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Genealogy of the Jenkins family of Maryland, from 1664-1895

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Title:
Genealogy of the Jenkins family of Maryland, from 1664-1895
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Jenkins, Mary Isabella Plowden, 1844-
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[Baltimore?]
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[Place of publication not identified]
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English
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112 pages : illustrations, portrait ; 28 cm

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non-fiction ( marcgt )

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General Note:
Includes Reminiscences by Col. Jenkins of Florida; also of Col. Cyprian T. Jenkins
General Note:
At head of title: Monograph.
General Note:
By Mary Isabella Plowden Jenkins?

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029677920 ( ALEPH )
27874691 ( OCLC )
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CS71.J5 1905 ( lcc )
929.2 J52G ( ddc )

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Florida Family and Community History

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Digitized by the Internet Archive
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University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries
https://archive.org/details/genealogyofjenkiOOjenk




MONOGRAPH
GENEALOGY
OF
THE JENKINS FAMILY
OF MARYLAND
From 1664 to 1895
















MRS. MICHAEL JENKINS,
nee' Isabella Plowden Jenkins




HESE Memoirs are affectionately dedicated. to the Author's 4 cousin, Ambrosia Jenkins Faxon, whose kind: assistance in tracing correct lineage, both in foreign countries and in lower Maryland, have been most valuable in the & correction of this
Monograph.




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EFORE I commence to write up my reminiscences-written some years ago and published in the Baltimore, American-it occurred to, me that I would make an effort to include something about my ancestors, commencing with Ap. Thomas Jenkins, the original of the long line, wh 'o at that name came to America and of whom I claim to be a descendant.
It never occurred to me how difficult such a task, and how hard it is, when, undertaken, and what patience one must possess.
It is a common inheritance we all have of 'boasting of the number of our ancestors, but few seem to be aware of the grounds they have for this vanity, except traditionally. It surely never occurs to most, that there is little or nothing one can rely upon that can be found recorded, for in most of our County. records very little mention is to be found of family records; in some, especially that of births, marriages, or deaths. These were only to be seen in families alone, and are exceedingly scarce at this period.
If one will take the trouble to count back for even one hundred years, in a direct line, he will be astonished to see the result-First, you have two -father and mother; next step,, you have four-two grandfathers and two grandmothers; each of these has a father and mother; so you have four great-grandfathers 'and four great-grandmothers. Each of these, again, has two parents, so that, at the fourth generation back, you have sixteen ancestors; at the fifth, you have thirty-two; at the sixth, you have sixty-four; at the seventhY you have one hundred and twenty-eight.
7]




As you go further they multiply to thousands, and on to tens of thousands, and then hundreds of thousands, so that, if all your direct ancestors, for say twenty generations, be added together, they amount to over a million.
There is historic evidences at hand, showing that Ap. Thomas Jenkins was a nephew of Sir Leoline Jenkins, of Anglesay, Wales, who, in 1634, was the Secretary to the English Admiralty, Wilkes Street, London, a Catholic; his nephew, at his request, came over to Maryland, in company with Father White, and located first in Saint Marie's, and, in 16pi, settled upon a tract patented to him by Charles Calvert, in Charles County.
While history furnishes slightly in the first few years in relation to Thomas Jenkins-to his descendants-much has to be drawn from tradition. By tradition I do not mean a mere hearsay, wanting sufficient evidence to deserve belief, but tradition first gathered from reliable sources, coming down, from family to family, in all desirable and uncontradicted proof from generation to generation. Fortunately, testimony, found at the archives, formerly kept at Whitemarsh, Prince George County, corresponds sufficiently with trad 'itionary, to compare, as two rivulets -flowing into the same stream, nevertheless, the stream will occasionally be found discolored, or in other words, obscured.
In this effort, my purpose is to introduce the many members of the Jenkins family, in Maryland, to each other, who, perhaps, otherwise would, most of them, remain absolutely strangers. I have thought it may be, at, least-, interesting for those of one original family from whose name all of the same religious convictions and blood-kin,' should learn something of themselves. It should, at least, help them to dwell together as of old, in unity, respecting one another, as well as their name. The effort, so far, has proven much more arduous than at first thought, it would have *been, for in order to obtain anything like correct data in relation to the genealogy of a family, so numerous as that of the Jenkins, it has been a very difficult task, requiring much correspondence with those connected with the original. Most of those written to have failed to reply, and those who have done so, are, .seemingly, at fault, or take little pains to inform themselves or the writer.
When I commenced this. undertaking I was acquainted with but very few of the name, beyond my immediate connections, but, f rom one whom I did not expect, I have been able to obtain a valuable fund of information, and without this, I would have given up in sorrow, if not despair.
[8




We all know full well how deeply impressed upon the mind is the story of the religious wars of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth centuries; when Protestant Puritans, of England, contested to the death "for the Faith within them." We all know the seeds inherited there, were soon transplanted here in the New Worldtransmitted from parent to child. This bigotry soon found'a place in the several colonies, and raged with unrelenting fury in South-' ern Maryland. True it is that the tempestuous storm w I as partially dormant, slumbering, yet dangerous, ever ready to burst forth upon the slightest protest. It was in this unnatural and unwarranted strife, among the early settlers in St. Mary's and Charles Counties, a contest over the removal of the Colonial Records from Saint Mary's City to Annapolis, that many of -the most valuable deeds of estates and records of marriages, births and deaths, of these two Counties, were destroyed. It has been written, that many of these papers, official documents, were used for gun wad, by the contending parties, for and against the removal of the archives to the present location, the State Capitol, Annapolis.
It is known that in consequence of this long and unprovoked strife, many of the Jenkins family migrated to Baltimore Town and County, some to Frederick and Harford Counties, whil e some went West to Kentucky and Ohio. By this unmerited persecution, there are more of the family name in these localities than there is in our original home, Maryland.
There is a tradition, as well as a written account, of the destruction of many valuable papers in 1664, at St. Mary's Settlement, when Leonard Calvert died. Calvert, by power vested in him by his brother, named one, Thomas Green, his successor, as Governor. During the space of fourteen years he had administered the affairs of the Colony with a devoted interest and unselfish devotion. But a difficulty had occurred among the troops employed. by him to protect the Colony from Indian intrusions from th e Virginia side of the Potomac. Not being able to satisfy the claims as demanded of him, they destroyed all of his papers, documents and other valuables. It is related, that a vacuum of, at least, twenty years of historical incidents of the Colony resulted.
In 1636, the Catholic Mission numbered four Priests, including Father White, who was coadjutor, and these were constantly employed among the Indians then in, and nearby, the settlement. Peace and contentment prevailed.
91




About, and for ten years, great progress favored the settlers, and many additional grants of land were given to all who complied with the required qualification.
,It was in 1 654, for the second time, a radical change occurred, when the Colony was administered by a commission appointed by Clayborne-i4t was then that all records of the Province that could be found-in Catholic possession were seized and taken to a private house owned- and occupied by one Richard Preston, an officer of Clayborne, residing on the South bank of the Patuxant. It is con'ceded that Preston destroyed many family documents that would have furnished much information of interest to the present generation whose ancestors were of the original immigrants who came to Maryland in company with Father White.
After six years-long and dreary-the ascendancy of the Puritans was overthrown and the Proprietary Government was reinstated.
IIn i66o, many persecuted ."Friends," from Virginia, commenced to arrive, and make homes in the Colony, principally in the upper County, North ofBaltimnore.
No sooner had these good people set foot upon the Colony, than they began to protest to the Governor, William Stone, against the "'ill iberal persecution of those of the Catholic Faith," and so persistent and perseveringly, that many of other beliefs joined in the appeal. The Committee that called -upon the Governor was as follows:
THOMAS MAYDWELL, AUTHER TURNER,
FRANCIS POSEY, JOHN -PERINE,
WILLIAM HUNGERFORD, GEORGE BECKWITH,
WILLIAM SIMPSON, GEORGE SAWER.,
JOHN G E, RICHARD BROWNE.
WILLIAM S MOOT,,
"They brought with them stout hearts, in which were cherished fundamental principals of liberty, learnt in a land where, before, Magna Charter had been extorted by the sturdy barons from King John."
It has been said, and I know it is true, that, so f ar as relates to their patriotism, there was no one f amily name that contributed more members to the honor of our flag in war, commencing with the year of 1775, all the way down to the last, 1861. It was from
[10




