Citation
No-so-we-ea

Material Information

Title:
No-so-we-ea
Creator:
St. Petersburg High School (Saint Petersburg, Fla.)
Floridiana Collection
Place of Publication:
St. Petersburg, Fla
Publisher:
Students of St. Petersburg High School
Frequency:
Annual
regular
Language:
English
Edition:
v.6 1925
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8 (1927).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
UF Special Collections, Florida History
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
028840345 ( ALEPH )
56589949 ( OCLC )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text









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it Oh, you Four Winds that blow so strong
4nd know that this is true,
Stoop f or a little and carry my song To all the men I knew!"'










Como Sembra, Como Cosccha.




NO-SO- WE- EA
Spanish Number
VOLUME SIX
PUBLISHED BY
THE STUDENTS OF
q I 4,
. PETERSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL
ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.




bD EDICATION
TO VERA DUMAS
Who has believed in us,
Guided us,
ind ever held us to our best, We Gratefully and lovingly Dedicate this volume.
N'O-SO-WE-EA4
1925
Six







OREWORD
NSTITUTIONS, LIKE HUMAN BEINGS,
HAVE PERSONALITIES, AND THE ST. PETERSBURG HIGH SCHOOL, GATHERING, AS IT DOES, THE FAR CORNERS OF THE EARTH UNTO ITSELF, HAS ACQUIRED A PERSONALITY, RICH AND
VARIED AND STIMULATING.
THE NO-SO-WE-EA STAFF HAS ENDEAVORED TO PRODUCE A YEARBOOK THAT WOULD BE A TRUE RECORD OF THE COMPLEX ACTIVITIES OF SUCH A
STUDENT GROUP.
HEREIN WE HAVE TRIED TO GIVE A CONCRETE EXPRESSION OF THE LIFE AND CHARACTER OF THIS SCHOOL, TRUSTING THAT YOU MAY FIND IN IT
A COMPOSITE PICTURE OF WHAT
"ST. PETE" IS AND DOES AND
STRIVES TO BE.
Eight




ORDER OF BOOKS
Picture Section
Classes
Athletics
Organizations
junior High
Features




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THE JUNGLE




G E.O R GE M. L Y N C H, Superintendent
Our Captain-"He stands four square to all the winds that blow."
Nineteen




WIN STON W. LITTLE, Principal
"E'en as just a man as ere my conversation cop'd withal."
Twenty




lo
ANEW




Faculty Roll Call
ANNA APPLEBY, A. B., A. M. EDITH FALKENSTEIN, A. B.
History 3Mathematics
Scarett Morrisville College West Virginia Wesleyan College
T. J. WALKER MARTHE DETCHON, A. B.
English, History English, Latin
Southern College Oberlin College
ALEXANDER McGILL, A. B. JESSIE L. WILSON. A. B.
Mlathemalics, Science Physical Training, English
Randolph Macon College Davenport College
University of Tennessee
HAZEL H. WILLIAMS, B. C. S.
Chairman Business Department KENNETH LEWIS, E. E.
State Normal School of Nebrasa. Manuel Training, Mathematics
Nebraska University of Commerce. Syracuse University
DOROTHY B. HARRISON, A. B. C. M. ALEXANDER, Ph. Dir.
English Physical Director
University of Wisconsin Southern Y. M. C. A. College
AUGUSTA B. CENTER, B. S., M. A. CHARLOTTE L. KING, B. P. D., B. S.
English Domestic Arts
Emerson College of Oratory Michigan State Normal College
Columbia University. Columbia University
GEORE SIME, A. B. GLADYS R. GARDNER, A. B.
History English
St. 01af College Florida State College for Women
University of Chicago. Columbia University
LOIS CURTIS GEIGER, A. B. PRICILLA LANE
Latin, English High School Secretary
Piedmont College Florida State College for Women
Columbia University.
WColumbia University. INSTON W. LITTLE, B. S., A. B., A. M.
F. E. FORTIER, B. S. Chairmac of Science
Mathematics, History, Science Mississippi College
University of Maine. Universiy of Chicago
FRANCES L. WEST, B. A., M. A. GOODRIDGE MI. GREER, Mus. Bac.
Science Music
Agnes Scott Lebanon Valley College
Columbia University. Eingle Conservatory
MARGARET G. WILDER, A. B. RAVENNA ECKELS. B. S.
Mathematics Domestic Science
University of Tennessee Columbia University
Columbia University
University of Florida L. VINCENT MEAD, B. S.
Mathematics
CORA NEELEY COFFEY. A. B. Baldwin-Wallace College
Chairman of History
Dean of Girls. VERA MADGE DUMAS, A. B.
Liberty College Chairman of Latin
University of Florida Howard College
Chicago University University of Chicago
LOIS STEWART, A. B. JENNIE MILLER, B. S.
Chairman of English JENNIE MILLER, B. S.
Science
University of Indiana.Scee
University of Indiana. Mississippi State College for Women
DAISY BELLE JOHN, A. B., B. E., B. D. A. University of ,Chicago
Chairman Public Speaking
University of West Virginia. MARGUERITE EDITH SUTTON
American Academy. Chairman Spanish
Flowers Academy. Spanish Degree, University of Porto Rico
JEANNE C. BOSE Richmond City Normal
French MARY JANE WILLIAMS, B. C. S.
University of Indiana Commercial Work
Wilson College Bowling Green Business University
W. M. WILLIAMS Florida State College for Women
Manuel Training
Advanced Specialist in Industrial Arts GEORGE M. LYNCH, A. B.
Psychology
BEULAH W. FRANKLIN, A. B. Florida Military College
Spanish University of Florida
University of Chicago Graduate Work, University of Florida
T~.venty-two







Seniors
3 OR'four years this has been our home; here we have worked
and played and lived together. Now, we must go our way; and
the four years seem unbelievably brief,-like "Hail" and "Farewell."
Has this, contact given us anything worth while? Has it enabled us to live more fully? Have we really achieved or have we only drifted with the tide? Have we acquired a point .of view that will
insure a successful future?
As graduation day draws near "not only do we view- the past in loving retrospect but we wonder what the future has in store for us.
Can we be blamed if in all our joyous anticipation, we have moments of doubt and fear as to how we shall relate ourselves to the new world stretched before us? Have we any right to expect the success we
naturally desire?
We believe that, to those who have faithfully and enthusiastically met all the petty details as well as the occasions of great moment,
there has come a hardihood of spirit that will be unconquerable.
We need not be afraid of this new life. If we have built well, there is nothing that we need fear, and if we hold the memory of St. Pete, its principles and ideals as our guiding star, we may go
forth into the world, dauntless and unafraid.
Senior Class Officers
MORRISON PEARCE LYNDA WALKER MARGARET OGDEN PRANK PHIPPS
Presient V ice-President Secretary Treasurer
T'wenty-four




THOMAS PRESTON JOHNSON LEROY C. LOVE
HENDERSONVILLE, KY. WILLIAMSPORT, PENN.
Entered '21, Hi-Y two years, Junior Chain- Entered '21, Senior Play.
ber of Commerce, Senior Play.
WINIFRED WALKER HELEN MOSER
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. PERRYSBURG, OHIO
Entered '21, Basket Ball, Junior Woman's Entered '22, Junior Chamber of Commerce,
Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior Woman's Club, Senior Play.
Board of Governors '25.
MYRTLE LEE BYRD VEDA BONCILLE FOREMAN
FORT MYERS, FLA. ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club, Junior Entered '21, Junior Chamber of Commerce,
Chamber of Commerce. Junior Woman's Club, Class Basket Ball.
WINIFRED LONG
ROCHESTER, N. Y. ARMANDE BOWERS
Entered '23, Junior Chamber of Commerce, ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.
Junior Woman's Club, Tennis Club. Entered '21.
Thcenty-five




LUCIAN HALL EARL ODOM
ASHLAND, KENTUCKY ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
Entered '21, Palmetto and Pine Staff '23, Entered '21.
Basket Ball '24.
MYRTLE ALMA DURANT
VERA MAE WESTMORELAND ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
HEADLAND, ALABAMA Entered '20, junior Chamber of Commerce.
Entered '24, Junior Woman's Club.
LINA MAE KING
HELEN GLADYS MARSHALL ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
DETROIT, MICHIGAN Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club, Junior
Entered '22, Treasurer Be Square Club, Chamber of Commerce, Board of GovJunior Woman's Club, Junior Chamber ernors, Annual Staff, Senior Play,
of Commerce, Senior Play. Ticket Manager '24.
MARJORIE FANNING COLEY MARGARET LENETTE LONGMIRE
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA ANDERSONVILLE, TENNESSEE
Entered '23. Entered '23.
T.enty-szx




HENRY ORHNS HERBERT MARSHICK
DETROIT, MICHIGAN DETROIT, MICHIGAN
Entered '21, Treasurer Tennis Club '24, Entered '21.
Track '24, Hi-Y, Palmetto and Pine.
ELIZABETH ANNE BOYD ISABEL LETITIA CRONKHITE
BATTLECREEK, MICHIGAN
COLUMBUS, OHIO
Entered '21, Class Basket Bail, Junior WoEntered '22, Junior Woman's Club, Senior man's Club, Be Square
man's Club, Be Square
Play, Girls Honor Council '24-'25.
EMMA LELA LIEGEROT FAITH CUSHMAN
PLATTE CITY, MISSOURI SILVER CREEK, NEW YORK
Entered '23, Orchestra '24. Entered '21.
FRANK D. NOWLAND GARFIELD HENRY VAN DERLIP
CINCINNATI, OHIO OAK PARK, ILLINOIS
Entered '24. Entered '21.
T.enty-even
TIlk,-sve




WAYNE MOYER HOWARD CRYAN
CORTLAND, NEW YORK HAVERHILL, NEW HAMPSHIRE
Entered '24. Entered '23.
FRANCIS WILLIAMS
ELINORE PERKINS WEARE BLACKDUCK, MINNESOTA
OGUNQUITE, MAINE Entered '24.
Entered '21.
DORIS HAMILTON
LUELLA ALBRIGHT PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND
Entered '24, Junior Woman's Club.
ANDREW CUTHBERT WALKER
PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA JESSEL SETZER
Entered '22, Chairman Senior Stage Corn- ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
mittee. Entered '21.
Tw e nt y- eight




GEORGE PRINGLE HAZEL FROST
MUSKOGEE, OKLAHOMA BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
Entered '21. Entered '24.
HENRIETTA NICHOLS MARY C. FIELDS
ELYRIA, OIO PORTLAND, MAINE
Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club, Junior Entered '22, Junior Woman's Club, Junior
', Chamber of Commerce.
Chamber of Commerce, Assistant Editor The Annual '25, Be Square.
EVELYN WHITE
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
ERNESTINE E. WHITTMEYER Entered '21, Secretary Junior Chamber of
LAKELAND, FLORIDA Commerce, Vice-President Junior Woman's
Entered '23, Junior Woman's Club, Junior Club, Senior Play
Chamber of Commerce.
CLIFFORD RAY
BONNEAU ANSLEY ROME, GEORGIA
DECATUR, GEORGIA Entered '21, Annual Staff '24, Editor-inEntered '24. Chief '25, Scholarship Club.
Tcwenty-ntne




LOUIS LEISTINGER THOMAS GRAMLING
PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA ATLANTA, GEORGIA
Entered '21, Class Foot Ball '23, Basket Entered '21, Vice-President Junior Chamber
Ball '24. of Commerce, Senior Play, Annual
Staff, Hi-Y '24-'25.
ELIZABETH COBB DICKENSON
MILFORD, VIRGINIA MARY FRANCIS BETHEL
Entered '22, Senior Play. PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA
Entered '22, Junior Woman's Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Annual Staff. RUTH CAROLINE SMITH
DELAWARE, OHIO
Entered '21, Girls Honor Council 2 years, BERTHA WESTFIELD
Palmetto and Pine '25, Senior Play, ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
Secretary Class '24. Entered '22, Scholarship Club.
DONALD S. CUSHMAN CATHERINE REICHARD McCAULEY
EVANSTON, ILLINOIS HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND
Entered 21, President Hi-Y '25, President Entered '23, Junior Woman's Club, TreasAthletic Association '25, Annual Staff urer '25, Junior Chamber of Commerce,
'25, Senior Play. Senior Play, Palmetto and Pine.
, 7




RICHARD CURRY THOMAS CHALFANT
BRADENTOWN, FLORIDA SOUTH BEND, INDIANA
Entered '24. Entered '24.
PHOEBE JANE CALKINS MARTHA TRICE
PITTSFIELD, PENNSYLVANIA M H TC
HOPKINSVILLE, KENTUCKY
Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club. Entered '24.
ROWENA GERTRUDE BEVERLY
OMEGA, GEORGIA THURSBA WHITAKER
Entered '24. MORGANTOWN, INDIANA
Entered '22, Swimming Team '24, Captain '25.
LENORE PALMER
KINGSPORT, TENNESSEE HOWARD KEEFE WALLACE
Entered '21, Be Square, Junior Woman's SWESSVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA
Club. Entered '21, Basket Ball.
Thirt
1z
[;7ry-n




BASCOMBE LANE RALPH ERASTUS STEWART
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
Entered '20. Entered '21.
MARGARET ZIERDEN
MEDIA, PENNSYLVANIA DOROTHY ELIZABETH MULLIN
Entered '23, Basket Ball '24, Captain '25, PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA
Junior Woman's Club. Entered '21, Senior Play.
HAZEL LEE CALKINS MARY ELIZABETH DETTERICH
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
Entered '21. Entered '21, Palmetto and Pine Staff '24,
Assistant Editor '25.
DUDLEY BREWER INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA
Entered '23, Vice-President Hi-Y '25, Editor- KATHLEEN LOCKHART
in-Chief of Palmetto and Pine '25, MERIDAN, MISSISSIPPI
Sport Editor Annual '25. Entered '25.
Thirty-tAo




CLITUS F. MOHR MARIO LINDELE
BELLEFONTAINE, OHIO ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
Entered '24. Entered '21.
VIVIAN LYNNETTE KROM MARY ELIZABETH HANSEN
ATLANTA, GA. ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club, Junior Entered '21, Swimming '24, Palmetto and
Chamber of Commerce, Senior Play. Pine '25, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior Woman's Club.
MYRTLE MARIE WALLACE
PITTSBURG, PA.
Entered '24, Junior Chamber of Commerce, IMOGENE DAVIS
Junior Woman's Club. ELDORO, IND.
Entered '24.
OLIVIA ANNE SWIFT
MT. VERNON, ILL. MORRIS ROSENBURG
Entered '21, Junior Chamber of Commerce, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Junior Woman's Club, Senior Play. Entered '22. 1
Thirty-three
" Thiry-thre




LOY JONES GEORGE BRANTLEY SMITH
RENARD, IOWA LAKE CITY, FLA.
Entered '23. Entered '21. Orchestra 4 years, Hi-Y.
DORIS BLANCHE LEAKE
JEWEL MILLS HAMILTON, 'ONTARIO
NEW CASTLE, IND. Entered '21, junior Woman's Club, junior
Entered '24. Chamber of Commerce.
MARGARET LOIS DIETZ SIDNEY MAURINE FULLER
PITTSBURG, PENN. ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
Enteed 23,junor Wmans Cub.Entered '21, junior Chamber of Commerce,
Enteed 23,Junor Wmans Cub.junior Woman's Club.
JOHN ASKEW AGNES WALKER
ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. BRADDOCK, PENN.
Entered '21, Senior Class Swimming Team. Entered '24.
Thirty-fou




---- --- fd
LEONARD GOULD KENNETH FREESE
LEOMINSTER, MASSACHUSETTS EUSTIS, FLORIDA
Entered '23. Entered '23.
CATHERINE LONG
MILDRED WOODFORD ROCHESTER, NEW YORK
ENDICOTT, NEW YORK Entered '22, Junior Chamber of Commerce,
Entered '22. Junior Woman's Club, Tennis Club,
Basket Ball 3 Years, Be Square
3 Years.
KATHRYN HOPKINS CLEATIE MAE TROSPER
EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN BARBOURVILLE, KENTUCKY
Entered '24. Entered '21, Junior Chamber of Commerce,
Junior Woman's Club, Scholarship Club.
JAY McVEY EARL OSBORNE
HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA OCALA, FLORIDA
Entered '21, Foot Ball '23-'24, Basket Ball Entered '21, Business Manager of Sen'or
'22, Hi-Y. Play.
Thirtyf! ve




LOYD BASSET CAREY JACOBUS
NORWICH, NEW YORK BERONA, NEW JERSEY
Entered '23. Entered '21, Orchestra 3 Years, Hi-Y.
ROBERTA DAVIS ROUIE LUCILLE WARNER
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
Entered '21. Entered '21, Palmetto and Pine Staff, Annual
Staff '25, Be Square.
NELLIE LUVINA BAILEY EDNA GLADYS BRYON
ASHTABULA, OHIO ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
Entered '21, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club, Junior
Junior Woman's Club '25, Board Chamber of Commerce
of Governors.
ETHEL E. WILLIAMS
MARION BAKER NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club, Junior
Entered '21. Chamber of Commerce.
Thirty-six




BYRD LATHAM CHARLES CHESTER ADAMS
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA GOSHEN, INDIANA
Entered '21, Base Ball 3 years, Captain '25, Entered '23.
Foot Ball 2 years.
MARY ELIZABETH SPOFFORD
DORIS MORONG ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
HAVERHILL, MASSACHUSETTS Entered '22, President Be Square, Junior
Woman's Club, junior Chamber of
Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club, Junior
Chamber of Commerce, Senior Play. Commerce.
MARY WORKIZER MYRTLE TOMLINSON
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA FRENCHTOWN, NEW JERSEY
Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club, Junior Entered '22, Junior Woman's Club, Junior
Chamber of Commerce. Chamber of Commerce
LETA LAVINIA CARTER
ETHEL COPPINS VALDOSTA, GEORGIA
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club, Junior
Entered '21. Chamber of Commerce, Senior Play.
Thirty-sevaen




HAROLD DAVIS WALTER JENKINS
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
Entered '21, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Entered '21, Track '24, Basket Ball '24,
Hi-Y. Senior Play.
FERN HATFIELD NELL GRACE COOPER
OLLIE, MONTANA ODOM-, INDIANA
Entered '23. Entered '24, Junior Woman's Club.
OLIVE MAE BUTLER RACHEL WILLIS
COLUMBUS, OHIO
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club, Girls Entered '21.
Honor Council '22.
ROSE KASTNER BITTING EDNA MILDRED BRADSHAW
LONG ISLAND, NEW YORK MCKEESPORT, PENNSYLVANIA
Entered '21, Junior Chamber of Commerce. Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club.
Thirty-eight




HAROLD TISHKEN PAUL BOARDMAN
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
Entered '21. Entered '21, Swimming 4 years, Captain '25,
Palmetto and Pine Staff.
LUCY BOWLDIN GARRISON
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA MARY LEWIS DARLINGTON
Entered '22. WEST CHESTER, PENN.
Entered '24, Junior Woman's Club.
JANE McCLURE MARY LOUISE CASSIDY
PETERSBURG, VA. PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA
Entered '24. Entered '24, Junior Chamber of Commerce.
CATHERINE WEGER JOHN FRANKLIN COLE
ROBINSON, ILL. ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
Entered '24. Entered '21.
Thirty-nine




HAROLD HATFIELD RICHARD DEE ATWOOD
OLLIE, MONTANA ST. CLOUD, FLORIDA
Entered '24. Entered '24, Hi-Y, Orchestra.
WANITA WALTER FRANCES CHARLOTTE RAY
ATLANTA, GEORGIA MONTICELLO, FLORIDA
Entered '23, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Entered '22.
Junior Woman's Club, Orchestra.
ANNAELIA LUTONROSE ESTELLE FORT,
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA GREENFIELD, .INDIANA
Enteed '2, B Squre.Entered '22, junior Woman's Club, Junior
Enteed '2, B Squre.Chamber of Commerce, Vice-President Civic League.
JAMES E. COOPER
ATLANTIC CITY, NEW JERSEY
Entered '21, Hi-Y, Palmetto and Pine 2 HAROLD SANDIIS BROWN
years, Annual 2 years, junior Chamber LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS
of Commerce, Senior Play. Entered '21.
Fort




HAROLD ANDERSON GEORGE JOHN MILLER
LIVINGSTON MANOR, NEW YORK KEENE VALLEY, NEW YORK
Entered '22, Track '24, Hi-Y. Entered '22, Hi-Y, Senior Play, Junior
Chamber of Commerce, Orchestra.
LUCILLE RUTH BROWN
MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE ELIZABETH BONNY
Entered '24, Secretary '24, President '25 of NORFOLK, VIRGINIA
Junior Woman's Club, Junior Chamber Entered '23.
of Commerce, Senior Play, Annual
Staff.
CLYMENE VIVIAN FRAZIER GRACE ELIZABETH TURNER
CLEVELAND, OHIO JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
EnteredD '24, J o hEntered '21, Junior Woman's Club, Junior Entered '24, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Chamber of Commerce, Annual Staff.
junior Woman's Club.
HAZEL HARNSBERGER RAYMOND BORSTEL
PRESCOTT, WISCONSIN HUNTINGTON, NEW YORK
Entered '22. Entered '21.
Forty-one




KENNETH MOORE RICHARD H. FRAZE
ENGLEWOOD, NEW JERSEY CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Entered '21, Senior Play, Track '25. Entered '22, Palmetto and Pine '24, Business
Manager '25, Treasurer Hi-Y '24, Senior Play, Business Staff.
ELIZABETH NAOMI REESE MARJORIE CLARK
BELLEFONTAINE, OHIO OAKLAND, INDIANA
Entered '23. Entered '24.
DOROTHY KATHERINE LEGTERS JEAN HITCHNER ITHACA, NEW YORK
PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA Entered '22, Junior Women's Club, Junior
Entered '24, Junior Woman's Club. Chamber of Commerce, Palmetto and
Pine '23, Senior Play.
NELSON FRANK METCALF HAMILTON YANCEY
ILLION, NEW YORK ROME, GEORGIA
Entered '23. Entered '25.
Forty-two




