors. But the moment we discovered that the date we have been accustomed to writing after our respective names exactly coincided with that on the calendar, we were suddenly confronted with the fact that “our days are numbered.” We don’t mind saying that, being perfectly normal in spite of all the above virtues, it made us want to shed a parting tear or two. Now that we must bid good-bye to our Alma Mater, we find ourselves extremely loathe to leave old St. Pete High. We may have been terribly overworked and greatly incensed at the thought of being deprived of such divine rights as chewing gum and throw ing notes, but though the first four years may be the hardest, and ex tremely trying ones, we want to say that we found them the most enjoy able and worthwhile years we have ever spent. Seniors of ’ 2 6 SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS Thirty

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LORA KERR Entered ’22, St. Petersburg, Fla. “She adds richness to common things.” P. & P. 2 years. Annual 1 year. A. A. 2 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. \ Pres. Fresh. Class. Honor Council '26. CLYDE BINKLEY Entered ’25. Columbia, Tenn. ”Every inch a man.” JEAN BELL AKIN Entered ’23. Columbia, Tenn. ‘ ‘ With a glib tongue. ’ ’ A. A. 3 years. Jr. W. C. PAULINE MICKLE Entered ’22. Columbus, Ohio “Rime and reason.” P. & P. 2 years. Jr. C. of C. Jr. W. C. A. A. 2 years. WILLIAM T. ERICKSON Entered ’24. New York, N. Y. “ Ye gods! How he could talk!” Baseball ’25. Swim ’25. A. A. P. & P. 2 years. MILDRED JUNE WALKER Entered ’21. St. Petersburg, Fla. ”Life is a jest.” Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. A. A. 4 years. Glee Club. P. & P. 2 years. MARGARET ADAMS MEVIS Entered ’22. Wellesly Hills, Mass. “All the world's a stage.” Be Square. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Glee Club. A. A. 4 years. P. & P. DONALD LaBRANT Entered ’22. Oak Park, Ill. “ Here's a heart for every fate.” P. & P. A. A. 4 years. Jr. C. of C. Thirty-one

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JOHN A. BUCKLEY Entered ’23. Elmira, N. Y. “Blest with that noble quality, reserve." A. A. 1 year. BETTY ANNE HORNBAKER Entered ’25. Washington, D. C. “Pours sunshine o'er all our woes." Jr. C. of C. Jr. W. C. A. A. HELEN A. BOARDMAN Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. ‘A kingdom where kindness resides." Pres. Civic League 2 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. A. A. 4 years. P. & P. 2 years. Swim 4 years. RICHARD RHEA Entered ’24. Pittsburgh, Penn. “Great men are not always wise." A. A. 2 years. Hi-Y Pres. ’25. Annual ’26. MYRTLE HARRIS Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “Such an unassuming young maid." A. A. CATHERINE COOK Entered ’22. Minneapolis, Minn. “ Lively, capable, and full of pep." A. A. 3 years. Be Square. Annual 2 yearq. RICHARD GIRARDEAU Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “A life that leads melodious days." P. & P. A. A. 3 years. KITTY MEE Entered ’23. Hollidaysburg, Penn. “She has a line." A. A. 2 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Thirty-two

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BETTY HINCKLE Entered '25. Bloomington, 111. “It is good to be children at times." A. A. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. JACK HALL Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Ela. “Show me a happier man than /.” Jr. C. of C. A. A. 4 years. Swim. Capt. ’26. LIDA ELIZABETH CADUGAN Entered ’24. Jersey City, N. J. "Mirth, with thee I mean to live." Be Square. MARGARET CANNING Entered ’23. McKeesport, Penn. "Flirt, flirt, flirt!" JOSEPH DAVIS Entered ’24. Savannah, Ga. "Women do not dismay him." Football. A. A. Jr. C. of C. MARY BELLE EACKLER Entered ’25. Shelby, Ohio. “ Never a better girl!" PAULINE BINNS Entered ’23. Fairmount, W. Va. "She'd rather walk with man than angel." Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. LESLIE MILLER Entered ’25. Minneapolis, Minn. "Hence, loathed Melancholy." Jr. C. of C. A. A. Thirty-three

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HARRIETT J. PROVOST Entered ’23. St. Petersburg, Fla. “ With a stroke of genius ” Swim. 4 years P. & P. 2 years. A. A. 4 years. Be Square. Jr. W. C. CLIFFORD PARDUE Entered ’24. Kansas City, Kan. “Little said is sooner mended." Hi-Y. MARINEZ HEITLAND Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "I choose the stage." Jr. C. of C. Jr. W. C. P. & P. 1 year. Annual 2 years A. A. 4 years. MARGARET EMMIE HART Entered ’22. Albany, Ga. "I love tranquil solitude." A. A. 3 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Be Square. LOREN JONES Entered ’25. Beloit, Ohio. “Much ado about nothing." Jr. C. of C. MARGARET HOOVER Entered ’25. Columbus, Ohio. "Thy artless winning smile." Orchestra. Glee Club. A. A. 1 year. FLORENCE PRENTICE Entered ’23. Binghamton, N. Y. "A thinking girl a winsome lass." TENNYSON FRECK Entered ’25. Asheville, N. C. "The world was made for music." Orchestra ’25. Thirty-four

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KAY KIRK Entered ’22. Akron, Ohio. "A bold, bad man." A. A. LOUISE WILLSON Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “Say no more, woman." A. A. 4 years Sec. Treas. Civic League ’25 Jr. W. C. MARTHA ELIZABETH CASE Entered ’22. Newtown, Penn. "It is to laugh." A. A. 4 years. Annual 2 years. P. & P. 1 year. JOE H. BANKS Entered ’22. Atlanta, Ga. “Ever ready." A. A. 1 year. WILLIE ANDERSON Entered ’24. Fort Valley, Ga. “Life is too short for logic." Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. OLIVE DOWNING Entered ’24. Hampton, Va. “Diligence is the mother of good fortune." A. A. HERBERT ROSS Entered ’24. Watertown, Mass. "Fore!" JOSEPHINE GIEFORD Entered ’22. Indianapolis, Ind. "A likeable miss with a friendly smile." A. A. 4 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Thirty-five

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ROBERT ELLSWORTH Entered ’25. Cleveland, Ohio. “ Not what I am but hope to be ” A. A. 1 year Jr. C. of C. Hi-Y. MARY LOUISE SQUIRE Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “A captain of industry." A. A. Basket-Ball 4 years. Cap’t. ’26 Jr. W. C. EDNA POTTER Entered ’24. Denver, Colo. “Every one lays a burden on the willing one." WALTER CLAYBERGER Entered ’22. Youngstown, Ohio. “ Kills time but never works it to death." A. A. 3 years. CHARLOTTE CARRYL Entered ’24. New York, N. Y. “Gently to hear, kindly to judge." Annual ’26. A. A. 2 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. GLADYS ABRAHAM Entered ’23. Tampa, Fla. “Perseverance makes honor bright." A. A. 2 years. Jr. W. C. Be Square. CHARLES LUKE Entered ’25. North East, Penn. “A lad worth knowing." MARY RUTH SANEORD Entered ’23 Grand Rapids, Mich. "Me and my boy friend." Jr. W. C. P. & P.2 years. A. A. 3 years. Swim. 2 years. Thirty-six,

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DORIS ELIZABETH LATIMER Entered '22. Jefferson, Ohio. “ Her eye was not the mistress of her heart." A. A. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Glee Club. ALDEN PEMBLE Entered ’22. Stillwater, N. Y. “I am as constant as the northern star." A. A. Hi-Y. HARRIET KENNEDY Entered ’24. Brooklyn, N. Y. “ Nothing succeeds like success." A. A. Jr. W. C. RHEA BROOKS Entered ’25. Hendersonville, N. C. “She wears the rose of youth upon her." JOE CARRAHER Entered ’25. Boston, Mass. “As many fine points as a pack of pins." GLADYS IRENE MULLIN Entered ’22. Indianapolis, Ind. “A good natured person is never out of place." Jr. C. of C. Jr. W. C. Orchestra 2 years. A. A. 2 years. WINIFRED DAVIS Entered ’22. Ehensburg, Penn. “Dates are my favorite fruit." A. A. 3 years. JOHN BODKIN, JR. Entered ’24. Evanston, Ill. “A silent mouth is musical." Thirtv-sevcn

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RICHARD KNAPPER Entered ’25. Greenville, Penn. 11 Still waters run deepest ” Basketball. MARTHA OXFORD Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "Words are women." A. A. 4 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. MARIAN STEWART Entered ’23. St. Petersburg, Fla. "Arrested for speeding — on a typewriter." P. & P. A. A. JACK CROW Entered ’24. Niles, Ohio. “ I 'm not in the role of common men." Hi-Y. ELEANOR JONES Entered ’23. Brockton, Mass. "On with the dance." MADELINE BAILEY Entered ’25. Ipswich, Mass. "Our delegate to Vassar." EARL LEGGETT Entered ’23. Terre Haute, Ind. "Wisdom is kindness." A. A. 2 years. Hi-Y 1 year. P. & P. 1 year. EDNA FRANCES KEEFE Entered ’22. Painesville, Ohio. "A loyal heart." A. A. 3 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Thirty-eight

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DONNA LEIBY Entered '22. Akron, Ohio. “Precious gifts come in small packages." A. A. 4 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. P. & P. 1 year. Honor Council '26. MERTON MURPHY Entered '23. St. Petersburg, Ela. “I know what's right." Annual Photo. 3 years. MARY PUGH Entered '22. Terre Haute, Ind. ‘ ‘ I ivould he a friend to all.' A. A. 3 years. Jr. C. of C. MARTHA HENRY Entered '22. Sebring, Ohio. ‘‘A studious mind is altvays evident." P. & P. '24. A. A. 2 years. WALTER JOHNSON Entered '22. Anetia, N. Y. “And he doesn't play baseball." A. A. 4 years. Hi-Y 1 year. Orchestra 1 year. SUSIE GALLOWAY Entered '24. Atlanta, Ga. "Oh, oh, oh, what a girl." FANNY MAUDE CAMERON Entered '24. Largo, Fla. “Dispels the sullen shade with her sweet influence." Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. WALLACE NEELY Entered '23. St. Petersburg, Fla. “Longevity is the soul of wit." A. A. 2 years. Annual 2 years. Jr. C. of C. Hi-Y. Thirty-nine

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WILLIAM P. MULHOLLEM Entered ’22. Altoona, Penn. “About evening a man is known." Basket-Ball. P. & P. Jr. C. of C. A. A. 4 years. MARY BULLARD Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “Feeling is deep and still" Swim. 3 years. Cap’t. ’24. Honor Council 1 year. A. A. 4 years. Sec. 1 year. Be Square. Glee Club 1 year. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. SHIRLEY M. LOCKE Entered ’23. Albany, Vermont. “ Her foes — has she any?" A. A. 3 years. Be Square. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Annual ’26. CARLTON TELLER Entered ’22. Lake Orion, Mich. “A blower of no mean note" A. A. 2 years. Orchestra. ANNA REGINA ETHERIDGE Entered ’24. Louisville, Ky. “Men have no charm for me." A. A. Be Square. LYDAREENE MAJORS Entered ’23. Columbia, Mo. “A winning smile a happy way." P. & P. A. A. 3 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. GORDON WRIGHT Entered ’22. Ithaca, N. Y. “For a saint thou art too much a sinner." A. A. 4 years. Track. Jr. C. C. Pres. ’26. V. Pres. Hi-Y ’25. Students Council ’25. REBECCA WHITTICE Entered ’25. Chattanooga, Tenn. "A plate of current fashion." Forty

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MARY HARRIET BIZE Entered ’24. Tampa, Fla. “The hearts of men adore thee.” A. A. 2 years. Jr. W. C. Sec. Civic League 2 years. HARRY McCARDELL, JR. Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “ If he had any faults he left us in doubt” Pres, class 4 years Student Council 2 years Track ’25 and ’26 A. A. V. Pres. ’26. Basket-Ball MARGARET STRANGE PEARCE Entered ’22 St. Petersburg, Fla. “A comrade blithe and full of glee.” Swim. 1 year. A. A. 3 years. Jr. W. C. V. Pres, class ’25 and ’26. MARIE E. HOGAN Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “Music hath charms.” P. & P. ’26. A A. 4 years. Jr. W. C. Orchestra. Honor Council 2 years. Sec. Fresh, and Soph, class. JAMES L. PEARSON Entered '24. Cincinnati, Ohio “ Keep that school girl complexion.” P. & P. 2 years. Jr. C. of C. MAGDALENA VANDERLYN Entered ’22. New Paltz, N. Y. ”Fair to look upon and better yet to know.” A. A. 4 years. Annual Editor '26. Sec. and Treas. Tennis Club ’26. Jr. W. C. V. Pres. Civic League ’25. MARTHA MCKIM Entered ’22. Fallensbee, W. Va. ‘‘A true marksman with rifle and pen.” Jr. C. of C. fr. YV. C. ‘ A. A. 4 years. P. &. P. ’26. GOULD CURTIS Entered ’23. Newtown, Conn. “Time is but the stream I go fishing in.” A. A. 2 years. Forty-one mmm

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POLLY BOREING Entered ‘24. London, Ky. “For she’s a jolly good fellow." KEITH SMITH Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “I muse on joy that will not cease." Football 1 year. Basketball. Baseball 1 year. A. A. 3 years. DOROTHY ELIZABETH CROSS Entered ’22. Silver Creek, N. Y. “Somewhat quiet, somewhat shy." A. A. 2 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. INEZ E. HOGAN Entered ’22. M icanopy, Fla. “One of the nicest girls we know." AUSTIN WILDER Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “Our Lord Chesterfield." A. A. 4 years. Jr. C. of C. Hi-Y 2 years. Class Treas. 3 years. LOUELLA MONG Entered ’24. Shippenville, Penn. “ Her manner is calm and pleasant." A. A. 1 year. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. MARGIE LUCILLE NORTHRIJP Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “I dare do all that doth become a man." A. A. 4 years. Swim. 2 years. Jr. W. C. LEWIS COOK Entered ’25. Columbus, Ga. “True blue." Forty-two

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DAVID ROSS Entered ’23. Wellsville, Ohio. “ Happy-go-lucky." A. A. 2 years. Hi-Y 1 year. Football 1 year. Track 2 years. KATHALEEN CARPENTER Entered ’23. Grand Rapids, Mich. “Sweet is every sound." A. A. 2 years. P. & P. Jr. C. of C. Jr. YV. C. GERTRUDE SOUERS Entered ’23. Akron, Ohio. “ Not what her name implies." A. A. 1 year. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. WAYNE ALLYN Entered ’23. Tampa, Fla. “ Happy am I, from care set free." Orchestra. A. A. 3 years. bp:tty eraze Entered ’22. Portland, Ind. “As sunny as her hair." A. A. 3 years. Jr. C. of C. Sec. Civic League. Treas. Jr. W. C. P. & P. BETTY TESSIER Entered ’24. Washington, D. C. "Live in my heart and pay no rent." ROSS WILCOX Entered ’25. Evanston, Ill. "Silent men are wise men." Hi-Y. EIDTH LOCKWOOD Entered ’25. Danville, Va. "As a maiden should he, meek and mild. ’ ’ Forty-three