Saint Mary's, Charles and Prince George's, that the bulk of our Revolutionary soldiers came. There was scarcely a battle of importance fought by our army in which' one or more of the name was not engaged. But for their religious convictions, few of them ever could receive commissions or even promotion, but this, as proved, was of no hindrance to their patriotism and love of Country, and for this reason then, 1775 until 1782, the list of Maryland Officers, one can scarcely see the name mentioned in history as then written. Nevertheless, much of their blood has stained the battle ground in many of our conflicts at home and abroad, in the Military and Naval service.
It is a well authenticated* fact that George Calvert, -Second Lord Baltimore, who was of the Catholic religion, obtained the Grant from King Charles, of land, in his Province, to be an asylum for those of his religion, from persecution of the times, appointed his brother Leonard, the Governor of his Colony, joined in common with himself one Thomas Cornwallis, Esq., and about two hundred Colonists were sent over to the Colony in 1634. All 'of them Catholics, and many of them gentlemen of fortune :-their settlement upon the continent, they declared, was a desire for the unmolested practice of their religious convictions. These two hundred settlers were favorably known for many years, as the pioneers.
This should be remembered, our fathers have descended to the grave before us, ourselves are following them to the tomb; our children and our kindred shall mourn for us, and shall be lamented, in their turn by others; and so the stream of time Will roll on, bearing the successive generation to the Ocean of Eternity, till, the day of our immortality dawns, and we shall all, all live 'again for all Eternity.
The year of 1664, has been regarded by some of our historians as the "dark hour" of the Catholic settlers then in Saint Mary's. This was due to the great disorder concocted, and carried out, by the adherents of Clayborne, who had entered upon the settlement in sufficient numbers to give great trouble. They began to make a war of outrage and oppression upon all who differed with them, politically, and those who supported the Laws of the Colony. Even the Missionaries, who had avoided politics of the day, were seized, and their stations plundered, and they sent away in chains to England. They finally took possession of all the provincial records, mutilated and destroyed them, so that it was near impossible to obtain any accurate data prior to 1664.




A list of emigrants from Saint Mary's Colony, who departed to find other locations more in accordance with their religious convictions, were 'from the Jenkins family, as follows:
PHILIP JENKINS, MORGAN JENKINS,
FRANCIS JENKINS, STEPHENS JENKINS,
MARC JENKINS., MATHIEW JENKINS,
JAMES JENKINS., RICHARD JENKINS,
HOWELL JENKINS, and WILLIAM JENKINS.
Some of these immigrated from Wales, in 1670, and until 168o. They were brought over under the protection of Sir Leolini Jenkins' Agency. Most of them located on the border of Pennsylvania, some few located in Kentucky, and established a Colony near Bordenstown, where a number of their descendants are now known, all of them holding on to their religious sentiments.
In 1 658, Josiah Fendall, Governor: --A commission was issued to Captain Christopher Russell, to be Captain of a Company, in Charles County, la 'te under Captain John Jenkins. This displeasure is in consequence of said Jenkins' refusal to take the oath imposedupon all who hold positions under the penal laws in force.
Captain John Jenkins, a year after, i1659, with his family of two sons and one daughter, moved to "Carter's Inheritance," in Prince George County, and was one, of the pioneers of his name in that County, now containing many influential and worthy members of, the original Jenkins family.
Ap. Thomas Jenkins (original), son of William Jason Jenkins, was born 1645. "Jason" was the only brother of Sir Leolini Jenkins, who was the Secretary of the British Admiralty, Fleet Street, London. Jason Jenkins, when about eighteen years. of age, was appointed by the Admiralty,.an Ensign, in the Royal Navy. He first served under Admiral Robert Holmes, Knight, and was on the Admiral's ship, "Hector," when the British Fleet aided in expelling the Dutch Governor of New Amsterdam (New York) in 1665.' Ensign Jenkins was also in the great Naval battle with the Dutch Fleet in the English Channel, against De Ruter, in 1669, in which the English Fleet, under the Duke of Albemarle, won the most memorable victory then known in history.
From this authenticated information, all else is conjecture or tradition. It is said by some of our name that he "became offended, grossly, by his brother officers, because he refused to take the proffered 'oath to renounce his religious convictions, and subsequently resigned, and went to Spain. Once in Spain, he soon became a
112




favorite, and was in a position in the Spanish Navy. It is said he was an officer of high rank and a valuable one."
Although efforts have been made to trace his career, there never was any reliable information learned, but it is certain that he never was in Maryland, as some suppose.
It is conceded that in the United States, most family lines do not go back earlier than the year 1700. It is fortunate that in Maryland, on both the Eastern and Western shores of the State, there are many family records to be found of interest. Among them are several in relation to the genealogy of Thomas Jenkins, the original, whose ancestors came over with the first two hundred.
"COPY I
"November 15th, 1670.
Thomas Jenkins, of Charles County, came, and
proved right to one hundred acres of land for his transportation of himself and Ann, his wife, unto this Province, to inhabit in anno, 1670. Warrent then issued in the name of the said Thomas Jenkins for one hundred acres of land, it being due him for the consideration mentioned."
Among the Records found in the Record Office, Annapolis, some few are Last Wills and Testaments in manner and form following, but in brief detail, are first:
"Thomas Jenkins, who bequeaths to his son George,,
his plantation; his son William, one hundred acres of land; to his only daughter, one hundred acres of land, and one thousand pounds of tobacco. He gives to his wife, Ann Spaulding, one entire third of all his possessions." Witnessed by, William Chandler, P. Boyle, M. Waldy, and proven by Esquire S. Hanson, Dy.
Corn. The date 17o6.
The Wills of William Jenkins, Michael Jenkins, Josiah Jenkins and Jason Jenkins, are found recorded.
Thomas Jenkins was, at the time of his immigration, probably, about twenty-five years of age, and soon after married Ann Spaulding. In 168o, he is in possession of a tract of land called "Popular Point," containing ioo acres. Later, in 1682, he obtained warrants for the following tracts, in Charles County: "Lyndsie," i~o acres; "Saint Thomas," i~o acres; "Pye Nardshift," 325 acres; all of which he purchased from Charles Pye.
13]




*Ap. Thomas Jenkins, was born, 164S; married, 1670; died, 1727. He was buried at Saint Thomas' Church. His wife died two years after, and was placed in the family lot, both greatly lamented. Issue are as follows: Edward, William, George, Mary, Elizabeth and Ann.
Among those who came, 'in company with Thomas Jenkins (original), were:
CHARLES BALLARD., ROBERT CORNICH,
FRANcIS TENCH, THOMAS BATCHELOR,
JANE TENCH, JOHN AUSTIN.,
WINIFRED JAMES, JOHN GRAND,
RICE JONES, JOHN Toy,
AUTHER NORWOOD, MARY SPARKS,
JOHN SIMPSON, JOHN LEWIS,
CHRISTOPHER BERRY, GEORGE HART,
EDWARD' MATTINGLY., JOHN HART.,
JOHN CLOTMAN, THOMAS PARSON,
JOHN PASEY, WILLIAM PHILIPS.
WILLIAM WEST.,
All these settled and received land grants of one hundred acres each. Some -few located in Kent afterwards, but, not finding a proper welcome, and for their welfare, returned to St. Mary's. Among these were:
JOHN JENKINS, THOMAS THOMPSON,
HENRY JENKINS, PETER ROBINSON.
THOMAS EDELIN,,
[14







WILLIAM JENKINS
Father of Thomas Courtney Jenkins




Memoir of Satnt VIlary's Cototoit1
T is a matter of history that the costume of our forefathers, of Saint Mary's, during the reign of Charles 1 was .the most picturesque ever known, and a glimpse ofit can be seen today in some of the Jenkins' family household. The well-kept silver, their venerable dwellings, and furniture in them, are to be seen in some
-instances. In the days of our ancestors, on their, plantations, Tobacco was the great p roduct, and-no -other was considered marketable.
- Tobacco was the money of the planter, and, being in great demand, agents, from England, were on hand at all the recognized landings to purchase. For many years, these Tobacco plantations were easily approached by deep -water, sufficient for the trading ships from Europe.. It was nothing strange to see from twenty to forty vessels lying at the various shores, loading tobacco-then packed in bales. These traders seldom used coin, as the goods brought over were generally needed by the planters, and were exchanged for the tobacco.
For years this tranquility predominated, and the people of the Colony were happy and contented, but the dark and stormy cloud, that hung over Wales and England, reached across the sea to the Colony. Soon the rainfall of hatred and bigotry and of envy b roke loose over the hitherto happy Colony. Men, who had all along been contented and neighborly, began to assail the only Church, which they knew had been their friend and protector, extending a, cherishing care of much that then, as now, contributed to the civilization w4 have greatly glorified.
15