S- -mJOSEPH GENTRY FICKLING JAMES RIDDLE
ROME, GEORGIA HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA
Entered '24, President Chamber of Com- Entered '21, junior Chamber of Commerce
merce '24, Sen'or Play, Hi-Y, Business 2 years, Cheer Leader '24-'25, Hi-Y,
Manager No-So-We-Ea '25. Palmetto and Pine '24.
MARY CHRISTINE BENN
MARGARET A. CLARK CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS
GENEVA, NEW YORK Entered '24, Treasurer Civic League, Junior
Entered '24. Chamber of Commerce, Board of Governors of Junior Women's Club,
Senior Play.
VANN AIKEN
DUNNELLON, FLORIDA
Entered '23. MARGARET MAGILL
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Entered '21, Be Square Club.
JOAN OSBORNE
OWASSO, MICHIGAN CHESTER MEHRING
Entered '23, Senior Play, Junior Chamber PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA
of Commerce, Junior Womens Club. Entered '23, Orchestra, Hi-Y '24.
i
. Forty-three




HELEN WALLACE EDWARD KEHEW
KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE ARLINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS
Entered '21, Orchestra 2 years, Senior Entered '21, Head Usher Senior Play, Hi-Y.
Quartet 125.
DORIS DEW
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
MARGARET LOUISE PEELER Entered '21, Class Secretary '21, Vice-PresiEAST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY dent '22, Treasurer Civic League '21,
Entered '24, Junior Woman's Club, Scribe, Honor Council '21, Junior Women's
Junior Chamber of Commerce, Annual Club, Junior Chamber of CoinStaff '25, Palmetto and Pine '25, merce, Senior Play.
Senior Play.
LUCILLE BROWN
SAUGERTIES, NEW YORK
j' DORIS RICHARDS Entered '24, Junior Woman's Club,, Junior
)ORANGE, MASSACHUSETTS Chamber of Commerce, Palmetto and
Entered '22. Pine.
MARGUERITE EVANS
ILA DAVIES HOLLIDYSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA
WEBSTER, FLORIDA Entered '21, Be Square Club, Tennis Club 2
Entered '21. years, junior Woman's Club.
F -




HARVEY PHIEL WILLIAN ANISLIE BUHMER
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA *JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
Entered '21, Foot Ball 4 years, Captain '25, Entered '21, Hi-Y, Swimming Team four
Junior Chamber of Commerce. years, Captain '24, Palmetto and
Pine Staff '25.
BLANCHE TOMPSON LAUNA FAULKNER PATTEN
WEST CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA ATHENS, GEORGIA
Entered '22, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club, Junior
Board of Governors Junior Woman's Chamber of Commerce.
Club.
BERTHA M. COOK
PAULINE FULLER CORNING, NEW YORK
HUDSON, MASSACHUSETTS Entered '22, Senior Play, Swimming Team
Entered '23, Junior Woman's Club. '25, Junior Woman's Club, Class
Basket Ball.
JOSEPH MARRION THURSTON EARL KILGORE
ANDERSON, INDIANA BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA
Entered '24, Captain Basket Ball '24-'25. Eentered '23.
i Fo rty-five




ALLEN KEESLER CHARLES HAIRE
POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
Entered '20, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Entered '21, Orchestra '21, Annual '25.
Senior Play.
ELENA LAWRENCE ELIZABETH SIMPSON
MUNROE, NORTH CAROLINA
WAPPINGER'S FALL, NEW YORK MUNROE, NORTH CAROLINA
Entered '25. Entered '21, Class Basket Ball '25.
JANET LACEY BERNICE IRENE SEYMOUR
FRANKLIN, PENNSYLVANIA HARTON, MICHIGAN
Entered '23. Entered '24.
HELEN FRANCES CLARK JAY SCOTT DONALDSON
GENEVA, NEW YORK HOMEWORTH, OHIO
Entered '24. Entered '24.
Forty-six




WAYNE CAMPBELL EUGENE BOGERT
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA ENGLEWOOD, NEW JERSEY
Entered '21, Swimming '25, Junior Chamber Entered '21, Annual Staff '25, Manager of
of Commerce. Basket Ball Team '25, Junior Chamber
of Commerce
GORDON KELLER HARRIS
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA DELMA LEE BRAZIER
Entered '23, Class Swimming Team, Treaus- LAKEWOOD, OHIO
urer of Civic League, Vice-President Entered '23, Junior Woman's Club, Junior
of Junior Carreno Club. Chamber of Commerce.
CAMILLA PARSONS MARY LOUISE MOODY
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
WASHINGTON, D. C.STLOI,*MSUR
Entered '22. Entered '21, Junior Woman's Club, Junior
Chamber of Commerce.
HERBERT HAROLD WHITNEY CLARK HARRIS CHAMBERS
NEW YORK, NEW YORK OWASSO, MICHIGAN
Entered '21, Foot Ball '23 '24, Base Ball Entered '22, Hi-Y, Track '23, Annual Staff
'23 '24. Senior Play.
Forty-s even




THOMAS McDEVITT KENNETH PAYTON
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA CLEVELAND, OHIO
Entered '21. Entered '25, Senior Play Musician, Senior
Orchestra.
DEWITT JACKSON DORIS IRENE RANGER ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS Entered '21, Hi-Y, Junior Chamber of
Entered '24. Commerce.
JACK ROWE "KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE Entered. '23, Base Ball '24 '25.
ROBERT CERMAK CLEVELAND, OHIO Entered '21, Annual Staff, Hi-Y '25, Scholarship Club '24.
Forty-eight




WILLIAM POTTER LAWRENCE POWERS
WEST FIELD, NEW YORK WEST FIELD, NEW YORK
Entered '20, Foot Ball 4 years, Basket Ball Entered '22.
'24, Base Ball '24.
WHITNEY WOLFE WILLARD FREDRIKSEN
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS
Entered '20, Foot Ball 4 years, Chamber of Entered '23, Junior Chamber of Commerce
Commerce 2 years, Senior Play, Hi-Y. '24, Orchestra
SForty-nine




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Juniors
F ALL the years of a High School career the Junior year is perhaps, the most enjoyed, since by that time almost every one has lost his freshman timidity and "greenness," but has not yet acquired the solemn dignity of a senior.
For the first time the class as a whole 7 appears to be imbued with a spirit of ambition and a love of conquest that is interesting to behold. In each is born the longing to achieve, to overcome, to subdue, and the realization of the joy of life. They begin to have a vision that lures them onward to greater accomplishments, LOIS CURTIS GEIGER that calls out all their pluck and will to
Adviser make them real.
A Junior dreams of himself as graduating and he buckles down to his elementary studies with a vim that is sure to make that dream come true.
We are looking then, for great things from the Juniors, and if their present spirit is any indication of what they will do next year, and all the other years to come, old St. Pete High will surely have reason to be proud of them.
IARRY McCARDELL MARGARET PEARCE KENNETH JONES AUSTIN WILDER1
President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer
Fifty-two




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Sophomores
i 5 HE Sophomores as a class -can be easily
compared not to one of those expensive and luxurious foreign made cars but to one of those rattling good Fords which runs merrily up and down the streets of any town. It is just such a car as this that once started on a journey. At the wheel was none other than Louis Adcock, who received emphatic instructions from Mrs. Bose, who, with her many children sat. on the back seat.
The hood of the car covered a combination of machinery, some parts of which worked perfectly, while others functioned only occasionally. After running several weary months, the occupants found that the old and worn parts would have to be mended or replaced. They knew that in order to overcome the difficulties of the trip. JEANNE C. BOSE all parts would have to co-operate.
Adviser
The car soon came to what was known as the Class Dues Detour. It passed through this with little difficulty, even going ahead of several, who were stalled there. Further on it came to a long steep hill called Basket Ball Mountain. The little flivverr," although chugging and grunting tremendously, finally went over the top with flying colors, still intact and whole. If this car with its fine lea rship and engine of co-operative students keeps up its present pace, St. Petersburg igh School will have just cause to be proud of the Class of '27.
LOUIS ADCOCK MAUDE DEW CHARLENE HALL IARIAN STENACHER
President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer
Fifty-six




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Football
c@IGHT years of football coaching after his graduation from Wabash College had been the record of Coach "Mac" McKinney before his coming to St. Petersburg. He had graduated from Shortridge High School at Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1908, and had entered Wabash the following fall as football coach. After two successful years there, Mr. McKinney was appointed head coach of the Rose Polytechnic Institute at Terre Haute, where he supervised the coaching of football, basketball and baseball. Later he left Rose Polytechnic and commenced a career of playing and coaching professional football. In 1919 Mr. McKinney gave up coaching and went into business, in 1923 he came to St. Petersburg where soon he became interested in the real estate business. Last spring the High School baseball team found itself without a coach, until Mr. McKinney generously volunteered his services. The following fall he was secured to coach the Green Devils through what proved to be one of the most successful and commendable records that have ever been established in St. Petersburg High School football. During the spring of 1925, Coach McKinney again coached the baseball COACH MeKINNEY team with the same success that he has met in all his
athletic experiences.
t9e
Sixty




Football
HERE have been Green Devils before, and there will
be Green Devils to come, but never will there be a team of Green Devils that can surpass the boys of 1924 for sheer fighting spirit and football skill combined. And not the least of these boys of 1924 is their husky, fearless, and hard-working captain, "Hops" Pheil. In the brief few months that he was at the head of the St. Pete warriors he set a record that perhaps may be surpassed, but never forgotten, and he made a name for himself in Green and White athletics that will be recalled as long as the Green Devils exist.
Pheil was elected captain for the past season by the letter men of last year. Their choice was based upon his previous three years of playing on the team and upon his consistently dependable work. Throughout the entire 1924 schedule, "Hops" proved himself to be a capable leader, distinguished as much for CAPTAIN PIJEIL
his generosity and good sportsmanship as for his skill and perseverence. Such players as Captain Pheil are truly a credit to the school whose honor and glory they maintain.
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Sixty-o7




- '7C
CAPT. PHIEL BROWN WHITNEY PHIEL
Dear Mose:
I expect that you still rekollects them boys which plays football down in old St. Pete High; Green Devils they calls them, on account of how they usually starts out with knowing nothing and ends up with knowing just about twice as much. Well, them boys what played in 1924 may have been dumb to look at, but they sure did know their avocado pairs when it come to passing the pill and bucking the line. They went through the line like a two-ton shell through a cheese-cloth fence, and that's some wenting, take it from me.
Big "Hops" Pheil was captain of the crew and "Mac" McKinney was their coach, and "Mac" ain't no dwarf, neither. The fact is that the only coach I ever saw that was bigger than "Mac" is already owned by the A. C. L. The Green Devils' first antagonistics was Sacred Heart, but to tell you what happened I sure ain't got the heart, and they didn't neither after they squirmed off from the fray without no heart atall and only one lung. But like old Bolognaous in "Hamlet" says, I'll be brief. They received the spare tire while we was running up the thirteen. Some bum luck, wasn't it?
Next shot we run up against Hillsborough, that little burg across the bay, and our boys not having hit their best stride, there wasn't nothing to do but rush out with thirteen shiny counters on a tray and ask the Terriers to help thereselves. The official
Sixty ytwo




1A
LATHAM BROWN ROSS COSS
score was 13 to 6, Hillsborough's flavor. What'd I say about thirteen and bum luck? The next week after, Bartow came down from the mountains and it seemed that they brought all their ancestors to play with them, from their grand-daddies back to Joner and his pet shark,. At any rate they certainly did asphyxiate "Hops" and his gentle playmates, leaving us with the goose-fruit, while they walked off with twenty-six perfectly good points. Talk about stealing bases in baseball; why this was grand larceny.
About this time things began to stir up a bit. "Mac" and "Hops" must have decided that there weren't no use of dropping games like that, when they could be won about as easy. Anyway everybody that boasted the Green Devilishness atall began to pick up. Between other things, young Angelfood (Goodbread they call him) commenced to tearing down the green, with the pigskin in one paw and a piledriver's push in the other. The team what had been bulldozed by Bartow wasn't any more like the one that squashed Ocala, than the hardboiled man in the moon is like the Prince of Wails. Speaking about Ocala reminds me. Our outfit sauntered up-state to that lowly village, a couple of weeks after the Bartow free-for-all, as full of determination to win as the proverbial dog is full of his proverbial fleas. And after the first two minutes of play there weren't no more doubt about who was going to win than there was decimal points in Ocala's final score. Needles to relate, St. Pete copped the skurmish to the fairy tale of 27 to 0. That settled Ocal
Sx-r
Sixty~tTre




HEWITT CALLENDER McVEY PRESTMAN
Followin' Ocala, the next on the docket was Bradenton, that little town down the coast which has the 'w' strucken out. She came up as Bradenton, but she went back like a ton of waterlogged lead. Nevertheless, whichever way she went back, as town or ton, she sure did have her spirits trailing, and she didn't bust no bottle of pre-war either. The truth is, if it must be out ,that the Green Devils donated the inside of the doughnut to Bradenton, while they was nabbing 28 markers and 11 cauliflower ears for theirselves.
By this time the habit of winning had sorta fixed itself on our boys, there being only one thing on old terra firma that could stop 'em, which I will discourse on at some length later on. But for the time being, Orlando didn't have no more chance against the Green Devils than a feeble excuse has with the skipper. So when the Tigers came down to Waterfront Park with fifteen hunks of bacon already cut and fried for our boys, all she got was just about half of what's inside a vacuum cleaner. The Orlando congregation came down like Tigers but went back like half-hearted felines of the younger generation.
Next on the bill of fare was Duval. Ten million agonies! The Green Devils went up the line with fond hopes for the championship. But all they got was sore linaments and busted shin-bones. They sure did put up one grand scrap but they wasn't just quite avordupois enuff to mash Duval like they had sat on Ocala and Bradenton.
X/
fij-' -,Sixty-four




GOODBREAD POTTER HENSON WOLFE
Anyway they got the best claim to second place and that ain't so bad. The final count was 15 to 7.
But tell me they wasn't mad when they went down to Fort Meyers on Thanksgiving, they made such an assault that they battered down the fortifications and took the place by surprise. Talk about fighting spirit, why them boys was raving maniacs. They wiped up on everything attall connected with Fort Meyers to the tune of 14 to 7. We was about to think that everything was over for the season when in comes the news that the highly tooted Maroons from West Palm Beach was craving action. They sure got it; action ain't no name for it. They may have been West Palm Beach when they got here, but they was East Bound Palm Beach when our men got hold of them. We pulled down 28 markers. West Palm Beach also played. Well, Mose, that just about winds it all up. Them 28 to 0 scores speak for themselves. If you want to know who all them boys was what played for St. Pete, you'll find their pictures somewheres in this here volume. Scratch around for yourself.
Yours respectfully,
EBENEEZER.
Sixty-fiAe




Boys' Basketball
ASKETBALL, in St. 'Pete' High reached its 4SI highest point of success, during the season of
the present year. Neerbefore, since the game was introduced into the school, has a team lasted' through as mnaseight games and suff ered only a single defeat, as did, Coach Johns' Green and White court stars of 1925. And never before has a St. Petersburg basketball squad been justified in going -to a state, tournament'. While the highest possible recognition, the state chainpionship, was not attained, still the 1925 season wsthe most successful and noteworthy of all those in the history of St. Pete High. A full share of the credit for the team's accom-, plishme nt must go to Keith Johns, coach. It is ~ ,.<:1.alone significant that, having material not out..standingly better than that of the past, he was Sable to direct the boys through a schedule that speaks for itself. He seemed to fix in the Green Devils his own trait, of pure fighting spirit.
CAPTAIN THURSTON Captain Joe Thurston,. at the same time the
smallest and most aggressive man on the squad, made an admirable leader for an outfit that had, to rely solely upon out-witting and out-fighting to score over a formidable opponent. He was always the very -stimulus of his men, a stellar player who has never been thwarted by the enormity of his adversaries or the amount of -their score. If anyone ever deserved a commendation for only the bravest and -most unselfish fighting spirit in the athletics of the Green and White, that person is most assuredly the captain of the 1925 basketball team. The Green Devils took a late start, their first game not occurring until the latter part of
*.~...!




Boys' Basketball
January, at which time they journeyed down-state to Bradenton, winning in this initial encounter by the very close score of 12 to 11. Returning home for their second centest, they sent the Tarpon Springs aggregation down with a much more promising score, taking the lead early in the game and maintaining their superiority throughout all four quarters, to wind up with the overwhelming A
majority of 33 to 11. Perhaps the greatest surprise of the entire season came when the Hillsborough Terriers romped over to the High School auditorium, expecting the easiest victory of their careers. What they actually received was the greatest whipping that St. Pete High has ever handed them; in fact, the only one that the Green Devils has registered against them since 1922. The alumni, Eustis, Tarpon Springs, and Hillsborough all fell, some of them for their second time this season. Clearwater alone was able to stand the gaff against our boys, and by a queer twist of fortune, she won, 14 to 12. With such a good record to back them up, the COACH JOHNS
Green Devils entered the state tournament at Gainesville. But, as Lady Luck would have it, the first one that they ran up against was Duval, and the funeral dirge was played to the tune of 29 to 11. Nevertheless, the boys of 1925 have the finest reason in the world to be proud of their record, the cleanest slate that has ever, as yet, been shown by the Green Devils of St. Pete High.
. ixty-seven




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Girls' Basketball
~IRLS' basketball during the year 1925 was eone of the queerest things that ever hit St.
Pete High.. The Green Angels, coached
by Mr. C. M. Alexander, new athletic trainer of the High School, went through a season that was perfect with only one exception. Every game that was played during the entire schedule was an easy victory for the Green and White aggregation. But there was a single error in the year s playing; that was the fact that the majority of St. Pete's foes were easy meat, teams in the vicinity of St. Petersburg which could not offer sufficient opposition to our stars to enable them
to remain in top notch form. How could our C. i. ALEXANDER
girls be expected to be at their very best at the
time they went to the state championship tournament, after having slid through a schedule of soft snaps? They needed strong fighting opposition from the start. Coach Alexander proved himself to be one of the most capable and eager coaches that ever trained a team for St. Pete High. He produced the most skillful, hardest fighting, and smoothest working girls' basket squad in the history of the school.
Captain "Peggy" Zierden was a phenomenon, the most brilliant and skillful player that Green and White fans had ever seen in action.
In action she was the calmest player of the sextet; she hooped the sphere from all angels on the court, she broke through the enemy's defense for score after score. Needless to remark, she was a unanimous choice for the all-state team.
Mary Louise Squier, jumping-center and always the hardest fighting player on the court, was a member of the outfit who could never be rendered too much praise. When it came to pure downright
clean scrapping, Mary was certainly there.
Sixty-nine




Girls' Basketball
Celia Lowe, forward; Dolly Palmer, runningcenter; "Winnie" Walker, guard, and Clifford Moody, guard, were all court stars of the highest possible calibre. Catherine Batts, Frieda Klauman, Ruth Osborn, Catherine Long, Ethel Kelley, and Hickman were dependable substitutes,
who played the game well.
AThe Green Angels went through the season like
a greased meteor, (Sarasota 42 to 20), the alumni (48 to 8), Bradenton (38 to 8 and 36 to 10), Kissimmee (27 to 15 and 21 to 11), Hillsborough (48 to 4 and 20 to 11), Ocala (35 PEGGY ZIERDEN tO 8), Sarasota (38 to 18), and Clearwater (26 Captain to 16) all fell like molten lead, giving the girls
the distinction of going to the tournament at Deland with a spotless slate. But there our fair maidens fell into evil clutches. Their first game was snatched by Palatka to the aria of 25 to 23. But renewed hope came when Bartow was eradicated by a 48 to 12 count, a hortlived hope that was dispelled when Gainesville trounced the Green Angels something like 39 to 36. Yet Captain Zierden was awarded a position on the first allstate and Mary Louise Squier was made captain of the second allstate.
It was surely the most brilliant season that St. Petersburg girls' basketball has ever experienced.
Sedvent




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Boys Swimming
6U NDER the leadership of Captain Paul Board.man, coached by Mr. Howland, and managed by Mr. Lawrence, owner of the Spa, the boys' swimming team produced a number of the most accomplished water stars that have ever swum for the Green and White. Preeminent among these -spray splashers were Jack Hall, who repeatedly lowered his marks in the 100 yard dash; Billy Buhner, who did the same in the 50 yard-dash, and Captain.
Boardman. Other boys, who did not quite equal the records of the above mentioned swimmers, but who were highly essential to Petersburg's aquatic prestige were William Erickson, Willis Yeamans, Clyde Haggerty, Archie McClatchie, Carey Jacobus, Earnest Humphries, Wayne Campbell, and Wilbur Norton.
But the efforts of all of these could not sum up to the utmost without the generous and continual assistance, both financial and moral, of Mr. Lawrance, who financed the trip to the meet, acted as manager to the team, and gave the freedom of the use of the Spa to all of the
CAPTAIN High School's side-wheelers. For a number of years past, he has
B OARDMAN shown only the most helpful interest in both the boys' and girls'
swimming teams.
It was the combined energies of all who assisted in the training of first-class squads for St. Pete High that made possible the splendid record that was achieved in 1925.
7 ,~
.94,
Seetytw




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Girls' Swimming
N St. Petersburg High School athletics,
swimming, of both boys and girls, has for some time occupied a major position. Almost every year either the boys' team or the girls' team has taken the state championship, and neither of them has ever failed to acquit itself in an-admirable fashion. Swimming and football have been the two branches of sport that have at all times received the entire backing of the student body.
Every year it is due almost solely to the efforts of Coach 4 Howland that S. P. H. S. is able to make the splendid showings that she does. With each succeeding school term, he must break in and train new and often wholely green tank stars. But the effective manner in which he does this is a credit to even his own coaching ability.
This year Coach Howland's female human fishes included Captain Thursba Whitaker, Harriet Provost, Mary Bullard, Helen Boardman, Mary Ruth Sanford, Maude Dew, Ruth Hohman, Claire Quick, Louise Hitchner, Phoebe Longman, Betty Miller, Mary CAPTAIN WHITAKER Elizabeth Hansen, Ruth Cole and Bobbie Gilford.'
And Swim? Why, there wasn't enough water in all the seven seas and the Atlantic ocean to boot, to stall these girls. They just waded through like a revenue cutter. And when it came to diving? Well, there were divers reasons for saying that they were the divenest divers that ever dived. Here's hoping that the girls' swimming teams to come will show the same skill and grit for which the girls of 1925 were famed.
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Boys' Base Ball
Dear Mose:
Seeing as how I wrote you an epistle some time since about our football team down here at St. Pete High, I thought show I might just about as well write one about our baseball outfit too, specially since the editor of this here book has told me to. Well, I'll tell you right now, them boys what plays baseball ain't hardly got started yet, and the above stated editor has ordered me to get my copy in by today, so there ain't nothing much for me to do but sling a wicked line about something that hasn't happened yet. I ain't never been strong for prognosticating, but I guess I'll have to do some now. Anyway, here goes.
Ever since the boys what plays the grand old national pastime first got started, they had a whole lot of trouble trying to get a diamond to play on. For several years they didn't have no more diamond than a ten-cent store COACH McKINNEY ring has, but this year they was lucky enuff to get to use
the grounds where the big bambino and all the rest of the Yankees hung out during the early spring. And man, what a difference it made. Compared with our boys, "Babe" Ruth and his sickly friends loked like mere protegees. That Crescent Lake diamond is a real gem, and it sure ain't in the ruff neither.
Well them Green and White apple slammers sure knows their commodities when it comes to playing baseball. What they don't know about baseball, Darwin don't know about marmosets. They was just naturally born with spikes on their shoes and a eagle eye for the pill.
To tell the truth, them Green Devil baseball sharks never was very bum, but this year they was per excellence. The way they run bases would have made Man-o-War feel like a battering-ram. They run so fast after batting the sphere over the pitcher's head, they got knocked over by it at second base. They slammed home-runs so far that they had to postpone one game two weeks to get the ball back. And the way their pitchers worked was a revolution. They wound up like a fishing reel but let loose like a couple of hundred machine-guns. They made the bat- "BIG BAMBINO"
Sev~enty-six