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RUTH DALLY Entered ’25. Lima, Ohio. “Gentle and just." LLOYD SWENSON Entered ’25. Akron, Ohio. “One of those mermen" CATHERINE BELLEN Entered ’25. Glen Falls, N.Y. “And rank for her meant duty" VIRGINIA BROWN Entered ’23. Elkins, W. Va. “I will drink life to the lees" DUARD THOMPSON Entered ’25. Greensburg, Pa. ‘‘We wonder if it’s permanent" ZELLA FRANCES WALLACE Entered ’24. Pittsburg, Pa. ‘‘Drink to me only with thine eyes." A. A. 1 year. Jr. W. C. Glee Club 1 year. RUTH HOHMAN Entered ’22. Hammond, Ind. “A penny for your thoughts." A. A. 4 years. KENNETH JONES Entered '22. East Liverpool, Ohio. “The witty man laughs least." Sec. class 2 years. Hi-Y 2 years. Jr. C. C. treas. A. A. 4 years. Tennis club president. Forty-four

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MARY ALLEN WALDEN Entered ’23. Dublin, Ga. "I love you more than A. A. 3 years. ELVA VIVIAN TAGGART Entered '23. LaGrange, Ill. “ What cannot art and industry perform." A. A. 2 years. Jr. C. of C. Jr. W. C. P. & P. 2 years. Annual ’26. HERBERT EDMONDS Entered ’23. Denver, Col. “A law unto himself." A. A. 3 years. Jr. C. of C. LUCILLE PITTARD Entered '25. Athens, Ga. “A lady fair to look upon" RUTH GRIMES Entered ’25. Gainesville, Fla. "What's all the attraction of Domestic Science?" Jr. W. C. A. A. 1 year. CURTIS WHEELER Entered ’24. Kansas City, Mo. ‘Let us then he up and doing." Hi-Y. CATHRYN PENDERGRASS Entered ’22. Argyle, N. Y. “ ’Tis only noble to be good." A. A. JAMES SANNER Entered ’23. Grand Rapids, Mich. "A red head is far better than none." A. A. 3 years. Jr. C. of C. Forty-Jive

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LELA MAE DURANT Entered ’23. St. Petersburg, Fla. “ Would there were more like her." P. P. A. A. 2 years. Jr. C. of C. Orchestra. JOHN HAYWARD Entered ’23. Grand Rapids, Mich. “Let us no more contend." ANNE ROBERTSON Entered ’23. McKeesport, Penn. “Dine and dance." CAMILLA SYLVESTER Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “A still, small voice." Orchestra 2 years. NEWMAN C. MARLETT Entered ’23. Washington, N. J. “A new one on us." DELLA OLA MOORE Entered ’22. Barbourville, Ky. “Because I love, I live." A. A. 2 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. NAOMI RUTH WILLIAMS Entered ’24. Shoals, Ind. “ S he’s a bonny, bonny lass." A. A. 1 year. Be Square. EDWIN PRICE Entered ’24. Umatilla, Fla. “ T here’s something fine in him." Jr. C. of C. Forty-six

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HELEN KATHLEEN WELLS Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “Follow events, not lead them." A. A. 4 years. Jr. C. of C. WESLEY PARDUE Entered ’24. Kansas City, Kan. “Experience is by industry achieved." Hi-Y. A. A. 2 years. Jr. C. of C.. JOSEPHINE SHANK Entered ’24. Findlay, Ohio. "My crown is in my heart, not on my head." A. A. Be Square. ETHYL MARIE VOSS Entered ’21. Columbia, Tenn. "A dancing shape, an image gay." Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. A. A. HARRY GREEN Entered ’25. Brooklyn, N. Y. "He tickles wicked ivories ” Orchestra. MARION BRANNON Entered ’22. Wellsville, Ohio. "Fair hair and blue eyes." A. A. 4 years. Jr.W. C. Jr. C. of C. NAOMI E. DECKER Entered ’25. Mason City, Iowa. "Tender eyes that shine." H. BROWNING EMPSON Entered ’22. .Springfield, Tenn. "Outwardly unassuming ’ ’ Forty-seven

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MARGARET CATHERINE FITZSIMMONS Entered ’24. Steubenville, Ohio. “She doesn't need a trot." JAMES BRANNON Entered ’22. Wilkville, Ohio. “ He'll surprise you some day." A. A. 3 years. Hi-Y. MARY HOLLADAY Entered ’25 Guilford, N. C. "An apt and capable miss." RUTH O. HALE Entered ’24. Gardiner, Me. “ Up in Maine ——.” Jr. Health Dep’t. DAN WORKIZER Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "The fame a man wins himself is best." Jr. C. of C. Hi-Y. Annual ’25. A. A. 4 years. Cheer Leader ’26. P. & P. DOROTHY ALLYN Entered ’23. Tampa, Fla. "I would be a mermaid fair ” Be Square. Orchestra. MARIAN WAKEMAN Entered ’32. Syracuse, N. Y. Yes, I'll be brief this time." Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. GEORGE L. MONTEIRO, JR. Entered ’22. Northport, N. Y. "Rejoice, oh youth, in thy youth." Forty-eight

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MARJORIE BOWEN Entered ’22 Quincy, Mich. “ Make haste slowly .” A. A. 4 years Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. ROBERT H. C. RAN COAST Entered ’22 Pitman, N. J. “He who governs most makes least noise." CAROL C. CUSHMAN Entered ’23 Evanston, III. “Touched by a light that hath no name" P. &. P. A. A. 2 years LOUISE BERRY Pmtered ’25 Morganfield, Ky. “Small in stature not in mind." LLEWELLYN MOORE Entered ’21 Detroit, Mich. “ Who walketh as in sleep." A. A. 2 years. Track 1 year GLADYS MITCHELL Entered ’22 St. Petersburg, Fla. “ Her nose tip-tilted like the petal of a dower." A. A. 4 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. MARION ELIZABETH LINK Entered ’24 Fennville, Mich. “Zealous and modest—some combination." A. A. 1 year JOHN P. LYNCH, JR. Entered '22 St. Petersburg, Pla. "My mind to me a kingdom is." A. A. 5 years Hi-Y 1 year Fort y -nine

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JOHN ROSS Entered ’23. Wellsville, Ohio. “Actions speak louder than words." Football. PHOEBE LONGMAN Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “Calm and unruffled as a summer sea." Swim 4 years. A. A. Jr. W. C. P. & P. ARDELLE LINDSEY Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “Music waves eternal wands." A. A. 4 years. Orchestra 4 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. WYATT EARL DAME Entered ’22. Hubbardsville, Ky. “Today is ours—what do we fear ” A. A. 3 years. Hi-Y 2 years. Orchestra 2 years. WINIFRED MAE WRIGHT Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "I'd rather be right than president." A. A. 4 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. P. & P. Civic League Treas. ’25. RUTH RIGGS Entered ’22. Watertown, N. Y. "A capable lassie we all would say." JAMES HORNER VUILLE, JR. Entered ’22. Huntingdon, Pa. "Taste the joy that springs from labor." Tennis 3 years. P. & P. A. A. 4 years. Hi-Y 2 years. MARY VIRGINIA HUME Entered ’22* St. Petersburg, Fla. "Such a racketl" Jr. C. of C. Jr. W. C. A. A. 4 years. Glee Club. Yice-Pres. Tennis Club. Fifty

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E. F. VINCENTA BOREING Entered ’24. London, Ky. “Let me live and love." LARRY POWERS Entered ’22. West Field, N. Y. “One of the wonder-working Powers Annual '26. MARY E:LIZABE:TH RYDER Entered '22. Knoxville, Tenn. "Oh, what a pal was Betty." A. A. 4 years. Jr. W. C. KATHERINE CLIFFORD MOODY Entered ’23. Clarkesville, Mo. “ M errily, merrily, merrily!" A. A. 3 years. Basket-ball. Jr. C. ofC. Jr. W. C. JACK GREGORY Entered ’25. Johnson City, Tenn. "I come not here to talk." FRANCES E. WAGNER Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “ How now! a rat?" P. &. P. A. A. 4 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Civic League Pres. ’26. Honor Council ’25. KATHERINE OSBORN Entered ’22. Lawrenceville, Va. "Shy and retiring?" A. A. 3 years. DARRELL BURNS JORDON Entered ’23. Portland, Me. "Make haste slowly." fifty-one ||Hh

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PHILIP TAYLOR Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “ He's always been with ns." ETHEL EAYE NULL Entered ’25. Vincennes, Ind. “ None knew her but to love her." Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. GRAHAM LOVEJOY Entered ’22. New York, N. Y. “Blow, blow, thou wintry wind." A. A. 4 years. ELLEN LOUISE AVERY Entered ’25. Columbus, Ohio. “For it isn’t any trouble just to s-m-i-l-e ” GLORIA BULL Entered ’25. Astoria, N. Y. “Let knowledge grow from more to more." A. A. DONALD PERSONS Entered ’22. Cleveland, Ohio. “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again." ROBERTS ROBINSON Entered ’23. Winslow, N. J. “The noblest mind the best contentment has." A. A. 1 year. Hi-Y 1 year. JANET POULSON Entered ’22. New Albany, Ind. “She was a shepherd’s daughter." P. &. P. ’25. A. A. 4 years. Jr. W. C. Pres. ’26. Jr. C. of C. Fifty-two

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FLORENCE JAMES Entered '25 Cleveland, Ohio. “She sings sweetly as a nightingale." Cilee Club. A. A. KENNETH REED Entered '24. Altoona, Pa. “A good reputation is a fair estate." Track ’24. A. A. Hi-Y. HARRY TURNER Entered ’24. (Gainesville, Fla. 'He’s just a plain good sport." Football 1 year. Basket-ball 1 year. A. A. MAXINE DEEM Entered '22. Dayton, Ohio. “Life is short and so am I." A. A. ADDISON JOHNSON Entered,'24. Canandaigua, N. Y. “ O h inconsistant man!" WARREN HAUK Entered ’21. Springfield, Ohio. “It’s better to be lucky than wise." JOSEPHINE PAYNE Entered '24. Owasso, Mich. “ Who said blondes weren't vivacious?" Orchestra, fr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. DEWITT WILKERSON, JR. Entered '22. London, Ky. “Let me drift and dream ” A. A. 4 years. Jr. C. of C. Fifty-three

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LEONARD COOPERMAN Entered ’24. Atlanta, Ga. “ Knowledge is power." A. A. DAVID DOWNING Entered ’24. Hampton, Va. "Experience joined ivith common sense." A. A. CHARLOTTE SMITH Entered ’25. North Adams, Mass. “Girl with the golden smile." Orchestra 2 years. A. A. 2 years. RUTH HAZELTON COLE Entered ’22. Ossining, N. Y. “The path of duty is the way to glory." Swim 3 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Be Square. A. A. 4 years. LAURA ATKINSON Entered ’25. Winthrop, Mass. “She has courage, gaiety, and a quiet mind." CLYDE HAGERTY Entered ’22. Youngstown, Ohio. “ With a view point all his own." Swim 2 years. Orchestra ’23. A. A. 4 years. HOLLIS PACKARD Entered ’24. Magog, Quebec, Canada. “ Here's a fine chap." Hi-Y. EMILY FOSTER Entered ’24. Sparrow’s Point, Md. “ You never find her with time to ivaste." A. A. Fifty-four;

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MILDRED SHAINLINE Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. ‘ 'Life is real, life is earnest ” A. A. 4 years. Jr. C. of C. DAVID C. TRAFTON Entered ’22. Lynn, Mass. “A// his paths are peace." A. A. 1 year. Hi-Y. GERTRUDE E. TURN Entered ’25. Steubenville, Ohio. "A gracious manner and a mind well stored" Mabel Elizabeth Robinson Entered ’22. Soughtuck, Mich. “ Which twin is this?" Annual 2 years. P. & P. HEWITT TAYLOR Entered '22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "He catches the flies." Baseball 2 years. Football. A. A. GERTRUDE WELLS Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "Steady, willing, ready." Jr. C. of C. MARGARET PARDUE Entered ’25. Atlanta, Ga. "A lady of quality .” ROBERT CAREY Entered ’25. Indianapolis, Ind. "The little corporal." Football. Basketball. Baseball. Fifty-five

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AUGUSTUS MAXWELL Entered ’24. Tallahassee, Fla. “A man diligent in 'his business.” RUTH DONOVAN Entered ’22. Boston, Mass. ‘ ‘ Musically bent. ’ ’ SAMUEL MELVIN SHANNON Entered ’22. Grenada, Miss. “ Nimble with thy feet, not thy hands.” Basket-ball 2 years. Baseball. A. A. 2 years. WILLIAM GAMBLE Entered ’24. Way land, N. Y. “A specimen of human happiness.” Hi-Y. A. A. 2 years. Jr. C. of C. GENE FRICK Entered ’25. Cleveland, Ohio. “She who succeeds ” LOUISE ERMA BOWEN Entered ’22. Cordele, Ga. “Laugh and the world laughs with you.” Be Square 3 years. A. A. 2 years. JACK BRANDT Entered ’25. Buffalo, N. Y. “ Lo the conquering hero comes!” A. A. Annual ’26. ROLAND HEDBERG Entered ’23. Ishpening, Mich. “A boy who's out to surely win.” A. A. 2 years. Fifty-six

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ROBERT L. SAYLOR, JR. Entered ’23. Orlando, Fla. “Fire in each eye papers in each hand." A. A. 3 years. lli-Y 2 years. Annual ’25. P. & P. EDNA KNOW ETON Entered ’25. Elmira, N. Y. “Goodness dwells with Beauty .” ROBERT E. BURKLEW Entered '23. Oberlin, Ohio. “Alas, the love of women!" P. & P. Hi-Y. Orchestra 3 years. A. A. CLAUDE H. MELTON Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. “ C hildhood — life's happiest days" Hi-Y. A. A. 3 years. MARGARET K. FASSETT Entered ’23. St. Louis, Mo. “We love her for her quiet ways." TOM FRECK Entered ’25. Ashville, N. C. “A star in the orchestral firmament. Orchestra ’25. RAYMOND H. ROBINSON Entered ’25. Cobleskill, N. Y. “Scholarly and wise." ELIZABETH JANE WILLIAMS Entered ’25. Cleveland, Ohio. “Maidenly charm and pleasing grace." Glee Club. A. A. Fifty-seven

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GEORGE T. GOODRIDGE Entered ’24. Oak Park, Ill “A lady's man." Annual. MARSHALL MANSFIELD Entered ’22. New York, N. Y. “ D ignity thou too art here" Hi-Y.' Baseball. AZA ATWOOD Entered ’25. Cambridge, Mass. “Before her smile all sadness flies" BIRDIE ALEXANDER Entered ’22. Summerville, Ga. “Do or dye\" A. A. ROBERT DEEM Entered ’22. Dayton, Ohio. “An optimist is he." HELEN LOOP Entered ’22. Syracuse, N. Y. “ High up in the world." B. B.’ 2 years. A. A. 3 years. ELOISE LEE Entered ’25. Shreveport, La. u Mitey and fine" ROYCE GOODBREAD Entered ’22. Crystal River, Fla. “7 hate to see a thing done by halves." Football 3 years. Track 3 years. Capt. ’24. A. A. 2 years. Hi-Y. Fifty-eight

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GEORGE McBRIDE Entered ’25. Bay City, Mich. “A good name is better than riches." BETTY MILLER Entered ’22. Norwalk, Conn. “Absolutely adorable." A. A. 4 years. Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. P. & P. Editor. FAY SMITH Entered ’24. Covington, Penna. ‘ 1 To be grave exceeds all power of the face. ’' GEORGE KILGEN, JR. Entered ’25. Long Beach, N. Y. “Anything for a quiet life." MARIAN WHEAT Entered '25. Elmira, N. Y. “ D ignity thou too art here" DOROTHY STOVALL Entered ’22. St. Petersburg, Fla. "To be awake is to be alive." Jr. W. C. Jr. C. of C. Sec. ’26. A. A. 4 years. Y. Pres. Soph, class. P. & P. 2 years. Annual ’25. • Fifty-nine

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3iewx££. 3Slo>X\t 3 era. \xj et i r ou.xv c\. ^4euu e\|i i Sailor. % o-#l JhStur c$ o\it Sexx\otrs. V\v exv, o\x axx JSlvax^o^e^, jStatce., Sixty

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O-ME-EA Juniors President Louis Adcock Secretary Jay Wilson Vice-President Catherine Batts Treasurer Marion Stenacher Class of Â’27. The journey of our Sophomore year was made in a flivver, but we have now advanced to a ship. Louie Adcock, the helmsman is still at the wheel, steering the. ship carefully through the troubled waters. Beside him sits Miss Edith Falkenstein, our pilot, whose perseverance, energy and self-sacrifice have guided us through all our trials. The rest of us are scattered in different parts of the ship, each pursuing his own interests. At the first of this year we had a class picnic. It was the first social event of the year and was so greatly enjoyed by everyone that we began to make plans for another. Next came the campaign for class dues. When we had all paid them, we settled down for a nice long journey. There followed a series of entertain ments given by various members of the class at our class-meetings. We enjoyed these thoroughly but gradually lost our interest in them when we began to plan for the greatest event of the whole year, the Junior-Senior banquet. At that time we invited the Seniors to accompany us on our voyage. They accepted our invitation and were our guests for the rest of the journey. We have enjoyed our voyage this year. Now we are at the end of it and, although we are sorry to leave, we are looking forward with eager anticipation to our ex pedition of next year. Sixty-two

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Sixty-three

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Sixty-four

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Sop<)omore0.