If there is a spot on the surface of the glorious old State of Maryland, where people of our Faith should meet, it is to be found on the site where the Pilgrims consecrated the land of our forefathers-"the Land of the Sanctuary."
There has been, for some years, considerable speculation among the several branches of the Jenkins f amily, in relation to the Family Crest, or "Coat of Arms."
In the United States, so strong was the prejudice against any aristocratic emblem, especially those from England, no one would care to acknowledge having one or even a desire to use one. It was not until within the last generation, or about 1820, that a crest, or "Coat of Arms," was ever seen, or exposed, in Baltimore. About the time mentioned, when "springs" for vehicles were in use, for family carriages, owners of fashionable ones began to have the panels of the doors engraved, or painted, fancifully, with "Coat of Arms" on them, denoting their Crests, as suited their fancy. Since, however, but particularly shortly after the war of the Rebellion, and when wealthy families became as plentiful as blackberries, there sprung up a wonderful demand for family Crests or "Coat of Arms," if not for foreign titles. Hence, the enterprising man at once set to work in furnishing them to suit the market-and did a good business, as there were abundant so-called society people to purchase. It mattered little, to them, as to 'the character of the emblematic Crest. As a matter of fact, no family in America was, or is now, entitled, or can claim a right to any emblem, or crest, whatsoever, unless it can be proven that it was the "Coat of Arms" of their forefathers prior to i700. Very few can do that in Baltimore. All of those originated, or purchased, since that period, are simply "store goods," and are not worth noticing, or, indeed, the cash paid for them.
It is an indisputable fact, that in Anglesey, Wales, for generations, the Jenkins family were among the most favored and worthy in that part of Wales. Anterior to James I., King of England, when Charles the Second, succumbed, the Jenkins, having shared his cause, many shared his fate. True, many were compelled to flee, but their star had forever set, after their blood had flowed freely for their convictions.
After days, when Wales became annexed to England, the bloody hand of the Jenkins became an emblem of their defense of Wales, and because of service rendered, in many of England's battles, and by a Grant, during Elizabeth's reign, the "Coat of Arms," with the bloody hand, a cannon supported by a Lion, and
[16




the motto: "The red hand forever," became the property of the
Jenkins, of Wales.
The following Appendix may be of interest:
'0ti(torb41roprietary of Mfarytantb
1632, CECILIUS CALVERT, Second Lord Baltimore.
1675, CHARLES CALVERT, Third Lord Baltimore.
1715, BENEDICT LEONARD CALVERT, Fourth Lord Baltimore.
1715, CHARLES CALVERT, Fifth Lord Baltimore.
1751, FREDERICK CALVERT, Sixth, Lord Baltimore.
1633, LEONARD CALVERT, Governor.
1647, THOMAS GREEN, Governor.
1649' WILLIAM 'STONE, Governor.
1654, COMMISSIONERS UNDER THE PARLIAMENT:
1658) JOSIAH FENDALL, Governor.
1661, PHILIP CALVERT,, Governor.
1662, CHARLES CALVERT., Governor.
1667, CHARLES, LORD BALTIMORE,, Governor.
16787 THOMAS NOTERY, Governor.
1681, CHARLES, LORD BALTIMORE, Governor.
1685, WILLIAM JOSEPH, President of Deputies.
1689, CONVENTION OF PROTESTANT ASSOCIATION.,
)Ioyat Oovgraors by'ppointmntt
1692, SIR LIONEL COPELY.
1693, SIR EDMOND ANDROS.' 1694, FRANCIS NICHOLSON.
1699, NATHANIEL BLACKSTONE.
1703, THOMAS TENCH.
1704, JOHN SEYMOUR.
1709, EDWARD LLOYD.
1714, JOHN HART.
171




41Proprietary Governmett
17151 JOHN HART.
1720, CHARLES CALVERT.
1727, BENEDICT LEONARD CALVERT.
1732, SAMUEL OGLE.
1733, CHARLES CALVERT.
1735, SAMUEL OGLE.
1742, THOMAS BLADEN.
1747, SAMUEL OGLE.
1752) BENJAMIN TASKER (President).
1753, HORATIO SHARPE.
1769, ROBERT EDEN.
1774'1
1775, CONVENTION OF SAFETY, COUNCIL.
1776'tJ
'2. hw )Iotes from tN 2A rcbtves
1642. LEO LEONARD CALVERT,, GOVERNOR.
The Indians, as related by Father White, "became exceedingly troublesome, and it became necessary to organize a Company, from the settlers, to resist them. Three good and trusty men, were given the authority to raise and equip a Company. The Commissioners were: RICHARD EDELEN, JAMES MIDDLETON and IGNATIUS JENKINS-RICHARD GARDINER, to be put in command."
Commencing with the Revolutionary period of 1775, a great boon broke over the entire portion of lower Maryland, in the very beginning, when it became known among the people of St. Mary's and Charles Counties, they, with one accord, hastened to bury all private animosities, all memory of past persecutions, to wash out all invidious distinctions, and, in the name of God and posterity, to unite in defense of the common rights of man-Freedom of one's convictions.
No less an authority than the historian, Dr. Shea, has given the weight of 'his name to this declaration: ."The Catholics spontaneously, universally and energetically, gave their adhesion to the
(18




cause of America, and when the time came, there was no faltering, no division. Every Catholic in the Country was a Whig. There were no Catholic Tories."
The present State House was only completed in the year 1697, in -the Ninth year of William Ill., and for this reason, the most valuable papers of the Colony, prior to 1697, never found a place in its archives.
No official record was ever made o 'f the arrival of immigrants prior to 1820, or none has ever been discovered filed or recorded.
It is well known that the Negro slaves were about nineteen per cent of the population, prior to i 8oo. But no record of 'the Negro, except in cases of traffic, or where mentioned in testamentary Wills, when given their freedom, for example :-Joseph Jenkins, a large land owner of Saint Mary's County, in his Will, dated 1709, said:
"I give liberty to, and hereby set free, emancipate, all my Negros, without exception."
Every Catholic Jenkins who came over to the Colony of Maryland, from the beginning, at 'the instance of Sir Lionel Jenkins, the Secretary and friend of the 'Lord's Barons, of Baltimore, were Welshmen. The Jenkins, who came over from Devonshire, England, were Protestants, and Englishmen-none of them settled in Saint Mary's or Charles. Records prove that they located in Kent, Dorchester and Somerset Counties principally. During the struggle for independence, many of these left for more congenial locations.
It has been frequently asked: "Why is it that we see no 'Welsh landmarks, or names of villages, or even of plantations?" Simply for the reason, the settlers were more Catholic than Welsh.
In the year 1667, the civil and religious privi 'leges enjoyed by the people of the Colony became known. Catholics, as well as others, from abroad, sought An asylum in St. Mary's, and were given the rights of citizenship, had the effect of introducing some French, Spanish and Bohemians into the colony, many of them bringing their families, and, in some instances, their chaplains, who at once became Missionaries, going about performing the rites of the Church, when needed.
It was 1669, when two additional lay brothers, or coadjutors, Members of the Society of Jesus, aimed to assist these already in the Colony, and who, for a few years, remained in -the little settlement of Saint Mary's, and it was one of these priests. who married, in 1669, Ap. Thomas Jenkins to Ann Spaulding. The marriages recorded, and found in possession of some of the family name, and' Letters Testamentary in Deeds and Wills, officially recorded, for,
19]




the 'first hundred years, or rather, from the year 1649 until 1748, may prove to be interesting reading by the present generation of the Jenkins family.
Since 1748, there has been little or no difficulty to ascertain information in any of the several Courts of the State, if desired. For this reason, and the fact of their great number, it might prove monotonous.
The first marriage, on this Continent, of any of the Jenkins (Catholic) family, was that of Ap. Thomas Jenkins, to Miss Ann Spaulding, at Saint Mary's, by Father Aitham, S. J., in the year of 1669. This was followed by Michael Jenkins, in 1670, who married Miss Jane White, both of Saint Mary's Colony.
It is proposed here only to give the names of the families intermarried, during the hundred years, in the Colony of Saint Mary's and Charles. In several instances there were two and three marriages of the same family name:
EDELIN,, CAL VERT, LANCASTER,
COURTNEY, COOMBS, CORY,
NEALE., SIMPSONS, HAGER.,
WHEELER,, GOULD., HEMMERSLEY.,
GARDINER, TANEY, MITCHELL,
PLO WDEN, BOARMAN, FEN WICK,
NORRIS, PYE SEMMES.
During the year of 1754, when the Catholics, of Saint Mary's and Charles, were required to pay taxes on their lands, double the amount exacted from other religious sects, many of the Catholic residents, to protect themselves from this offensive order, left for other locations, where a full liberty of conscience prevailed. Happily all oppression of this character, in latter days, a revolutionary change, has silently been affected among the various sects of the present century.
It was during this unjustifiable and discordant tax imposed upon the Catholic Church, that many of the Jenkins family emigrated elsewhere, so that, it is near impossible to trace them.
George Jenkins, son of Ap. Thomas Jenkins, was born 1675, he married Susannah Gardiner, and located in Prince George County. He died, intestate, in 1727. His wife died in Charles County, 1763. In her Will, she mentions four child ren.:-Geo rge, John, and William, and Henrietta who married Marmaduke Semmes, of Charles County.
[20