Boys Base Ball
ters swing so wild that they tore out their shoulder-blades every time they came to bat. Tell me they couldn't play baseball, cause they took to the game like a laundryman takes to Ma Gone.
McKinney was their coach again and what he ain't aware of about baseball, Tie Cobb won't never know. He can coach at baseball just as good as he can at football, which ain't saying just a little bit.
Byrd Latham was the captain this year and what I mean to tell you he ain't no easy bird. Fact is he's the old original early bird when it comes to piling up winning scores. He and the rest of the Green Devils certainly were acquainted with their stuff, especially the stuff that they put on the old onion. As I quoted prematurely, I don't know what I'm slinging the ink about, but let's hope that I ain't told no lies.
Permiscuously, CAPTAIN LATHAM
EBENEEZER.
Sevaenty-s even




Track
ANRACK! It is a foreign word to many-ears that are parked for nine months of each year in old St. Pete High. Track! Methinks I have heard the term before., Track! Ah, yes, track. Eureka, now I have it. Track! 'Tis that upon which Goodbread's mighty cohorts have run. True, true, 'tis true, 'tis track. Yo, ho, and a bottle of, Sloan's linament, by the sign of the fiery cross. The backing that Petersburg gives to track is enough to make any hale old Grecian discus thrower get curvature of the spine. About all that track consists of in S. P. H. S. is for some ten to twenty intrepid young men to get out and work their heads off for a month or two and then to go up-state and win as much as they can. But they have been handicapped by not having adequate training facilities in the past, a lack which we hope will be better remedied in the future.
Notwithstanding their set-back, the track men of 1925 accomplished some worthwhile things, and at the state meet they represented their school well. Coached by Mr. Fortier, they CAPTAIN have done their best to uphold the dignity of their school in
GOODBREAD spite of the deficient equipment and training grounds. Royce
Goodbread was the one to keep the old Greek games going in St. Pete High. Fellows who backed him up in his purpose were John Ross, Kenneth Reed, Vernon Blanton, Harry McCardle, Donald Link, Hollis Packard, Darrel Jordon, Charles Bochterle, Dave Ross, Herbert Ladd, Walter Jenkins and Joe Thurston.
Seventy- eight




Tennis
5ENNIS is a sport that has never been over-popular in St. Pete High. Interest in it has
always been limited to a very few ardent net fans, who, with practically no backing or assistance from the student body, have been engrossed and earnest in their determinaiton to put St. Petersburg High School on the state tennis map. It is due to the work of this small group of boys and girls that S. P. H. S. has made any tennis record at all.
During the 1924-25 school year, a number of matches were arranged with both Hillsborough and Clearwater, resulting, in most instances, in victories for the Green and White pellet pushers. The first of these, which was contested with Hillsborough, was taken, 4 to 1. After this initial triumph, the boys took on Clearwater, who fell just as easily by a 3 to 1 count. By this time Hillsborough had recuperated from her stinging defeat, and, with an over-powerful determination for vengeance, she administered a sound drubbing to the Petersburg net stars, taking three matches to their two. Shortly afterward, our boys duplicated their original feat against Clearwater, with a 3 to 2 score. While these four matches were only a part of the entire season's play, they satisfactorily indicate what the Green and White tennis players were capable of doing. The boys who represented the school on the courts throughout the year were Jim Vuille, captain and star singles and doubles player, Ralph LeNeave, James Olson, Hamilton Yancy, and Henry Kelley. Their most formidable doubles combination was composed of Vuille and LeNeave, who together pulled some of the finest doubles team work that local High School tennis has ever seen. Olson and Kelley formed the other doubles pair that turned in frequent victories. In the singles matches, Yancy, LeNeave and Vuille were all effective, winning by far more often than they lost.
The successful season which these boys experienced is made little short of remarkable by the fact that, during the whole time of their playing, they had no regular coach to point out their errors and to train them in technique, which amounts to a great deal in the game of tennis. What victories they won were altogether due to their own ability and hard work.
... ....-.




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PALMETTO AND PINE
( HE start that the Palmetto and Pine made this year was about as feeble as
Custer's last stand. The editorial "we" of course had to go through the usual formality of appealing to the school spirit of his fellow-students, with his knees clicking like a pair of ivories. After the first four or five issues, the students got used to having the paper come out a couple of days late each week. From force of habit some of them haven't called for their second week's paper yet.
However, after a while things began to work a little more smoothly and the scholastic organ would arrive at least by four o'clock in the afternoon, whereupon about half of the students would flock to the counter, procure a copy, look to see if their names appeared on the joke page, and if not, promptly throw it away. The only features of the paper that they ever looked at were the jokes and Jimmie Cooper's cartoons. We'll have to admit, though, that we did get a lot of pleasure and sometimes hearty fun, out of writing the paper up each week, even if no one ever did bother much about it. But we certainly can't righteously blame them if they were fond of using it for wrapping paper.
We want to thank the few students on the staff who stood by us through thick and thin (mostly thick) and also the ones whose pictures are on the next page but who never did a lick of work in their lives. We are also very appreciative to the many students who have made the paper a possibility through their continued interest and backing. We believe that it has been said that we have done a fairly good job with the Palmetto and Pine this year, but to us it has been all grammatical mistakes, misprints, and typographical errors.
DUDLEY E. BREWER.
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Dudley Brewer Lois Stewart Richard Fraze
Editor Adviser Business Manager
Eight y-tcwo




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PALMETTO AND PINE
Eighty-three




NO-SO-WE-EA
JE should, perhaps, use this page for thanking the rest of 'the staff, the
entire student body, our engravers, printers, and all the rest of themsince it is customary-for their loyalty, interest and support. However, we'd rather tell you about us not because you want to know, but because we want to tell you.
Four weary, though interesting months have been spent compiling the volume you are now reading, or maybe, just gazing through. We have labored over it, sweatwe don't mean 'perspired either-over it and blessed it in and out. If we could have gone without sleep for a week at a time, we might have been able to have got it out sooner. As it is, several perfectly good dispositions have been hopelessly ruined. Even our adviser so far succumbed to the general atmosphere of despair as to exclaim "Well, for cryin' aloud" and "Dog-gone-it anyway.
Speaking seriously, we really have tried to make the book representative of the entire school. It isn't just what we want it to be, of course-the natural perversity of human nature prevents that-but we've made an honest effort. If you like it we're glad-if you don't like it we're too tired to care very much.
Au revoir,
HENRIETTA NICHOLS.
Clifford Ray Joe Fielding Henrietta Nichols
Editor usine~s Manager Assistant Editor
Eighty-four




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President ......................................................................................... Elizabeth Spofford
Vice-President........................................................................................ Margaret' Mevis
Secretary ....................... ..................................................... I................. Kitty Dunlap
Treasurer...................................................... ...................................... Helen Marshall
HIS club is composed of High School girls of the Sophomore, junior and Senior Classes.
~(5 Meetings are held each week at the Y. W. C. A. building, or the club house.' Many
profitable as well as enjoyable times are had by the members of this club.
The Be Square Club endeavors to *piomote a friendly feeling among the girls of the High School and they are -always ready to render any service to the school and the community. Under the efficient leadership of Miss Charlotte Pigott, this club has had a very successful year. The various activities of the club are carried on by special committees, -whose chairmen are as follows:
Program...................................................................................... ......... Margaret Lloy
Service ...................................................... ................ ................. Mary Carter Osborne
Membership ................... ...............I........... ................ I........................ Margaret" Mevis
Social................................................................ ................................. Doris Hamilton




Hi-Y Club
( EGINNING the year 1924-25 under the leadership of Donald Cushman, president;
Dudley Brewer, vice-president; Harold Davis, secretary; Richard Fraze, treasurer, and Dewitt Jackson, chaplain, the Hi-Y Club launched out upon an active season's work and a school term of successful endeavor to carry out the purpose of the club, which is "to create, maintain, and extend, throughout the school and community, the highest standards of Christian character."
Directed by two helpful friends, Doctor Gorsuch, adviser, and Gilbert Bush, secretary of the Young Men's Christian Association, the Hi-Y boys accomplished a number of worthwhile achievements during the year. Among the most noteworthy of these were the record-breaking attendance at the annual Older Boys' Conference at Bartow, the alumni reunion banquet, at which all the former St. Petersburg Hi-Y boys renewed old acquaintances during the Christmas holidays, and the excellent work which was volunteered by the club during the city-wide Y. M. C. A. building fund campaign in March.
The Hi-Y Club will continue, throughout succeeding years, to maintain its reputation as one of the most worthy of school and community organizations. The following Were members of the club during the 1924-25 year: Donald Cushman, Dudley Brewer, Harold Davis, Richard Fraze, Jack Miller, James Olson, James Vuille, Richard Atwood, Morrison Pearce, Carey Jacobus, Dewitt Jackson, John Bliss, James Riddle, Harold Anderson, Tom Gramling, Joe Fickling, Harry McCardell, Kenneth Jones, Clark Chambers, William Mulhollem, Frank Phipps, William Buhner, James Cooper, Charles Haire, Henry Ohrns, Ralph Stewart, George Smith, Jessel Setzer, Marshall Mansfield, Robert Cermak, Preston Johnson, Eugene Bogert, Gould Curtis, Alden Pemble, Jack Rowe, Howard Wallace, Robert Burklew, Gordon Wright, Wyatt Dame, Kenneth Moore, Joe Thurston, Austin Wilder, Robert Saylor, John Lynch, and Walter Johnson.
Eighty-eight




Athletic Association
S0 other organization in the St. Petersburg High School has given the continued backing to clean athletics that 4
the Athletic Association has unceasingly offered. Under the leadership of Donald Cushman, president, Morrison Pearce, vicepresident, Mary Bullard, secretary, and Harry McCardell, treasurer, the association has virtually kept progressive athletic competition
alive.
St. Pete High is one of the very few schools of the state in which athletic organizations foster and maintain sports of every kind. How admirably the association has accomplished this in the local school is clearly illustrated by the fact that, at the beginning of the year, it faced a deficit of over three hundred dollars.
Now, this has been paid and with the aid of the civic clubs, notably the American
Legion, all athletic activities have been financed and no debts left on hand.
Football, as everywhere, has been the most popular and best supported of the high school sports. The Athletic Association this year has been able to finance football, basket ball, track, swimming, baseball and tennis teams that rank with the best in
the state.
The Athletic Association has collected approximately $5,000 and financed all the games, leaving neither a surplus nor a deficit. We have not spent as much as we would have liked to on seme of the sports because it is a plan of the Athletic Association never to have a deficit at the close' of the season.
The membership this year has been tripled although there is still room for improvement. The larger the membership, the better the school spirit. It creates enthusiasm, and becomes an advertising asset to the school and also to the city.-Thus ends a most
successful athletic year.
DONALD CUSHMAN HARRY M'CARDELL MORRISON PEARCE MARY BULLARD
President Treasurer Vice-President Secretary
" Eighty-nine




The Junior Chamber of Commerce
(5HE Junior Chamber of Commerce, organized in 1922, which was the -first of its kinc
in America to become officially recognized as an auxiliary body of a Senior Chambel of Commerce, entered' upon its third year of existence with the determination to carr3 on the splendid work done by the past clubs and to make the club of '25, through its many activities, one never to be forgotten in the history of the school.
The first event of the season was the task of entertaining three hundred members of the Florida Educational Association who met here in September in a three day session.
The weeks following were spent in preparation for the "Hallowe'en Carnival" the event which marks the formal opening of the tourist season in St. Petersburg. Here the Chamber co-operated with the senior body toward the success of the parade and also took complete charge of the sale of confetti and novelties.
On the night of November the fourth, coffee and sandwiches were sold by the organization at the City Hall, where the Election Returns were being received. Again during November the club was given an opportunity to render service to the community, this time assisting the Florida Art School in its observance of National Picture Week. Every civic organization and every school in St. Petersburg was visited by speakers from the club. Honorable mention was made to National Headquarters for the way in which this duty was performed.
The Clean-Up Week conducted in January by the High School Chamber Of Commerce proved that in future years every week will be made a clean-up week by each student. Many duties about the building were successfully performed by the organization in its attempt to make S. P. H. S. the most beautiful school in Florida.
Several two-act plays were presented to the public which netted a fair return in a financial way. The final and largest task of the year came with the Festival of States Celebration in which the High School Chamber of Commerce played a prominent part.
Officers
President ..................................... ... JOE FICKLING
V ice-President .......................................................................... TOM G RAM LING
Secretary... .................................................................................E VELYN W H ITE
T reasurer .................................................................................. W HITNEY W OLF
Board of Governors
DON CUSHMAN GORDON WRIGHT EDWIN PRICE
AUSTIN WILDER MARGARET PEELER LINA KING
JACK MILLER DICK FRAZE LYNDA WALKER
R. E. JONES FRANK PHIPPS MARY BULLARD
CHARLES HAIRE EARLE OSBORNE DORIS DEW
WINIFRED WALKER
Ninety




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Scholarship Club
"The Club The School Delights to Honor"
In order to be a member of the Scholarship Club, students must have a general average of A.
SENIORS JUNIORS SOPHOMORES
MARTHA HENRY EDNA KEEFE CHARLENE HALL
RUTH C. SMITH LORA KERR FREDA KLAUMAN
BERTHA WESTFIELD HARRIET PROVOST LARUE STRINGER
JACK MILLER JOHN LYNCH PAULINE BANYA
CLEATIE TROSPER JIM VUILLE IRENE GAUDREAU
CLIFFORD RAY HARRY McCARDELL MILDRED HODNETT
KATHRYN HOPKINS HILDA MILLER WINIFRED BECK
AGNES WALKER MAGDALENA VANDERLYN HORACE WILLEY
JEAN HITCHNER LIDA CADUGAN GARDNER LEWIS
FLORENCE WALTON
Ninety-two




Tuesday Morning Clubs
A novel feature, the Tuesday Morning Clubs, was introduced in our school for the first time, this year. It was a unique idea that has proven extraordinarily successful in promoting an enthusiasm and interest among the students in vital subjects.
In these organizations the students were given special advantages not to be found in the ordinary school curriculum and since credit towards graduation was to be given on the same basis as the other school subjects they were indeed popular.
The clubs met once a week at chapel time and discussed certain phases of art, music, current events, social problems, etc. Their aim being always to arouse the initiative and response and to reveal the hitherto undiscovered powers of those students who have thus far been merely drifting, routeless and without a goal.
Although these clubs have been successful, they still have a tremendous field in which to enlarge their scope. They can be made a powerful factor for influencing students to lead four-square lives.
A great deal of credit is due the members of the factulty who sponsored these organizations and succeeded in making them such an interesting and delightful part of our school life.
The Orchestra
The High School Orchestra was, after some delay, reorganized last fall under the able leadership of Goodridge M. Greer. Its membership jumped from thirty to sixty almost over night and the rehearsal room soon became inadequate for such a large band of musicians. The orchestra consisted of a large number of extraordinarily talented players and in less than one month after its organization it was being enjoyed in the regular chapel exercises and at various social and business functions. The orchestra has proven a most essential part of our school and its director and members deserve a great deal of credit for its success.
: : Ninety- three




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Full Text

PAGE 5

“Oh, you Four Winds that blow so strong And know that this is true. Stoop for a little and carry my song To all the men 1 knew!”

PAGE 7

I A 1

PAGE 8

Como Sembra, Como Cosecha.

PAGE 9

NO-SO-WE-EA Spanish Number

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(^Dedication TO VERA DUMAS JVho has believed in us, Guided us. And ever held us to our best, IVe Gratefully and lovingly Dedicate this volume. NO-SO-WE-EA 192 5 Six

PAGE 11

Seven

PAGE 12

OREWORD / N ST ITU T IONS, LIKE HUMAN BEINGS, HAVE PERSONALITIES, AND THE ST. PETERSBURG HIGH SCHOOL, GATHER ING, AS IT DOES, THE FAR CORNERS OF THE EARTH UNTO ITSELF, HAS AC QUIRED A PERSONALITY, RICH AND VARIED AND STIMULATING. THE NO-SO-WE-EA STAFF HAS EN DEAVORED TO PRODUCE A YEARBOOK THAT WOULD BE A TRUE RECORD OF THE COMPLEX ACTIVITIES OF SUCH A STUDENT GROUP. HEREIN WE HAVE TRIED TO GIVE A CONCRETE EXPRESSION OF THE LIFE AND CHARACTER OF THIS SCHOOL, TRUSTING THAT YOU MAY FIND IN IT A COMPOSITE PICTURE OF WHAT “ST. PETE" IS AND DOES AND STRIVES TO BE. Eight

PAGE 13

ORDER OF BOOKS Picture Section Classes Athletics Organizations Junior High Features Nine

PAGE 14

T en

PAGE 16

SHADOWS T
PAGE 17

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL Thit teen

PAGE 18

SPANISH DANCERS Fourteen

PAGE 19

Fifteen

PAGE 20

Sixteen

PAGE 21

Seventeen

PAGE 22

Eighteen

PAGE 23

GEORGE M LYNCH, Superintendent Our Captain—“He stands four square to all the winds that blow.” Nineteen __

PAGE 24

T wenty

PAGE 25

Twenty-one

PAGE 26

Faculty Roll Call ANNA APPLEBY, A. B., A. M. History Scarett Morrisville College T. J. WALKER English, History Southern Collegi? ALEXANDER McGILL, A. B. Mathema 1 ics, Science Randolph Macon College HAZEL II. WILLIAMS, B. C. S. Chairman Business Department State Normal School of Nehrasa. Nebraska University of Commerce. DOROTHY B. HARRISON, A. B. English University of Wisconsin AUGUSTA B. CENTER, B. S., M. A. English Emerson College of Oratory Columbia University. GEORE SI ME, A. B. History St. Olaf College University of Chicago. LOIS CURTIS GEIGER, A. B. Latin, English Piedmont College Columbia University. F. E. FORTIER, B. S. Mathematics, History, Science University of Maine. FRANCES L. WEST, B. A., M. A. Science Agnes Scott Columbia University. MARGARET G. WILDER, A. B. Mathematics University of Tennessee Columbia University University of Florida CORA NEELEY COFFEY, A. B. Chairman of History Dean of GirlsLiberty College University of Florida Chicago University LOIS STEWART, A. B. Chairman of English University of Indiana. DAISY BELLE JOHN, A. B., B. E„ B. D. A. Chairman Public Speaking University of West Virginia. American Academy. Flowers Academy. JEANNE C. BOSE French University of Indiana Wilson College W. M. WILLIAMS Manuel Training Advanced Specialist in Industrial Arts BEULAH W. FRANKLIN, A. B. Spanish University of Chicago EDITH FALIvENSTEIN, A. B. Mathematics West Virginia Wesleyan College MARTHE DETCIION, A. B. English, Latin Oberlin College JESSIE L. WILSON, A. B. Physical Training, English Davenport College University of Tennessee KENNETH LEWIS, E. E. Manuel Training, Mathematics Syracuse University C. M. ALEXANDER, Ph, Dir. Physical Director Southern Y. M. C. A. College • CHARLOTTE L. KING, B. P. D., B. S. Domestic Arts Michigan State Normal College Columbia University GLADYS R. GARDNER, A. B. English Florida State College for Women Columbia University PRICILLA LANE High School Secretary Florida State College for Women WINSTON W. LITTLE, B. S., A. B„ A. M. Chairman of Science Mississippi College Universiy of Chicago GOODRIDGE M. GREER, Mias. Bac. Music Lebanon Valley College Engle Conservatory RAVENNA ECKELS, B. S. Domestic Science Columbia University L. VINCENT MEAD, B. S. Mathematics Baldwin-Wallace College VERA MADGE DUMAS, A. B. Chairman of Latin Howard College University of Chicago JENNIE MILLER, B. S. Science Mississippi State College for Women University of Chicago MARGUERITE EDITH SUTTON Chairman Spanish Spanish Degree, T T n i versity of Porto Rico Richmond City Normal MARY JANE WILLIAMS, B. C. S. Commercial Work Bowling Green Business University Florida State College for Women GEORGE M. LYNCH, A. B. Psychology Florida Military College University of Florida Graduate Work, University of Florida Twenty-two

PAGE 28

Seniors OR four years this has been our home; here we have worked and played and lived together. Now, we must go our way* and the four years seem unbelievably brief,—like “Hail” and “Farewell.” Has this contact given us anything worth while? Has it enabled us to live more fully? Have we really achieved or have we only drifted with the tide? Have we acquired a point of view that will insure a successful future? As graduation day draws near not only do we view the past in loving retrospect but we wonder what the future has in store for us. Can we be blamed if in all our joyous anticipation, we have moments of doubt and fear as to how we shall relate ourselves to the new world stretched before us ? H ave we any right to expect the success we naturally desire? We believe that, to those who have faithfully and enthusiastically met all the petty details as well as the occasions of great moment, there has come a hardihood of spirit that will be unconquerable. We need not be afraid of this new life. If we have built well, there is nothing that we need fear, and if we hold the memory of St. Pete, its principles and ideals as our guiding star, we may go forth into the world, dauntless and unafraid. Senior Class Officers MORRISON PEARCE LYNDA WALKER MARGARET OGDEN FRANK PHIPPS Presient Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Twenty-four