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Sophomores President Ben Greene Secretary Keith Myers Vice-President Laura Ann Rowell Treasurer George Shattle C/ass Advisor Miss Vera Dumas Yea! Sophomores, how about telling the rest of our fellow students why they should be proud of us. Our class first began to experience events such as might be called history in the year 1923-24 when we spent many happy days in the old Southern Methodist Sunday School Building. The following year, 1924-25, we were the first class to graduate from the New Junior High School Building. This year we have entered the realms of the Senior High and have shown a help ful, cooperative spirit by taking part in all the school activities. Already, as a class we have accomplished four things worthy of mention: first, in the pay-up campaign for dues the Sophomores excelled the Juniors and Seniors with 80 per cent paid up; second, at HalloweÂ’en time we all had a delightful party which was a howling success and was said to be the best HalloweÂ’en Party ever staged by any class in the High School; third, the Beach party held at St. Peters burg Beach recently was enjoyed by everyone; and fourth, in the Inter-class vSwimming Meet the Sophomores swam away with highest honors. The won derful success of each of these was due to the excellent spirit of cooperation exhi bited by each individual. Now we hope that all who may chance to look upon this page will say in Â’28 that the graduating class of this year was the liveliest, most scholarly, most athletic and best all round class ever graduated from the Senior High School of St. Peters burg. Sixt y-six

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Sixty-seven

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Sixty-eight

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•> 4 x etia. c e, a 3\s oa^. cva. b K ^ouix ^e si.. ^vc£tc & o'5 %t\(k\\ o ma\Cs 6 \.\xtx ALUMN I. X%oX\^ % xxxv cV. Looa. t a j ^ol arevcL 3Wterw 3^ &x\> tX)3a^fc\WVr ol\ %zVl% y?a,xt. t oAW"c vcve 3CC c <5 cv\*\x\^ Seventy

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Alumni News Paul Boardman is literally like a fish out of water, for there is no swimming pool up at the U. of F. and alas! he can neither swim nor fish. Sure must be tough on Paul. Lincoln Bogue graduated in Law last F'ebruary and is now back in town with Lane and Bussy. Helen Lynch is still making a name for herself in athletics — on the Hockey team, Varsity Basketball team, as well as Junior Basketball team. And Olivia Ann Swift has also made the Hockey team. Raymond Borstel is still swapping fords. Walter Braden has an orchestra of his own, plays the banjo in it, and has ac quired the poetic name of “Banjo Bandidi.” Gretchen Geiger has taken up fencing. Wanita Walters is first violinist in the college orchestra. She also plays for the Y. W. meetings, and various social functions. Billy Buhner has joined the Chili Clough Club, but does not offer to spell or pro nounce it. And of course Joe Fickling is still making his trips to Tallahassee. Ain’t it grand ? Elizabeth Girardeau plays the violin at social functions. She and Keller Harris both took part in the minstrels. Martina McKim is struggling with Latin, and plans to be a teacher as soon as she has finished being a student. Dick Fraze is a member of the Y. M. C. A. cabinet. Preston Johnson has changed his name to Tom. Margaret Yaryan is still showing her ability as begun on the P. & P. and the No-So-We-Ea. She is now on the Flambeau and Flascino Staffs. H. K. Wallace is having dates now. Polly Buhner is going to Europe this summer. Burdette White is quite as studious as ever, and is also planning a trip to the other side of the “big pond’’. Morrison Pearce’s activities up at Gainsville are somewhat interrupted by his frequent visits to St. Pete. Powell Majors is running for editor of the F. book. A group of the home girls have organized the Beta Woman’s Club — Margaret Peeler, president, Gladys Brooks, Erma Lee Klutts, Dorothy Cook, Joan Fox worthy, and Nellie Mae Meisson are all active members. Jimmie Riddle is at an aviation school in Kansas City, Mo. Stuffy Livingston is manager of one of the boarding houses. Oliver Hewitt and Hazel Wallace are married. Don Cushman, Dick Fraze, and H. K. Wallace are room-mates — and cook their own meals! Seventy-one

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PAGE 78

Seventy-four

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Don Ferguson, a newcomer, at right tackle showed up to be not only a hard hitting defensive man, but a plunging demon on offence. Clarence “Tubby” Kirchner at full back proved to be the main cog of our defensive machine, and no small part of the offense. His ability to back up the line in time of danger, and to break up passes that would have meant long gains, placed him in line for all state honors. George Presstman, left guard,another last year’s man, played a consistently good game throughout the season. Lynn Darby, at right guard, proved a tower of strength. Though this was his first year of football, he played with the best, and records show that few gains were made against right guard. Royce Goodbread, fleet-footed left half, carried the brunt of the attack, and gained more yardage than any other man on the team. He was also high point man. His sweeping end runs, his pass receiving ability and his powerful tackling won honorable mention for him on the all Southern team. Seventy-five

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Frank Hodgkinson at right end round ed out the best line in the state. On the receiving end of Johnnie’s long passes, Frank was a valuable asset. Harry “Speedy” Hewitt at right half, was a consistent ground gainer. When two or three yards were needed for first down, “Speedy” could be depended on to put it across. Clement Coss, Captain Elect, and letter man of last year, held the key position at center. His accurate passing and his brilliant defensive work stamp him as a star. Clarence “Scabby” Pheil filled the va cancy left by his brother “Hops” at left tackle, and filled it well. His work, tho’ not brilliant was steady, the kind that makes for a great linesman. Howard Warner played left end and succeeded in holding down that diffi cult position with remarkable ability. His playing in the Tampa game was ex ceptionally good. John Ross, Captain and quarterback, can not be given too much praise and honor for the skillful manner in which he handled the team. He himself was a triple threat man with no little ability. Seventy-six

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Sr. s cn £ e£d. by G/?n,e.r/e<=)fn Jyzyf'c There’s a high school down in southern Florida, And we love, yes, love it well, Every year we gather there, a happy band, For we love, yes love it well; Everybody comes to see S. P. H. S., 'Tis our own dear high school home, And we never shall forget S. P. H.S. wheresoever we may roam; We are the boys S. P. H. S. We are the girls S. P. H. S. We are the students of the Sunshine City High School Oh, clear and high ring out the cry, S. P. H. S. Ready all to shout the call, S. P. H. S. Clear the way, prepare the fray, S. P. H. S. We are marching on to victory. Old St. Pete High, how proudly we honor and praise you, Time will not change you, your spirit will never die; We’re here to boost you, in classroom, on gridiron, and field, too, You are to us our own, our wonderful St. Pete High. Rah, rah, for St. Pete, St. Pete will win, Fight to the finish, never give in; Rah, rah, rah, You do your best boys, We’ll do the rest, boys, Rah, rah for St. Pete High. 'Jack Seventy-seven

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Boys’ Basketball Living up to traditions of former years and striving to equal the record of our victorious football heroes, the basketball boys started the 1926 season with a rush. Although last year’s team was sadly depleted, there was far more material on hand this year than ever before and with a few of last year’s stars as a nucleus, the prospect was very encouraging. A regular coach was not secured until our first two games had been played and then the squad was fortunate in securing Fred W. Stewart of this city, an expert player and coach, to take them under his guardian ship. To Mr. Stewart’s credit goes a great part of the Team’s accomplishment. After a fairly successful season, having been beaten only by Tampa and South Florida Military Academy, the Green Devils entered the State tournament at Gainesville, determined to win in spite of all odds. Here they defeated Hastings, Graceville, and Tallahassee, thereby placing themselves in the semi-finals. Then on the eve of victory came Duval, our old and bitter rival, (in a friendly way, of course.) To make a long story short, we came out on the short end of the Score. This defeat eliminated us from the tournament. The boys playing on the squad were Captain Frank Hodgkinson, G. Severance, W. Mullhollem, H. Hewitt, C. Kirchnvr, J. Ross, H. Turner, P. Wilbur, T. Costello, and W. Mullendore. “Green Devils, we are proud of you! St. Pete vs. Largo__ 45—11 Florida Military Academy_33-12 Bradenton_ 14-9 So. Fla. Military Academy_28-31 Miami Aggies_ 17-7 Tarpon Springs_ 14-9 St. Pete vs. Tampa_ 12-18 So. Fla. Academy_ 24-28 Wachula_ 22-13 Arcadia_ 32-11 So. Fla. Academy_ 27-26 Tampa_ 16-22 Seventy-eight

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Seventy-nine

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GirlsÂ’ Basketball GirlsÂ’ Basketball during 1926 proved a repetition of 1925. The Green Angels under the supervision of Miss Barbara King, and under the leadership of Captain Mary Louise Squier, went through the season without suffering one loss. They won every game with ease and their trouble again proved to be lack of stiff enough competition. A singular honor came to the girls this year in that three girls were placed on the All State team. This is an achievement never before equalled in St. Petersburg High and one that will stand for many years Our dauntless Captain was chosen as chief. The two players chosen for this mythical team, besides Mary Louise, were Olivia Grime s and Celia Lowe. These girls are two of the best basketball players who have ever donned the Green and White. The girls then put on their fighting togs and went to the State tourna ment at Deland with a spotless slate and with high hopes of coming home with a State Championship. Their first opponent, Delray, was disposed of in short order, 30-5. The second game of the tournament, however, was played with Palatka, who proved our undoing last year. Playing desperately and encountering stiff opposition all through the game the girls were forced to lose the game by the close score of 20-18. This is the second time the girlsÂ’ hopes have been dashed against the rocks on the eve of victory. The girls who played on the team and made this enviable record possi. ble were Celia Lowe, Ethel Kelly, Catherine Batts, Dolly Palmer, Oli via Crimes, Clifford Moody, Idella Hersmer and Ruth Beverly. St. Petersburg High is proud of the wonderful record set by these girls, and wishes next yearsÂ’ team a successful year. St. Pete vs. Bradenton 67-4 Arcadia_ 51-13 New Smyrna 34-16 Clearwater_ 25-9 Wachula 18-14 Bradenton 67-4 Clearwater 34-6 Eighty

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Eighty-one

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BoysÂ’ Swimming After nailing last yearÂ’s State Championship to our flagpole, our mermen de termined to make it two straight and secure a strangle hold on the swimming cup. Led by Jack Hall, coached again by T. J. Howland, who is one of the foremost swimming experts in the United States, and managed onCe more by Bradford A. Lawrence, the owner of the Spa, the boys have one of the best chances in the state of winning the title. The other members of the team are Clayton Clark, Willis Yeamans, Clyde Hagerty, Dudley Hall, Archie McClatchie, Ernest Hum phries and Harold Clizbe. Every one of these water pushers are swimmers of exceptional talent and absolutely necessary in order to win the meet. Perhaps the most notable member on the team is the versatile captain, Jack Hall. Jack, as everyone knows, won several firsts in the meet last year. After a trip through the north last summer where he entered in many amateur contests, and acquitted himself with highest honors, he came back here for his Senior year pre pared to do or die. We know that he will not die. At the A. A. U. Meet held at Miami in March of this year, Jack won first place in the hundred yard backstroke, and placed in several other events. Co-operation of the swimmers, coach and manager of the team, along with the enthusiastic support furnished by the student body again gave St. Petersburg High the unexcelled record of 1926. Eighty-two

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Boys SwimmIng Team. Eighty-lh ree

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GirlsÂ’ Swimming St. Petersburg High School has always been famed for its merniaids. You know, those sun-browned, wind-tanned Florida beauties who may be seen almost any day in the year sporting on the beach at the Spa or gliding with ease through the water in the pool, under the eagle eye of Coach Howland. The girls had hard luck last year at the meet, but acquitted themselves in true St. Petersburg High fashion. This year, however, the girls have the best chance in the State of bringing home the bacon. A double championship is the goal of the swimming teams this year and we know that we are not going to be disappointed. Coach T. J. Howland who has coached the girls along with the boys for several years, is the man who has made swimming a major sport in the High School, has sacrificed practically all his time, and given himself in unstinted effort to make our teams the best in the south. Harriett Provost is captain of the girls team this year. She is one of the greatest swimmers in the State, but last year was unable to enter the meet on account of illness. Great things are to be expected from Harriett this year. The personnel of the team includes Maude Dew, Louise Hitchner, Mary Bullard, Jewel Mills, Phoebe Longman, Mary Ruth Sanford, Claire Quick, Helen Boardman and Betty Miller. Maude Dew and Marjorie Provost, a coming high school star, journeyed down to Miami with Jack Hall to the A. A. U. meet. Here they captured several first and second places, swimming against many amateur champions. With these results already tucked away, there is no doubt as to the ability of our mermaids. At any rate, we know that they will hold up the flag for old St. Petersburg High as have all the teams which have gone before. May those of future years uphold the standards that the girls of Â’26 have planted. Eighty-four

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GiRLS SwiMMiNG Eighty-five

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Baseball With Marshall Mansfield as their doughty captain, Seth Whitmore their official newspaperman, F. M. Stewart their coach, Walter Wells their manager, and the entire Student Body their ardent supporters, the baseball nine of St. Petersburg High embarked on its maiden voy age of 1926, prepared to meet the heaviest gales and lightest winds that blow. The men who signed the 1926 roster were Marshall Mansfield, captain, Irvin Balgeman, Price Goldsmith and William Mulhollem, pitchers, Hewitt “Red” Taylor, catcher; Tom “Splinter” Costello, Frank White, Fred Redfield, Ben Green, infielders; Norman Derr, Paul Brown, Clarence Pheil and Graham Severance, outfielders, and William Erick son and Charles Templeton, utility men. Baseball has always been a fairly popular sport in the High School and this year was no exception to the rule. There was no dearth of material ready for the coach, F. M. Stewart, to look over and never have the prospects for a State Championship looked brighter. Up to this time the team has played Bradenton, Sacred Heart, St. Leo, Clearwater and Tampa — though we are sorry to record that all of these games have not been overwhelming victories. Eighty-six