In the preparation of this record, the name of each individual is given, either as the head of a family, or where the name first occurs. The frequent i nter-marri ages, in each family, has made a continuous rotation necessary, besides, it will be seen, there is such a continuity of Christian names, from generation to generation.
In Thomas Jenkins' Will, he names, first, his son Edward, then William, then George, not in the order of their birth :-Edward was born 1671, George 1675, William about 1673, but it had been found that William was the eldest son.
In the year of 169i, the following relations of Ap. Thomas Jenkins came to Saint Mary's, from Wales: Benedict Jenkins, who settled on the Patuxant River; Rowland Jenkins, who settled at Saint Inigoes, Saint Mary's County; Jason Jenkins, unmarried, and lived with his brother, Benedict, where was erected the first storehouse in that settlement, and in 1813, it was destroyed by the B ritish.
"March 31, 1671, Charles Calvert, Esq., of the Province of Maryland, to Baker Brooke, Esq., of the County:"
"Whereas the said Jerome Whyte, Esq., hath sometime left this Province of Maryland, and is at present in the Kingdom of England, by which absence of said Surveyor General from this Province, his Lordship's business of divers of the inhabitants have much retarded. I do hereby impower upon the said Baker Brooke to be his Lordship's Surveyor General of said Province."~
- From this it can be seen the great neglect, not only of recording events of interest in the New Colony the first few years, but negligence and the continual strife seemed to go hand in hand to annoy and prevent a clear and reliable record of the early days of Saint Mary's.
William Jenkins, son of Thomas the original, was born 1673, and married 1718. He moved to Charles County in 17o6, died
75.From records at hand, he evidently was a large property owner and the owner of a large number of slaves. In his Will, recorded, he left all to his wife, Mary Courtney, and after, to his eight children namely: Henry, William, Thomas, Jane, Ignatius, Michael, Mary and Joseph. He gave to his wife, for her "sole use and benefit," a tract of land called: "Tuesday's Work," and in like manner, gave to his son Henry, a tract of land, called "Salem." Henry was appointed Executor for the four younger children. This Will bears the date of November 1, 1757. Thomas (Courtney) remained unmarried, and died in 1758. He bequeathed his property, owned by him, in Baltimore County, to his brother
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Michael. His plantation, in Charles County, was equally divided between his sister Jane and Ignatius and Joseph.
William Jenkins' "rent roll" comprised the following plantations and tracts of land: "Poplar Point," "Saint Thomas," three of this name, formerly owned by Thomas Mattingly, Thomas Reeder, Thomas .Spaulding, Sr., and Thomas Spaulding, Jr.; "Lyndsie, ". .Pye's Shift," "Jenkins' Chance, ". .Stump," "Vale," "Bljthwood," "Brand's Discovery," "Batchellor's Hope," "The Maze," "Three Thirds,". "Mill Lot," "Fox's Range.'
IIn person and individually, he was said to be a typical Welshman, and given to austerity, redeemed by great benevolence.
William Jenkins, son of Michael, was born 1769, married Ann Hillen, daughter of Solomon Hillen, of Baltimore County, who, however, lived but a few years. He then married Eleanore, daughter of Mark Wilcox, of Philadelphia. William Jenkins, when only a youth, volunteered as a private in Captain Banteleu's Cavalry, "Light Horse," and served until disbanded, in 1783. He served at North Point, in the Mechanical Volunteers. He was a Delegate to the State Convention, in 1785; he also held many responsible positions, both public and private. He was one of the original Trustees of the Cathedral, and, very liberal in his aid t 'o the Church throughout life. In person he was finely formed, of a commanding presence; in his dress he always followed the fashion of the old school; he wore a que, as had been worn from manhood. His father, Michael Jenkins, left him *no inheritance.
In the year of 1779, there were but three of the name in Baltimore Town, and but few in the County. In the Town were Edward, Thomas and William. 'They began business at that time.
William Jenkins became a partner with Robinson Jones, on Wide Water Street. Thomas Jenkins, merchandised, on South Street. These three young men were soon after followed by several relatives, from St. Mary's and Charles Counties. Among them were Michael, Henry, William, Valentine, Felix, Frederick and Lewis A. Jenkins, of Charles County, and Jason, James, Ignatius, from Saint Mary's.
William Jenkins, of "Oak Hill," died February, 1843. The writer of these briefly written notices of the original of the Baltimore family of Jenkins, would do himself injustice if he did not pay tribute to the worth of the above Mr. Jenkins. This can be said in a few words: He was one of the most esteemed of our citizens, none more honorable or more charitable, a man of integrity and of good business judgment, he made for himself an hon[22