PAGE 29

THOMAS PRESTON JOHNSON HENDERSONVILLE, KY. Entered Â’21, Hi-Y two years, Junior Cham ber of Commerce, Senior Play. WINIFRED WALKER JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Entered Â’21, Basket Ball, Junior Woman's Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Board of Governors Â’25. MYRTLE LEE BYRD FORT MYERS, FLA. Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce. WINIFRED LONG ROCHESTER, N. Y. Entered Â’23, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Tennis Club. LEROY C. LOVE WILLIAMSPORT, PENN. Entered Â’21, Senior Play. HELEN MOSER PERRYSBURG, OHIO Entered Â’22, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Senior Play. VEDA BONCILLE FOREMAN ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. Entered Â’21, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Class Basket Ball. ARMANDE BOWERS ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. Entered '21. Twenty-five

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LUCIAN HALL ASHLAND, KENTUCKY Entered Â’21, Palmetto and Pine Staff Â’23, Basket Ball Â’24. VERA MAE WESTMORELAND HEADLAND, ALABAMA Entered Â’24, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. HELEN GLADYS MARSHALL DETROIT, MICHIGAN Entered Â’22, Treasurer Be Square Club, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Senior Play. MARJORIE FANNING COLEY SAVANNAH, GEORGIA Entered Â’23. EARL ODOM ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. Entered Â’21. MYRTLE ALMA DURANT ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA Entered '20, Junior Chamber of Commerce. LINA MAE KING ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Board of Gov ernors, Annual Staff, Senior Play, Ticket Manager Â’24. MARGARET LENETTE LONGMIRE ANDERSONVILLE, TENNESSEE Entered Â’23. Twenty-six

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HENRY ORHNS DETROIT, MICHIGAN Entered Â’21, Treasurer Tennis Club Track Â’24, Hi-Y, Palmetto and Pine. Â’24, HERBERT MARS HICK DETROIT, MICHIGAN Entered Â’21. ELIZABETH ANNE BOYD COLUMBUS, OHIO Entered Â’22, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Senior Play, Girls Honor Council Â’24-Â’25. ISABEL LETITIA CRONKHITE BATTLECREEK, MICHIGAN Entered Â’21, Class Basket Ball, Junior Wo manÂ’s Club, Be Square EMMA LELA LIEGEROT PLATTE CITY, MISSOURI Entered Â’23, Orchestra Â’24. FAITH CUSHMAN SILVER CREEK, NEW YORK Entered Â’21. FRANK D. NOWLAND CINCINNATI, OHIO Entered Â’24. GARFIELD HENRY VAN DERLIP OAK PARK, ILLINOIS Entered Â’21. Twenty-seven

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WAYNE MOYER CORTLAND, NEW YORK Entered '24. HOWARD CRYAN HAVERHILL, NEW HAMPSHIRE Entered Â’23. ELINORE PERKINS WEARE OGUNQUITE, MAINE Entered Â’21. FRANCIS WILLIAMS BLACKDUCK, MINNESOTA Entered Â’24. DORIS HAMILTON LUELLA ALBRIGHT providence, rhode island Entered Â’24, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. ANDREW CUTHBERT WALKER PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’22, Chairman Senior Stage Com mittee. JESSEL SETZER ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21. T wenty-eight

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GEORGE PRINGLE MUSKOGEE, OKLAHOMA Entered Â’21. HENRIETTA NICHOLS ELYRIA, OHIO Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Assistant Editor The Annual Â’25, Be Square. ERNESTINE E. WHITTMEYER LAKELAND, FLORIDA Entered Â’23, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce. BONNEAU ANSLEY DECATUR, GEORGIA Entered Â’24. HAZEL FROST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS Entered Â’24. MARY C. FIELDS PORTLAND, MAINE Entered Â’22, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce. EVELYN WHITE ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Secretary Junior Chamber of Commerce, Vice-President Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Senior Play CLIFFORD RAY ROME, GEORGIA Entered Â’21, Annual Staff Â’24, Editor-inChief Â’25, Scholarship Club. Twenty-nine

PAGE 34

LOUIS LEISTINGER PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’21, Class Foot Ball Â’23, Basket Ball '24. ELIZABETH COBB DICKENSON MILFORD, VIRGINIA Entered Â’22, Senior Play. RUTH CAROLINE SMITH DELAWARE, OHIO Â’ Entered Â’21, Girls Honor Council 2 years, Palmetto and Pine Â’25, Senior Play, Secretary Class '24. DONALD S. CUSHMAN EVANSTON, ILLINOIS Entered 21, President Hi-Y Â’25, President Athletic Association '25, Annual Staff Â’25, Senior Play. // THOMAS GRAMLING ATLANTA, GEORGIA Entered Â’21, Vice-President Junior Chamber of Commerce, Senior Play, Annual Staff, Hi-Y Â’24-Â’25. MARY FRANCIS BETHEL PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’22, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Annual Staff. BERTHA WESTFIELD ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’22, Scholarship Club. CATHERINE REICHARD McCAULEY HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND Entered Â’23, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Treas urer Â’25, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Senior Play, Palmetto and Pine. Thirty

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RICHARD CURRY BRADENTOWN, FLORIDA Entered Â’24. PHOEBE JANE CALKINS PITTSFIELD, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. ROWENA GERTRUDE BEVERLY OMEGA, GEORGIA Entered Â’24. LENORE PALMER KINGSPORT, TENNESSEE Entered Â’21, Be Square, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. THOMAS CHALFANT SOUTH BEND, INDIANA Entered Â’24. MARTHA TRICE HOPKINSVILLE, KENTUCKY Entered Â’24. THURSBA WHITAKER MORGANTOWN, INDIANA EnteredÂ’22, Swimming TeamÂ’24, CaptainÂ’25. HOWARD KEEFE WALLACE SWESSVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’21, Basket Ball. Thirty one

PAGE 36

BASCOMBE LANE RALPH ERASTUS STEWART ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’20. Entered Â’21. MARGARET ZIERDEN MEDIA, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’23, Basket Ball Â’24, Captain Â’25, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. DOROTHY ELIZABETH MULLIN PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’21, Senior Play. HAZEL LEE CALKINS MARY ELIZABETH DETTERICH BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21. Entered Â’21, Palmetto and Pine Staff Â’24, Assistant Editor Â’25. DUDLEY BREWER INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA Entered Â’23, Vice-President Hi-Y Â’25, EditorKATHLEEN LOCKHART in-Chief of Palmetto and Pine Â’25, meridan, Mississippi Sport Editor Annual Â’25. Entered Â’25. T fiirty-two

PAGE 37

CLITUS F. MOHR BELLEFONTAINE, OHIO Entered Â’24. MARIO LINDELE ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. Entered Â’21. VIVIAN LYNNETTE KROM ATLANTA, GA. Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Senior Play. MARY ELIZABETH HANSEN ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. Entered Â’21, Swimming Â’24, Palmetto and Pine Â’25, Junior Chamber of Com merce, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. MYRTLE MARIE WALLACE PITTSBURG, PA. Entered Â’24, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. IMOGENE DAVIS ELDORO, IND. Entered Â’24. OLIVIA ANNE SWIFT MT. VERNON, ILL. Entered Â’21, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Senior Play. MORRIS ROSENBURG JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Entered Â’22. i I T hirty-three

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LOY JONES RENARD, IOWA Entered Â’23. GEORGE BRANTLEY SMITH LAKE CITY, FLA. Entered Â’21. Orchestra 4 years, Hi-Y. JEWEL MILLS NEW CASTLE, IND. Entered Â’24. DORIS BLANCHE LEAKE HAMILTON, ONTARIO Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce. MARGARET LOIS DIETZ PITTSBURG, PENN. Entered Â’23, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. SIDNEY MAURINE FULLER ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. Entered '21, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. JOHN ASKEW ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. Entered Â’21, Senior Class Swimming Team. AGNES WALKER BRADDOCK, PENN. Entered Â’24. Thirty-four

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LEONARD GOULD LEOMINSTER, MASSACHUSETTS Entered Â’23. KENNETH FREESE EUSTIS, FLORIDA Entered Â’23. MILDRED WOODFORD ENDICOTT, NEW YORK Entered Â’22. CATHERINE LONG ROCHESTER, NEW YORK Entered *22, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Tennis Club, Basket Ball 3 Years, Be Square 3 Years. KATHRYN HOPKINS EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN Entered Â’24. CLEATIE MAE TROSPER BARBOURVILLE, KENTUCKY Entered Â’21, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Scholarship Club. JAY McVEY HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’21, Foot Ball Â’23-Â’24, Basket Ball Â’22, Hi-Y. EARL OSBORNE OCALA, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Business Manager of Senior Play. Thirty-jive

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LOYD BASSET NORWICH, NEW YORK Entered Â’23. CAREY JACOBUS BERONA, NEW JERSEY Entered Â’21, Orchestra 3 Years, Hi-Y. ROBERTA DAVIS ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21. ROUIE LUCILLE WARNER ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Palmetto and Pine Staff, Annual Staff Â’25, Be Square. NELLIE LUVINA BAILEY ASHTABULA, OHIO Entered Â’21, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior WomanÂ’s Club Â’25, Board of Governors. EDNA GLADYS BRYON ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce MARION BAKER ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21. ETHEL E. WILLIAMS NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce. Thirty-six

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BYRD LATHAM PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’21, Base Ball 3 years, Captain Â’25, Foot Ball 2 years. DORIS MORONG HAVERHILL, MASSACHUSETTS Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Senior Play. MARY WORKIZER ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce. ETHEL COPPINS ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21. CHARLES CHESTER ADAMS GOSHEN, INDIANA Entered Â’23. MARY ELIZABETH SPOFFORD ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’22, President Be Square, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce. MYRTLE TOMLINSON FRENCHTOWN, NEW JERSEY Entered Â’22, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior, Chamber of Commerce LETA LAVINIA CARTER VALDOSTA, GEORGIA Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Senior Play. Thirty-seven

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HAROLD DAVIS CHICAGO, ILLINOIS Entered Â’21, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Hi-Y. FERN HATFIELD OLLIE, MONTANA Entered Â’23. WALTER JENKINS ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Track Â’24, Basket Ball Â’24, Senior Play. NELL GRACE COOPER ODOM, INDIANA Entered Â’24, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. OLIVE MAE BUTLER COLUMBUS, OHIO Entered Â’21, Junior Woman's Club, Girls Honor Council Â’22. RACHEL WILLIS BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS Entered Â’21. ROSE KASTNER BITTING LONG ISLAND, NEW YORK Entered Â’21, Junior Chamber of Commerce. EDNA MILDRED BRADSHAW MCKEESPORT, PENNSYLVANIA Entered '21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. Thirty-eight

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HAROLD TISHKEN ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21. PAUL BOARDMAN ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Swimming 4 years, Captain Â’25, Palmetto and Pine Staff. LUCY BOWLDIN GARRISON ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered '22. MARY LEWIS DARLINGTON WEST CHESTER, PENN. Entered Â’24, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. JANE McCLURE PETERSBURG, VA. Entered Â’24. MARY LOUISE CASSIDY PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA Entered '24, Junior Chamber of Commerce. CATHERINE WEGER ROBINSON, ILL. Entered Â’24. JOHN FRANKLIN COLE ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21. Thirty-nine

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HAROLD HATFIELD OLLIE, MONTANA Entered Â’24. WAN IT A WALTER ATLANTA, GEORGIA Entered Â’23, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Orchestra. ANNA ELIZA LUPTON ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’22, Be Square. JAMES E. COOPER ATLANTIC CITY, NEW JERSEY Entered Â’21, Hi-Y, Palmetto and Pine 2 years, Annual 2 years, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Senior Play. RICHARD DEE ATWOOD ST. CLOUD, FLORIDA Entered Â’24, Hi-Y, Orchestra. FRANCES CHARLOTTE RAY MONTICELLO, FLORIDA Entered Â’22. ROSE ESTELLE FORT GREENFIELD, INDIANA Entered Â’22, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Vice-President Civic League. HAROLD SAN DUS BROWN LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS Entered Â’21. Forty

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HAROLD ANDERSON LIVINGSTON MANOR, NEW YORK Entered Â’22, Track Â’24, Hi-Y. LUCILLE RUTH BROWN MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE Entered Â’24, Secretary Â’24, President Â’25 of Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Senior Play, Annual Staff. CLYMENE VIVIAN FRAZIER CLEVELAND, OHIO Entered Â’24, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. GEORGE JOHN MILLER KEENE VALLEY, NEW YORK Entered Â’22, Hi-Y, Senior Play, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Orchestra. ELIZABETH BONNY NORFOLK, VIRGINIA Entered Â’23. GRACE ELIZABETH TURNER JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Annual Staff. HAZEL HARNSBERGER PRESCOTT, WISCONSIN Entered Â’22. RAYMOND BORSTEL HUNTINGTON, NEW YORK Entered Â’21. Forty-one

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RICHARD H. FRAZE CHICAGO, ILLINOIS Entered Â’22, Palmetto and Pine Â’24, Business Manager Â’25, Treasurer Hi-Y Â’24, Senior Play, Business Staff. MARJORIE CLARK OAKLAND, INDIANA Entered Â’24. ELIZABETH NAOMI REESE BELLEFONTAINE, OHIO Entered Â’23, KENNETH MOORE ENGLEWOOD, NEW JERSEY Entered Â’21, Senior Play, Track Â’25. JEAN HITCHNER PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’24, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. DOROTHY KATHERINE LEGTERS ITHACA, NEW YORK Entered Â’22, Junior WomenÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Palmetto and Pine Â’23, Senior Play. NELSON FRANK METCALF ILLION, NEW YORK Entered Â’23. HAMILTON YANCEY ROME, GEORGIA Entered Â’25. Forty-two

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MARGARET A. CLARK GENEVA, NEW YORK Entered Â’24. VANN AIKEN DUNNELLON, FLORIDA Entered Â’23. JOAN OSBORNE OWASSO, MICHIGAN Entered '23, Senior Play, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior Womens Club. MARY CHRISTINE BENN CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS Entered Â’24, Treasurer Civic League, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Board of Gov ernors of Junior WomenÂ’s Club, Senior Play. MARGARET MAGILL CHICAGO, ILLINOIS Entered Â’21, Be Square Club. CHESTER MEHRING PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’23, Orchestra, Hi-Y Â’24. JOSEPH GENTRY FICKLING ROME, GEORGIA Entered Â’24, President Chamber of Com merce Â’24, Senior Play, Hi-Y, Business Manager No-So-We-Ea Â’25. JAMES RIDDLE HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’21, Junior Chamber of Commerce 2 years, Cheer Leader Â’24-Â’25, Hi-Y, Palmetto and Pine Â’24. n 4 Forty-three

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HELEN WALLACE EDWARD KEHEW KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE ARLINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS Entered Â’21, Orchestra 2 years, Senior Entered Â’21, Head Usher Senior Piay, Hi-Y. Quartet Â’25. DORIS DEW ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Class Secretary Â’21, Vice-Presi dent Â’22, Treasurer Civic League Â’21, Honor Council Â’21, Junior WomenÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Com merce, Senior Play. LUCILLE BROWN SAUGERTIES, NEW YORK Entered Â’24, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Palmetto and Pine. MARGUERITE EVANS HOLLIDYSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’21, Be Square Club, Tennis Club 2 l years, junior WomanÂ’s Club. MARGARET LOUISE PEELER EAST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY Entered Â’24, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Scribe, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Annual Staff Â’25, Palmetto and Pine Â’25, Senior Play. 1 yDORIS RICHARDS ^ORANGE, MASSACHUSETTS Entered Â’22. ILA DAVIES WEBSTER, FLORIDA Entered Â’21. Forty-four

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HARVEY PHIEL ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Foot Ball 4 years, Captain Â’25, Junior Chamber of Commerce. WILLIAN ANISLIE BUHMER JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Hi-Y, Swimming Team four years, Captain Â’24, Palmetto and Pine Staff Â’25. BLANCHE TOMPSON WEST CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’22, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Board of Governors Junior WomanÂ’s Club. LAUNA FAULKNER PATTEN ATHENS, GEORGIA Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce. BERTHA M. COOK PAULINE FULLER corning, new york Hudson, Massachusetts Entered Â’22, Senior Play, Swimming Team Entered Â’23, Junior WomanÂ’s Club. Â’ 2 5 > Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Class Basket Ball. JOSEPH MARRION THURSTON EARL KILGORE ANDERSON, INDIANA BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA Entered Â’24, Captain Basket Ball Â’24-Â’25. Eentered Â’23. Forty-five

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ALLEN KEESLER POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK Entered Â’20, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Senior Play. CHARLES HAIRE ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Orchestra Â’21, Annual Â’25. ELENA LAWRENCE WAPPINGERÂ’s FALL, NEW YORK Entered Â’25. ELIZABETH SIMPSON MUNROE, NORTH CAROLINA Entered Â’21, Class Basket Ball Â’25. JANET LACEY FRANKLIN, PENNSYLVANIA Entered Â’23. BERNICE IRENE SEYMOUR HARTON, MICHIGAN Entered Â’24. HELEN FRANCES CLARK JAY SCOTT DONALDSON GENEVA, NEW YORK HOMEWORTH, OHIO Entered Â’24. Entered Â’24. Forty-six

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WAYNE CAMPBELL ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Swimming Â’25, Junior Chamber of Commerce. GORDON KELLER HARRIS ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’23, Class Swimming Team, Treas urer of Civic League, Vice-President of Junior Carreno Club. CAMILLA PARSONS WASHINGTON, D. C. Entered Â’22. HERBERT HAROLD WHITNEY NEW YORK, NEW YORK Entered Â’21, Toot Ball Â’23 Â’24, Base Ball Â’23 Â’24. EUGENE BOGERT ENGLEWOOD, NEW JERSEY Entered Â’21, Annual Staff Â’25, Manager of Basket Ball Team Â’25, Junior Chamber of Commerce DELMA LEE BRAZIER LAKEWOOD, OHIO Entered '23, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce. MARY LOUISE MOODY ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI Entered Â’21, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce. CLARK HARRIS CHAMBERS OWASSO, MICHIGAN Entered Â’22, Hi-Y, Track Â’23, Annual Staff Senior Play. Forty-seven

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THOMAS McDEVITT ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21. KENNETH PAYTON CLEVELAND, OHIO Entered Â’25, Senior Play Musician, Senior Orchestra. DORIS IRENE RANGER LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS Entered Â’24. DEWITT JACKSON ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’21, Hi-Y, Junior Chamber of Commerce. JACK ROWE KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE Entered Â’23, Base Ball Â’24 Â’25. ROBERT CERMAK CLEVELAND, OHIO Entered *21, Annual Staff, Hi-Y Â’25, Scholar ship Club Â’24. Forty-eight

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WILLIAM POTTER WEST FIELD, NEW YORK Entered Â’20, Foot Ball 4 years, Basket Ball Â’24, Base Ball Â’24. LAWRENCE POWERS WEST FIELD, NEW YORK Entered Â’22. WHITNEY WOLFE ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Entered Â’20, Foot Ball 4 years, Chamber of Commerce 2 years, Senior Play, Hi-Y. WILLARD FREDRIKSEN ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS Entered Â’23, Junior Chamber of Commerce Â’24, Orchestra Forty-nine

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‘He is not dead! He has but passed Beyond the mists that blind us here, Into the new and larger life Of that serener sphere.” LILLARD DILLMAN ’25.