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T rack Although track has been of the minor sports in St. Petersburg I ligh, it is rapidly gaining the popularity it deserves. Despite the fact that the team had no proper equipment and did not even have an adequate training ground, they turned in a record which meant much credit and is in keeping with the splendid results achieved by the other athletic teams. The team was ably coached by Mr. H. M. Buland, who has had considerable experience in that line, and aided by the perserverance and determination of the boys who made up the team, he succeeded in mak ing 1926 a banner year. This year the team went up to Gainesville and faced the greatest aggregation of track athletes that has ever been gathered together in Florida. Ocala High, due solely to the exceptional prowess of one boy. who captured four firsts in as many events, won the meet, Miami was second and Lakeland third; St. Petersburg High tied with Duval for fourth place. This in view of all the difficulties encountered is a record of which we can be justly proud and we are confident that in the fu ture the State Championship cup will reside permanently in our trophy case. The St. Petersburg team placed well in several events, including the relay. The personnel of the team includes Dave Ross, John Ross, Royce Goodbread, Clement Coss, Clyde Bozeman, James Sanner, Paul, Maurer, Herman Peterson, and Joe Carraher. Eighty-seven

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Tennis Tennis, one of the sports which has held minor interest in St. Petersburg High School has come into prominence in the last two years with an ever increasing rush. The suitable climate of our southland makes this an all year round sport, and tennis is rapidly coming to the front in High School Athletics. This year, a tennis club was formed early in the season. Kenneth Jones was elected president, Mary Hume, vice-president, and Magdalena Vanderlyn, secretary and treasurer. The club started off with a bang, an in tensive membership campaign was put over and interest in tennis reached its zenith in the High School. Elimi nation tournaments among the players were held at intervals in order to de termine the team to represent the school. The team played Clearwater, Sacred Heart College, and Tampa — defeating them all. m %  The players who represented the school in the matches were Jim Vuille, our William Tilden II, William Barnes, Henry Kelly, Kenneth Jones, Howard Eggleston and Ralph LeNeave. Every one of these net demons are stars of the first magnitude and it is due to them that we again gained fame on the athletic field during 1926. Tennis is one of our national sports and is coming into its true place in High School athletics. In future years we hope that the boys and girls of St. Pete High will secure many State Championshi ps in tennis. Eighty-eight

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No-So-We-Ea The Annual Staff of Â’26 has tried to make this yearÂ’s No-So-We-Ea the best that S. P. H. S. has ever had. We have endeavored to give you a book, representative of the whole school. We hope that it may bring to each and everyone, memories of the years spent at S. P. H. S. If we have succeeded, it is only because of the wonderful spirit and cooperation manifested by all the students who have been connected with the staff and its work. We wish to use this little space to thank our helpers; those who have so kindly lent us their home Annuals, those who have spent many long and weary hours in research work, our ad-go-getters, our advertisers, and finally every person who has contributed anything toward making the No-So-We-Ea of 1926 a success. A Few of Our Assistants Ninety

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Annual Staff: r Ots&dyvl"'-*' QiMsNo Q++UA, Ninety-one

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This year the Palmetto and Pine has endeavored primarily to please the discriminating public and to be entirely representative of the school at large in its social, athletic and scholastic world. A new feature added to the paper this year has been the Notes on Notables column. Its purpose was to acquaint the student body with the names and personalities of the students who dominate in the various activities of the school. The attendance at High School this year was so large that it was difficult for everybody to know everyone else and so the staff through our columns hoped to make many introductions. At the beginning of the year there were many Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors working on the P. and P., but now at the end of the year, there are a few hard-working Seniors and Juniors. We want to thank them for their untiring efforts. Without Miss GardnerÂ’s able assistance, we fear that many times the paper would not have come out at all. Some of Miss GardnerÂ’s pet phrases, and long words have helped to lengthen many an article. The editors of the special sections have done their work exceedingly well. We hope that we have made an improvement on the former yearsÂ’ papers and wish the staff of Â’27 the greatest success and prosperity in their publication. The following people composed the staff of the Â’26 Palmetto and Pine: Advisor, Miss Gardner. Managing Editor, Bob Saylor. Staff Editor, Betty Miller. Assistant Manager, Donald LaBrant. StudentÂ’s Pen Advisor, Miss G. Davis. StudentÂ’s Pen Editor, Lora Kerr. Sport Editor, Jim Vuille. Sport Reporters, Bill Erickson, Leighton Pearce. Notes on Notables, Helen Boardman. Exchange Editor, Mary Ruth Sanford. Assistant Exchange Editor, Virginia Scales. Joke Editor, June Walker. Cartoonist, Lela Mae Durant. Reporters, Marie Hogan, Jack Lentz, Betty Hinclcle, Betty Hornbaker. Typists, Marian Stewart, Edna Pike. Ninety-two

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... nd Pine PALMET 7 St. Petersburg 'IS DIVA!” FRONT TODAY if 11 ELEVEN HY GREEN I Decided Today School Confident in Ability of Team to Keep Unbroken Record, Largest Attendance in High School Records at Saturday’s Game. AME girrm? %  SS MEET AN ED. NOV. 21 am: speakin GIVES !'!i again:; Mueh rivalry h bring eoen the. classes*, a* t Only notable material k, %  a mutters divers and phir< &f {Continued on Page "3 What* ie may be. it proud (Coatlotted on Pago %  Sp The Palmetto and Pine Staff. Ninety-three

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i • Athletic Association President Bob Saylor Secretary Mary Bullard Vice-President Harry McCardell Treasurer Jay Willson This year has undoubtedly proved to be the most fruitful in the history of the Athletic Association, both as to finance and size of membership, which have ef fected a substantial increase. The purpose of the organization is to sponsor the athletic contests between the various schools with which S. P. H. S. competes. It conducts the financial part of the games and furnishes the teams with supplies, uniforms, and other acces sories. It might be added that this year’s Athletic Association has kept the teams better outfitted than ever before, due in a great measure to the cooperation of the student-body, which, with outside aid has contributed eight or ten thousand dollars. OFFICERS Ninety-four

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Hi-Y This year marks the close of the greatest successful season in the annals of the St. Petersburg Hi-Y. The club has as its purpose the creation, maintenance and extension of high standards of Christian character, throughout the school and community. Members holding office during the year were: Richard Rhea, Gordon Wright, John Lynch, Edward Kearney, Dan Workizer, Kenneth Reed, Alden Pemble, Walter Johnson, David Ross, Wesley Pardue and Leslie McEwan. Six of the boys were sent to the Florida Hi-Y Congress at Lakeland, which proved to be a marked improvement over that of last year, as every club in the state was represented. The club also manifested its interest in civic affairs by taking people without cars to register for the Sunday movie vote. Mr. Alexander, as adviser, helped greatly in all undertakings. Ninety-five

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Junior Chamber of Commerce One of the most outstanding organizations of the St. Peters burg High School is the Junior Chamber of Commerce. The organization is composed of the Public Speaking classes, headed by Miss Center. It is closely connected with the Chamber of Com merce of St. Petersburg. The idea of a Junior Chamber of Com merce originated in St. Petersburg, and our example has since been followed by many schools. It has been the purpose of the Club to sponsor those activities which will aid the school as well as the city and it has the reputation of making a success of whatever it attempts to do. Probably this is due largely to the dependable officers of the organization; Gordon Wright, the president, has already shown his ability as an executive leader, and Austin Wilder, Dorothy Stovall and Kenneth Jones, our Vice-president, Secretary and Treasurer, have also proved their ability in the work. One of the many school activities of the Junior Chamber of Com merce is the chapel program given every Friday which is always well worked-out and very interesting. Besides this, there are many more accomplishments of the Club, which, in its history, has never failed to carry out its obligations. Ninety-six

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The Junior WomanÂ’s Club President Janet Poulson Secretary Mary Settle Treasurer Betty Fraze One snappy bunch, and thatÂ’s just a hunch of the club IÂ’ll tell you about; theyÂ’re always fit, doing their bit, and never are counted out. Many a deed left as a token of many things done, and no promises broken. Remember the tea, the tea they gave for the faculty, Remember? Remember the many times they helped the Senior Club, Remember? Remember they helped when the veterans came, and even when tired they smiled just the same; the club that was active and cheery and game, you must not forget to Remember. The high school is proud of this little crowd and the record they made this year. They did not forget that each task should be met with a spirit of kindly cheer. Remember the times, the times they were guests of the Senior club, Remember? Remember the Christmas box they gave for two little orphans, Remember? Remember the hand and the sunny smile given in true S. P. H. S. style? The Junior club, doing things worth while, you must not forget To Remember. Apologies to Irving Berlin. Ninety-seven

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Be Square Club President Margaret Mevis Vice-president Vivian Davis Secretary Elizabeth Lynch Treasurer Ila Burke This has been the most successful year in the history of the Be Square Club. This can be accounted for in part by the large membership of girls from the three upper classes of the High School. The success of the club is also due in a large measure to Miss Charlotte Pigott, Girl Reserve Secretary. The girls are very fortunate in having a club house in which meetings and parties are held. There are tennis courts on the lawn of the club house which provide recreation for the members. There is also a Y hut at Treasure Island where picnics and houseparties are held. The members of this club strive to promote a feeling of friend ship among girls of the high school. At Christmas time, the girls sent gifts to the Indian children on the Cherokee reservation. The members also dressed dolls to be distributed among the less fortunate children of the city. Above all things the club members endeavor to live up to the club purpose: “To face life squarely, and to find and give the best.” Ninety-eight

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Scholarship Club “ The Club the School Delights to Honor ” In order to be a member of this club, a student must have a general average of A. Seniors Juniors Sophomores Martha Henry Charlene Hall Elizabeth Rich Jum Vuille Larue Stringer Edythe McKim Harry McCardell Pauline Banta Frances Wood Katherine Warmington Magdalena Yanderlyn Betty Hinckle Mary Belle Fackler Mildred Hodnett Elizabeth Lynch Laura Jean Workizei Georga Burk Keith Meyer Marian Beeman Laura Ann Rowell Faith Harris Lucille Burns Rebecca McKinney

PAGE 104

The Orchestra The Senior High School orchestra under the direction of Mrs. Gertrude Cobb Miller, was organized under a new and unique plan this year. Nearly all of the orchestra members were students in the regular music classes and received one whole credit instead of one-half credit as in former years. Practice was held three times a week at seven-thirty in the mornings, and during the second semester special practices were called after school and in the evenings. Herself a very accom plished musician, Mrs. Miller aided her pupils to a finer musicianship and gave them a keener insight into the true value of ensemble or orchestral playing. Because the orchestra as a whole was somewhat unbalanced in instruments, some of the more advanced members were often called upon to play at various receptions and social events in the city. Next year those members who played “seconds” this year will form the nucleus of the orchestra. The main group, though, numbered about forty members, her “faithful forty” as Mrs. Miller has named them, and played at many notable occasions, such as: the “Midsummer Night’s Dream,” the Shrine Club, the Woman’s University Club, the North Ward entertainment, Valentine school entertainment, the Senior play, etc. A formal concert was given on May 7, which proved a suitable ending for a remarkable year. OneHundred,

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Glee Club The Glee Club, infant prodigy, is St. Petersburg High School’s first mixed Glee Club. When at the first of the year it was announced that Mrs. George Miller would conduct music classes and a Glee Club which would give credit, only the most ambitious honor seekers and music lovers responded, so the group was des tined to hard work along with the “Glee”. The 7:30 A. M. rehearsals and even three part chorus singing could not daunt this group however, and soon the chapel services were often made more enjoyable In ks selections. The Club, after having gained experience and training proudly announced that it would make it’s formal debut the Seventh of May, in the High School Audi torium. The concert, a big success, was the first of it’s kind ever given in .St. Petersburg High School. The program included not only chorus work, but a ladies’ double quartette, saxaphone octette, string quartette, also vocal and piano solos. The Glee Club has worked hard and faithfully — and successfully, for a mixed Glee Club has now become one of the institutions of the school. (hre Hundred One

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Extra Curricular Activities Program of the St. Petersburg High School In this phase of school S. P. H. S. is leading the entire country. The appeal is to individual interest. The administration holds, that the range of pupil abilities is so great that the regular work must be supplemented and motivated. These clubs give opportunity to develop leadership, ini tiative, co-operation and intelligent obedience and respect for authority. This year the program concentrates to two specific purposes; — character training and vocational guidance. There is little driving in our school, teachers and pupils together in glad comradeship go eagerly forward. Pu pils are given many opportunities to develop their abilities. The school is democratic — the best preparation for life is living. One Hundred Two

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T3T Cti
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l/V JIJVD JROKYD One Hundred Four

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“A Successful Calamity” By Clare Kummer Act I Scene I—A living room in Mr. Wilton’s house. Afternoon. “Planning a charity ball might be good fun if one only had time to enjoy it.” Scene II—The same. Shortly before dinner. “We don’t need to go out of the house to-night to hear about things that explode.” Scene III—The same. Later in the evening. “But, after all, one must keep up appearances, mustn’t he?” Act II Scene I — The same. Next morning. “I wish I hadn’t waked up, really.” Scene II—The same. Later in the morning. “It’s wonderful to be forgiven, even if you haven’t done anything.” Time — The Present. Place—New York City. Cast of Characters. Henry Wilton, a millionaire, who longs to spend a quiet evening at home_ Wallace Neely Emmie, his young second wife _ M arinez Heitland Marguerite, his daughter_ Tanet Poulson Eddie, his son_ •_ R obert Ellsworth George Struthers, Marguerite’s fiance_ H arry McCardell Clarence Rivers, another fiance G ordon Wright Julia Partington, Eddie’s fiance_ H elen Boardman Connors, the butler A u stin Wilder Pietro Rafaelo, an Italian portrait painter_ A u gustus Maxwell Dr. Broodie, the family physician R ichard Rhea John Belden, Wilton’s partner R obert Saylor Albertine, Mrs. Wilton’s maid B etty Miller Lizzie, the cook E lva Taggart Reporter from “The Times”_ i W inifred Wright One Hundred Six

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One Hundred Seven

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t, ss^vX G caX a WxXruy /S a e, ft \ t't 0 ‘Co £B cx.Ttx X l/v^. One Hundred Right