orable reputation, as an example for his offspring, and one that others might do well to follow. William Jenkins would have been rich without money, an honest name to leave behind is better than money.
William Jenkins possessed a large amount of real and personal property in and around Baltimore. His last Will and Testament was made on the 9th of March, 1843. The Will contains many benevolent legacies, numbering many thousand dollars.
The entire balance being mostly real estate, he ordered that it be divided into six equal parts for his daughter and five sons. The daughter, Mary Ann, who married Win. Kennedy, of Philadelphia, inherited the homestead, "Oak Hill," valued then 'at eleven thousand dollars. To his son, Thomas Courtney, five acres of land on the West side of the York Road to -Sadtlers Lane, valued then at two thousand dollars. To his son, Mark Wilcox, the property known as "Huntington," with the tannery thereon, valued -at ten thousand dollars. To his son, Edward, five acres, adjoining that of Thomas Courtney's, valued at twenty-five hundred dollars. To his son, James Wilcox, the Oak Hill tannery and the Mitchalia lot, with certain rights reserved,' in Oak Hill property, valued at fifteen thousand dollars.. To his son, Joseph, five acres on South side of lot of Thomas Courtney's, valued at two thousand dollars. He also gave to his daughter, Mary Ann, his sons, Mark and Edward, his interest in the store on. South side of Water Street and Franklin Lane, valued at five thousand dollars, also the warehouse on Guilford Street and Franklin Lane, valued at twelve hundred. dollars.
These estates, in 1843, which are herein probated before David M. Perine, Registrar, were then valued at forty-seven "thousand dollars.
Michael Jenkins, of Baltimore County, was born 1778, married Sarah Worthington, of Baltimore, 1799~, .died 18,11. He was a well-known and enterprising business man in Baltimore, and established the furniture and cabinet business on Light Street, 1799. Early in his youth he joined the First Company of 'the Fifth Regiment, then under command of Colonel Upton H.- Heath. In the service he was at the battles of Bladensburg and North Point.
Commencing with William Jason Jenkins, Ensign in the English Navy, who was born, at Anglesay, Wales, in the year 1615, and who married in London, in the year 1636, and who was the brother of Sir Lional Jenkins, then the Chief Secretary of the "Admiralty Board," Whitehall, London, and who was the father
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of Ap. Thomas Jenkins, who was born 1640, Anglesay, and who came to Saint Mary's at the instance of Lord Baltimore. It is known that he was about twenty-five years of age on reaching the Colony in Maryland.
Ap. Thomas Jenkins was married to Ann Spaulding, of Saint Mary's; died 1727. Issue six child ren :--E dwa rd, William, George, Ann, Elizabeth and Mary.
William Jenkins, son of Thomas, born 1673, married Mary Courtney 1717; died 17513.
Michael Jenkins, son of William, born 1736, married Charity Wheeler, of Harford County, 1761; died 18o2 (Long Green).
William Jenkins, son of Michael,' born 1767, married Ellen Wilcox, of Pennsylvania, 18oi; died 1843.
Thomas Courtney Jenkins, son of William, born 1802, married Louisa Carrell, of Pennsylvania, 1829; died December 24th, 1881.
Michael Jenkins, son of Thomas Courtney, was born in Baltimore, December 27, 1842. Married Isabel Jenkins, daughter of Austin and Margaret Jenkins, on October 2, 1866. This Michael Jenkins, worthy successor of a long line of antecedents bearing the name nobly, is now one of Baltimore's most illustrious citizens. In the walks of life, both domestic and public, he bears all the characteristics of the true gentleman. Engaged in many enterprises of business, yet finding time for a kindly hearing to the call of charity, or to lend a helping hand to many institutions for the betterment of his less fortunate fellow-creatures. May he long be spared to the community that would sadly miss his loss.
Commencing again with William Jason Jenkins, Ensign in the English Navy, who was born in the year 1615, at Anglesay, Wales, and was married in the year 1636, at London, and who was the brother of Sir Lional Jenkins, then the Chief Secretary to the "Admiralty Board" of the British Navy, Whitehall, London, and who was the father of Ap. Thomas Jenkins, who was born 164o, and who came to Saint Mary's at the instance of Lord Baltimore's Sec ,retary, Sir Lional Jenkins. It is known that he was near twentyfive years of age on reaching Maryland.
Ap. Thomas Jenkins, born 1640, was married to Ann Spaulding, 167o, at Saint Mary's. He died 1727; Charles County. He left six children, three sons. and three daghters :-Edward, William, George, Ann, Elizabeth and Mary.
George Jenkins, third son of Ap. Thomas, was born 1675, married Susannah Gardiner, 1698, died 1727, both of Charles County.
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George Jenkins left three sons: George (died single), John, and William, who married Elizabeth Mitchell, and one daughter, Henrietta, who married Marmaduke Semmes.
William Jenkins, son of George and Susannah Gardiner, was born 1720, married Elizabeth Mitchell, 1738, both of Charles County; he died 1793, and left seven children (two sons and five daughters) : Thomas, George, Henrietta, Ellen, who married Edelen, and three other daughters,-one married Edelen, another Ward and another Pye.
Thomas Jenkins, son of William and Ann Mitchell,'was born 1751, and married Mary Corry (Neale), 178o; died 1821; both of Charles County. He left six sons and two daughters :-Henry, William, Felix, Benedict, Frederick and Louis A., Elizabeth and Matilda.
William Valentine Jenkins, second son of- Thomas, was born 1783, married Ann Maria Wells, 1807; died 1854. He left eleven children, ten sons and one daughter.:-Mary Josephine,' Charles F., Cyprian Thomas, Leolini Augustus Ludlow, Frederick,' Ambrose, William, Octavius, Fenwick and Constantine.
William Henry, the seventh son of William Valentine, was born 1819, married Catharine Ann Lawrence, 1847. His sons are Cyprian Thomas, Leolini, Augustus Ludlow, Fr 'ederick, Ambrose, Carroll, and one daughter, Catharine A.
~'Extracts from ncorbs
"Edward Spaulding and wife Margaret, and two children, came to Saint Mary's County in the year of 1632, from Jamestown, Virginia. Ann Spaulding, his granddaughter, born in Saint Mary's, married Thomas Jenkins, the original Jenkins of Saint Mary's. William Spaulding and Michael Jenkins, came in 165 Francis Gardiner, Edwin Edelen, Thomas Courtney, Philip Coombs, Robert Mathew, Enoch Fenwick, Edward Courtney, Michael Wheeler, Francis Jenkins, John Jenkins, Stephen Tarleton, Edward Mattingly, Ignatius Jenkins, came in, and settled in 1656."
"Augustine Jenkins, S. J., was a native of Maryland, born -January 12, 1742, and -entered the Society, September 7, 1766. After his-studies and ordination, at Liege, he returned to Maryland, arriving on May 24, 1774. He was a zealous and successful missionary,
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and it appears, f rom a letter in the archives, that at Easter, 1787, he had one thousand and forty-nine communicants. He died February 2, i 8oo, aged 58 years. Francis Jenkins, S. J., and Charles Jenkins, S. J., were of Saint Mary's County. In addition to these herein mentioned, are T. Meredeth Jenkins, Priest, and Oliver Jenkins, Priest, of Baltimore."
"Michael Jenkins, grandson. of Ap. Thomas Jenkins, was born 1736, in St. Mary's County. In 1761, he married Charity Wheeler, of Harford County, she was the daughter of Thomas Wheeler, High Sheriff of Harford County,. 1773. M. Jenkins died, 18o2, in Baltimore County, Long Green. The homestead was known as 'Pye's' or 'Purchase,' a select tract of about one hundred acres of Long Green valley. He was the owner of a number of Land Patents in St. Mary's, some of them being in possession of his descendants. 'Homewood,' 'Saint Giles,' 'Two Brothers,' and 'Hearts Delight,' are of them."
"Edward Jenkins, son of William, 'Oak Hill,' third son, was born 18o6, married Julianna Elder, of Baltimore, May, 1829. Issue of children :-M ark, Paul, James, Elizabeth, Edward, Courtney and Helena."
"Joseph W. Jenkins, son of William, 'Oak Hill,' sixth son, was born March, 1814, married Mary Hawkins, of Philadelphia. Issue of six child ren :-Gertrude, Fielding Lucas, William F., Matilda,, Joseph and William."
"Edward Jenkins, the first son of Ap. Thomas Jenkins, born 1666, married Annie Gardiner (of Clement Gardiner), 1669. Issue eleven children :-John, Clement, Henry, Thomas, Catharine, Ignatius, Richard, Felix and John the second, died 1699, and two who died infants."
"Edward Jenkins, son of Thomas and brother of William, Henry, Thomas Courtney, Michael, Ignatius, Joseph, Jane and Mary. He was born 168o, married Mary Ann Simpson, died 1753. He was a large land holder, and resided on a. plantation known as 'Pye's Hardshift.' He owned an immense number of slaves. In 1723, he purchased 22,; acres in Charles County. In 1740, in company with Captain Milburne and other young, men, the following members of the Jenkins family emigrated to the West, and located in Kentucky, and have many descendants now living in that State, namely :-David, George, Francis, Enoch. Edward Jenkins, in 1738, purchased three hundred and thirty-three acres, and in 1740, two hundred and forty-nine acres, immediately adjoining his original tract, known as the 'Maize.' He left at his death eight children."
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Michael Jenkins, of Wales, born 1641, original settler in Saint Mary's, was located* at Saint Clements prior to 1666. It is not known when he married, but it is recorded that he patented lands adjoining Jerome White's and James Courtney, the father of Mary Courtney, who married William Jenkins. His wife was, Mary Taney, whose father was the grandfather of Chief justice Taney. His plantation was a very extensive one, known as "White Plains," and was purchased from Charles Calvert.
Very little is recorded of his life, but it is known he was killed by being thrown from a vicious horse in a runaway on his plantation. A part of this plantation is still in the possession of the Jenkins' family.
"Thomas Courtney Jenkins (original), born, 1723, in Saint Mary's County, and after 1754, moved to Long Green, Baltimore, died 176o. He was the -original owner of the Jenkins' homestead, 'Long Green.' He left Saint Mary's County, with many others, to escape the penal laws, locating at Joppa, on the Gunpowder, then quite a thriving settlement, and the intended site for a commercial town. He, after a few years' residence here, located at Long Green, where he erected a spacious dwelling, owned from that date to the present by his children and grandchildren. Among these are :Messrs. Edward, Michael, George Joseph and Josiah. Besides these, during the occupancy by the, Jenkins family, for one hundred and sixty years, it is conceded that' near one hundred Jenkins first saw the light of day in this venerable structure."~
"In 1710, Jason, Edward, George, Jeremiah and John Jenkins, of Charles County, removed to Prince George's County, on land formerly purchased from Edward Edelen the year before, 1770, (recorded) 1715."
"Philip Jenkins settled in Prince George's County, entering his warrant for land. 1716, recorded May io, 1716"
"In 1720, William Jenkins, located in Baltimore County, 'Freeland,' just which one of the William Jenkins is not in evidence, as none of that name had settled there prior to 172o. He married Sarah Hilton Hager, granddaughter of Jonathan Hager, the founder of Hagerstown."
The knowledge of family history is, or ought to be, at all times, interesting. There is no question but there is as ample material in the Jenkins family for a memoir, as any of the original Marylanders.
The most surprising thing is the discovery of the enormous number of the name, who emigrated during the penal act, when, among other vindictive laws enacted, was, Catholic children were forbidden from attending the schools of the Colony.
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Among the many worthy and noted Planters, who left for other locations, were Henry Jenkins, with his entire family of eight children; also, his brother William, with his family of thirteen children, for Kentucky.
"T 'homas Courtney Jenkins, of Saint Mary's, who originally owned the Long Green property, in 1754, and who died in 1757, at 'Charlotte Hall,' in Saint Mary's County, and who was buried in that County, was a man of rema 'rkable personality. A descriptive account of his appearance was -written, and was, for a long while, in the possession of Captain Benedict Ignatius Jenkins, as late as 1838. Captain Jenkins, for many years, was a Pilot and Captain of the Steamer Fredericksburg, and also the Columbia, then running between Baltimore and Washington." In the above mentioned article, the writer says of his dress: "I noticed that he was dressed in what I took to be a neat suit of black velvet clothes, he wore a beaver fur hat and close fitted knee breeches, silk socks with lowcut shoes, with bright silver buckles, his, vestcoat was large and with flaps, with watch fob. He had a bunch of colored ribbon hanging down in front attached to a watch (presumably). His face was clean shaven and exceedingly good-looking."
He was thirty-four years of age when he died, being the possessor of a large fortune for the time in which he lived and was well educated. There is no doubt he was, personally, a fine looking gentleman, as is well known, a most generous and worthy Christian. He never held any position under the Colony or State.
"Thomas Courtney Jenkins, the second, was born in Baltimore, March, 182, and was the eldest son of William Jenkins. He received a classical education at Saint Mary's College, Emmitsburg. After having been thoroughly educated and fitted for general business, he entered into his father's office on Water Street. About 1822, he was given an interest in his father's establishment, where he remained until 1828. He then formed a co-partnership with Mr. Adam Poland, and founded the business firm of Poland and Jenkins. Mr. Jenkins from the start was a business man. He became a Director in the Mechanics' Bank, as well as other bank institutions, for over forty years. He was a Director in the Savings Bank many years. He was one of the original organizers of the Parkersburg and Central Ohio Railroad and Northern Central Railroad, and always took an active part in City and State improvements. He was the first among the organizers of the Merchants' and Miners' Transportation Company, and When successful in the enterprise, was elected its first President. He was, also, for a while,
[28