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j u n i o rs

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Juniors LOIS CURTIS GEIGER Adviser F ALL the years of a High School career the Junior year is perhaps, the most enjoyed, since by that time almost every one has lost his freshman timidity and “green ness,” but has not yet acquired the solemn dignity of a senior. For the first time the class as a whole appears to be imbued with a spirit of am bition and a love of conquest that is interesting to behold. In each is born the longing to achieve, to overcome, to sub due, and the realization of the joy of life. They begin to have a vision that lures them onward to greater accomplishments, that calls out all their pluck and will to make them real. A Junior dreams of himself as graduating and he buckles down to his elementary studies with a vim that is sure to make that dream come true. We are looking then, for great things from the Juniors, and if their present spirit is any indication of what they will do next year, and all the other years to come, old St. Pete High will surely have reason to be proud of them. HARRY McCARDELL MARGARET PEARCE KENNETH JONES AUSTIN WILDER President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Fifty-two

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Fifty-three

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Fifty-four

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o pKorrvores

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Sophomores JEANNE C. BOSE Adviser HE Sophomores as a class can be easily compared not to one of those expensive and luxurious foreign made cars but to one of those rattling good Fords which runs merrily up and down the streets of any town. It is just such a car as this that once started on a journey. At the wheel was none other than Louis Adcock, who received emphatic instructions from Mrs. Bose, who, with her many children sat on the back seat. The hood of the car covered a combination of machinery, some parts of which worked perfectly, while others functioned only occasionally. After running several weary months, the occu pants found that the old and worn parts would have to be mended or replaced. They knew that in order to overcome the difficulties of the trip all parts would have to co-operate. little The car soon came to what was known as the Class Dues Detour. It passed through this with difficulty, even going ahead of several, who were stalled there. Further on it came to a long steep hill called Basket Ball Mountain. The little “flivver,” although chugging and grunting tremendously, finally went over the top with flying colors, still intact and whole. If this car with its fine leadership and engine of co-operative students keeps up its present pace, St. Petersburg ^igh School will have just cause to be proud of the Class of ’27. LOUIS ADCOCK President MAUDE DEW CHARLENE HALL MARIAN STENACHER Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Fifty-six

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Fifty-seven

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Fifty-eight

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ofllkleticvS

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Football coach mckinney IGHT years of football coaching after his gradua tion from Wabash College had been the record of Coach “Mac” McKinney before his coming to St. Petersburg. He had graduated from Shortridge High School at Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1908, and had entered Wabash the following fall as football coach. After two successful years there, Mr. McKinney was appointed head coach of the Rose Polytechnic Institute at Terre Haute, where he super vised the coaching of football, basketball and baseball. Later he left Rose Polytechnic and commenced a career of playing and coaching professional football. In 1919 Mr. McKinney gave up coaching and went into business, in 1923 he came to St. Petersburg where soon he became interested in the real estate business. Last spring the High School baseball team found itself without a coach, until Mr. McKinney gener ously volunteered his services. The following fall he was secured to coach the Green Devils through what proved to be one of the most successful and commend able records that have ever been established in St. Petersburg High School football. During the spring of 1925, Coach McKinney again coached the baseball team with the same success that he has met in all his athletic experiences. Sixty

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so Football HERE have been Green Devils before, and there will be Green Devils to come, but never will there be a team of Green Devils that can surpass the boys of 1924 for sheer fighting spirit and football skill combined. And not the least of these boys of 1924 is their husky, fearless, and hard-working captain, “Hops” Pheil. In the brief few months that he was at the head of the St. Pete warriors he set a record that perhaps may be surpassed, but never forgotten, and he made a name for himself in Green and White athletics that will be recalled as long as the Green Devils exist. Pheil was elected captain for the past season by the letter men of last year. Their choice was based upon his previous three years of playing on the team and upon his consistently depend able work. Throughout the entire 1924 schedule, “Hops“ proved himself to be a capable leader, distinguished as much for his generosity and good sportsmanship as for his skill and perseverence. Such players as Captain Pheil are truly a credit to the school whose honor and glory they maintain. CArTAIN PHEIL Sixty-one

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Dear Mose : I expect that you still rekollects them boys which plays football down in old St. Pete High; Green Devils they calls them, on account of how they usually starts out with knowing nothing and ends up with knowing just about twice as much. Well, them boys what played in 1924 may have been dumb to look at, but they sure did know their avocado pairs when it come to passing the pill and bucking the line. They went through the line like a two-ton shell through a cheese-cloth fence, and that’s some wenting, take it from me. Big “Hops” Pheil was captain of the crew and “Mac” McKinney was their coach, and “Mac” ain’t no dwarf, neither. The fact is that the only coach I ever saw that was bigger than “Mac” is already owned by the A. C. L. The Green Devils’ first antagonistics was Sacred Heart, but to tell you what happened I sure ain’t got the heart, and they didn’t neither after they squirmed off from the fray without no heart atall and only one lung. But like old Bolognaous in “Hamlet” says, I’ll be brief. They received the spare tire while we was running up the thirteen. Some bum luck, wasn’t it? Next shot we run up against Hillsborough, that little burg across the bay, and our boys not having hit their best stride, there wasn’t nothing to do but rush out with thirteen shiny counters on a tray and ask the Terriers to help thereselves. The official Sixty-tzvo

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LATHAM BROWN ROSS COSS score was 13 to 6, Hillsborough’s flavor. What’d I say about thirteen and bum luck? The next week after, Bartow came down from the mountains and it seemed that they brought all their ancestors to play with them, from their grand-daddies back to Joner and his pet shark. At any rate they certainly did asphyxiate “Hops” and his gentle playmates, leaving us with the goose-fruit, while they walked off with twenty-six perfectly good points. Talk about stealing bases in baseball; why this was grand larceny. About this time things began to stir up a bit. “Mac” and “Hops” must have decided that there weren’t no use of dropping games like that, when they could be won about as easy. Anyway everybody that boasted the Green Devilishness atall began to pick up. Between other things, young Angelfood (Goodbread they call him) commenced to tearing down the green, with the pigskin in one paw and a piledriver’s push in the other. The team what had been bulldozed by Bartow wasn’t any more like the one that squashed Ocala, than the hardboiled man in the moon is like the Prince of Wails. Speaking about Ocala reminds me. Our outfit sauntered up-state to that lowly village, a couple of weeks after the Bartow free-for-all, as full of determination to win as the proverbial dog is full of his proverbial fleas. And after the first two minutes of play there weren’t no more doubt about who was going to win than there was decimal points in Ocala’s final score. Needles to relate, St. Pete copped the skurmish to the fairy tale of 27 to 0. That settled Ocala. Sixty-three

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HEWITT CALLENDER McYEY PRESTMAN Followin’ Ocala, the next on the docket was Bradenton, that little town down the coast which has the ‘w* strucken out. She came up as Bradenton, but she went back like a ton of waterlogged lead. Nevertheless, whichever way she went back, as town or ton, she sure did have her spirits trailing, and she didn’t bust no bottle of pre-war either. The truth is, if it must be out ,that the Green Devils donated the inside of the doughnut to Bradenton, while they was nabbing 28 markers and 11 cauliflower ears for theirselves. By this time the habit of winning had sorta fixed itself on our boys, there being only one thing on old terra firma that could stop ’em, which I will discourse on at some length later on. But for the time being, Orlando didn’t have no more chance against the Green Devils than a feeble excuse has with the skipper. So when the Tigers came down to Waterfront Park with fifteen hunks of bacon already cut and fried for our boys, all she got was just about half of what’s inside a vacuum cleaner. The Orlando congregation came down like Tigers but went back like half-hearted felines of the younger generation. Next on the bill of fare was Duval. Ten million agonies! The Green Devils went up the line with fond hopes for the championship. But all they got was sore linaments and busted shin-bones. They sure did put up one grand scrap but they wasn’t just quite avordupois enuff to mash Duval like they had sat on Ocala and Bradenton. Sixty-four

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GOODBREAD POTTER HENSON WOLFE Anyway they got the best claim to second place and that ainÂ’t so bad. The final count was 15 to 7. But tell me they wasnÂ’t mad when they went down to Fort Meyers on Thanksgiving, they made such an assault that they battered down the fortifications and took the place by surprise. Talk about fighting spirit, why them boys was raving maniacs. They wiped up on everything attall connected with Fort Meyers to the tune of 14 to 7. We was about to think that everything was over for the season when in comes the news that the highly tooted Maroons from West Palm Beach was craving action. They sure got it; action ainÂ’t no name for it. They may have been West Palm Beach when they got here, but they was East Bound Palm Beach when our men got hold of them. We pulled down 28 markers. West Palm Beach also played. Well, Mose, that just about winds it all up. Them 28 to 0 scores speak for them selves. If you want to know who all them boys was what played for St. Pete, youÂ’ll find their pictures somewheres in this here volume. Scratch around for yourself. Yours respectfully, Ebeneezer. Sixty-five

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BoysÂ’ Basketball ^"TuASKETBALL in St. Pete High reached its DjS highest point of success during the season of the present year. Never before, since the game was introduced into the school, has a team lasted through as many as eight games and suf fered only a single defeat, as did Coach JohnsÂ’ Green and White court stars of 1925. And never before has a St. Petersburg basketball squad been justified in going to a state tournament. While the highest possible recognition, the state cham pionship, was not attained, still the 1925 season was the most successful and noteworthy of all those in the history of St. Pete High. A full share of the credit for the teamÂ’s accom plishment must go to Keith Johns, coach. It is alone significant that, having material not out standingly better than that of the past, he was able to direct the boys through a schedule that speaks for itself. He seemed to fix in the Green Devils his own trait of pure fighting spirit. CAPTAIN THURSTON Captain Joe Thurston, at the same time the smallest and most aggressive man on the squad, made an admirable leader for an outfit that had to rely solely upon out-witting and out-fighting to score over a formidable opponent. He was always the very stimulus of his men, a stellar player who has never been thwarted by the enormity of his adversaries or the amount of their score. If anyone ever deserved a commendation for only the bravest and most unselfish fighting spirit in the athletics of the Green and White, that person is most assuredly the captain of the 1925 basketball team. The Green Devils took a late start, their first game not occurring until the latter part of Sixty-six

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Boys’ Basketball January, at which time they journeyed down-state to Bradenton, winning in this initial encounter by the very close score of 12 to 11. Returning home for their second centest, they sent the Tarpon Springs aggregation down with a much more promising score, taking the lead early in the game and maintaining their superiority throughout all four quarters, to wind up with the overwhelming majority of 33 to 11. Perhaps the greatest sur prise of the entire season came when the Hills borough Terriers romped over to the High School auditorium, expecting the easiest victory of their careers. What they actually received was the greatest whipping that St. Pete High has ever handed them; in fact, the only one that the Green Devils has registered against them since 1922. The alumni, Eustis, Tarpon Springs, and Hills borough all fell, some of them for their second time this season. Clearwater alone was able to stand the gaff against our boys, and by a queer twist of fortune, she won, 14 to 12. With such a good record to back them up, the Green Devils entered the state tournament at Gainesville. But, as Lady Luck would have it, the first one that they ran up against was Duval, and the funeral dirge was played to the tune of 29 to 11. Nevertheless, the boys of 1925 have the finest reason in the world to be proud of their record, the cleanest slate that has ever, as yet, been shown by the Green Devils of St. Pete High. 9 : d H I §j / m :. % j w V v ( jj y yrygs pfj COACH JOHNS Sixty-seven

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GRAHM SEVERANCE f\Qt>r-Qar& FRANK HODGiNSON JOE THURSTON, tOUfS tisfiNGER $ ub£<&rw
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Girls’ Basketball XRLS’ basketball during the year 1925 was one of the queerest things that ever hit St. Pete High.. The Green Angels, coached by Mr. C. M. Alexander, new athletic trainer of the High School, went through a season that was perfect with only one exception. Every game that was played during the entire schedule was an easy victory for the Green and White ag gregation. But there was a single error in the year’s playing; that was the fact that the majority of St. Pete’s foes were easy meat, teams in the vicinity of St. Petersburg which could not offer sufficient opposition to our stars to enable them to remain in top notch form. How could our girls be expected to be at their very best at the time they went to the state championship tournament, after having slid through a schedule of soft snaps? They needed strong fighting opposition from the start. Coach Alexander proved himself to be one of the most capable and eager coaches that ever trained a team for St. Pete High. He produced the most skillful, hardest fighting, and smoothest working girls’ basket squad in the history of the school. Captain “Peggy” Zierden was a phenomenon, the most brilliant and skillful player that Green and White fans had ever seen in action. In action she was the calmest player of the sextet; she hooped the sphere from all angels on the court, she broke through the enemy’s defense for score after score. Needless to remark, she was a unani mous choice for the all-state team. Mary Louise Squier, jumping-center and always the hardest fighting player on the court, was a member of the outfit who could never be rendered too much praise. When it came to pure downright clean scrapping, Mary was certainly there. C. M. ALEXANDER Coach Sixty-nine

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Girls’ Basketball Celia Lowe, forward; Dolly Palmer, runningcenter; “Winnie” Walker, guard, and Clifford Moody, guard, were all court stars of the highest possible calibre. Catherine Batts, Frieda Klauman, Ruth Osborn, Catherine Long, Ethel Kelley, and-Hickman were dependable substitutes, who played the game well. The Green Angels went through the season like a greased meteor, (Sarasota 42 to 20), the alumni (48 to 8), Bradenton (38 to 8 and 36 to 10), Kissimmee (27 to IS and 21 to 11), Hillsborough (48 to 4 and 20 to 11), Ocala (35 to 8), Sarasota (38 to 18), and Clearwater (26 to 16) all fell like molten lead, giving the girls the distinction of going to the tournament at Deland with a spotless slate. But there our fair maidens fell into evil clutches. Their first game was snatched by Palatka to the aria of 25 to 23. But renewed hope came when Bartow was eradicated by a 48 to 12 count, a shortlived hope that was dispelled when Gainesville trounced the Green Angels something like 39 to 36. Yet Captain Zierden was awarded a position on the first allstate and Mary Louise Squier was made captain of the second allstate. It was surely the most brilliant season that St. Petersburg girls’ basketball has ever experienced. PEGGY ZIERDEN Captain Seventy

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1 $/Jt> CenterDOLUE PALMER MARY L. SQUIRE 'INI F RED WALKER Captain f Foruzercf MARGARET Z/ERDEN Gtt&rcf CLfFFORP MOODY Fori*s
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CAPTAIN BOARDMAN BoysÂ’ Swimming NDER the leadership of Captain Paul Boardman, coached by Mr. Howland, and managed by Mr. Lawrence, owner of the Spa, the boysÂ’ swimming team produced a number of the most accomplished water stars that have ever swum for the Green and White. Preeminent among these spray splashers were Jack Hall, who repeatedly lowered his marks in the 100 yard dash; Billy Buhner, who did the same in the 50 yard dash, and Captain Boardman. Other boys, who did not quite equal the records of the above mentioned swimmers, but who were highly essential to Peters burgÂ’s aquatic prestige were William Erickson, Willis Yeamans, Clyde Haggerty, Archie McClatchie, Carey Jacobus, Earnest Hum phries, Wayne Campbell, and Wilbur Norton. But the efforts of all of these could not sum up to the utmost without the generous and continual assistance, both financial and moral, of Mr. Lawrance, who financed the trip to the meet, acted as manager to the team, and gave the freedom of the use of the Spa to all of the High SchoolÂ’s side-wheelers. For a number of years past, he has shown only the most helpful interest in both the boysÂ’ and girlsÂ’ swimming teams. It was the combined energies of all who assisted in the training of first-class squads for St. Pete High that made possible the splendid record that was achieved in 1925. Seventy-two

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COACH HOWLAND. Seventy-three

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GirlsÂ’ Swimming CAPTAIN WHITAKER N St. Petersburg High School athletics, swimming, of both boys and girls, has for some time occupied a major position. Almost every year either the boysÂ’ team or the girlsÂ’ team has taken the state championship, and neither of them has ever failed to acquit itself in an admirable fashion. Swimming and football have been the two branches of sport that have at all times received the entire backing of the student body. Every year it is due almost solely to the efforts of Coach Howland that S. P. H. S. is able to make the splendid showings that she does. With each succeeding school term, he must break in and train new and often wholely green tank stars. But the effective manner in which he does this is a credit to even his own coaching ability. This year Coach HowlandÂ’s female human fishes in cluded Captain Thursba Whitaker, Harriet Provost, Mary Bullard, Helen Boardman, Mary Ruth Sanford, Maude Dew, Ruth Hohman, Claire Quick, Louise Hitchner, Phoebe Longman, Betty Miller, Mary Elizabeth Hansen, Ruth Cole and Bobbie Gilford. And Swim? Why, there wasnÂ’t enough water in all the Atlantic ocean to boot, to stall these girls. They just waded And when it came to diving? Well, there were divers the divenest divers that ever dived. HereÂ’s hoping the seven seas and through like a revenue cutter, reasons for saying that they were that the girlsÂ’ swimming teams to come will show the same skill and grit for which the girls of 1925 were famed. Seventy-four

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Seventy-five

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Boys’ Base Ball Dear Mose: Seeing as how I wrote you an epistle some time since about our football team down here at St. Pete High, I thought as how I might just about as well write one about our baseball outfit too, specially since the editor of this here book has told me to. Well, I’ll tell you right now, them boys what plays baseball ain’t hardly got started yet, and the above stated editor has ordered me to get my copy in by today, so there ain’t nothing much for me to do but sling a wicked line about something that hasn’t happened yet. I ain’t never been strong for prognosticating, but I guess I’ll have to do some now. Anyway, here goes. Ever since the boys what plays the grand old national pastime first got started, they had a whole lot of trouble trying to get a diamond to play on. For several years they didn’t have no more diamond than a ten-cent store ring has, but this year they was lucky enuff to get to use the grounds where the big bambino and all the rest of the Yankees hung out during the early spring. And man, what a difference it made. Compared with our boys, “Babe” Ruth and his sickly friends loked like mere pro tegees. That Crescent Lake diamond is a real gem, and it sure ain’t in the ruff neither. Well them Green and White apple shammers sure knows their commodities when it comes to playing baseball. What they don’t know about baseball, Darwin don’t know about marmosets. They was just naturally born with spikes on their shoes and a eagle eye for the pill. To tell the truth, them Green Devil baseball sharks never was very bum, but this year they was per excellance. The way they run bases would have made Man-o-War feel like a battering-ram. They run so fast after batting the sphere over the pitcher’s head, they got knocked over by it at second base. They slammed home-runs so far that they had to postpone one game two weeks to get the ball back. And the way their pitchers worked was a revolu tion. They wound up like a fishing reel but let loose like a couple of hundred machine-guns. They made the bat-big bambino” coach mckinney Seventy-six

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BoysÂ’ Base Ball ters swing so wild that they tore out their shoulder-blades every time they came to bat. Tell me they couldnÂ’t play baseball, cause they took to the game like a laundryman takes to Ma Gone. McKinney was their coach again and what he ainÂ’t aware of about baseball, Tie Cobb wonÂ’t never know. He can coach at baseball just as good as he can at football, which ainÂ’t saying just a little bit. Byrd Latham was the captain this year and what I mean to tell you he ainÂ’t no easy bird. Fact is heÂ’s the old original early bird when it comes to piling up winning scores. He and the rest of the Green Devils certainly were acquainted with their stuff, especially the stuff that they put on the old onion. As I quoted prematurely, I donÂ’t know what IÂ’m slinging the ink about, but letÂ’s hope that I ainÂ’t told no lies. Permiscuously, CAPTAIN LATHAM Ebeneezer. Seventy-seven

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Track RACK! It is a foreign word to many ears that are parked for nine months of each year in old St. Pete High. Track! Methinks I have heard the term before. Track! Ah, yes, track. Eureka, now I have it. Track! Â’Tis that upon which GoodbreadÂ’s mighty cohorts have run. True, true, Â’tis true, Â’tis track. Yo, ho, and a bottle of SloanÂ’s linament, by the sign of the fiery cross. The backing that Petersburg gives to track is enough to make any hale old Grecian discus thrower get curvature of the spine. About all that track consists of in S. P. H. S. is for some ten to twenty intrepid young men to get out and work their heads off for a month or two and then to go up-state and win as much as they can. But they have been handicapped by not having adequate training facilities in the past, a lack which we hope will be better remedied in the future. Notwithstanding their set-back, the track men of 1925 accom plished some worthwhile things, and at the state meet they represented their school well. Coached by Mr. Fortier, they have done their best to uphold the dignity of their school in spite of the deficient equipment and training grounds. Royce Goodbread was the one to keep the old Greek games going in St. Pete High. Fellows who backed him up in his purpose were John Ross, Kenneth Reed, Vernon Blanton, Harry McCardle, Donald Link, Hollis Packard, Darrel Jordon, Charles Bochterle, Dave Ross, Herbert Ladd, Walter Jenkins and Joe Thurston. CAPTAIN GOODBREAD < Seventy-eight

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Tennis —'ENNIS is a sport that has never been over-popular in St. Pete High. Interest in it has vjL' J always been limited to a very few ardent net fans, who, with practically no backing or assistance from the student body, have been engrossed and earnest in their determinaiton to put St. Petersburg High School on the state tennis map. It is due to the work of this small group of boys and girls that S. P. H. S. has made any tennis record at all. During the 1924-25 school year, a number of matches were arranged with both Hillsborough and Clearwater, resulting, in most instances, in victories for the Green and White pellet pushers. The first of these, which was contested with Hillsborough, was taken, 4 to 1. After this initial triumph, the boys took on Clearwater, who fell just as easily by a 3 to 1 count. By this time Hillsborough had recuperated from her stinging defeat, and, with an over-powerful determina tion for vengeance, she administered a sound drubbing to the Petersburg net stars, taking three matches to their two. Shortly afterward, our boys duplicated their original feat against Clear water, with a 3 to 2 score. While these four matches were only a part of the entire season’s play, they satisfactorily indicate what the Green and White tennis players were capable of doing. The boys who represented the school on the courts throughout the year were Jim Vuille, captain and star singles and doubles player, Ralph LeNeave, James Olson, Hamilton Yancy, and Henry Kelley. Their most formidable doubles combination was composed of Vuille and LeNeave, who together pulled some of the finest doubles team work that local High School tennis has ever seen. Olson and Kelley formed the other doubles pair that turned in frequent victories. In the singles matches, Yancy, LeNeave and Vuille were all effective, winning by far more often than they lost. The successful season which these boys experienced is made little short of remarkable by the fact that, during the whole time of their playing, they had no regular coach to point out their errors and to train them in technique, which amounts to a great deal in the game of tennis. What victories they won were altogether due to their own ability and hard work. Seventy-nine

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Eighty

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Palmetto and Pine HE start that the Palmetto and Pine made this year was about as feeble as Custer’s last stand. The editorial “we” of course had to go through the usual formality of appealing to the school spirit of his fellow-students, with his knees clicking like a pair of ivories. After the first four or five issues, the students got used to having the paper come out a couple of days late each week. From force of habit some of them haven’t called for their second week’s paper yet. However, after a while things began to work a little more smoothly and the scholastic organ would arrive at least by four o’clock in the afternoon, whereupon about half of the students would flock to the counter, procure a copy, look to see if their names appeared on the joke page, and if not, promptly throw it away. The only features of the paper that they ever looked at were the jokes and Jimmie Cooper’s cartoons. We’ll have to admit, though, that we did get a lot of pleasure and sometimes hearty fun, out of writing the paper up each week, even if no one ever did bother much about it. But we certainly can’t righteously blame them if they were fond of using it for wrapping paper. We want to thank the few students on the staff who stood by us through thick and thin (mostly thick) and also the ones whose pictures are on the next page but who never did a lick of work in their lives. We are also very appreciative to the many students who have made the paper a possibility through their continued interest and backing. We believe that it has been said that we have done a fairly good job with the Palmetto and Pine this year, but to us it has been all grammatical mistakes, misprints, and typographical errors. Dudley E. Brewer. Dudley Brewer Editor Lois Stewart Adviser Richard Fraze Business Manager Eighty-two

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P.^hjO. FIATMS WR/7IAS A &, CENTER WALKS# JMS SO/TVfjS APVfS£A lO/S $T£WARTj \^aovisepj P££IS£. fyC,CAUSEY.PA £V0&E&0APP/WH, n £ P oA7£8 S > TYP/STS /A/yj0/Y, WAftNFRand TVWHE H v AT Pi’S T HQUA" J COOPS# CAPTOomST D/S7P/aST2JV& APErt Tg. PALMETTO AND PINE Eighty-three

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NO-SO-WE-EA S' ~7J j AE should, perhaps, use this page for thanking the rest of the staff, the viy (FI?/ entire student body, our engravers, printers, and all the rest of them— since it is customary—for their loyalty, interest and support. However, we’d rather tell you about us not because you want to know, but because we want to tell you. Four weary, though interesting months have been spent compiling the volume you are now reading, or maybe just gazing through. We have labored over it, sweat— we don’t mean ’perspired either—over it and blessed it in and out. If we could have gone without sleep for a week at a time, we might have been able to have got it out sooner. As it is, several perfectly good dispositions have been hopelessly ruined. Even our adviser so far succumbed to the general atmosphere of despair as to exclaim “Well, for cryin’ aloud” and “Dog-gone-it anyway.” Speaking seriously, we really have tried to make the book representative of the entire school. It isn’t just what we want it to be, of course—the natural perversity of human nature prevents that—but we’ve made an honest effort. If you like it we’re glad—if you don’t like it we’re too tired to care very much. Au revoir, Henrietta Nichols. Clifford Ray Editor Henrietta Nichols Assistant Editor Eighty-four