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One Hundred Nine

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Class Prophecy 1926 {From the New York Times, 1940) Miss Donna Leiby, movie queen, stars to-day in “Beauty and the Beast.” {From the Frankfort, Ky. Times, 1940) Miss Catherine Cook of Florida has been made matron of the Orphans Home here. The children all enjoy her stories, especially the one called, “How the Camel got his Hump.” {From the London Times, 1940) At last a woman has succeeded in swimming the English Channel. Miss Harriett Provost, World Champion. {St. Petersburg Independent, 1940) The most fashionable Modiste shop in the south is the Northrup-Wilson store, owned by Miss Margie Northrup and Miss Louise Wilson. {From the St. Louis Sentinel, 1940) Among the noted players of Sousa’s famous band is Robert Burklew. {Austin, Texas, 1940) Miss Willie Anderson, famous stage dancer will appear here to-night. {Evanston, III., 1940) Royce Goodbread, captain of the National football team will speak here to-night. {Venice, Italy, 1940) Miss Marie Hogan gave a piano recital here to-night. She is worthy of the name “The Mistress of the Piano.” {Philadelphia, Penna., 1940) Miss Helen Boardman has accepted the position as head of the Language department in the high school here. ( R ichmond, Va., 1940) Miss Janet Poulson (social Butterfly) will entertain the governor and his wife at a dinner to-night. {New York, 1940) The Shakespearean comedy “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” was presented here last night. The part of Puck was very well taken by Martha Oxford, Shakespearean actress. Miss Betty Hinckle, lecturer, will speak here to-night on the subject “How to Develop a Radiant Personality.” {Chicago, III., 1940) Mr. Richard Rhea, famous lawyer, will act as prosecuting attorney in the criminal case of Larry Powers. {Yale U., 1940) Dan Workizer was recently elected coach of the Yale cheerleaders. {New York, N. Y., 1940) Augustus Maxwell, famous for his characterization of Italian parts, announces that his next work will be in the opera. One Hundred Ten

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{Cairo, Africa, 1930) Mr. Howard Warner, missionary from the U. S. has arrived here after a two months’ absenc e. He is accompanied by his charming wife, formerly Miss Harriett Bize. {Washington Eagle, 1930) The plans for the new million dollar museum at Washington were drawn by Miss Martha McKim, architect employed by the government. (New York Times, 1930) d'he Conservatory of Music here has added a new member to the faculty, Miss Dorothy Stovall of Florida. {Pineville, Kentucky, 1940) Miss Polly Boreing has returned from a visit with her sister, Mrs. Larry Powers, and reports the loss of three pounds. {New York Herald, 1940) Miss Marinez Heitland has just completed fifty-two weeks on Broadway, playing the part of Mrs. Henry Wilton in “A Successful Calamity.” {North Adams, Mass., 1940) Johnny Ross and his charming bride, nee Charlotte Smith, are sailing for Paris tomorrow, where Mrs. Ross will continue her study of music. {St. Petersburg, Fla., 1940) Miss Eleanor Jones, having divorced her fourth husband, has decided to take unto herself another. Meanwhile she is still answering ‘‘Heart and Home Problems” for the people at large. {Terre Haute, Indiana 1940) “Tubby Kirchner,” world renowned athlete has recently been elected captain of the All American Football team. Miss Magdalena Vanderlyn, after several years of editorship on one of America’s leading magazines, is about to be married to a well known psycho-analyst of Buffalo. {From the St. Petersburg Times, 1940) Mr. and Mrs. Morrison Pearce have left for a trip to Europe. Mrs. Pearce was formerly Miss Frances Wagner, a popular member of the social set of this city. {From the New York Herald, 1940) The great comedian, Kenneth Jones will perform at the Big Charity Ball here to-night. {From the St. Petersburg Times, 1940) We were not at all surprised to hear of the marriage of Miss Margaret Pearce, proprietor cind owner of the New Pearce Drug Store, to Mr. Harry McCardell, president of the First National Bank. {From the Paris Paper, 1940) Miss Elva Taggart, the young American artist will exhibit some of her masterpieces at the Art Museum this week. One Hundred Eleven

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NosT oguyn\i_ mm 5tTT/ MILLER ^rmHc^s va&ner. |0J£/ ^EV/ITT GrtROL CuSHMW fHvtl^jfcTT &| 2 E 4TI n WiL.W-SL One Hundred Twelve

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4LL ^h>KD l Mo s t 47^ IP fie TMg£Gpi^oH M^Sf TU^lWE ^d/cfc G^JD&J^D QXTo^p W057 ,4 smiled JoLLlEr^T WATT C^tRinEQ*=>}L JW^DAlf^ V^DE^iyftf One Hundred Thirteen

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Our Own Version of “Alice in Wonderland” Alice was falling Moran more rapidly down the “rabbit’s” hole now, but she decided that not even this should make her forget all the wise, sage things that the Faculty had taught her in S. P. H. S. So she began by saying over and over to herself, “William’s the Conqueror,” and trying to recall all she knew about Lewis XIY. She had just got to the point where she was wondering if the comparative of forty was Fortier, when suddenly the long fall came to an end. Alice picked herself up with alacrity and Sutton a green bench nearby, while she rested and decided what to do next. Just then two Millers came along with a sack of flour for Miss Eckles to make into bread, and Alice accosted them very politely. “How do you do?” she asked. “Bonniwell,” they answered, and she decided they must be Royal Scotch Highlanders. It had just rained in the Wonderland, and the road ahead seemed to Glisson so that Alice was afraid she would Skidmore if she tried to walk on it. So she followed the white rabbit down a long Lane, till they came to the Center of a grassy Mead, where a large castle stood. She thought perhaps that this might be the home of Herr friend, the duchess, but the Porter said no, it belonged to an Earle who would some day B. King and marry the C. King’s daughter from over the sea. Alice went inside and ordered the Porter to close the Doran keep out all the Little children who insisted upon following her in her adventures. “For,” she said with a very grownup air__“thev Dumas up things so!” Immediately upon her entrance to the castle, the Stewart brought her some Coffey in what appeared to be a beer-stein but was really a Falkenstein, marked, “Drink me.” She was also given a juicy red Appleby the Gardner, which was marked “eat me.” Alice, however, had been fooled by this arrangement once before, and refused to “bite” again. She strolled over to the pool of tears instead, and made friends with a very amiable little fish which cried out, “Pm thrilled to McGills!” at sight of her and “Welcome to our city, Alice. Stay till June.” Alice was very pleased at this and was just stopping to Pettit when Dickson came back from the greatest battle of the season with the news that “Davis Kelly'ng Goliath again!” Alice was so thrilled at this that she began making a terrific noise and the Webking himself came out to stop her. ‘Altman,” she said, “Pm only giving fifteen for St. Pete!” At this, the wild West grew Wilder and the mob threatened to Geiger and Lynch her. But just at this crucial moment, Alma Mater turned the tide by asking suddenly and unexpectedly “Wilson be home for dinner to-night, or is he at another one of those Annual Staff meetings?” -Continued on page 203 — ( try an’ find it). One Hundred Fourteen

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One Hundred Fifteen

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Try This on Your Piano There’s a High School down in Southern Florida and we love—yes, love it well. Where the girls are the fairest, the boys are the squarest Of any old school down this way. St. Pete! St. Pete! That’s the school you can’t beat. Who has most fun? Old St. Pete! Who gets most done? Old St. Pete! Oh, that’s the High you can’t surpass No matter how you try. When McKinney’s fighting fellows fall in line Can’t you hear the Captain shoutingLet’s fight for St. Pete! I know it, sisters, I know it, Our bones gonna rise again. There’ll be a scramble, a touchdown, That’s all!!! You do your best, boys We’ll do the rest, boys For old St. Pete I yell, yell, yell, yell And for the men who wear the green and white I yell, I yellIf anybody loves old St. Pete High, It’s I! I! I! I! I! We are the students of the Sunshine City High School Always winning, always grinning, Always getting by. Old Petersburg, to you our sons are ever loyal Old Petersburg, to you our sons are ever true We’ll back you to stand ’Gainst the best in the land For we know you’ve got sand, St. Pete High! Time will not change you, Your spirit will never die. And we never shall forget S. P. H. S. Wheresoever we may roam! Utopia There’s a land where: Students are quiet in Study Hall. There are no blue admits. Gum is unknown in High School. Latin is enjoyed by the student body. Boys do not like to throw chalk. Palmetto and Pine comes out on time. Pianos which have been used as part of the gymnasium equipment are still in good condition. Blackboards do not have cartoons and ’26’s written all over them. Teachers do not persist in giving quizzes. You can stay away from school three days a week and come unprepared the other two, and make the Scholarship Club. It’s the Never-Never-Land. One Hundred Sixteen

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One Hundred Seventeen

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Process of Elimination Ten little lessons And a Palmetto and Pine The latter proved more interesting And then there were nine. Nine little lessons And just a little date— Simply had a gorgeous time! And then there were eight. Eight little lessons Not begun until eleven— Too late to study then, And so there were seven. Seven little lessons, Chance to learn a few new “kicks.’' The Charleston sure does tire you out! And then there were six. Six little lessons Went for just a little drive; Far too nice to stay inside. And then there were five. Five little lessons Studies such a bore! I simply hate to concentrate! And then there were four. Four little lessons As neglected as can be— Mustn’t miss the water sports, And then there were three. Three little lessons; Feelin’ sorta blue, Rather see a peppy show. And then there were two. Two little lessons, Seems I never will get done! Think I’ll leave one till tomorrow. And then there was one. One little lesson Waiting all alone — Forgot to take the right book home. And then there was none. (Also true of the grade on the report card. One Hundred Eighteen

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SrfeA z>£dxj=>syN ^v,Ke TWfc5£uS ADA Q^EBJi lPPUTA oBt^or\ TiTArM 7/nXe.\ TfTOA^ 'NtR. f4l^!-E5 "Pyi^^TuAT^ Cog>WB.S!> One Hundred Nineteen

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Junior-Senior Banquet From the log of the Good Ship Class of ’27.' Set sail from the Yinoy Park Hotel at eight-thirty o’clock, March 26, 1926, on the most notable voyage of the season—that given by the Junior class in honor of the Seniors of ’26. The passengers were received in the ballroom of the hotel by the Junior and Senior class officers and advisors, after which they merrily crossed the gangplank, and entered the large dining room while Sophomore Marines stood at attention. They then took their places at small tables deco rated with red rcses and thoughtfully equipped with steamer trunks and lifesavers; the anchor of care was lifted and the two classes embarked on one of the happiest evenings of their high school careers. Louis Adcock, president of the Junior class, acted as Toastmaster, and the following toasts were given during the voyage: Canoeing on Mirror Lake_ J a y Willson Drifting on Tampa Bay_Virginia Scales Sailing on the Gulf of Mexico_Jack Lee Ice-Boating on the Polar Sea_Leighton Pearce Yachting in the Mediterranean_Catherine Batts A Voyage in the Atlantic_Mary Settle A Cruise on the Pacific Ocean_Jack Lentz Response H a r ry McCardell To Our Captain C lement Coss Response G eorge M. Lynch To the Shipbuilders K enneth Jones Response A Norwood To the Crew___Margaret Pearce Response G ladys Gardner To the Unchartered Seas G ordon Wright Entertainment in the form of dancing, singing, and musical selections was furnished by members of the Junior Class, assisted by Master Arthur Cheney, age seven, who gave an interesting exhibi tion of the Charleston, and sang several popular songs. The splendid music of the Paul Whiteman Orchestra was also enjoyed during the evening. At last, with a rising song to “Old St. Pete High,” the Seniors came back to land once more, deeply grateful to the Juniors and their advisor, Miss Falkenstein, for the delightful voyage which they had just enjoyed. One Hundred Twenty

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Where Have We Heard This Before? Get out pencil and paper. I forgot to take my book home. Let’s have all the chairs down flat on the floor. Ahem! Better get an admit. Now let me tell you something—that is not intelligent. Want to see all you fellows out. If you feel that you are not interested in the discussion, you may leave the room. All right! Go talk to Mr. Little about it. Everybody up! You dropped something. Aw, grow up! Has my fountain pen been turned in? All you students standing in the doorway, come down here. Push down on it. We will now have the reading of the minutes. Watch the stick. I won’t keep you long because I know you’re anxious to get to your next class. A couple of hamburgers, and a bottle of pop. I am going to give you a five minute recess. The street car broke down. Your notebook is incomplete. Who’s been in this locker? The Palmetto and Pine will be out between the offices at noon. One Hundred Twenty-one

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Such is Life When you are a Freshman — You don’t know anybody, And nobody knows you. When you are a Sophomore — You know everybody in school, And a few members of the faculty know you. When you are a Junior — You know all the Seniors and some Juniors And all the Sophomores, and some Juniors know you. When you are a Senior You only know a few of the Seniors And everybody in school knows you. Miami-St. Pete Game (With apologies to Tennyson.) And the sun went down, and the stars came out, Far over old Tampa Bay, But never a moment ceased the fight Of Green Devil and Stingaree. Sub after sub, the whole night long, Their coach sent into the game; Man after man, the whole night long, In the hope of eternal fame; Time after time, the whole night long, Drew back with their halt and their lame. For some were broken and some were shattered And so could fight us no more. Judge of battles, was ever a battle Like this on the grid before? Miss Center (In P. S. class)—“How many of you are familiar with^Kipling’s ‘Bell-Buoy.’ ” Jack Hall — “Soreno, or Princess Martha?”. One Hundred Twenty-two

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One Hundred Twenty-three

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§*3^ a, %  'gave. Sailor ^Ctiows. fio <&<&*<. SWt J&oX\ J^UCOG^TU-Xo. "V{oul& ^ou-WUeut iX oR3Wt\^? Swo S i 't/’OtfO v< iSi-aX c^v, ^\t au s er. •'at. -SC o-S vvt\. o\s eU,e Skest ^ LbCow *Yf& Jibsl. ^JmJ -&U~ One Hundred Twenty-four

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Jack Gregory—“If a burglar should break into the basement, would the coal chute? Edwin Price—“No, but the kindling would.” Magdalena—“Where is that dummy? Miss Appleby—“Why, Magdalena, such language! I told you I sent him downtown to get some pictures.” Miss Geiger—“Who was William Shakespeare’s mother?” Wallace Neely—“Mrs. Shakespeare.” Terrible stamping of feet heard from above. Miss Appleby—“What on earth are they doing up there?” Marie Hogan—“Putting through the Stamp Act.” Freshie—“I'll meet you at Fifth and Central. If you get there first you make a cross on the sidewalk and if I get there first I’ll erase it.” Miss Gardner—“Was it Henry Van Dyke who said ‘Who will walk a mile with me along life’s merry way?’ ” Graham L—“No, Captain Lynch, on Armistice Day.” One Hundred Twenty-five

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Do You Remember When Marie Hogan wore ear rings? Mary Hume had curls? Bob Burklew was a Latin shark? The teachers had long hair? Martha McKim wore her hair straight? Dan Workizer first put on long trousers? Larry Powers fought a duel in the Spanish play? You first approached Capt. Little for an admit? The now dignified Senior boys used to love to climb the curtains on the stage? We used to think nobody could beat Duval? The bells used to ring so you could hear them? The Faculty presented “The Merchant of Venice” ? Wyatt Dame failed to wake up when the bell rang in P. S. class? The P. & P. came out on time once? Frank Hodgkinson said he “didn’t know that play”? The library was in one side of the study hall? Picnickers, starting for Pass-a-Grille—“We’re off!” Cynical Bystander—“So’s your old man!” syt Leighton Pierce (sticking head in Annual Room)—“Did any of you find some money in here?” Catherine Cook—“Ask Maggie, she said she saw a lot of Jack during the Holidays.” Miss Dumas (in Latin class): “The cavalry in the back row will please mount upon their trusty steeds, gallop up to the front, dismount, and rid themselves of the poorest trots ever made for Virgil.” Louie Adcock (at noon) — “You’d better get in a good humor. I’ve got bad news for you.” Jay W. (at Frozen Sucker wagon) — “Well, ain’t I gettin’ a Good Humor?” One Hundred Twenty-six