THOMAS COURTNEY JENKINS




MRS. THOMAS COURTNEY JENKINS
ncA Louisa Carrell







President of the Board of Trade, and fifty years a Director in the Mechanics' Bank."
Mr. Jenkins was one of the most prominent members of the Catholic ChurcTh in Baltimore. He was the first pew holder, and after, the oldest member of the Board of Trustees, of the Cathedral. He married, in 1829, Louisa Carrell, of Philadelphia, a sister of Bishop Carrell, of Covington, Kentucky.
In the year 1865, Mr. Jenkins retired from business, leaving the business to his sons, George C. Jenkins, Joseph W. Jenkins and Michael Jenkins. Thomas Courtney Jenkins, was a most courteous gentleman, unostentatious, a plain painstaking man, carefully avoiding all notoriety, and in social and domestic circles he was, much prized for his many genial and amiable qualities-benevolence being his best. It was a maxim of Mr. Jenkins that, "he who receives a good turn, should never forget it; he who does one should never remember it."
There are many of our old citizens, to-day, who will remember the havoc of business and thle distress that followed during the year Of 183-5, then designated 'as the "Great Crisis," when' our monied institutions refused in aiding anyone, lamentable and really painful examples of distress were presented to verify the truth of the "Shinplaster Panic," such as never were seen in Baltimore. -Many an honest man, who failed to stem the disastrous current, "went under," and closed up, and "Gone to Texas.," der 'isively written, was to be seen on his store door. A near neighbor of Thomas C. Jenkins, was among the number of unfortunates, and when some mischievous wag wrote upon the closed door "Gone to Texas," the next day was seen-"Nary time, come and see." The neighbor had gone to see Tommy Jenkins, instead of Texas.
Liberality is never so beautiful or engaging, as when the hand is concealed that bestows the favor.
There never was a greater truism than that, "there is one advantage in being born a gentleman; it makes him sensible of his manhood, and lays stronger obligations upon. him,' not to degenerate from these excellencies of his ancestors !"
I remember Mr. Jenkins very distinctly-have conversed with him. He was what I have ever cherished, "an Old Schooler." He carried his cane, and wore plain and faultless clothes. With a serene countenance, the reflection of a pure heart, in walk was slow and dignified. But whenever he moved, he was "the benefactor," as all admit-"A good name liveth forever."
29]




"Louis William Jenkins, son of T. Courtney Jenkins and Robinia Hillen, of Long Green. Mr. Jenkins, was a lawyer of reputation and an orator of great ability and wonderful eloquence and force. He, on one occasion, served in the State Legislature, and although frequently offered Official positions, invariably refused. He was exceptionally popular with the people and numbered many friends. Official favors were frequently offered him by the President, and, as an incentive, gave him the privilege to choose one, but, as on former occasions, he refused."
"James Wilcox J enkins, fourth son of William Jenkins, of Oak Hill, was born 18o8. Married Margaret Kennedy, of Pennsylvania, March, 1833. Issue eight children :--Charles Kennedy, Edward, Ellen, William Spaulding, Louis De Barth, James Wilcox, Mary Joseph and Thomas Courtney. Mr. Jenkins learned the business of the firm of William Jenkins and Sons-York Road Tannery-which he carried on during life. He was a thoroughgoing business man and held a high place'among those engaged in the Lea ther Trade all over the Town."
"Mark Wilcox Jenkins, was born at Oak Hill, in 1804. Married Ann Maria Jenkins, of Long Green; died 1871.
"Mr. Mark Jenkins, was the oldest son of William Jenkins, 'Oak Hill.' As soon as Mark Jenkins arrived at the proper age, he was placed in charge of the property of his father, known as 'Huntington,' comprising about five acres, on which was an extensive Tannery. On his father's death, 1843, he became the sole owner and proprietor, doing a very lucrative trade. He conducted this tannery until his age and infirmities bid him retire. He then, until his death,, lived on his Long Green property, 'Hillen Dale.' Jssue:-John W., Bettie Hillen, Nellie, William and Michael Hillen."
"Ed 'mund Plowden Jenkins, was born, 1844, in Charles County. Married Martha Lee Jenkins; died, July 7, 1896.
"He was the son of the late Senator from Charles County, and a grandson of judge John J. Jenkins, both of whom were prominent men, and served their Country with distinguished credit for generations. Never was a son worthier. He was a man of absolute integrity, true to his trust, great or small; intellectual, modest, virtuous, and a thorough gentleman. He was, for twenty-five (2n) years, paymaster of the B. & 0. Railroad, and a devoted officer in the service from boyhood. During the administration of his office, it is enough to say that he disbursed one hundred and twenty millions of dollars without the loss of a penny, or the loss of an hour in rendering his accounts."
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"Austin Jenkins, second son of Edward Jenkins, was born in Baltimore, 1 8o6; married Margaret Jenkins, of Charles. County,' 1839. He died 1888. He was one of the most esteemed members of his name, and of the community in which he moved. Was a man of singular integrity and keen judgment in, affairs of business matters, and made an honorable record among the progressive men of Baltimore. He was a man of clear judgment, and of unimpeachable integrity of life. The children of Austin Jenkins were: Edward Austin, Isabel, Harriet, Mary Plowden, Thomas Meredith, and Francis De Sales."
"Alfred Jenkins, son of Edward Jenkins, born in 18io. Married Elizabeth Hickley in 1 8-; died 187S. Issue :-Ellen, Annie, Mary, a Visitation Nun, Alfred, Robert, Rosa, a Sister of Charity, and Elizabeth. He was a well-known and highly esteemed citizen."~
"Joseph W. Jenkins, was the fifth son of William Jenkins of Oak Hill, born 1813. He was married first to Mary Hawkins, of Philadelphia. There was issue two children :-William F. and Matilda.
"His second wife was Gertrude Seckel; the children born to them are :-Henry, Frederick and William. On reaching manhood, he was given an interest in the business by his brother Thomas, and became a member of the firm of Poland, Jenkins and Company, in which he continued until the end of the war of 186S. During the war, and subsequent to the war, he was engaged in the cotton business. He was for a long time President of the Despard Coal Company. Mr. Jenkins took a great interest in the development of the South after the war, and had a considerable share of all the improvements going on in Texas and Alabama. He was largely concerned in the improvements about Curtis Bay Car Works. At the time of his death, February, 1897, he was the- oldest member of the Jenkins family in Baltimore, and was the oldest member of the Cathedral. He was a man of fine personality, and of a generous, kindly nature."
"William S. Jenkins, son of Edward Jenkins and Ann Spaulding, brother of Edward Jenkins, of Long. Green,, also of Alfred Jenkins, of Baltimore. He was born in Baltimore, and in early life, after a proper time at school, was taught the trade of making fur hats. When arriving of age, he entered into partnership with Henry Jenkins, Baltimore and Calvert Streets, where he carried on a large business.
"He was a member of the Fifth Regiment Volunteers, in the war of 1814, in defense of Baltimore. After years, hie moved to
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Conawago, Pennsylvania. He was a first cousin to Thomas Jenkins. His only daughter married Dr. Felix Jenkins of Baltimore, her cousin "
"John Joseph Jenkins, of Saint Mary's, was born, 1785. Married Mary Ann Plowden,'18o9. Issue :-George Plowden, Caroline, E dmond, Mary, Cecilia, Margaret and John W. Jenkins. He died, 1845. George, married Henrietta Davis;' Caroline, married M. Courtney Jenkins; Edmond married M. A. Morton; Mary, married Doctor Thomas Davis; Cecilia, married Doctor Edward Miles; Margaret, married Austin Jenkins; 'John W.,, married Emily Gardiner."
"Judge John J.- Jenkins, was, without any disparagement to others of the name, one of the most distinguished. .He lived, without a single blemish, filling every requisite that goes to make the man. He was a scholastic gentleman, a benevolent, neighbor, and reverential to his Maker. He was exceedingly popular, was State Senator, judge of his District, and filled many important trusts."
"William Jenkins, the first, son of Ap. Thomas Jenkins (who was. the first of the name to settle at Long Green, about 1740), was the father of Thomas Courtney Jenkins, who made application and received a.Patent for the Long Green tract. Thomas Courtney Jenkins having never married he died without issue,, leaving the entire property to his brother, Michael Jenkins. -Since then, 1740, the Estate has ever remained in that branch of the Jenkins family."
It will be seen that f rom the first and original Ap. Thomas Jenkins, the whole of the Catholic Jenkins of Maryland, for one hundred years, from 164o to i740, as recorded, resided in Saint Mary's and Charles Counties, as under the Colony both Counties were undivided.
Long Green, in Baltimore County, in the year 174o, and before, was simply a forest of "Mighty Oaks" and sparkling rivulets,, hills and dales. No white man had ever made application for patent grants beyond the Gunpowder, except along the water front of the Chesapeake. The whole tract, of two to five thousand acres, were untramped and almost an unknown wilderness.The Catholics, of Saint Mary's, worried over the uncertain trend of affairs in the Colony, by the unconciliatory laws of the Penal Acts, then in full force, began leaving their homes, in great numbers, for new and congenial locations, where there was a possible chance of their observance, and, as they hoped, exercise of their religious convictions. -And they found that in all its desire, in the peaceful valley of Long Green.
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Josiah Jenkins, youngest son of Michael Jenkins and Ann Wheeler, of Baltimore County, was born, 1781. Married Elizabeth Hillen, i8o5, and died 1823. Issue:-John Hillen, Ann M., Michael, George, Sarah, Josiah and Ellen.
John Hillen, married Elizabeth White; Ann M., married Mark Wilcox Jenkins; Michael, never married; George, married Lydia Armour; Sarah, married Edward F. Jenkins; Josiah, married Augusta Wilson; Ellen, married Philip P. George.
After the death of Josiah and wife, John Hillen Jenkins owned the home place until his death, and left it to his brother, George Jenkins, who was born at Long Green, September io, 18io. He married Lydia Armour, 1839. Issue, twelve child ren :-Eli zabeth, Mary, Ann, Maria, Richard Hillen, Josephine, Fannie Lawrence, Talbot, Cecilia Corrine, William Armour, Francis, George and Lycurgus.
George Jenkins, at his death, left the home place to his wife, Lydia, who, at this writing, is living there.
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MRS. MICHAEL JENKINS,
ne Isabella Plowden Jenkins