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BPfWSN WILSON a n-eL PN/PPS CUSH WAN Ql/fi MOST HANDY MfQ C//?CULAT/m MAN A au/0/?mM/? J*a tov tk,v^v; gy£ /*
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Junior WomanÂ’s Club OFFICERS Lucile Ruth Browne.. Evelyn White. Betty Miller. Nellie Bailey. Catherine McCauley. Grace Turner. Margaret Peeler. .President .First Vice-President .Second Vice-President .Secretary .Treasurer .Reporter Chairman of Board of Directors, Scribe HE Junior WomanÂ’s Club has been honored upon several occasions this year, perhaps the greatest was the invitation to attend the State Convention of WomanÂ’s Clubs at Orlando, where the club representatives were heartily welcomed. The club was entertained several times by the Senior WomanÂ’s Club. These were memorable events on the JuniorÂ’s calendar. On the twenty-sixth of February, the JuniorÂ’s entertained the Senior club with their annual reception at the High School. The Civic Club, an organization fostered by the Junior Club has been re-organized and has proved its worth to the school. In assisting the Junior Chamber of Commerce, and the various organizations in school, the Junior WomanÂ’s Club has been an important factor. The St. Petersburg Junior WomanÂ’s Club has the distinction of being the largest, oldest and most active in Florida and the South. Eighty-six

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Be Square Club—Y. W. C. A. President. Vice-President. Secretary. Treasurer. .Elizabeth Spofford ....Margaret Mevis .Kitty Dunlap .Helen Marshall HIS club is composed of High School girls of the Sophomore, Junior and Senior Classes. Meetings are held each week at the Y. W. C. A. building, or the club house. Many profitable as well as enjoyable times are had by the members of this club. The Be Square Club endeavors to promote a friendly feeling among the girls of the High School and they are always ready to render any service to the school and the community. Under the efficient leadership of Miss Charlotte Pigott, this club has had a very successful year. The various activities of the club are carried on by special committees, whose chairmen are as follows: Program.Margaret Lloy Service .Mary Carter Osborne Membership...Margaret Mevis Social.Doris Hamilton Eighty-seven

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Hi-Y Club EGINNING the year 1924-25 under the leadership of Donald Cushman, president; Dudley Brewer, vice-president; Harold Davis, secretary; Richard Fraze, treasurer, and Dewitt Jackson, chaplain, the Hi-Y Club launched out upon an active season’s work and a school term of successful endeavor to carry out the purpose of the club, which is “to create, maintain, and extend, throughout the school and community, the highest standards of Christian character.” Directed by two helpful friends, Doctor Gorsuch, adviser, and Gilbert Bush, secretary of the Young Men’s Christian Association, the Hi-Y boys accomplished a number of worthwhile achievements during the year. Among the most noteworthy of these were the record-breaking attendance at the annual Older Boys’ Conference at Bartow, the alumni reunion banquet, at which all the former St. Petersburg Hi-Y boys renewed old acquaintances during the Christmas holidays, and the excellent work which was volunteered by the club during the city-wide Y. M. C. A. building fund campaign in March. The Hi-Y Club will continue, throughout succeeding years, to maintain its reputation as one of the most worthy of school and community organizations. The following were members of the club during the 1924-25 year: Donald Cushman, Dudley Brewer, Harold Davis, Richard Fraze, Jack Miller, James Olson, James Vuille, Richard Atwood, Morrison Pearce, Carey Jacobus, Dewitt Jackson, John Bliss, James Riddle, Harold Anderson, Tom Gramling, Joe Fickling, Harry McCardell, Kenneth Jones, Clark Chambers, William Mulhollem, Frank Phipps, William Buhner, James Cooper, Charles Haire, Henry Ohrns, Ralph Stewart, George Smith, Jessel Setzer, Marshall Mansfield, Robert Cermak, Preston Johnson, Eugene Bogert, Gould Curtis, Alden Pemble, Jack Rowe, Howard Wallace, Robert Burklew, Gordon Wright, Wyatt Dame, Kenneth Moore, Joe Thurston, Austin Wilder, Robert Saylor, John Lynch, and Walter Johnson. Eighty-eight

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Athletic Association O other organization in the St. Peters burg High School has given the con tinued backing to clean athletics that the Athletic Association has unceasingly of fered. Under the leadership of Donald Cushman, president, Morrison Pearce, vicepresident, Mary Bullard, secretary, and Harry McCardell, treasurer, the association has vir tually kept progressive athletic competition alive. St. Pete High is one of the very few schools of the state in which athletic organizations foster and maintain sports of every kind. How admirably the association has accomplished this in the local school is clearly illustrated by the fact that, at the beginning of the year, it faced a deficit of over three hundred dollars. Now, this has been paid and with the aid of the civic clubs, notably the American Legion, all athletic activities have been financed and no debts left on hand. Football, as everywhere, has been the most popular and best supported of the high school sports. The Athletic Association this year has been able to finance football, basket ball, track, swimming, baseball and tennis teams that rank with the best in the state. The Athletic Association has collected approximately $5,000 and financed all the games, leaving neither a surplus nor a deficit. We have not spent as much as we would have liked to on some of the sports because it is a plan of the Athletic Asso ciation never to have a deficit at the close of the season. The membership this year has been tripled although there is still room for improve ment. The larger the membership, the better the school spirit. It creates enthusiasm, and becomes an advertising asset to the school and also to the city.—Thus ends a most successful athletic year. Eighty-nine

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The Junior Chamber of Commerce HE Junior Chamber of Commerce, organized in 1922, which was the first of its kinc in America to become officially recognized as an auxiliary body of a Senior Chambei of Commerce, entered upon its third year of existence with the determination to carr3 on the splendid work done by the past clubs and to make the club of ’25, through its many activities, one never to be forgotten in the history of the school. The first event of the season was the task of entertaining three hundred members of the Florida Educational Association who met here in September in a three day session. The weeks following were spent in preparation for the “Hallowe’en Carnival” the event which marks the formal opening of the tourist season in St. Petersburg. Here the Chamber co-operated with the senior body toward the success of the parade and also took complete charge of the sale of confetti and novelties. On the night of November the fourth, coffee and sandwiches were sold by the organization at the City Hall, where the Election Returns were being received. Again during November the club was given an opportunity to render service to the community, this time assisting the Florida Art School in its observance of National Picture Week. Every civic organization and every school in St. Petersburg was visited by speakers from the club. Honorable mention was made to National Headquarters for the way in which this duty was performed. The Clean-Up Week conducted in January by the High School Chamber of Commerce proved that in future years every week will be made a clean-up w r e e k by each student. Many duties about the building were successfully performed by the organization in its attempt to make S. P. H. S. the most beautiful school in Florida. Several two-act plays were presented to the public which netted a fair return in a financial way. The final and largest task of the year came with the Festival of States Celebration in which the High School Chamber of Commerce played a prominent part. Officers President.. Vice-President. Secretary. Treasurer. .Joe Fickling .Tom Gramling .Evelyn White .Whitney Wolf Don Cushman Austin Wilder Jack Miller R. E. Jones Charles Haire Winifred Walker Board of Governors Gordon Wright Margaret Peeler Dick Fraze Frank Phipps Earle Osborne Edwin Price Lina King Lynda Walker Mary Bullard Doris Dew Ninety

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JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 1925

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Scholarship Club “The Club The School Delights to Honor ’ of the Scholarship Club, students must have a general In order to be a member average of A. SENIORS MARTHA HENRY RUTH C. SMITH BERTHA WESTFIELD JACK MILLER CLEATIE TROSPER CLIFFORD RAY KATHRYN HOPKINS AGNES WALKER JEAN HITCHNER JUNIORS EDNA KEEFE LORA KERR HARRIET PROVOST JOHN LYNCH JIM VUILLE HARRY McCARDELL HILDA MILLER MAGDALENA VANDERLYN LIDA CADUGAN FLORENCE WALTON SOPHOMORES CHARLENE HALL FREDA KLAUMAN LARUE STRINGER PAULINE BANYA IRENE GAUDREAU MILDRED HODNETT WINIFRED BECK HORACE WILLEY GARDNER LEWIS Nmety-two

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Tuesday Morning Clubs A novel feature, the Tuesday Morning Clubs, was introduced in our school for the first time, this year. It was a unique idea that has proven extraordinarily successful in promoting an enthusiasm and interest among the students in vital subjects. In these organizations the students were given special advantages not to be found in the ordinary school curriculum and since credit towards graduation was to be given on the same basis as the other school subjects they were indeed popular. The clubs met once a week at chapel time and discussed certain phases of art, music, current events, social problems, etc. Their aim being always to arouse the initiative and response and to reveal the hitherto undiscovered powers of those students who have thus far been merely drifting, routeless and without a goal. Although these clubs have been successful, they still have a tremen dous field in which to enlarge their scope. They can be made a powerful factor for influencing students to lead four-square lives. A great deal of credit is due the members of the factulty who spon sored these organizations and succeeded in making them such an interesting and delightful part of our school life. The Orchestra The High School Orchestra was, after some delay, reorganized last fall under the able leadership of Goodridge M. Greer. Its member ship jumped from thirty to sixty almost over night and the rehearsal room soon became inadequate for such a large band of musicians. The orchestra consisted of a large number of extraordinarily talented players and in less than one month after its organization it was being enjoyed in the regular chapel exercises and at various social and business functions. The orchestra has proven a most essential part of our school and its director and members deserve a great deal of credit for its success. Ninety-three

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Lock pleasant Ninety-four

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Junior Hidh o

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Ninety-six JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

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MR. RUSS “His True Greatness Lies in the Consciousness of an Honest Purpose in Life and a Steady Obedience to the Rule Which He Knows to be Right.” Ninety-seven

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Roll Call of Teachers MARIE HOLMES, A. B. English Missouri Valley College KATIE DUMAS Secretary WomanÂ’s College of Alabama GLADYS FANNIN, A. B. History Randolph-Macon WomanÂ’s College PHYLLIS EDNA PICKERING English Iowa State Teachers College LIDA TULANE History Bethany College ETHEL McGRATH Mathematics Kalamazoo State Normal EVA MAY SMITH Mathematics Florida State College and University of Tennessee LOUISE SURVE MAY Latin, History, English, Civics Rockford College Vassar College, University of Chicago, American School of Classical Studies in Rome PEARL E. BELONGA English, Reading Leland Powers School Spoken Word, Oswego Normal, Northfield Seminary, New Hampshire State, Harvard EMMA LIOSMER, A. B. History Olivet College, University of Michigan EMMA LOU LEPLEY, A. B. English University of Colorado MAURINE McANINCH, A. B. English Missouri Valley College mrs. j. p. McGuire English, History Central Normal College LULA ATWOOD Mathematics Oberlin, Illinois Normal HARRY RECORD History Westbrook College, Maine F. E. S. TURNER Physiology, Junior High Athletics Loyola College, University of Florida R. G. RUSS Latin University of Florida W. A. LINN General Science Lehigh University LAUSON B. SKIDMORE General Science Fredonia Normal School, Cornell University, (B. S. A.) Columbia University, Syracuse University (B. S.) MRS. KATE SMITH, A. B. English Western Reserve University A. E. MAY Mathematics University of Florida IDA M. BROWN Reading South Western State Normal School of Pennsylvania MRS. GRIFFITH Reading Albion College SLADE WALKER, A. B. History University of Florida PEARL E. BELONGA Reading Leland Powers School Spoken Word ELSIE I. HARGRAVE Domestic Science: Florida State College, Columbia University JULIA V. LINN Music Institute of Musical Art FLORA C. PHILLIPS Reading Minneapolis University, Chicago University MISS FLORA E. EADY' Social Science, Physiology Rockford College (A. B.), University of Columbia (M. A.), University of Chicago, University of Wisconsin, University of Illinois, Bureau of University Travel, Boston, Mass. N. PATTERSON English Ypsilanti, Oberlin, Toledo, Columbus, Ohio BLANCHE McGRATH History Kalamazoo State Normal, Gainesville University MANIE RIDEN Mathematics State TeachersÂ’ College Virginia MRS. S. G. KULP Geography West Chester State Normal School, Pennsylvania MRS. FLORENCE S. SMITH Mathematics Plymouth, N. H., Normal, Columbia University OLIVE PARK Physical Director Mr. ArnoldÂ’s School of Physical Culture, New Haven, Conn. Ninety-eight

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JUNIOR HIGH FACULTY Ninety-nine

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Junior High ‘'Build me straight, O worthy Master! Staunch and strong, a goodly vessel, That shall laugh at all disaster, And with wave and whirlwind wrestle.” Three years ago there arose a demand for a Junior High Building. Pupils were being sent to Churches or any available place for the purpose of maintaining the school work. In the year nineteen twenty-three the new Junior High School System was adopted, but unfortunately there were no accommoda tions for the overflow of classes and not until this year have we been able to occupy a building of our own as an organization separate from other grades and classes. 'Twas with thankful hearts that we witnessed the open door of our school this September and lessons were resumed under the protecting roof of our First Junior High School. Some times friend memory plays queer tricks upon us and trans ports us to different places, turning conditions about and we see things in a different light even though the underlying theme is the same. And now, memory aptly places before my eyes, a panorama upon which the scene of last spring is laid before me. That wonderful event, the Dedication of the new Junior High School. Oh, the Human Flag, girls in red, white and blue! Across the blue and sparkling waters of Mirror Lake, through a vista of graceful palms, I see that massive, commanding building. New, young, promising, a rival to its sister school, but dear are the ties of kinship. As Memory turns the pages, the scene changes; the glistening water seems to surround, not the School, but a ship The wind catches the white sails and slowly out upon that vast “Sea of School Days” sails “Our Ship.” On the tenth, eleventh and twelfth of September, nineteen twenty-five, the Sailors came from all parts of the country to enlist. Oh, what an undignified scramble took place, for you see, each seafarer was to be placed in different classes under the supervision of a Pilot. For three days the division of sailors and pilots took place. At the end of this time the work was completed, the crew organized and ready to sail the following Monday, September 15 under the guidance of the very best Pilots obtainable, who, during the long voyage directed the course of the Ship that contained the most valuable cargo in all the world—Education. Monday morning dawned bright and clear, which is characteristic of our beaut’ful sunny land. Our jolly crew of sailers, eager to get under way on this three-year cruise, bade farewell to port. Every sailor must have some play as well as work, so various clubs were organized. The Dramatic, Parliamentary Law, Sandspur, Shakesperian, Gleaners, Athletic Association, Basket Ball Team. So you see there was no lack of fun on board. At the many seaports which this ship touched to take on cargo, we found much excitement, as these unexperienced sailors were not quite steady without “Sea Legs.” They were so anxious to carry with them so much of the gifts of the fruitful lands, that our ever watchful Pilots had reason to feel worried, and coming to the rescue, directed us safely into calm waters. After weathering the gales, the quiet Harbor came into view, our voyage drew to a c’o^e, Ou~ iaithful Pilots returned to guide another crew; the sailors separated and the cargo was trans ported to all parts of the world—some to dance, some to sing, others like birds on the wing to soar to heights unseen. So, sailors cf nineteen twenty-five: “Sail on, nor fear to breast the sea! Our hearts, our hopes, are all with thee, Our faith, triumphant o’er our fears, Are all with thee.—are all with thee. One Hundred

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Laura Ann Rouse L~Trca& MrSfcodrriort F 6 k Adviser hlic&Bellips-V.Pr&s, MargardEtkndft-Sia /less lulane S th 6eAdviser GerdtnBewiJressL lomHBsrn&s-Pres. DjeSj l ocR& ~Se 1 BtM Kcihler/Pres J&ne-t WcoipeyA-Sei Ralph PrnS c&rprta. hart me Pe&rc & -/pros. One Hundred One

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Dramatic Club HE DRAMATIC CLUB of the Junior High School came into existence at the beginning of the school year under the direction of Miss Belonga. Clubs have come and clubs have gone since it’s organization, yet the Dramatic Club has pursued its way onward to a definite goal. Membership was limited to the eighth and ninth grade students, that the club might not become too unwieldly. The member ship this year was one hundred seventy-five. The club began its activities with a Hallowe’en party. Shortly after a cast was selected by Miss Belonga, and the officers of the club, for the performance of “Yanki San.” From this per formance, which was exceedingly well given, a sum of approxi mately $300 was realized. We are hoping, next year, to continue and improve upon our record of this year and add many more books to our library. A school with no library is certainly not to be desired. Recog nizing this fact, the Dramatic Club chose as its goal the con tribution of a library to the Junior High School. With the money from their first play, the library was started. Several of the students have also donated books. LIBRARIAN From a meager beginning, the library grew until it numbered almost five hundred volumes, including two sets of encyclopedias. The circulation averages about one hundred books a day, so the librarian, Miss Helen Schroeder, reports. The Junior High School thus vouched their gratefulness to the club and to Miss Belonga whose mission made the library possible. One Hundred Two

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One Hundred Three

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Our Girls MRS. PATTERSON Dean of Girls HEY are just like the majority of girls today. What we mean by this is, they are active, in for fun, work, and the spirit of the times. Are they perfect? No. Could any be so? They are a united bunch. Should one go wrong immediately condemnation on the faces of their classmates is seen. The wrong must be righted. Censure, when min istered, is accepted in quiet humility and an effort at once is made to be re-instated. Plans, aims or schemes need only to be suggested and our girls line up, fall in, and the task, be it easy or hard, is accomplished. Are there little ripples on the surface, when things do not go just right? Certainly, but by tactful judg ment these little frictions bring us in closer contact with one another and all is quietly adjusted and work continues. The team work which our superintendent so thor oughly instills in his faculty is passed on through the teachers to the pupils and work in all lines runs smoothly and joyfully to a complete unison. I believe our girls love their school and its social environment. The School of Life The pupil sits in the Latin class Listless and eager for t’me to pass Over the printed page he gazes Then his eyes to the window he raises. Oh the new green fields and flowers of May And the brooklet singing and laughing at play No wonder the pupil imprisoned in school Longs for the Outdoors, fragrant and cool. But studies come first and pleasure follows So Cup of Duty to the dregs he swallows And attention gives to the Master’s word Throughout the schoolroom as ’tis heard. Heard by the pupils hard at work Learning a lesson that one never shirks, Preparing himself for the Lesson of Life That is learned by the hardest of trouble and strife. But learn it we must and never give up If to our Master we try to live up. Live up to his teaching, He is generous to give, Helping each pupil, the right way to live. So while in school keep working ever For there’ll come a time when you can sever The Binding Tie in the Meadow’s Green— Find the promised land that you have seen. One Hundred Four

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bc.th fli oh. RathSa^lcr^C&tMi V k f ir*4*. Z Se.igh ton Pc aroso B<}4Uj*5J/Mgf*-. rt*-fit** 6Stx.fl 'Advisor MissHolmes -r Eth ehfnU. ttlo -Ci r %, One Hundred Five

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Junior High Girls Claim State Championship The St. Petersburg Junior High School Girls have one of the best, if not the best, junior high basket ball teams in the state. Under the able leadership of Miss Olive Parks, coach, a fast and smooth working team was turned out. This is proven by the fact that they played off a hard schedule with five wans and no defeats and two more games left to play. These are expected to be easy victories, as they are to be played with teams who have already been met and defeated by large margins at the hands of the fast local team. Due to their record they have a strong claim for the state title. Their record is as follows: 23—St. Petersburg-Woodrow Wilson (Tampa) 13 25—St. Petersburg-Woodrow Wilson (Tampa) 11 22"—St. Petersburg-New Port Richey. 6 The leading scorers were: Martine Pearce .... Myrtle Moorefield Margaret Simpson 51—St. Petersburg-Clearwater. 4 30—St. Petersburg-George Washington (Tampa) ... 6 151—Opponents ... 40 FIELD GOALS FREE THOWS TOTALS 36 6 78 27 8 62 5 1 11 Totals 68 15 151 Boys’ Basketball The local Junior High Boys’ Basketball team this year was of high calibre, but due to a late start was not in the best of condition for its fij*st games. After the initial game with New Port Ritchey the boys began to improve wonderfully under the excellent supervision of their new coach, “Lefty” Zimmerman and at the end of the season were just rounding into form. The record was as follows: 4—St. Petersburg-Tampa. 38 1—St. Petersburg-Tampa. 25 14—St. Petersburg-New Port Ritchey. 24 28—St. Petersburg-Clearwater 8 2—St. Petersburg-New Port Ritchey. 19 49—Opponents 114 The leading Scores were: Dan Cunha ... 14 points Ben Green 13 points Kenneth Johnson ... 9 points Junior High Baseball Team The Junior High baseball team was one of the strongest Junior High nines in this part of the state. They faced the hardest schedule ever undertaken by a local junior high team and worked hard, determined to win. The team was built around last year’s lettermen, composed of Captain Charlie Carter, Henry Carr and Ben Greene, with much other excellent material to round it out. The team was well coached by Earl “Lefty” Zimmerman, former high school star, and had a successful season. One Hundred Six