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^hleorcl Around School 'clack. I ,, ^_K5H!i e & iini Jg£-W3S0= [os*} H “No, sez I; I sez; nothin’ doin!” “What you’se guys doin’ in here?” One Hundred Twenty-seven

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IT IS TO LAUGH e}\xcVcx A V6
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The Night Before Xams {Tune of Remember) Remember the night before examination— Remember? Remember the midnight oil of preparation— Remember? Remember you found a lonely spot, And after you tried to cram a lot, You promised that you’d forget it not, But you forgot to remember. We saw a boy standing on Central Avenue at one of the street corners, idly dreaming away the minutes. Suddenly the traffic signal bell rang, and immediately a look of wild joy spread over his face, he let out a loud whoop, hastily gathered up his books and dashed off madly down the street! Puzzle—where was he from? Wouldn’t it be funny ifBetty was a Clause instead of a Fraze. Jack was a Veranda instead of a Hall. Shirley was a Key instead of a Locke. Helen was a Knot instead of a Loop. Carlton was a Clerk instead of a Teller. Marion was a Chain instead of a Link. Kay was a Courthouse instead of a Kirk Claude was Freezin’ instead of Melton. Maude was a Don’t instead of a Dew. Fay was Void instead of Null. Kitty was You instead of Mee. Edwin was a Cost instead of a Price. Harriett was a Hornet instead of a Bize. Betty was a Number instead of a Case. Ola was a Less instead of a Moore. Howard was a Laughin’ instead of a Cryan. Clifford was Happy instead of Moody. Mary Hume—“Did your brother come home from College yet? Lydarene Majors—“I guess so, or else the car’s been stolen.” Wyatt Dame (counting by metronome in Physics lab.): “1—2—3, 1—2—3, ( Magdalena Yanderlyn—“My word! Do you mean to say you are a Senior, and can only count up to three?” Miss Gardner—“Was Hamlet Insane after he had killed Polonius? If so, why?” Graham Lovejoy—“His attorney’s advice, probably.” One Hundred Twenty-nine

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Slanguage The mob room—restaurant. The Mourners’ Bench—you know where. Class Hopper—well, we won’t tell. The Powers that Be—the faculty. The Handwriting on the Wall—Book reports due Friday. Captain's Courageous—Mr. Little and Mr. Lynch. John’s Pass—road to Victory. He’s a goal getter. Hall Hog—some of us all the time, all of us some of the time. Famous Steeds of S. P. H. S.—Charley horse and Latin pony. Magazines Review of Reviews— Exams. Good Housekeeping —Domestic Science Dept. Judge —Our Skipper. True Story —(unknown in S. P. H. S.) “I didn’t get my lesson because I didn’t want to.” Cosmopolitan —S. P. H. S. Life —One darn lesson after another. Literary Digest —Stude with P. & P. in one hand and hamburger in the other. The Theatre —Keith’s. The Outlook —Pencil sharpener by an open window. College Humor —Speeches from the Alumni on their returns to 5. P. H. S. American —(a merry can) Ford Playboy. Poetry —Something most students detest to study. Powder —Jr. Woman’s Club. Liberty —June 4th. He—“Ego amo te.” She—“Tego amo e.” One Hundred Thirty

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First Hangover—“That was a bird-of-a-nite!” Second Ditto—“It sure was, be. It was a nite-in-gaol.’’ Shakespearean Parodies A Midsummer Night’s Dream—school house burning down. As You Like It—Stude receiving white admit. Julius Caesar—Latin II. Measure for Measure—Plane Geometry. Much Ado About Nothing—usual howl raised upon receipt of “The Mark of Zero.” The Tempest—Entrance to the Lunchroom. Comedy of Errors—Ask any teacher after exams. Hamlet—Largo. The Winter’s Tale—“I lost the assignment, and forgot to take my book home, and besides, I didn’t have time to study ’cause I had to go to the basket-ball game.” All’s Well that End’s Well—Diploma. One Hundred Thirty-one

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Romance He was rushing down the hall one day, And she was rushing too, the other way. His path met hers, and hers met his, So other they just met like each this And after that both night and day, At work, at school, at home, at play, His thoughts were all of this fair miss. And so his grades went down like this! He went into the football fray, And asked her for his life to pray She gave him her most true promise V From first to last, and play by play, He was the hero of the day, So thrilled became the cheering miss, up like jumped and just this! She down That night, beneath the moonÂ’s pale ray, They sat together near the Bay. And in that hour of perfect bliss this! His like arm just went her round Thus they passed the happy houiA away. He was a lad with winning way; He asked her for one little kiss, And so their lipsmet just like this! One Hundred Thirty-two

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jScs sstm art St tidier s. loo‘S* vcatx. Jt J $acullu 3^, ova. auce. -Safletb uttauiare ^u.xu,ot; J%ctcKe"c • ,JL Stva^xj^Xe. Owp Hundred Thirty-three

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Beside the Seaside Beside The seaside, Side by side, They sat. She sighed. He cried “Decide!” She replied, “Denied.” He sighed, “Suicide!” That’s that. Bystander—“Two true!” She—“I’m true.” He—“To me?” She—“To you.” He—“True to two?” She—“True too; two.” He—“I’m t’ru.” She—“Me too.” He—“You too?” Bystander—“You two?” He and She—“Too true!” One Hundred Thirty-four

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ff tinde? a s^reacUtug CRes't'trwt -Sre. jjitdta. CLTt X'’ujq "^kg/tu,. 3 u 6 S S wkcd/ -^er'to6? S^-e h&yxxox,'s Svavastav^ 5"wo o$'Uve iacvtvtsX. S/Ou.^?t a.x\d teadl-y. J^’x$s 3 Wttq. >** V o P She $?vvaft & Sex-voixs (D^fcdlvorv. <§ o-p\ more s ’ 5 boo S"t e X. One Hundred Thirty-five

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Coming Out Party There were Mother and Father and Luther and Marie and the lamp present. Father decided there were too many and went out; which left mother and Luther and Marie and the lamp. Soon Mother followed Father’s example and she too went out. That left Luther and Marie and the lamp. Then the lamp went out. Two hours later Luther went out. And then Willy came out from under the sofa! EXTRA, EXTRA! FOOTBALL MAN BREAKS INTO VERSE. Writes song to his Teachers. Tune of YearningLearning just for you, That’s all we do all day. Wondering why we’re blue? Report card due today. Smiles will turn to tears, Days will turn to years, Yearning just for you To give us our O. K. Postscript When you come to the end of this perfect (?) book, And you’ve read all that’s inside it, Don’t say we could have done it better; We know—because we tried it! One Hundred Thirty-six

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Shepard & Company /^lothes Do Not Make a Man vj They Advertise Him Ill-fitting clothes advertise Carelessness; shabby clothes, Poverty; freakish clothes, Shallowness. To you young men and women who are leaving your Alma Mater, holding lifeÂ’s success uppermost in your minds; some of you immediately to take up your life work, others to study and travel during the summer in preparation to furthering your education by entering next fall, the various institutions of higher learning throughout the country. It makes no difference whether you choose college or work, you will find all along lifeÂ’s journey a person is judged to a certain extent by the first impression, a good appearance will make that first impression right. Let Shepard & Co. help you make that first impression; for ladies and missesÂ’ fine footwear and hosiery, for men and young men, clothing, shoes, hats and furnishings of the better kind. 'Shepard & Company Shoes and Clothing 35v3 57 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida Where a lasting satisfaction must follow each transaction^ One Hundred Thirty-eight

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AT THE TOP We do our best to give quick and courteous service C. Q. S. P. D. Q. SUNSHINE PHARMACY Dial 5970 Ninth St. and Seventh Ave. N., St. Petersburg, Florida (Where the car turns) Fairy Trade Marks Kenny Bob shovelled out one more handful of sand from the cave he was digging, and then sat back on his sandaled heels to view the result. It was a splendid cave. Perhaps, after a while, he would make another one, but now—it was dreadfully hot, and besides he was quite too sleepy to work any more. He wandered over to one of the beach umbrellas and threw himself down flat in the warm glistening sand. A slight breeze fluttered the torn and dirty pages of an old aban doned magazine, and thereby drew his attention to it. The stories, of course, were far too old and too dull for him, but the pictures were interesting, especially the funny folk in the advertisements. Treasures of Treasure Island R O B E R T LOUIS STEVENSON, dear to the hearts of all of us, wrote Treasure Island which has become famous in fiction. Treasure Island today at the sunset end of Central Avenue, is now famous in fact; and on this beautiful island there will be found now greater treasure than the hero of Stevenson’s story ever dreamed of. DONOVAN & SONS, Inc. Donovan Building, Central at Sixth 'elephone 5162 St. Petersburg, Florida Established 1910 One Price to All LkGRAND HASKIN OPTOMETRIST MANUFACTURING OPTICIAN 481 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida One Hundred Thirty-nine

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CAREFUL INVESTORS— HERE IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY “GOLDEN RIDGE” 5000 ACRES Only nine miles from Tampa, six miles from Plant City on the new main line of the Atlantic Coast Railroad. Sell ing tracts of 10 to 1000 acres. Agriculture, land and townsite development. 10 ACRES FOR $1350.00 One-Third Cash, Balance 6, 12, 18, 24 Months at 6% ROBERTS AND DUTCHER, Inc. Earl Weir, Sales Director American Bank and Trust Co., Trustee St. Petersburg, Florida When You have said “Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothing” “Walk Over Shoes—” and all that goes with it— You have said enough—The Boys know ARTHUR L. JOHNSON “Men’s and Boy’s Store” 428 Central Ave. St. Petersburg, Fla. One linn dree] Fnrlv

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QUALITY and SERVICE Neither is much good without the other, and you will find both when you call on CAMPBELL HARDWARE CO. 820 Central Avenue 632 Ninth Street North Compliments of CITIZEN’S ICE CO. 100 First Street South Phone 4733 The magazine had slipped from his fingers and Kenny Bob was almost asleep, when suddenly, Plop! something big and white and square fell splashing into the ocean. Kenny Bob jumped to his feet, and stood staring at it in wonder. It looks, he thought, like a huge cake of soap. And then, aloud, he cried, “Oh look! It floats!” “Of course, it does,” said a voice at his elbow, “Ivory always floats.” Kenny Bob turned around and there stood Bobby Jollyco, with his dog Ulysses, at his heels. Mrs. Jollyco and Sally were just coming out of his cave, with Julia, the maid, following close behind. They were not very large at first, because Kenny’s cave was so small, but as soon as they stepped out on the beach, they began to grow with such rapidity that Kenny Bob was frightened. F. J. BURNS REALTY CO. Owners and Developers of WATERVIEW PARK FOREST HILLS and BELLECREST HEIGHTS 723 Central Avenue One Hundred Forty-one

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Central National Bank and Trust Company WHEN YOU SPEAK OF CENTRAL, SAY NATIONAL TOO This is a national bank, and a trust company as well. As a national bank, it is an integral part of the Federal Reserve System; all the facilities of this nationwide banking system are immediately and always available. Customers come from all parts of the country—a national bank in name and in fact. As a trust company, the Central National acts as trustee, either under will or deed of trust; as executor of estates, as custodian, guardian, com mittee or in any other capacity of trust. And for sound, stable, substantial investments having good yieldCall on Central CENTRAL NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPANY St. Petersburg, Florida. Total resources more than $13,000,000.00. One Hundred Forty-two

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All Styles Hair Cutting, Shampooing, Water Waving Nine Experts—Soft Water ALHAMBRA BOB SHOP Exclusively for Ladies and Children Center of School and Business District Phone 84032 Cor. First Ave. and Sixth St. North, Room 17, Upstairs, Alhambra Arcade He was even more startled, however, by another splash in the water as another cake of soap fell in, beside the first one. It was white, too, but round, with a little fairy sitting on top of it. She smiled at Kenny and called out, “Mine floats, too!’’ Just then a score of fairies emerged from the cave with boxes on their shoulders, labeled Lux and Fab. They were carrying them down to the shore, and Kenny Bob wondered what in the world they were going to do with them. He found out very soon, however, for they emptied them into the sea till the air was filled with snow white flakes as if there had been a snow-storm. When it all cleared away, and he could see once more, the sea was one mass of soap-suds, and the fairies were blowing bubbles. PASADENA St. Petersburg’s $100,000,000 home community The South’s finest golf course America’s most distinctive hotel PASADENA ESTATES Jack Taylor, President One Hundred Forty-three

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Seth Thomas Clocks Fancy Boudoir Clocks Fine Ladies’ and Gents’ Watches in Hamilton, Waltham and Elgin Prices Right L. D. STALLCUP 14 TAYLOR ARCADE Cor. Fifth St. and First Ave. North FISHER & DEADERICK REALTORS 210 First Avenue North St. Petersburg, Fla. Magazines Postcards Stationery Out-of-Town Newspapers MULHOLLEM & WEST 239 Central Avenue Phone 46 St. Petersburg, Fla. For Today’s News, Read §lje Evening Jniepenitew “ The Sunshine Paper ” Telephone 5171 and it will be delivered at your door One Hundred Forty-four

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We try to give it to you all the time power “more power to you” as some one has expressed it power to run your fans in warm weather power to run your household helpers power to cook with and power to light your rooms ... to brighten up your home and your life. Light can turn the gloomiest room in the house into a veritable fairyland light can make your home-life brighter your temper smoother your memories of home more lasting memories that will be cherished for years to come. And light and power and really cheap these days you can light every light in the average house all evening ... for only eighteen cents and that’s cheap enough for you and me you know light and power are cheaper today and better than ever before ... so use them freely. Pinellas County Power Company Clearwater St. Petersburg Tarpon Springs “SAVE AND HAVE” —Poor Richard We Pay 6% on Savings Accounts Interest compounded quarterly. One dollar or more opens an account. Start now. Get a “Barrel Bank” to help you save. The Franklin Savings & Loan Co. Franklin Building—Opposite Postoffice At last they all gathered together and blew till the largest, most beautiful soapbubble Kenny had ever seen, was growing before his eyes. It covered the entire ocean, and stretched so far up into the sky that it made Kenny Bob dizzy to look at it. And when the sun shone on it all, not a color of the rainbow was missing from its surface. “That is why the sun was so hot today,” volunteered Bobby Jollyco, “and the water was so warm and unpleasant when you went bathing this morning. Warm water makes better soap bubbles — the colors show better, you know.” “I’m awfully glad you’re here,” said Kenny, a little awkwardly, “I never saw any thing like this before.” One Hundred Forty-five

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A Risky Experiment It is often a risky experiment to put your faithfully earned money into some untried or unproved scheme. The bottom may drop out and everything be lost. Safety, plus a fair yield at the American Bank and Trust Company are important factors for building up your fund and ones that you can rely upon always. Savings accounts occupy an important place in distribution of the nationÂ’s wealth and include every class of investor. You can do no better than join the number at this bank. Four Per Cent Interest Paid on Savings Accounts American Bank & Trust Co. ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA A. P. AVERY, Pres. D. E. BEACH, Vice-Pres. O. G. HIESTAND, Trust Officer One Hundred Forty-six