IN WALES.
HE circumstances which immediately preceded the war in which the Welsh were finally annexed to the English Kingdom, are in substance as follows: Liewellen, the'last and one of the bravest of Welshmen, was, in the year 1277, obliged to sue for peace from Edward I., of England. The terms were, besides the payment of money, Llewellen was required to 'go to England every Christmas, to do homage to the King. "The Barons of Snowdon," with other noblemen of the most wealthy families in Wales, attended Liewellen to London, when he want there, at Christmas, to do homage to Edward, and bringing, as their usual custom, a large retinue with them, to a village near by. The place did not suit, because there was not milk enough for the numerous train-they liked neither wine nor aleand, though very plentifully entertained, were much angered at the new manner of living. They were still more angered at the crowds of people staring at them as if they were unnatural beings. They were so angered, that they at once determined to rebel on reaching home, and die in their own country rather than ever go again to London, as subjects to Edward or England.
The war which ensued was a severe one, and contested inch by inch. Edward invaded Wales by land and by sea. He sent the whole Naval Fleet to Anglesay. In the struggle at Anglesay, the Welsh King was slain, when his brother, Llewellen, said: "Wales has lost the finest'feather in her' cap."
The brother of the King carried on the war, but was unsuccessful, finally captured and beheaded. The contest continued four
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years, with unrestricted cruelty. Edward, to restrain the rebellious Welshmen, caused the entire woodland of Wales to be cut down, "inot a tree to be standing to hide a Welshman." The Welsh, from hunger and famine, were enforced to "sue for peace."
During the Civil war, the inhabitants of Anglesay agreed to strongly expressed words of resolutions in behalf of Charles L., and, in consequence, Anglesay was besieged by the Parliamentary forces of Cromwell. The Town and castle did not hold out long against the Britains. But the Welsh, however, obtained an honorable capitulation. Edward's ambition, and England's desire, were at length triumphant. For many years after, Anglesay prospered, but the castle was an incumbrance. It had been surrounded by immense walls, and a moat, or canal, wide and deep, and all the ground outside converted into a marshy soft soil, so that "Horse or footman cannot scale its walls."
In a manuscript, written in 16io, it relates, that "Part of this canal, till very lately, had places for mooring vessels at the quay. The low lands, or vale, are drained,' and the whole level made into a healthy tract of natural beauty, and designated under the name of Llyn Green-"Long Green."
A very diligent effort has been made to ascertain, correctly, the names of the Jenkins family who served in the war of Independence-the war of 1 812; the war with Mexico, as well as that of the Rebellion, of 1861.
The result shows that Edward Jenkins, Ignatius Jenkins, Joseph Jenkins, William Jenkins and Benedict Jenkins were soldiers; and Captain Thomas Jenkins, who was captured at sea, running the blockade, and imprisoned, for nine months, -on the prison ship "Jersey," at Brooklyn, and exchanged for a British officer, is the only one of the family made prisoner 'during the war.
In the war of 1812, those who served in the defense of Baltimore, were Captain Josiah Jenkins, William Jenkins, William V. Jenkins, Henry Jenkins, George Jenkins, Edward Jenkins, Michael Jenkins, Samuel Jenkins, Charles Jenkins, James Jason Jenkins, Frederick Jenkins and Felix Jenkins.
In the war with Mexico, were-:-Mark 0. Jenkins, Edmond Jenkins, William H. Jenkins.
In the war of the Rebellion, 1861, there were many of the family, but a very large majority on the Confederate side. Altogether, counting those from the lower Counties and outside of the City, there is known to have been forty-three. Twenty killed and died from wounds. Ten have died from natural causes, and ten are now living.
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It is creditable indeed to the name, that during the entire struggle for our Independence, there were none of the family known to be adherents of the Crown of England, but, to an individual, were, all of them, on the side of the Rebellion. This, of itself, is something to be proud of-if not, why not? True, the whole tier of the lower Counties of Maryland were on the side of self-government, yet it is a question if any one f amily has a better showing.
The year of i8oo may be claimed as the dawn of Baltimore'gs history, which followed the dark and eventful night of the Revolutionary war. Baltimore is indeed replete with historical events, as far as it can be applied to a City of only 20,000 people' at the beginning of the new century. From this beginning of a new era, the people of Baltimore insisted upon new methods, and the old formalities were laid aside. New people with new ideas came, and with them progressiveness in every form, so that to-day Baltimore has her place in the front as among the most intellectual and reputable, as financially, commercially and enterprising a community as there is on the Western. Continent.
Thomas Jenkins, second son of, William J. and Elizabeth Mitchell, of Cob Neck, Charles County, was born at Saint Thomas', Charles County, January 12, 1751. He married Mary Corry, nee Neale, August 27th, 178o. Died, October, 1821.
He was the son of George Jenkins and Susanne M. Gardiner, of Charles County. Mary Corry, his wife, who was much younger, was the daughter of Henry Neale, son of Anthony Neale, who married Elizabeth Roswell, and the grandson of Captain Neale, who was the first of the Neales who came to Maryland. His estate was known as Wallston Manor, and was then all of the Cob Neck grant in Charles County one thousand acres. Captain Neale's eldest son, James, inherited the manor, and married Elizabeth Calvert, a relative of Charles Lord Baltimore. Anthony's. great grandfather was the second son of the Captain, and brother of James' Neale. The parents of Mary Corry died young, and she was adopted by her aunt, Elizabeth Neale, who married John Lancaster, of Charles County. At the age of sixteen, this aunt, Elizabeth Neale, married her to Doctor Corry, whose mother was first cousin to Mrs. Lancaster and second cousin to Mary Corry. Doctor Corry died within a year, leaving one son, Leslie, who married and died within one year, leaving one daughter, who became a nun, known as Sister Andrea.
Mary Corry, a young widow, married Thomas Jenkins, son of William Jenkins and Annie Mitchell.
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In early life Thomas Jenkins followed the sea, in the employ of the firm of Daingerfields, then largely engaged in the commercial trade of Alexandria, Virginia. When of proper age, he engaged in ,business for himself, and established a large trade in tobacco at Port Tobacco, Charles County. In course of time he became quite wealthy,, owning several sea going vessels. He commanded the ship "Potomac," and when on, a return voyage f rom the West Indies, his ship was captured, and himself and crew made prisoners by the British Fleet, then off Cape Henry. Captain Jenkins was sent, by order- of the British Commander, to'New York, and placed in close confinement, on the memorable prison ship, "Jersey," where he was kept, closely guarded, for nine months. After suffering all the horrors of disease and 'want, near unto death, he was sent on shore to die, like many others before, but by the protecting hand of Providence was restored to health and his friends, by exchange for a British Captain, held by the American army, under General Smallwood, who was his neighbor and friend, of Charles County.
To the characteristic bluntness of a sailor, he united the most rigid principles of probity, with the finest feelings of humanity. Respected and esteemed by his neighbors, revered and beloved by his children and numerous relatives. He was lamented by all, but none more than the poor of -his neighborhood, who, with sorrowful hearts, declared :-"We have lost a friend indeed."
Many of his slaves were given their freedom, a few were distributed among his children, to set free when of age. He was buried beside his wife in the grave lot at St. Thomas Church, Charles County.
On his return to his home and family, he was offered the command of a large ship, then being 'fitted out at Alexandria. It is well known that General Smallwood, his neighbor. and friend, while recruiting men in the three lower Counties of Maryland, and before Captain Jenkins was made prisoner, recommended him to the "Committee of Safety," some of whom knew him well, to be made a Commander in the Navy, then'being organized. He, however, declined all public service of whatever kind, 'preferring to devote his life to his young wife and family, and never followed the sea.