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One Hundred Seven

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One Hundred Eight

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One Hundred Nine

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One Hundred Ten

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COHTBHT£> cHlumru cNeius

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Recollections From the Diary of A. Alumnus. March 17—Waiting in the lobby of the Wiltmore hotel today, expecting old “Pop” Hudson, the famous professor and scholar to show up (by the way, they used to call him Elmer in his younger days, but now he’s so well loved by everyone that they call him just plain “Pop”) who should come walking through but King Chase, that old rapscallion who used to keep our high school principal’s head full of grey hairs. Naturally, I was mighty glad to see him and hej seemed glad to see me again. We flopped on a settee and began to talk over old times. I had gotten completely out of touch with the old gang, but King knew all about them. Before long “Pop” showed up, greeting King in his usual digfinified manner. We certainly had a glorious hour. “Our old friend ‘Hambones’ Frampton is editor of the Compton County Gazette now You know he always did like newspaper work.” “Yes, he was always writing. He’s got the best little weekly in the country now,” King filled in what “Pop” had forgotten. “Speaking of writing, have you heard that Frank Walker has just finished his ninth novel, ‘The Blood Red Sun’? I understand Eddie Middleton is publishing it. Eddie has certainly stepped out.” I knew that much to be so. “I wonder what the other classes did for the honor of the old high school after they got into the new building?” mused Professor Hudson. “Well, I don’t know what they did in school, hut I know that Wildred Norton and Sam -Long got married not long after they graduated,” I told him. It drew a whistle from Hudson. “I didn’t know Long,” he said, “but I did know Mildred. I am told that Dorothy Coe is married too.” “Yeh,” they all get that way,” King cut in in his dry manner. “That’s no miracle though,” I told him. “You know Bernette Aikin, Jeanne Case, and Dorothy Lapham, who were always found together? Well, they’ve separated! Never seen in each other’s company any more.” “My Gosh!” King burst out. “That’s not at all like what happened to Mary Buhner. She got all hooked up to “Doc” York, the tooth expert.” “Such are the ways of fame,” quoth Hudson. “There was J. B. Hall, he of the neat clothes. He’s a regular guy now, working with an electric light line gang—and Roger Randall is dealing in real estate. He was always a he-man, but one never knows.” “I’ll say they don’t,” King agreed, “look at Oliver Richmond, the chap who was always bashful. He’s fast now, I’ll tell you. Got pinched for speeding not long ago. And Paul Armstrong is just as quiet as ever.” “Speaking of quiet people. Remember Ralph Bevier? That old boy quit Georgia Tech and went back to St. Petersburg.” “Yeh,” King spoke up. “that brings back old Hank Baynard, of “Charley’s Aunt” fame. He and “Stuffy” Livingston went to Florida State. Livingston, you know, was the best football captain in the state, so it was said, and Hank was no slouch himself.” “Well,” Hudson spoke reminiscently, “all the good looking ones are not married yet. There’s Eloise Caswell, the last I heard of her she was teaching school back in the old town.” “Uh-huh, and Marie Proctor was selling stationery the last I knew of her,” mused Chase, “she was another beauty, you know.” One Hundred Twelve

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Recollections From the Diary of A. Alumnus. “Quite so,” Hudson agreed. “While we’re speaking of keen girls,” I added, “don’t forget Mart Sterchi. She was right there with the old basketball, and she hasn’t deserted the game either.” “By the way, getting back to the Buhners, Pauline drops around to the old burg now and then,” said I. “She raises the roof every time, too.” “And getting back to basketball,” King reminded us, “Helen Lynch wasn’t slow by any means. She went up to the Women’s College and made her mark.” “I say,” I cut in, “do you remember petite little Jennie Howard? She’s cutting a big figure in some bank I think. Anyway, she took up that sort of work.” “They followit up don’t they?” King grinned. “There’s Walter Seavey, who started as circulation manager of the Independent. He’s on the New York Times now.” “That’s something like Jeff Moshier and Powell Majors,” said Hudson. “They’re editing the Greenwich Village News.” “Yes, and Dale Drum is still clerk of the municipal court back in old St. Pete,” King reminded us. “Liz Miller, you remember her, she’s still vamping ’em.” “You were speaking of journalists a moment ago,” I said. “Don’t forget that Ed Nippert was somewhat of an ink-slinger. He’s sporting editor of the Chicago Tribune right today.” “They’r-e not all away up there though,” King said. “I think “Prunes” Allen is still fitting clothes in the Rutland store.” “That may be so,” I replied, “but there’s Johnny Walker, he owns his own soda fountain and it’s the gathering place of the younger social set. Class you know, and all that.” “High still,” Hudson carried on, “Merl Barnd, who has been fighting under the name of “Kid Lightning” bids fair to become the world’s champion heavyweight boxer.” That revealed the Professor’s pet hobby. “I hear that Ed Ingram is head pressman of the Independent now,” I states casually. “Golly!” King ejaculated. “There’s no end to them is there? I heard the other day that Marjie Collany is one of the highest paid physical directors in the country.” “That’s nothing,” I put in. “Robert Hume and Walter Anderson have just patented their “Escalamotomentalicisticizer,” that marvelous machine that thinks for them and takes strain off their brains.” “Well, they’ll make a pot of money off that,” King agreed, “but none of them got rich any quicker than Fred Bender. He’s made a million with his chain of pawnshops, you know.” “What do you thing of that?” Hudson exclaimed. “They get up fast don’t they? May Belle Gautier, I hear, is now a United States senator and has her eye on the Presidential chair.” “But say!” King startled us. “Have you heard about Mary Kline? By thunder! she’s the star of them all in Ziegfield Junior’s Follies chorus and making a barrel of money.” “And Matthew Morrison finally licked Bill Tilden,” I added. “But poor old A1 Swift is still in the garage business. He’s getting along. Gladys Brooks stepped up, though. She has been acclaimed a worthy successor to Sarah Bernhardt.” And so we went on until King suggested a drink so we all went up to Ritola’s and knocked off a couple of Hay Highballs. They’re awful dry. [The End] One Hundred Thirteen

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Junior-Senior Banquet HE Junior-Senior banquet which was held at the Soreno Hotel April 3, was most unusual, since it represented a short aeroplane ride. The recep tion was held in the ball room, with a receiving line made up of the president, vice-president and advisers of each class. The banquet proper began at nine o’clock when the guests took their places at the tables which were decorated with yellow flowers and nut cups, in the shape of tiny aeroplanes. The same idea was carried out in the program and menu. With Harry McCardell as toastmaster the program began by the christening of the good plane “Gaiety.” The following toasts were given, which followed out still fur ther the idea of an aeroplane journey: Taking Off M a r garet Pearce Dual Work C aryl Aikin Worthy Wings J a mes Olsen Intercepted Melody.. J u n i or Orchestra Response M o r r ison Pearce Here's to the Pilot A ustin Wilder Response C aptain Lynch Stunting .Martha Oxford Our Moorings D a n Workeizer Response . R obert Walden Solo Flying .William Anderson Concerning Propellers... .Donald Cushman Response M i ss Center Stunting B y Sophomores Gas J o e Fickling An Angle Dive K enneth Jones Response L ynda Walker Goggles C atherine Cook Clouds and Showers.. D o nald Le Brant Landing .Tom Gramling The Juniors concluded the affair with singing an original song to the Seniors. The Class of ’26 and its adviser deserve much credit for the way in which they handled the great social event of the school year. One Hundred Fourteen

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The New High School 6W iHEN on last March 3, the city of St. Petersburg passed a bond issue by a majority of ten to one, guaranteeing $1,160,000 to be used for a wide program of high school expansion, it marked the largest vote and majority ever recorded for a bond issue in St. Petersburg, and also was a splendid tribute to the official organization, loyalty, and sacrificial spirit of the Eligh School administra tion and student body. The bond issue is now being used to carry out a program, perfected and adopted by the local board of school trustees. The program is unique in that it groups all the educational units of a school system around a single campus. The initial work consists in the erection of a $850,000 Central High School building and of a intermediate building to cost $100,000. W. B. Itner, of St. Louis, who was the builder of the present High School and who is recognized as the greatest school architect in the country today, is in charge of the designing and construction of what will prove to be one of the worldÂ’s finest and most adequate high school educational plants. The Central High School, which will occupy about one and one-half block in the south central section of the twenty acre campus, will face south on Fifth, Avenue North. It will be constructed on the lines of modified Spanish architecture, will be two stories high, and will contain, besides an auditorium which will seat 2,000 per sons, fifty-seven class rooms. The auditorium stage, in addition to its use in pre senting plays which may require even the largest casts and grandest stage fixtures, will be employed as an indoor gymnasium, divided by a steel curtain into two separate sections, each accomodating 80 physical training students. There will be two study halls, adjoining a large central library, and a smaller auditorium, seating 150 persons, to be used for special student conferences and small meetings, such as those of the Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior WomanÂ’s Club, and Civic League. Other features of the new building will include five special student rooms for extra school activities, such as the two publications, girlsÂ’ and boysÂ’ reception rooms, two large reception rooms for teachers, eleven vocational training rooms to care for Domestic Science, Manual Training, and commercial courses, four science laboratories and two lecture rooms, music and art rooms, a dental clinic, two offices for nurses and medical attendants, and a reception room for the medical clinic. Adjoining the main building and of a design in harmony with the Spanish style, will be a large cafeteria with tables for seven hundred and a possible seating capacity of one thousand. This cafeteria will be connected with the High School by means of two covered archways. Here also will be showers and special club rooms for boys, containing billiard and pool tables, as well as other helpful indoor games. Girls too will have similar club rooms at their disposal. Under the direction of expert engineers, there will be layed out two baseball diamonds, a gridiron, a running track circling the field, and a smaller track on which exercises may be executed with no interference from other quarters of the grounds. The laying of the first stone of the new plant marks the realization of a four yearsÂ’ effort on the part of Captain Lynch, superintendent of St. PetersburgÂ’s public schools, to give the cityÂ’s youth the utmost in the way of thoroughly modern and entirely com plete educational facilities. One Hundred Fifteen

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P£DnAM'S YOURt WELCOME Mo J N W W UYED HAPPILY EVER AFTER ?" FROM CHATTAHOOCHEE ImOAVW E, LEE (Reformed) matter v i lce i KENNETH JAMIESONS BiRTHOAY PARTY Hundred Sixteen

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'so YOU KNOW PARIS TOO! "DIANE, I JUST CAN'T TELL YOU HOW THIS MAKES ME FEEL "who WANTS A HUSBAND SET tin' so we're giving the rector this watch One Hundred Seventeen

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Thank You HIS year the Senior Class presented the comedy drama (Thank You) by Winchell Smith and Tom Cushing. The action took place in the study at St. Mark’s Rectory where the Rev. Lee was discussing the arrival of his brother’s (little girl). His congregation as sembled, bringing gifts for the child. As he thanked them, Diane Lee entered, and astonished the assembly by her age and stylish clothes. The girls of the church gave a tea for Miss Lee. At the same time Mr. Lee asked the vestry for a raise in salary and was refused. Diane believing she was the cause of the refusal decided to leave, but this her uncle would not allow. Then Kenneth Jamieson came to the rectory to make ar rangements for his Aunt’s funeral. He fell in love with Diane and to be near her decided to work on his father’s farm, and she became her Uncle’s housekeeper. A small weekly paper printed a scandal involving Mr. Lee, Diane and Kenneth. Betsy Blodgett did her share of spread ing the news. Mrs. Morton Jones tried to induce Diane to leave Dedham, but was worsted by Diane and left in a rage. The church vestry voted to dismiss the rector. Cornelius Jamieson entered and was convinced by his son that the minister should be helped. They fought the battle together, and won. At the same time Diane received her inherited fortune and henceforth, she and Mr. Lee had adequate funds to do as they pleased. The last scene, a birthday surprise for Kenneth, ended in his and Diane’s engagement. As the curtain fell, the entire cast danced, and sang “I Want To Be Happy.” One Hundred Eighteen

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How nice it will be when we are out of school, nothing to do but be a lawyer or a business man—plenty of time to sleep and do all the other things we never have time for now. ^ % & & Mr. Greer is wrong. Don’t try to 1-a-u-g-h when you get in trouble at the office. & & % % Summer here, and summer there, and summer everywhere And summer on the mourner’s bench, but that is only fair. & % % A PROPOSITION Given—You have a girl, you love her. To Prove—That she loves you. Proof—You are a lover. All the world loves a lover. She is all the world to you. Therefore—She loves you. Standing with reluctant feet Where the hall and office meet. % % % As a three hundred pound Hindo flapper said, “I am all going to waiste!” & % % % The latest model of alarm clocks is called, “Macbeth.” It murders sleep. % & % % Face powder never tastes as good as it smells. Teacher to Student-^*You come early of late. You used to come behind, before, but now you’re first, at last. One Hundred Nineteen

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One Hundred Twenty

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^'SS. LAN E ( ^ another, "pack 7 0F Pink a d M ITS Pl€AS e ? MOURNER'S BENCH BE 5 e AT G 3 > 'I USED THAT J He AD AC H e. on e th e /A.W IMPRESSION Of THE OFFICE BY ONE WHO HAS NEVER BEEN THERE-* COOPGlT —o One Hundred Twenty-one

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Drew Walker—Did you know Bob Cermack blew off his finger in the Chemistry Lab last period Paul Boardman—Isn’t it funny what some people do to get their names in the paper ? ^ ^ % Miss Wilder—“What’s the difference between square and square root?” Helen Moser—“I’ll bite, what is it?” % % % Vi EMBARRASSING MOMENTS Walking down the street with a cop friend who thoughtlessly puts his hand on your shoulder. Opening your locker in the presence of a teacher and having a girl’s hat drop out. % & % & Little drops of acid Little bits of zinc, Give us lots of learning But raise an awful-—. % & & Joe Fickling—“I wish to ask you a question concerning a tragedy.” Miss Gardner—“Well.” Joe Fickling—“What is my grade?” One Hundred Twenty-two

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(OFFtce) Elmer Adcock—“You know that excuse you told me to tell Mr. Little when I came late this morning.” Marjorie Clark—“Yes, I said it was a sure fire excuse wasn’t it?” Elmer—“It was. He sure fired me.” % % % % Margaret Magill (Translating French)—“If you do not understand this I will do it submit. Wish you to embrace this infant? Mr., the doctor, I was about to wetly weep when the doctor cried “To the reservoire.” And left with extreme velocity. % & % % Dudley Brewer claims, “Be it ever so homely, there is no face like your own.” % % & & While working on unknowns in chemistry, Nelso Metcalf came to the door of the supply room. # Mr. Little—“What do you want?” Nelson—“My bottle.” % & % % Ted Whitney—“Are you familiar with Boby Burns?” Kathryn Hopkins—“How dare you! I’m never familiar with anybody.” One Hundred Twenty-three

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N/VKoci Ft a 4 Order Crt thecourt HI ‘Wad SOVy>ft pOU->& The. fttfttQ fttfcuS "Wilt thou? “ -Off for P&U^ ma-rch fifteenth— Po-w-4 R out at 0 H dABYir U'n vmstvud "Wise ou Ou*r One Hundred Twenty-four

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£lothes do not make a man they advertise him Ill-fitting clothes advertise Carelessness; shabby clothes. Poverty;, freakish clothes, Shallowness. To you, young men and women, who are leaving your Alma Mater, holding life’s success uppermost in your minds; some of you immediately to take up your life work, others to study and travel during the summer in preparation to furthering your education by entering next fall, the various institutions of higher learning through out the country. It makes no difference whether you choose college work, you will find all along life’s journey a person is judged to a certain extent by the first impression, a good appear ance will make that first impression right. Let Shepard & Co. help you make that first impression; for ladies’ and misses’ fine footwear and hosiery; for men and young men, clothing, shoes, hats and furnishings of the better kind. SHEPARD & CO. 353-57 Central Ave. St. Petersburg, Florida “Where a lasting satisfaction must follow each transaction.” One Hundred Twenty-six

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“Play More and Live Longer ’ BALLARD BROTHERS ON TAMPA BAY West Coast Headquarters For SPORTING GOODS FISHING TACKLE FIT FOR FISHING BOAT SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT We suggest that you take advantage of the wonderful opportunities offered by Pinellas County, Tampa Bay, the Gulf of Mexico, their Beaches and Tributaries, for ALL Out-of-Door Sports Twelve Months Every Year and enjoy the most healthful recreation in the most glorious climate in the world. We cordialy invite you to make Our Store Your Headquarters while in the “Sunshine City.” “Fish More and Live Longer” THE MARINE STORE ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA 100 Central Avenue Phone 104+ GARDEN GROVE In the Healthful Hills of Hernando County Citrus and Other Fruits, Trucking, General Farming, Dairying, Poultry. Close to Tampa and St. Petersburg. %  tip GARDEN GROVE, Inc. 412 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida One Hundred Twenty-seven

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BOYER & HAYWARD APPAREL FOR MEN Featuring ADLER COLLEGIAN CLOTHES EMERY SHIRTS AND IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC GOLF ATTIRE “Our Label Is Your Guarantee of Satisfaction” 269 Central Avenue PASADENA ON THE GULF Cordially invites the Superintendent of our splendid Public Schools and all of his co-workers—the teachers—to conduct groups of children to our Nurseries where they will have an opportunity to study the effects produced by careful and intelligent nursing of plants for the beautification of the new resort city Pasadena is now building on the West Coast of St. Peters burg. We believe teachers appreciate that today one of the outstanding funda mentals of a complete education is—the understanding of the importance of beautification. The children of today are cultivating a knowledge of trees, plants and flowers. The Pasadena Nurseries are a college. PASADENA ESTATES JACK TAYLOR, President By WILLIAM C. FREEMAN Advertising Director One Hundred Twenty-eight

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Gamble Paint and Hardware Company 756 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida DISTRIBUTORS HARDWARE PEE GEE HOUSE FURNISHINGS PAINTS AND VARNISHES SPORTING GOODS F. L. BADGER Featuring Fine Footwear for Ladies and Children Phoenix Hosiery 523 Central Ave. St. Petersburg, Florida F. H. Littered & Co., Inc. LUMBER-MILL WORK—SASH AND DOORS — BUILDERS’ HARDWARE — PAINTS AND VARNISHES — CE MENT — PLASTER —LIME—BRICK •hollow TILE. “Everything for the Builder” 1315 First Ave., South 21st Street and Third Ave. South Phones—1710—1711—48—1225R One Hundred Twenty-nine

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Roberts-Bize Motor Company, Inc. We aim to merit your confidence by giving you a “Satisfied Service” in every transaction. AUTHORIZED DEALERS LINCOLN FORD FORDSON TO SEE RIGHT SEE FRED T. SMITH Optometrist — Mfj. Optician PHONE 135-M 610 Central Ave. St. Petersburg, Florida McCRAE MOTOR CAR CO. INCORPORATED Buick Dealers United States Tires—Accessories “If IPs for An Auto We Have It” One Hundred Thirty

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PF'hat the ^President i it | >HE American people, taken as a whole, have been very quick to grasp the benefits that result from thrift and industry, and the cultivation of a saving disposition. They have not only deposited money in banks, but invested it in all kinds of business enterprises. “Those who have started in this direction have always found that real satisfaction arises, not from indulgence, but from achievement. Those who save regularly find an increasing power, not only of finances, but of character. It is through the use of such power, for wise and just ends, that we can better our whole industrial and commercial establishment. “It is not too much to say that the growth of America as we know it, has been the result of these agencies. It has been, not only the cision and high purpose of our forefathers, but likewise their work and their savings, which have created our country, and on the continuation of which the whole future and welfare of our people rests. This habit of saving is a constructive virtue. “There is an inescapable personal responsibility for the develop ment of character, of industry, of thrift and of self-control. These do not come from the government, but from the people themselves.” CALVIN COOLIDGE. 1 St of St. ‘Petersburg, Florida WITH TRUST Department One Hundred Thirty-one

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HIGH SCHOOL ACTIVITIES Are published in Detail &t. Petersburg 0tmea Experienced reporters are assigned to all High School af fairs in athletics, dramatics, classroom and other activities. If you would keep in touch with the progress of the St. Petersburg High School Read the Petersburg 0tmea “St. Petersburg's Biggest and Best Newspaper” Every Morning in the Year Frat Clothes FOR YOUNG MEN APPLE SAUCE Said a young collegian home for Easter when someone suggested that trousers would be narrower. We’re continuing to “balloon” ours; the way younger men want them— the way they get them here. Wider shoulders—trim hips—oversize trousers; that’s our spring style combination. “SPARE” TROUSERS WITH EACH SUIT. ENT&ENGLISH Mhe DECO r cT/cpn THE FOOT \NHUL Quality is tk true test of Economy 333 CENTRAL AVENUE One Hundred Thirty-two

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PINELLAS COUNTY POWER CO. “LIGHT” “HEAT “POWER” “AT YOUR SERVICE” Phone 136 506 Central Ave. FENDERS’ PHARMACY W. C. FENDER We deliver anything we sell We sell anything you find in a good drug store. PHONE 774 Second St. and Seventh Ave. North WHEN IT’S AUTO PAINTING AND TOPS say it to OXFORD “Cooled by Typhoon Fans” HENNINGTON’S MODERN OASIS “A St. Petersburg Institution” Sea Foods, Steaks, Chops, Dainty Salads, Sandwiches of all kinds. AT [Catering to after-theater and dancing parties. 243 Central Avenue One Hundred Thirty-three

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And Now— THE FUTURE The study period is over. Whether you pause for a moment before entering higher institutions of learning or step out into a busy world where you will find ready burdens and tasks, you young men and young women of St. Petersburg have ideals to cherish—and apply. And you have a debt to pay. The Sunshine City must depend upon you to mold that clay of the future with skill and courage. St. Petersburg must depend upon you to carry out the vision of its greatness which its founders conceived and which men and women today are making a reality. For years to come, you will repay your city for the education it has given you, for the wholesome home life you have enjoyed, through par ticipation in the upbuilding of Florida’s finest city. If you are loyal to your city—if you pay your debt—you will build rather than tear down ; you will think and act constructively and not destructively. You will give more than you take away. And you will discharge a great portion of your debt to the Sunshine City through service in the St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce—the body devoted unswervingly to the upbuilding of your city. Your valedictory to school books will mark the beginning of your greater opportunities. St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce One Hundred Thirty-four

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Don’t Suffer With Asthma Get a Bottle of SUNSHINE ASTHMA REMEDY FREER’S PHARMACY Corner Central and Ninth St. St. Petersburg, Florida Let us equip you with your hardware wants. We carry in stock thousands of items that you are constantly in need of. Make our store your head quarters. Walden Hardware Company “We deliver the goods” 337 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida To Know the Worth of a Dollar is an Incalculable Asset Students Start a Savings Account—Our little Nickle-plated Bungalow Savings Bank will be a Big Help to you. DEPOSIT A DOLLAR GET A SAVINGS BANK FREE NO ACCOUNT TOO SMALL ALEXANDER NATIONAL BANK WHERE 7TH MEETS CENTRAL John F. Alexander, Pres. W. T. Baynard, Active V.-P. John N. Thorn, V.-P. C. S. Hinds, Cashier One Hundred T hirty-five

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PHONE 1257 PENINSULAR FRUIT COMPANY, Inc. GROWERS AND PACKERS Grapefruit Oranges Tangerines VISIT OUR PACKING HOUSE TVe make a specialty of express shipments 33 Seventh Street South St. Petersburg, Florida FUHRMANN'CHENEY' LEONARD REALTY CO. FLORAL VILLA PARK See our salesman. 9th Ave. North—100 Ft. Boulevard WONDERFUL HOMESITES— SPLENDID INVESTMENTS Walking distance of the new $1,000,000 High School. Phone 838 F. C. L. Realty Co., 561 Central Ave. HERE ALL THE YEAR DEEM REALTY COMPANY A REALTORS f/ 1 • Acreage, Homes, Lots. Phone 914-R Realty Arcade, 714 Central Ave., Room 102 WE WISH YOU SUCCESS While You Succeed (( Let Us Serve You' SUMNER GROCERY COMPANY Marion Sumner, Mgr. Phone 1248 Cor. Seventh Ave. and Second St. N. One Hundred Thirty-six