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“No, I expect not,” answered Hobby Jollyco, with the air of one who was quite used to it. “I thought perhaps you’d like to have me show you through Fairyland, the way you looked at me, in the magazine.” The colors were racing round the surface of the bubble now so fast that Kenny got really dizzy and tumbled into the water, which was awkward, too. When he came up, soaked and soapy, Bobby Jollyco was standing just inside the bubble, and motioning for him to follow. “Come on,” he cried, “you can’t break it now, because you’re all over soap.” Kenny Bob remembered how he used to thrust one soapy finger into the bubbles he had blown and ventured to step through the delicate rainbow wall and inside the bubble. Hennington’s Modern Oasis “ The Sunshine City's Leading Restaurant ” A la Carte Service till Midnight SEA FOODS A SPECIALTY 243 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Fla. A. Sierkese Department Store The Most Popular-Priced Store in Town See Us Before Buying Elsewhere La Fleur Shop Flowerfone 5111 Say It With Flowers DeVOE 529 Central Avenue Also shops in the new Vinoy Park Hotel and Soreno Hotel during winter season. One Hundred Forty-seven

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ST PETERSBURG’S MASTER DEVELOPMENT Here, where Nature smiles, men of vision are building a community of homes embodying all that is best in our modern life. Homes Schools Churches and the great outdoors where those who love life may live it more abundantly. Here the young men and young women who will make the Greater St. Petersburg of tomorrow will find the home of their dreams. Here’s Hoping You All Graduate —cum Laude!* Here’s hoping. And here’s hoping you all go thru life, cum laude, as your class valedictorian has no doubt remarked. We wish you all all the success in the world, in your forthcoming battles with the world. And as time goes by— and by and from time to time, you buy— and buy please remember us. In the meantime, good luck. A TREASURE HOUSE of FINE MERCHANDISE *With Honors One Hundred Forty-eight

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Sunshine Pharmacy Sunshine Pharmacy 9th Street 7th Avenue (where the car turns) This store makes a Specialty in GRADUATION GIFTS FLORIDA SOUVENIRS CLASS RINGS AND NOVELTIES Central at Third Owen Cotter Jewelry Company Diamond Expert—Manufacturing Jewelers It was all so wonderful, he could hardly believe his eyes. The sea had turned into one big shining mirror in which were reflected all the wonders of Fairyland, and to his surprise, Kenny Bob found he could see almost across the ocean and even up to the top of the bubble. There, on a ladder that seemed to reach hundreds and hundreds of miles up in the air, sat a little Dutch Boy, busy painting a sign. So Kenny made friends with the Fibre Man and went trotting along at his heels until, at last, they came to a little Log Cabin deep in the forest, where the people were making syrup. A woman in a big blue apron was washing the cabin windows and there, on the windowsill next to her, stood the tiniest little chicken that Kenny had ever seen. At his exclamation of delight, the woman smiled at him and remarked, “It hasn’t EAT GOOD WHOLESOME FOOD at the HIGH SCHOOL LUNCH ROOM Mrs. W. L. B. Twiss One Hundred Forty-nine

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Keeping Everlastingly at it Brings Success We Are Now Selling Our Twenty-third Sub-Division JOHN E. BATEMAN The Lot Man 689 Central Avenue Dial Phones One Hundred Fifty

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Gamble Paint & Hardware Company PEE-GEE PAINTS and VARNISHES BUILDERS’ HARDWARE TOOLS, BRUSHES 2309 Central Avenue Phone 66-312 OTT FORT PHARMACY A GOOD DRUG STORE Try Us First 853 Central Avenue Diamonds Watches Expert Watch and Jewelry Repairing scratched yet.” and then Kenny knew that this must be the woman who washed maga zine windows with Bon Ami. Inside they found Aunt Jemima, making pancakes and over in one corner, with his hands up to his face, sat Big Ben of West Clox, just as Kenny had hoped. At first Big Ben was reluctant to leave Baby Ben, but Kenny finally persuaded him to go with him to the Palace. It was a long way back and Kenny saw many interesting things. He met the Calu met Indian and his daughter, the Argo Starch girl and once, he saw the Twenty Mule Team hauling Borax over the desert. When, at last, they neared the palace, it was raining very hard and he almost ran One Hundred Fifty-one

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If you have property to sell which is priced right, we can sell it for you. Try Us! Replogle Realty Co. 15 Sixth Street South Phone 7355 I William Beers I C E ITÂ’S PURE AND LASTS LONGER Ninth Street and First Avenue S. St. Petersburg, Fla. Phone 5149 Northrup-RutlandÂ’s 50 Complete Departments St. Petersburg Florida One Hundred Fifty-two

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The Goldenrod Candy Shop 8 Third Street North St. PetersburgÂ’s Real Candy Store Home of the Famous Goldenrod Kisses Mail Orders Given Special A ttention York Beach, Me. St. Petersburg, Fla. Here since 1914 LINCOLN Custom Bodies No Yearly Designs Advanced Craftsmanship These Features of Lincoln Bodies are of Primary Importance to the Fine Car Buyer SERVICE WORTHY OF THE CAR ALBRIGHT MOTOR COMPANY, Inc. Authorized Lincoln Dealers Established 1915 Show Room and Service, Third St. and Third Ave., South Phone 7705 One Hundred Fifty-three

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Pearce Drug Co. INCORPORATED Sells Everything for Students and Faculty 445 Central Avenue Phone 6532 56-542 St. Petersburg Florida One Hundred Fifty-four

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into a little girl who was carrying an umbrella over her head and a package of salt under one arm. There was a hole in the top of the box, and the salt was spilling out. “Your salt is sifting out,” said Kenny, politely. The little girl stopped to look and then in dismay, she cried, “Sifting? It pours!” Then she began to cry and Kenny did not know what to do. Just then a little boy appeared with a box of crackers under his arm. As soon as the little girl told him her trouble, (for he seemed to be her brother) he cried, “Why Uneeda biscuit! Come now, stop crying, and I’ll give you one.” So the little girl forgot her troubles and went on her way quite happily while Kenny trudged on to the Palace with Big Ben. A large black and white dog was standing in the The Price-Word Company our FURNITURE Price is Right 273-75-77 Ninth Street North St. Petersburg, Florida Our Word is Good Do you know that SNELL ISLE close-in Waterfront Development? Is only eight minutes from the postoffice, yet has real country environment? Will have $100,000 worth of fine statuary adorning its streets? If you, the Public, could visualize the beauty of SNELL ISLE as a finished product, you would rush to get the remaining lots. Office, 401 Central Ave. Telephone 46-010 SNELL ISLE, Inc. One Hundred Fifty-five

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Get a “Good Humor” for only 10 cents The taste lingers long after the price is forgotten Good Humor Ice Cream Company Smart Millinery Snappy Ready-to-Wear Seasonable Novelties Courteous Service POINSETTIA SHOPPE 448 CENTRAL AVENUE E. M. OSBORNE 716 Ninth Street North Fancy Groceries and Meats Bigger and Better Store. Just three doors north of old location. Where you have traded for years. We deliver your Dinner Phone 5179 FERNDELL FOODS One Hundred Fifty-six

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ROSERY FOOD SHOP Delicious HOME COOKED FOODS Special attention given to orders for PICNICS and PARTIES. All our pastry made by women. 823 Central Avenue doorway, but he was listening for his MasterÂ’s Voice and did not notice them, so they hurried on again. It was getting very late when they reached the PrincessÂ’ room and found Bobby Jollyco waiting for them. Kenny instructed Big Ben to sit on the edge of the table and wake the Princess at five oÂ’clock. Then he took up his station just inside the door to wait, and talk to Bobby Jollyco. He was just in the midst of telling his adventures when Big Ben suddenly called out at the top of his voice, that it was five oÂ’clock. The Princess stirred. Big Ben repeated his statement. She stirred a little more, and just as he said it the third time, she opened her eyes. FENDERÂ’S PHARMACY W. C. FENDER We deliver anything we sell. We sell anything you find in a good drugstore. Phone 4774 Second Street and Seventh Avenue North THEO. CURRY, President H. O. DOWLING, Manager Everything in Hardware HOUSEFURNISHING GOODS and SPORTING GOODS. We cater specially to the wants of the housewife. HALL HARDWARE COMPANY 618 Central Avenue One Hundred Fifty-seven

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HOMES—On Gandy Boulevard Study RlO Vi IStCL Now! Later, when it has grown beyond all expectations, analyze the reason, make it an object study from which you can guide your investments when the time comes. Worries — On Gandy Boulevard THE ST. PETERSBURG CO., Agents ST. PETERSBURG FLORIDA One Hundred Fifty-eight

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Shoes HERE, START AT THE CRADLE and GRADUATE to HIGH SCHOOL sizes It’s a pleasure for us to tell our little shoe-store story to the readers of the Annual, even tho' it may be an old story to some of you; our stock includes so many kinds of footgear which appeal to young ladies generally, and smart young ladies particularly, that it’s a simple matter to come here and be perfectly fitted, and perfectly satisfied. Drop in and see us styles change often. LADIES’ AND CHILDREN’S SHOES F. A. L. BADGER Taylor Arcade opposite Suwannee Hotel If it is for an Automobile or Radio, we have it Behind the School is Everything 211 Third Street S. Phone 4795 ACE AUTOMOTIVE COMPANY Everyone in Fairyland was wild with joy at the news that the Princess had been awakened from her long sleep at last. But just as this happiness was at its height, the Fisk boy wandered in with a candle in one hand and yawning terrifically. “Time to Retire,” he said, and blew out the light. Whereupon, the Princess went right back to sleep immediately, and no one, not even Big Ben, could wake her up again. “Oh, you bad, bad, wicked boy!” cried Kenny in his wrath. “You have spoiled everything, for the sake of an advertisement! Now the little Dutch Boy can never stop painting, and Old Dutch Cleanser and the Gold Dust Twins can never stop cleaning the kitchen. And besides, the Thirsty Fibre Man will have to hurry all the time, and the SERVICE COURTESY Central Hardware & Paint Co. Formerly Central Supply Co. Now Located Corner BAUM AVE. and NINTH ST. N. GOOD GOODS PRICED RIGHT One Hundred Fifty-nine

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And Now — THE FUTURE The study period is over. Whether you pause for a moment before entering higher institutions of learning or step out into a busy world where you will find ready burdens and tasks, you young men and young women of St. Peters burg have ideals to cherish—and apply. And you have a debt to pay. The Sunshine City must depend upon you to mold that clay of the future with skill and courage. For years to come, you will repay your city for the education it has given you, for the wholesome home life you have enjoyed, through participation in the upbuilding of Florida’s finest city. If you are loyal to your city—if you pay your debt—you will build rather than tear down; you will think and act constructively rather than destructively, you will give more than you take away. And you will discharge a great portion of your debt through the St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce—the body devoted un swervingly to the upbuilding of your city. Your valedictory to school books will mark the beginning of your greater opportunities. St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce One Hundred Sixty

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Child’s Pharmacy Meet Me at the PRESCRIPTIONS CASCADE A SPECIALTY ICE CREAM SODA JI CANDY SANDWICHES 12 Fourth Street North Phone 4545 554 First Avenue North With compliments to the Class of 1926 CUNNINGHAM BROTHERS HARDWARE and BUILDERS’ SUPPLIES 861 Central Avenue Campbell Kids will have to go on eating soup forever and ever. Oh, you wicked naughty boy!” But the Fisk boy was talking in his sleep, “It pays to advertise.” And then Kenny Bob woke up. The big wooden shoes and the little dutch cap and the baggy pantaloons all looked very familiar to Kenny so, nudging Bobby Jollyco, he asked, “Is that the Dutch Boy who paints signs and things for the National Lead Company?” Bobby Jollyco nodded, “Do you want to go up and see him.” he asked. “Yes!” shouted Kenny and started scrambling up the ladder. But, woeful luck! He was little over half way up when zwoop\ he slipped and fell — down, down, down, till he struck the shining mirror. But luck wasn’t all against him, for the mirror didn’t One Hundred Sixty-one

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V HE Biggest Little Newspaper on Earth! 7 UST one year from the day of its first issue, the Daily News published the largest Tabloid newspaper ever printed. It carried over 140,000 lines of local adver tising, in addition to a rec ord lineage of National ad vertising. Vindication of the Tabloid form of newspaper, yes; and overwhelming approval of the Daily News in particu lar. Frank F. Pulver, Owner Major Alfred Birdsall, General Manager ST. PETERSBURGÂ’S PICTURE PAPER ST. PETERSBURG 7/ve. Sunshine City" FLORIDA One Hundred Sixty-two

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COLE JEWELRY COMPANY Nothing But the Finest NEWEST CREATIONS Diamonds—Platinum —JewelryWatches 419 Central Avenue Phone 66-049 714 Central Avenue DEEM REALTY REALTORS 102 REALTY ARCADE ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. Year 'Round Realtors break. Perhaps it was because Kenny was such a little boy, and then again, may bejust maybe — mirrors don’t break in Fairyland. He wasn’t really hurt much and “the little nurse for little ills” came to his aid so he was well again in no time. When they were ready to leave, the little Dutch Boy called down to them to go see his mother while they were in Fairyland. Kenny didn’t know who the Dutch Boy’s mother was, so he had to ask Bobby Jollyco. “Why, Old Dutch Cleanser, of course,” answered Bobby Jollyco, “She stays at the Palace.” At last they came to the Palace, and sure enough, there was Old Dutch Cleanser, cleaning an already spotless kitchen, with the Gold Dust Twins to help her. L. R. FAZAKERLEY H. L. JACKSON The Ermatinger Shoppe 534 First Avenue North Featuring Ladies’ Hats Dobbs Hats for Men Unusual Furnishings and Sportwear We CLEAN and BLOCK HATS Dial 76-060 One Hundred Sixty-three

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What Are Your Plans ? You would not think of building a house without a plan. Likewise you should not think of building a career without making some sort of plan. If you want to get somewhere in this world, start now to map the course you should follow. Decide first what you wish to accomplish. Then figure how you can best attain your end. Work your plan and you can not help getting ahead. Among other things in your plan, be sure to include the habit of saving money. For without this habit, success is difficult if not impossible. And to make saving easier and more systematic, start a Savings Account now in the First National Bank. st National Bank of St. Petersburg Florida WITH TRUST DEPARTMENT Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits Over $1,000,000 Total Resources Over $15,000,000 Our Hundred Sixty-four

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e Gilmore Realty Company e 613 Central Avenue ^ S R St. Petersburg, Florida L T Union Mortgage Company of Florida “Achievement is Proof of Opportunity'” Non-Speculative CASHIN & JONDRO Fiscal Office: 17 Sixth Street South C. Buck Turner Company REALTORS 147 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida C. BUCK TURNER, President One Hundred Sixty-five

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As Usual the very smartest and most fashionable shoes for sub-deb are to be found here. Styles this season are becoming and striking, enhanced by a brilliant touch of beautiful buckles. The chap who wants the latest rage in he-man shoes will find the new collegiate styles at Tillinghast. Swagger, broad toe in light colors. W. L. TILLINGHAST Feet Fitter 421 Central J. B. THOMAS All Year Realtor Lots and Acreage a Specialty 756 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Fla. She was too busy to talk to them so Kenny and Bobby Jollyco went on to the next room, where they found the Campbell’s Kiddies eating soup with spoons very nearly as large as themselves. In the very last room of the Palace, Kenny found the most beautiful lady he had ever seen — even more beautiful than his mother or Aunt Elizabeth — but she was fast asleep. “She uses Pompeian Night Cream,” said Bobby Jollyco, “and that is why she is so beautiful.” Kenny Bob wished that she would wake up because he wanted to talk to her. “Oh,” explained Bobby Jollyco, “she never wakes up! She sleeps like that all the time.” One Hundred Sixtv-six

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Scott Music Company Edison Phonographs Baldwin Pianos Everything for the Music Lover 224 Fourth Street North Phone 6958 St. Petersburg Office Equipment Company “Everythingfor the Office' Exclusive Agents for Stationery L. C. SMITH & BROS. Greeting Cards TYPEWRITERS Novelties Dennison’s Party Goods 666 CENTRAL AVENUE Phone 5736 One Hundred Sixty-seven

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The Fidelity Bank & Trust Company OF ST. PETERSBURG Is Prepared to Serve You in a General Banking Business Commercial Accounts, Checking Accounts, Savings Accounts SafeDeposit Boxes, CollectionDepartment, Trust Department OFFICERS H. C. CASE, President W. A. SIMCO, Cashier CHAS. R. CARTER, Vice President GEO. H. WOOLLEY, Asst. Cashier DIRECTORS W. W. BIRCHFIELD, Chairman of Board C. C. CARR, Pres. Lesan-Carr Advertising Agency CHAS. R. CARTER, Foley-Carter Company H. C. CASE, President ROBT. ARNOLD, Builder and Retired Capitalist J. S. DAVIS, Attorney to County Commissioners W. L. STRAUB, Editor St. Petersburg Times O. R. ALBRIGHT, Albright Motor Company FRANK T. S. HALLOWELL, Hallowed Electric Company W. a! SIMCO, Cashier A. L. RICHARDSON, Attorney and General Counsel W. F. SMITH, Chairman City Park Board Your Patronage is Respectfully Solicited FIDELITY BANK & TRUST COMPANY West Coast Title Bldg., Central Ave. at Fourth In the Center of Business District Harrison-Powell Company EVERYTHING FOR Baseball, Tennis, Golf Fishing, Hunting and other sports Central Avenue at Third Street One Hundred Sixty-eight

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“How funny!” Kenny exclaimed. Just then a man came down the hall with a cup of Postum and a dish of Grapenuts on a tray. Kenny Bob called to him as he passed. “Oh, why does the Pompeian lady always sleep, like this.” But the man only muttered, “There’s a reason,” and hurried on down the hall. “I wish he would wait a minute. I want to ask him about it,” wailed poor Kenny Bob. “Never mind,” answered his companion, “I will tell you all about it. She is the Princess, you see, and no one can wake her up. But some day a young Prince will come and awaken her. Then she will marry him, and he will be our King and all Fairyland will be happy. Old Dutch Cleanser will not have to work and the Dutch Boy can stop “ The Big Land People ” McLean, Rector & Scott REALTORS—AUCTIONEERS St. Petersburg, Fla. Knxoville, Tenn. Hendersonville, N. C. If it’s Real Estate, We Sell It One Hundred Sixty-nine

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Kirby’s Studio HIGH-CLASS Portraiture Ground Floor Studio:—260 First Avenue North Phone 6585 One Hundred Seventy

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Clothing and Furnishings With Snap, Style, Quality and Our Positive Backing M. KATZ’S 842 Central Ave. FRANKLIN J. MASON CO. INCORPORATED Building Construction Tenth Floor, West Coast Holding Company Building ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. painting and rest; the Gold Dust Twins will be free to play, and the Campbell Kids shall have something else to eat besides soup, and”, he added, “the Thirsty Fibre Man will not have to hurry then.” “Why does he hurry, now?” asked Kenny Bob. ‘‘Because he is hunting for the Prince to waken up our Princess.” Now Kenny Bob was quite sure he knew what would awaken her, but he wasn’t sure he could find it in this new Fairyland. So he hurried down to the kitchen and asked Old Dutch Cleanser. “I don’t know,” she answered, but the Thirsty Fibre Man could tell you, because he travels everywhere.” McCREA-ADCOCK, Inc. BUICK CARS The Standard of Comparison B UICK SALES AND SER VICE 4th St. and 15th Ave. North St. Petersburg, Florida One Hundred Seventy-one

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HORE ACRE ‘On Tampa Bay” The Boardman-Frazee Realty Company, Inc. REALTORS 176 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida Roberts-Bize Motor Company, Inc. First Avenue North and Thirteenth Street We aim to merit your confidence by giving you a “Satisfied Service” in every transaction AUTHORIZED DEALERS LINCOLN FORDSON Phone 1272 One Hundred Seventy-two

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I Ladies’ High-Grade Shoes JAY’S BOOT SHOP 483 Central Avenue “Watch our windows, see the new things first’’ EAT at the FIFTH AVENUE CAFE Around the Corner from Wood Street W. H. JETTE, Prop. There was no telling when the Fibre Man was likely to appear so Kenny Bob waited all morning at the Palace gate. At last he saw a very tall man hurrying down the road with a very tall hat on his head and a very small cane in one hand. He decided this must be the Thirsty Fibre Man, so, shouting at the top of his voice, he set out after him. The man had such long legs, however, and took such long strides that it was a long time before Kenny Bob caught up with him. “Ah, yes, yes,” said the Fidgety Fibre Man, when Kenny had whispered something mysteriously in his ear. “I’m going to Ben’s house, myself, and you can come along, if you like. Only, hurry; it’s getting fearfully late!” McGAHAN-PARMLY COMPANY FLORISTS St. Petersburg, Florida Positively the Highest Assortment Two Stores: Soreno Hotel Main Store, 563 Central Avenue One Hundred Seventy-three

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Boyer & Hayward St. Petersburg's Exclusive Men's Store Catering to the Well Dressed Man FEATURING Nationally known lines of Clothing, Furnishings and Hats, together with a rep resentative assortment of Imported and Domestic Sport Apparel 269 CENTRAL AVEVUE ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Real Estate Loans High School and Graduation First A Good Job Next—Then Buy a Lot C. ALLEN and SMITH 10 Fourth Street South Mortgages One Hundred Seventy-four

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W E want to thank the Palmetto and Pine Staff for their helpful co operation throughout the year. NO-SO-WE-EA STAFF RADIO SUPPLIES Seaman & Elston 832 Central Avenue The Hibbs Fish Company, Inc. Wholesale Dealers in FRESH AND SALT FISH Office and Packing House Phone 4149 960 Third Street South St. Petersburg, Florida Never fails to delight taste and satisfy thirst because it is pure and wholesome ST. PETERSBURG COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY One Hundred Seventy-five

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DECO Outfitters for Young Men and Men 333 Central Avenue Compliments of a Friend D. W. BUDD COMPANY Drugs and Sundries 327 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida One Hundred. Seventy-six

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Qinolyiv Woman’s Dress Shop ANNA C. MILLER Phone 58-060 214 First Avenue North Let the Corona STAN D ARD-KE YBO A R D PORTA BLR help you through school and college. Sold on easy terms. Use it while you pay. CONSOLIDATED TYPEWRITER CO. Coronas and all the others 4 Florida Arcade Phone 6940 January to February—“If you don’t March with me now, April May next June.” Miss Geiger (just before Gordon goes to sleep)— “There will be a prize for the best essay.” Stude (while Gordon is asleep)—“How many words is it to be?” Miss Geiger (as Gordon wakes up)—“Two or three thousand.” Gordon (excitedly)—“How much did you say the prize was?” It’s one of those summer resorts where you go for a rest and a change, but the bell boys get your change and the hotel gets the rest. See MR. COSGROVE One Hundred Seventy-seven

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Don't Suffer ff^ith Asthma GET A BOTTLE OF Sunshine Asthma Remedy FREERÂ’S PHARMACY Cor. Central and Ninth St. You Can be convinced it a very short time that there is a vast dif ference in Ranges. Allow us to explain all about ORIOLE and see the difference C. J. GODSEY Plumbing, Steam and Gas Fitting 657 CENTRAL AYE. PAIGE JEJVETT Keystone Garage A. C. MacBROOM, Proprietor DISTRIBUTORS OF PAIGE and JEWETT CARS Ninth Street and Third Avenue North ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. One Hundred Seventy-eight

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THE FASHION SHOP LADIES' READY TO WEAR Millinery 844 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Fla. FLORIDA ART SCHOOL Beach Drive and Second Ave. North announces the opening of A Summer School for Landscape and Figure Work JUNE 15 at KENNEBUNKPORT, MAINE Early Reservations Advised ^C._. REALTY CO St. Petersburg’s Newest and Best Senio?~ High School is being built within three minutes walking distance of “KELLHURST” A Safe Investment F. C. L. REALTY COMPANY 561 Central Avenue Miss Geiger—“I want your notebooks in, complete. Helen Boardman—“Oh, I’m so glad. I was afraid you wouldn’t take it incomplete.” Mr. Skidmore—“You made 99 in your last exam. Why did you not get 100?” Stud—“There must have been a misprint in the book, sir.” Do you remember the girl we used to call “Postscript” because her name was Adeline Moore? One Hundred Seventy-nine

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One Hundred Eighty

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Visit Our French Pastry Shop PURE ICE CREAM 740 Central Daily Made Florida Pecan Roll Packed in St. Petersburg Sold in Boxes Always a Welcome Gift 413-15 Central Miss Miller—“R. U. Eton in this study hall?” Wilson Overturf—“No, I swear I’m not eating, Honest. I ain’t.” We wonder why the teachers have never sprung this one on usj.et: Punctuate—“I say that that is is that is that that is not is not that is it is it not. Heard in the Office—”De more I’s late, demoralize.” Paul & Davis Furniture Company Central Avenue at 8th Street W here Houses are Made into Homes Pinellas Lumber Company Lumber and Building Material From Tree to Trade 1400 Central Avenue Phone 7791 One Hundred Eighty-one

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Congratulations We congratulate the Senior Class of 1926, St. Petersburg High School, who have so successfully completed their High School course, and we sincerely hope for this Class, individually and collectively, the same measure of success and happiness in their future endeavors. We congratulate the school and the faculty whose influence has been instrumental in molding the excep tional personnel of this Class; and the City of St. Petersburg, whose future valued citizens this Class will be. We congratulate the Class on the happy selection of the No-So-We-Ea Staff and Advisor. We know the Class will appreciate their untiring efforts and the splendid results accomplished. And we congratulate ourselves that we were per mitted to print this issue of No-So-We-Ea. We have tried hard to bring our work up to the standard the Staff has achieved, and if we have succeeded, we know we are deserving. CASHWELL-COOKE AND THEIR PRINTERS One Hundred Eighty-two

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“PROFIT MAKERS” High School work is the art of reasoning and logic. Therefore we offer for further investigation the opportunity for investment In TOY TOWN Profits from this investigation may mean your expenses at college. Driver & Townsend, Inc. SELLING AGENTS Phone 4905 621 Central Ave. St. Petersburg, Fla. One Hundred Eighty-tliree

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Congratulations from POINSETTIA HOTEL Central Avenue Prather-Strickland Pharmacy, Inc. 611 Central Avenue Phone 5762 We Are Authorized Eastman Agents. Developing a Specialty Twenty-four Hour Service THE PEACOCK SHOP New York Art in Shoes Paris Beautiful Shades in Rosaine Hosiery The Aristrock of Silk Stockings High Arch Combination Last Peacock Shoes are designed to create the fashion rather than to follow it. Beautiful shades and combinations. THE PEACOCK SHOP Art in Shoes St. Petersburg 1 s Smartest Shoe House West of Post Office 446 1st Ave. N. One Hundred Eighty-four

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Let us equip you with your hardware wants. We carry in stock thousands of items that you are constantly in need of. Make our store your headquarters ^ Walden Hardware (Ompany^, ^ "WE DELIVER THE GOODS -— 2a**/ 337 central AVENUE St Petersburg. Florida SMITH &BUMPOUS INC. OPTICIANS OPTOMETRISTS M 610' CENTRAL AYE. 619 Ninth Street North Phone 4324 Purvis-Freese Company ODORLESS DRY CLEANERS One Hundred Eighty-five

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We Buy, Sell and Exchange REAL ESTATE H. G. Sutton and Associates Seventeen Sixth Street South DONÂ’T FORGET THE PARK CAFETERIA Corner Third St. and First Ave. North One Hundred Eighty-six

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Bargains in REAL ESTATE, AUTOMOBILE and FIRE INSURANCE MAJORS & THORN, Inc. 540 First Avenue North JACKSONVILLE MIAMI TAMPA ORLANDO ST. PETERSBURG Exclusive Florida Representative STEIN WAY KURTZMANN FRANCIS BACON PHILPITT and DUO-ART REPRODUC ING PIANOS AEOLIAN PIANOLA PLAYERS ESTEY ORGANS FLORIDA’S COMPLETE MUSIC STORES Everything Musical S. Ernest Philpitt 444 Central Avenue St. Petersburg Florida Victrolas Victor Records Musical Instruments Sheet Music Exclusive Representatives Buescher Band Instruments Vega Banjos Martin Mandolins Maurer Guitars Philpitt Ukeleles WE WISH YOU SUCCESS While you succeed, “Let Us Serve You” SUMNER GROCERY COMPANY MARION SUMNER, Manager Phone 5948 Cor. Seventh Ave. and Second St. N. LARUS-BATTLE COMPANY CLOTHIERS and MEN’S FURNISHERS Postoffice Arcade St. Petersburg, Florida One Hundred Eighty-seven

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Rug Cleaning PHONE 5177 Dying TOWNSEND “ The Cleaner Who. Cleans" Dry Cleaner, Pressing, Altering, Custom Tailor We Call for and Deliver Office: 29 Third St. South Plant: 1444 Fourth St. South Pinellas Dairy Company Manufacturers of POINSETTIA ICE CREAM Pasteurized Dairy Products PHONE 233 112 Second Street South St. Petersburg, Florida This Car by being well equipped saved several lives Best service that can be had Call 4174 J. W. WILHELM, The Original One Hundred Eighty-eight

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POMELLO CITY POMELLO PARK P O M E L L O CITY is now under construction. The first business building to be erected is a two-stOry administration building, which will soon be under construction. Pomello City is located in the heart of Manatee County, seventeen miles south-east of Bradenton and thirteen miles north east of Sarasota. We are selling business lots 50 feet by 127 feet, which is twice the size of an ordinary business, for $50.00 Down, $15.00 Per Month We now have over 1000 investors in Pomello City and Pomello Park P O M E L L O PARK is a twelve thousand acre de velopment in Manatee County and surrounds Pomello City. Manatee County is particularly noted for its wonderful soil and its great productive ness. Pomello Park has approximately one hundred feet elevation and is high Pine timber land, which signi fies that it has some of the finest and most fertile soil in the county. The soil is suitable for fruit growing, trucking and general farming. We have a few resale 10-acre tracts for $100.00 Down, $25.00 Per Month llouk Realty Co., Inc. Main Office: 689 Central Avenue, St. Petersburg, Fla. Branch Office: Jennings Arcade, Bradenton, Fla. One Hundred Eighty-nine

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X! A-fo(9 •(>.• FV M -
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Signatures One Hundred Ninety-two

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Signatures

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he No-So-We-Ea Staff and the entire Senior Class of Â’26 wishes to express their sincere appreciation to Mr. W. H. Kirby, our photographer; the Southern Art Engraving Company, our engrav ers; and Cashwell-Cooke, our printers, as it is only through their hearty co operation and assistance that we have been able to publish a 1926 Annual. One Hundred Ninety-Jive

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One Hundred Ninety-seven

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