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Lincoln Ford Fordson Have you seen our new story building where it Meet your friends here. show rooms? Also our new threeis a pleasure to serve your needs? ALBRIGHT MOTOR CO., INC. Established 1915 Phone 1980 Third and Third South Modern Eleven Story Each Room Fireproof Building With Private Bath PHEIL HOTEL European OPEN THE YEAR ROUND R. T. THORNE, MGR. St. Petersburg, Florida YEAR Â’ROUND REALTY SERVICE C. BUCK TURNER CO. REALTORS REAL ESTATE, RENTALS, LOANS, MORTGAGES 147 Central Avenue Phone 6085 St. Petersburg, Florida One Hundred Thirty-seven

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W H E N you are thinking of graduation, shoes, socks and stockings, remember St. Petersburg’s headquar ters for stylish and comfortable footwear. W. L. TILLINGHAST “FEET FITTER’’ 421 Central Ave., ST. PETERSBURG, FLA., Phone 366J SCOTT MUSIC COMPANY EVERYTHING FOR THE MUSIC LOVER 470 Central Ave. Phone 1258 Pearce Drug Company INCORPORATED SELLS EVERYTHING FOR STUDENT AND FACULTY 445 Central Avenue Phones 637 and 565 St. Petersburg, Fla. One Hundred Thirty-eight

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SPAULDING SPORTING GOODS If IVe Haven't Got It, We ll get It Everything for TENNIS—GOLF—HUNTING—GYMNASIUM WORKFISHING TALK IT OVER WITH US HALL HARDWARE CO. 616-618 Central Ave. Ladies’ Rest Room w w E Gilmore Realty Company E S 613 Central Avenue R E St. Petersburg, E L Florida N L T THE HIBBS FISH COMPANY INCORPORATED WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FRESH AND SALT WATER FISH Office and Packing House Phone 113-L 960 Third St. South St. Petersburg, Fla. LARUS-BATTLE COMPANY Clothiers and Mens Furnishers POST OFFICE ARCADE ST. PETERSBURG FLORIDA One Hundred Thirty-nine

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ChildsÂ’ Pharmacy The Corner Drug Store Corner of Fourth and Central PHONE 81 MAGAZINES POSTCARDS STATIONERY OUT-OF-TOWN NEWSPAPERS MULHOLLEM & WEST Two Stores 239 Central Ave. 461 Central Ave. ST. PETERSBURG FLORIDA BOUTON & CERMAK An Organization With a Legion of Friends You can rely on values given by this organization 519 Central Avenue Phone 555 One Hundred Forty

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POMELLO PARK and TOWNSITE P O M E L LO is a proposed city in the heart of Pomello Park. An acreage subdivision consisting of twelve thousand acres. Pomello Park was sold out in ten acre units very rapidly, a few of them remaining at reason able price and terms. Pomello is the townsite that we expect to develop on account of the expected activity surrounding it, due to grove and trucking development, and the large num ber of investors collected in this township in Manatee County. Highways from five sources and a railroad come into this property. Two of the highways and the railroad go through this townsite. It lies on the through highway from Bradenton, Arcadia, ConnerÂ’s Highway, Palm Beach and Miami. Lots and ten acre tracts may be bought at a nominal price for a short time, to encourage development. The owner is a former school man and will take a personal interest in school teachers and school children who invest on very attractive terms and prices. HOUR REALTY COMPANY GREEN-RICHMAN ARCADE 689 Central Avenue ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Phone 1854 One Hundred Forty-one

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LE GRAND HASKIN Optometrist and Manufacturing Optician 467 Central Avenue Phone 455-J St. Petersburg, Florida SHORE ACRES “ON TAMPA BAY” The Boardman-Frazee Realty Company, Inc. REALTORS 176 Central Avenue St. Petersburg Florida CENTRAL CAFE E. TRANGAS, Manager FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN OPEN DAY AND NIGHT ALL YEAR ’ROUND PHONE 607 248 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida One Hundred Forty-two

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COBBLE AND OSBORNE 700 NINTH STREET NORTH FRESH MEATS AND FANCY GROCERIES The old firm in the new store We deliver your dinner Phone 469 Pinellas Dairy Company Manufacturers of I^oinsettia Ice Cream Pasteurized Dairy Products Phone 233 112 Second Street South St. Petersburg, Fla. HARCOURT & COMPANY INCORPORATED LOUISVILLE, KY. Commercial and Engraving Stationery Commencement Invitations Dance Programs and Invitations Christmas Greeting Cards Fraternity Stationery Calling Cards Favors “Favorably Known Throughout the Nation” One Hundred Forty-three

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As Mirror Lake Reflects the High School so does the Central National reflect the com mercial and home activities of St. Petersburg. Many parents in the Sunshine City have established voluntary trusts with the Central National to provide a steady income that the education of their sons and daughters may not be interrupted by unexpected emergencies. And here at the Central National we welcome the thrift accounts of high school students, knowing that in serving them we are assisting in the future advancement of our city, state and nation. Central National Bank AND TRUST COMPANY St. Petersburg, Fla. Resources More Than $7,000,000 One Hundred Forty-four

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PAUL AND DAVIS FURNITURE CO. INCORPORATED Cash Furniture House F. J. BURNS REALTY CO. Owners and Developers of WATERVIEW PARK on the Water FOREST HILLS and BELLECREST HEIGHTS on Disston at Central o ATTENTION High School Students When in Need of High Class ENGRAVING OR RELIEFOGRAPHING Keep Your Local Dealer in Mind Pinellas Printing & Stationery Co. 265 Central Avenue Phone 4 ENDICOTT FUNERAL COMPANY, INCORPORATED 649 SECOND AVENUE SOUTH PHONE 46 One Hundred Forty-five

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THE HOWELL SHOP EXCLUSIVE MILLINERY and READY-TO-WEAR 478 First Avenue North Phone 1412 St. Petersburg, Fla. Uptown Store Downtown Store 842 Central Avenue 428 Central Avenue Near Ninth St. Near Fifth St. TWO STORES Arthur L. Johnson Devoted to High Class Men and Boys Goods St. Petersburg, Fla. Final Issue of the Palmetto and Pine Containing A Complete Summary of the 1924-25 Year OUT SOON “From Tree to Trade” PINELLAS LUMBER COMPANY BUILDING MATERIALS 1400 Central Ave. Phones 1996-1997 St. Petersburg, Fla. One Hundred Forty-six

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THE FRIEND OF THE STUDENTS THE HIGH SCHOOL LUNCH ROOM MRS. W. L. B. TWISS RUTLANDÂ’S CAMPUS TOGS CLOTHES FOR YOUNG MEN RUTLAND COMPANY Second door from Northrup-Rutland Co. CUNNINGHAM BROTHERS General Hardware and Builders' Supplies 861 CENTRAL AVENUE We Solicit Your Business One Hundred Forty-seven

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For Today’s News Read Styf “THE SUNSHINE PAPER” Phone 1420 and it will be delivered at your door IF IT’S FOR AN AUTOMOBILE, WE HAVE IT Behind the School In Everything 125 Third Street South Phone^.799 ACE AUTOMOTIVE CO. WINSTON S. BRANNING REALTOR—REAL ESTATE Specializing in Close-In Property St. Petersburg, Fla. No. 2 Fourth St. South radio Frank N. Barhydt radio 544 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida A RADIO SET FOR EVERY PURSE Radiola III -----$ 35.00 Radiola Super-Heterolyne $220.00 Radiola Amplifier 30.00 Radiola X 245.00 Radiola III-A 05.00 Radiola Super-VIII 425.00 Radiola Regen oflex 150.00 Radiola 4 275.00 ATWATER KENT SETS—Demonstrations given free on appointment. We also have parts and supplies for all RADIO makes. “ASK FRANK.” One Hundred Forty-eight

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OLLEGE and High School Annuals have come to be recognised as an institution. Year by year they are growing in import ance and number. They are growing, too, in beauty and character, so that many high school annuals now excel the books issued from colleges a few years ago. In this ad vancement we have had no small part. For more than twentyfive years we have been helping create representative annuals for schools thruout the middle west and south and thru our help ful co-operation have won a position of recognised leadership among annual engravers. Last year three of our annuals won four first and second prises in state and national contests—a testi monial to our service of which we are proud. This is one of 154 annuals, published in eleven states, that bear the Indeeco imprint this year. Not content to rest on laurels won we have worked out plans to make our service to 1926 staffs more helpful than ever. Editors, business managers or faculty advisors are invited to write and give us opportunity to explain how Indeeco Service can help them publish the best annual they have ever had. Indianapolis Engraving Company 222 EAST OHIO STREET INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA •j -—--s> One Hundred Forty-nine

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Jacksonville Miami Tampa Orlando St. Petersburg Exclusive Florida Representative Stienway Kurtzmann Francis Bacon Philpitt and Duo-Art Reproducing Pianos Aeolian Pianola Players Estey Organs Florida’s Complete Music Stores Everything Musical S. ERNEST PHILPITT 444 Central Avenue %  Sl, Petersburg, Fla. Victrolas Victor Records Musical Instruments Sheet Music Exclusive Representatives Buescher Band Instruments Vega Banjos Martin Mandolins Maurer Guitars Philpitt Ukeleles POTTS GROCERY COMPANY 522 9th St. South Phone 1096-LL We have the very best western meats and fancy groceries Free Delivery ONCE AGAIN WE GREET YOU Let us remind you of our store full of attractive gifts Remember NORRIS AND WHITMAN’S CANDIES and EASTMAN KODAKS J. D. PEARCE INCORPORATED 822 Central Ave. “OPEN ALL NIGHT” One Hundred Fifty

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St. PetersburgÂ’s Best Store NORTHRUP RUTLAND COMPANY NEWLY REMODELED DRY GOODS READY-TO-WEAR HOUSE FURNISHINGS MILLINERY Exclusive French Room Juvenile Dept. Drinking Fountains Rest Rooms Phone 1756 A. G. White, Manager WHITE, GARNER & WALKER REAL ESTATE BROKERS 556 Central Ave. St. Petersburg Phone 1539 ACREAGE IN LARGE TRACTS ALL OVER FLORIDA One Hundred Fifty-one

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OWEN-COTTER JEWELRY COMPANY Headquarters for GRADUATION GIFTS and FLORIDA SOUVENIRS CLASS RINGS AND PINS A SPECIALTY Central Avenue and Third Street ROSARY FOOD SHOP DELICIOUS HOME COOKED FOODS Special attention given to orders for picnics and parties. All Our Pastry Made by Women. 823 CENTRAL AVENUE THE LADIES’ EMPORIUM High-Grade Ladies’ Furnishings 4-30 Central Ave. Pheil Building OOP A O nr'ln'TOl A ^ ew hundred dollars wisely invested will be 1 O A i AAV A 11/.L> t h e means 0 f your becoming eventually inde pendently wealthy. The main thing is to get started. Your capital will increase with each investment. We make big profits for others—we will make them for you. W. McKEE KELLEY CO. 659 CENTRAL AVENUE PHONE 110 WE KNOW VALUES—OVER TWENTY-FIVE YEARS EXPERIENCE A COMPLETE REAL ESTATE, LOAN, AND INSURANCE SERVICE One Hundred Fifty-two

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THE CURIO FLORIDA GIFTS AND CURIOS Something different and characteristic Alligator Leather Goods, Armadillos, Novelty Jewelry An endless variety GARDNER & DINWOODIE 233 Central Avenue R. L. Sharp and L. P. Meares REAL ESTATE Phone 933 No. 36 Sixth St. c Q S s s s s Speaking of cross-word puzzles—do you know what these letters mean applied to our drug and soda business? SUNSHINE PHARMACY In business for your health 9th St. and 7th Ave. N. Where the car turns Telephone 1010 (ten-ten) P D Q R S V p One Hundred Fifty-three

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When you have learned to choose between the true and the false— NE lesson in living will repay those who learn it early a thousandfold ... flit is the wisdom of distinguishing the true from the false .... If The choice must be made daily, hourly,—in work and play, in winning, in losing, in getting and spending, and in sav ing and investing .... If Success, Growth, and Happiness come only when this Lesson has been learned .... "If But how shall each choice be made to insure future success? .... If There is no measuring-stick like the knowledge of the past.... If The St. Petersburg Company, agents for RIO VISTA, with its homes on Gandy Boulevard, submits its record of past accom plishment as the foundation of its bid for your future patronage and good will ... If It is a foundation on which the prospect of growth looms large and bright. THE ST. PETERSBURG COMPANY AGENTS “Rio Vista Homes — On Gandy Boulevard” 479 Central Avenue Telephone 22 One Hundred Fifty-four

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Phone 423-J HOMESTEAD TEA ROOMS SIXTH ST. AND FIRST AVE. NORTH Summer Season Board-walk—North End Ocean Grove, N. J. ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA D. W. BUDD DRUG COMPANY DRUGS AND SUNDRIES 327 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida One Hundred Fifty-five

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Office Plant 17 Third Street North 619 Ninth Street North Phone 478 Phone 430 PURVIS-FREESE CO. INCORPORATED The St. Petersburg Tailors & Dry Cleaners ODORLESS DRY CLEANING Delivery Service St. Petersburg, Fla. SOUTHERN REALTY COMPANY 557 Central Ave. Room No. 3 St. Petersburg, Fla. Harrison-Powell Company Everything for BASEBALL TENNIS GOLF FISHING HUNTING And Other Sports Central Avenue at Third Street One Hundred Fifty-six

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JOHN E. BATEMAN SUB-DIVISION OWNER AND DEVELOPER ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Phone 1233 689 Central Avenue One Hundred Fifty-seven

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Ninth Street Bank and Trust Company St. Petersburg Florida CL A FINANCIAL institution of safety and service. Unremitting attention to business details is re sponsible for success. Our bank is unexcelled in its close attention to every business detail, always in touch with activities and good place for your account. Into each life some rain must fall. Start saving now for that rainy day. For a dollar saved is a dollar earned. Use our Savings Department where four per cent is paid, compounded quarterly. Special attention is given to collections entrusted to our care, an important banking factor. “Bank with us and you may bank on us.” Ninth Street Bank and Trust Company Central Avenue at Ninth Street ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA One Hundred Fifty-eight

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SEE MR. COSGROVE Congratulations to You All We have many things to interest you in Our Gift Department Attractive Gowns and Sport Wear in Our Sport Shop Call and See Us BEECHER Central at Seventh COLE JEWELRY COMPANY Nothing But the Finest Class of Goods D i amondsB-P1 atinum Jewelry—Watches 419 Central Avenue One Hundred Fifty-nine

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The PHOTOGRAPHER in Your Town l<5SS The Franklin Studios R. Todd Dean No. 10 Sixth Street N. J. Morgan Lozo SIGA'S Phone 1286—Office 1102 Ridge Ave. S. WILLIAMS-BEERS IT’S FULL WEIGHT Ice—It’s Clean—Ice IT MELTS SLOWLY 100-12 Ninth Street North Phone 995 La Fleur Shop Say It With Flowerfone 1061, J UlLV (JlL Flowers 529 Central Avenue ALSO The “Soreno” Flower Shop E. 123 First Ave. North Phone 1144 One Hundred Sixty

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ALLENDALE TERRACE PROPERTIES Buy a lot—yes, in ALLENDALE TERRACE if you will. But our advice to the Seniors of the St. Petersburg High School is to get their hands on a little of this St. Petersburg sand, just as soon as school days are over. Cade B. Allen C. Allen & Smith Harold Smith 10 Fourth St. South Compliments of Foley Carter Insurance Agency General Insurance—Bonds—Mortgages—Real Estate 15 Fourth Street North Phones 9 and 1931 DRINK Coca-Cola—Misto Water—Wall Springs Water Misto Orange and Lime Thirst Knows No Season St. Petersburg Coca-Cola Bottling Company Phone 735 Cor. 17th St. and Central Ave. St. Petersburg, Florida One Hundred Sixty-one

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American Bank Trust Co: Of St. Petersburg, Florida Solicits Your Patronage Tourist Accounts Given Special Attention Capital -----$200,000.00 Surplus and Undivided Profits ------$200,000.00 OFFICERS A. P. Avery, Pres. D. E. Beach, Cashier Wm. King, Vice-Pres. J. A. Stringer, AssÂ’t Cashier O. G. Hiestand, 2nd Vice-Pres. E. A. Doty, AssÂ’t Cashier. A. P. Avery Wm. G. King D. E. Beach O. G. Hiestand DOES A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT PHONE 62 DIRECTORS J. JDuffy J. H. Brunjes Wm. Muir James Cribbett H. R. Frazee Geo. A. McCrea Archie Aitchison Jas. R. Bussey Geo. O. Osborne W One Hundred Sixty-two

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KIRBY’S STUDIO HIGH CLASS PORTRAITURE Ground Floor Studio—260 First Avenue N. Phone 800 One Hundred Sixty-three

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You Can be convinced in a very short time that there is a vast difference in ranges. Allow us to explain all about the ORIOLE and see the difference. C. J. GODSEY Plumbing, Steam and Gas Fitting 657 Central Ave. Phone 234 HOTEL SUWANNEE St. Petersburg, Florida The Sunshine City's Winter Home for Northern Tourists EVERY ROOM WITH BATH ELEVATOR STEAM HEAT European Plan Rates on Application J. N. Brown, Owner H. B. Churchill, Manager WEST COAST TITLE CO. ABSTRACTS OF TITLE and TITLE INSURANCE WEST COAST TITLE COMPANY O. W. GILBART Sec.-Mgr. One Hundred Sixty-four

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St. Petersburg Office Equipment Co. 650 Central Ave. EXCLUSIVE AGENCY Phone 1057 L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITERS St. Petersburg, Florida “The Sunshine City” ACREAGE ANYWHERE IN FLORIDA E. B. Willians Realty Company 685 Central Avenue Phone 1333-M Phone 1760 Phone 1760 “ WHERE QUALITY IS THE HIGHEST” Womens and Misses’ Wearing Apparel Lingerie and Millinery Furniture, Draperies, Ready-to-Wear, Silks and Linens, Hosiery, Cotton Dress Goods, Leather Novelties and Notions THE WILLSON-CHASE CO. “One of Florida’s Greatest Stores” One Hundred Sixty-five

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QJ CD c/5 -t— c/3 o c o W 2 Q —I o U Q Z c y CO Z £Q N CL, ON One Hundred Sixty-six

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649 Central Telephone 340 J. B. GREEN REALTY CO. REAL ESTATE, RENTALS AND INSURANCE “We Advertise Only Good Buys” Box 176 St. Petersburg, Fla. DANN-GEROW COMPANY BUILDERS’ SUPPLIES “A Dependable House” EVERYTHING TO BUILD WITH J. W. WILHELM Of the WILHEM UNDERTAKING CO. Has No Connection With Any Other Undertaker in This City Phone 550 One Hundred Sixty-seven

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TrSA Florida Art School wishes to express its appreciation of the services rendered by the High School, % % %  ; i The Junior Woman’s Club and The ‘ J QJJBcT Junior Chamber of Commerce. ST • PETERSBURG S. R. McIntosh, Pres. “SAY IT WITH ORDERS” When in the market for anything in the hardware line from a box of tacks to a Tractor phone one of our busy stores. Main Store, 820 Central Ave. Branch No. 1, Largo, Fla. Branch No. 2, 632 9th St. N. “Our Service Covers Pinellas Like the Dew” Campbell Hardware Company “The Fastest Growing Hardware Firm on the West Coast” DONOVAN DEVELOPMENTS LAKE PASADENA—BELLEVISTA BEACH Inter-Bay PALM HARBOR—CHAUTAUQUA Pasadena Park A total of 3145 Acres in Active Development DONOVAN & SONS INCORPORATED DONOVAN BUILDING Telephone 809 Central at Sixth St. Petersburg, Florida BAKER BROTHERS INCORPORATED Markets St. Petersburg, Fla. Tampa, Fla. Orlando, Fla. “Where Quality and Service Count” Phone 375 One Hundred S:xty-eight

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Toy Town Own a Lot for Future Reference! O! Mamma Dear, See Here, See Here! Jack and Jill went up the hill To get an education, Said Jack to Ma, “When I get through, “Let’s see the situation “Will I have money of my own “To fight the cruel world? “A TOY TOWN lot, if purchased now “Could be a weapon hurled. “Four hundred dollars buy one now, “And soon would double worth. “And a lot for Jill would be quite nice, “In four years we’d own the earth.” Toy-Town was born in Mother Goose Land, The fairies brought it here. Its value rises hour by hour, When Jack is grown—O-o-o-o-h dear! Our free bus leaves daily, except Sunday, from our office at 10:00 A. M. and 2:30 P.M. THORPE BROS. DEVELOPMENT CO. Of Florida, Owners DRIVER & TOWNSEND INCORPORATED Exclusive Selling Agents 621 Central Ave. Phone 905 One Hundred Sixty-nine

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Dedication To Next Year’s Annual Staff E hereby dedicate this page to the Annual Staff of next year. Our profound sympathies are extended to those unfortunates who are destined to lose their youth, beauty, temper, sense of humor, and many hours of sleep in their attempts to compile a publication which will enjoy a cir culation equal to that of the Saturday Evening Post and whose art department will rival a Maxfield Parrish exhibit. Ambition will sink into oblivion, your hopes and dreams of life will be shattered and changed, but you will love it and you will cherish the memory of those hours of trial spent under a 200 watt Mazda as the dearest of your school career. You will have, by the time your issue goes to press, enough “WHITE ADMITS” to repaper your bed-room—pink. You’ll laugh; you’ll cry; you’ll tear your hair until there’s no more there; you’ll learn to speak very fluently one of the most popular languages offered in the High School curriculum, profanity; you’ll wish you were dead; you’ll wish everybody else was; you’ll cuss some more and then you’ll find yourself back at the place from which you started. Our only word to you is one of caution. Don’t leave any car bolic acid, iodine, or old razor blades lying around the annual room to tempt the despondent editors to seek suicidal exits. But anyway, we wish you success in your perilous undertaking. Signed: The Tired, Frail, and Tempermental Annual Staff of 1925, After Four Months of Anguish.

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Signatures One Hundred Seventy-two

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Signatures. One Hundred Seventy-three

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EL FIN.