Thomas Jenkins and Mary Corry had five sons; they were :Henry, William V., Benedict, Felix, Frederick and Louis. The daughters were:-Eliza and Matilda.' Eliza became a Nun, and went to Mobile, Alabamn'a, and died there. Matilda married Raphael Semmes, of Georgetown, of. "Alabama" fame.
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William Valentine Jenkins, second son of Thomas Jenkins, of Cob Neck, was born February, 1783, and married November 7, 18o7, Ann Maria Wells, of Baltimore. In 1809, he established a business for himself on the York Road, and afterwards at 'Huntington. In 1829, he erected a tannery on Jenkins lane on Cold Stream property, where he continued until the great crisis in 1'837, when he retired from business.
He was appointed by the President, Andrew Jackson, to a position in the Custom House, and continued in this office until his death, in 1854. He left a large family, but several of them had emigrated West. His children were :-Mary Josephine, who married Richard Wright, of Georgetown. Charles Francis, who went to Kentucky, and after to Texas. Cyprian Thomas, who 'went to Florida. Leoline Wells," who .,died. at, the College at. Georgetown, a student for the Priesthood. Augustus Ludlow, who died. in Baltimore, in 1838, was clerk to Fire-Insurance Company. Frederick 0., who went to Woodville, Miss., and died there in 1839. Amnbrose Marechall, who went to Kentucky and married and died there. William H., now living in Baltimore. Octavius Mark, who went to Kentucky, and married and died there. Enoch Fenwick, died in Baltimore. Constantine D., now living in Baltimore.
Cyprian Thomas Jenkins, son of William Valentine Jenkins, was born. at the old homestead, "Huntington," 1811i; married. in 1857; died 1893.
No one of his name had a more remarkable h istory. He learned the trade of Tanner and Currier, and, when of age, he went to Florida, then a wilderness and in a very uncivilized condition, and was instrumental largely in making the history of that territory throughout the Seminole war, and for years after.
Mr. Jenkins held many important positions in the service of Florida, as a territory and State. His first commission was from President Jackson, as an Inspector of Government Lands, a position he held until 1861. He was the first settler in the Hernando Country, then in possession of the Seminoles.
He witnessed the first wedding in that unsettled country, and saw the first white child born there. He raised a Company of mounted rangers in the Seminole war, and gave the command to Colonel Bailey, a military officer of renown. In this troop, he acted as *A scout and interpreter during the desperate conflict with the Seminoles. He volunteered to rescue Colonel Dade's command, and was within a mile when the command was slaughtered. Owing. to a wide river and morass, he was unable to reach Dade in time.
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He was in many desperate encounters with the savages during the campaign of 1836-8.
Mr. Jenkins was a member of the first Legislature, 1852, and re-elected for four terms, of two years each. He was appointed the Government Timber Agent, and held this position eight years. He was re-elected to the Legislature in 1861, and also under the Confederacy, in 1863. He -organized the first railroad ever seen in Florida.
In the Civil war, he served as Captain, and after as Colonel of the Fourth Florida Regiment, doing duty on the West coast of Florida. His Regiment, after one year, was reduced in number to a mere squad, and was, with himself, taken prisoner near Newnanville. Colonel Jenkins, after capture, was sent first, to Taylor, then to Fort Lafayette, and tried by a Court Martial, and condemned to death. Through the influence of, a Baltimore lady, the wife of an Union Officer, he was committed to imprisonment at Fort Warren, Boston, for life. After twventy-six months in prison, he was liberated. He returned to -Florida, stopping on his way in Baltimore with his relations and friends. On his arrival in Florida, almost penniless, he was appointed Surveyor of Hernando County, and served as Surveyor for ten years or more. He purchased and settled on a large tract of land on the Crystal River, where he had a large and productive orange grove and a fine farm, to the end of his days.
He left a wife and three children, who reside on the place near Homosassa, Florida.
Henry Jenkins, eldest son of Thomas Jenkins, of Cob Neck, was born in Charles County, October 31, 17y8-1. He married Ann Harrison, in 1809. He died in 1869.
Henry Jenkins conducted, for many years, the hat, cap and furrier business, corner of Baltimore and Calvert Streets. Issue, four children :-MargAret, Elizabeth, Anastasia and Thomas P. Jenkins. Margaret became a religious, and was Superior of a Convent at Brooklyn. Elizabeth married Samuel.Brown, of Howard County. Anastasia married Charles Wood, of Richmond, Va., and Thomas P. married E. M. De Ronceray, of Baltimore.
Louis A. Jenkins, son of Thomas Jenkins, of Cob Neck, Charles County, was born on his father's estate "Walston," and married Mary Boarman, of Charles County.
ILouis Jenkins received his education at Georgetown College, and soon after entered into business as a commission merchant on Light Street, Baltimore, with success. -He was a very popular man
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and numbered many friends. For the last eight-years of his life he was an Officer of the Customs, receiving his appointment from, President Jackson, and also from President 'Van Buren.
He died universally regretted, leaving a widow and four children :-Bradford, who died in Texas; Ambrosia, who married Eben Faxon, Architect; she was an exceptionally beautiful woman; Mary and Ignatius Jenkins.
Benedict Jenkins, son of Thomas, of Cob Neck, Charles County, was born, 1798. He married Adeline Neal Murray, of Saint Mary's, in 1 821. Issue :-John Thomas, Ellen, Josephine, Rufus, Napoleon and Mary. He died, 1837. His widow and children emigrated to Illinois, 1838.
In many instances, where the Jenkins emigrated from Maryland, it is simply perplexing to get any record, thinking, no doubt, the whole State should know from whom they descended, and now their grandchildren can give no positive account who they are, save they were ladies and gentlemen, and the women virtuous.
Benedict Jenkins, for many years, held and lived in the old manor at Walston, now in possession of some of the Jenkins family.
Felix Jenkins, fourth son of Thomas Jenkins, was born at Cob Neck, Charles County, in 1786. He married Martha Coskery, i8io. Issue, one daughter, who became a Nun. He married a second time, to Francis Wheeler, of Baltimore. Issue, three sons:Felix, Michael and Albert. Felix, married Annie Jenkins, and became a Doctor of Medicine. He is now a prominent physician of, Baltimore. He has three children-a son, also "Dr. Felix"and two daughters.
Charles F. Jenkins, eldest son of Valentine Jenkins, was born in i8io, and is now, probably, the oldest of his name living. He emigrated to Caldwell County, Kentucky, in 1835. Married Miss Arthur Williams, 1838.
He started the first tannery in, that part of the State; was a member of the Legislature for several years, and was sheriff of the County twenty years, or until the year 0861. He moved to Texas in 1865, and settled, with his entire family of six children and twelve grandchildren, in Eartland County. Five of his sons were killed in, the Confederate Army. During the war he was made prisoner several times, and his property destroyed. He was, on one occasion, ordered to be shot to death. Since his residence in Texas, he has been unusually successful in restoring his losses in Kentucky.
41]










715
INTERIOR VIEW AT LLEWELLYN




$uppkement
T may prove interesting to know that in the City of Baltimore, in 1799, there were but three of the Jenkins family located there, Edward Jenkins, Thomas C. Jenkins and William Jenkins, sons of Michael and Charity, and old and young, there were but fifteen souls in all.
Ini8oo, 'Walter Jenkins settled in the City. In 1802, Samuel Jenkins, A sea Captain, settled with his family. From 1802 until i809, there was no addition, but in 18io, Michael Jenkins, David Jenkins, Thomas Jenkins, William V. Jenkins, located and, commenced business.
In 1812, there were but two families residing in the City, all of the others of the Jenkins moved into the suburbs, but conducted business in the City.
In r814, Felix Jenkins located on South Street, No. 6. James Jason Jenkins, located on Aliceanna Street; he was a Pilot, from Saint Mary's County.
In 1q, Captain Benedict Jenkins, from Charles County, located at No. 6 Market Street; he was a sea captain.
James and Jason Jenkins, Cabinet makers, established business on Calvert Street, warehouse, No. 6. Frederick Jenkins, grocer, located on Water Street, No. 23. Thomas L. Jenkins, Pilot, located on Bond Street. All these were from St. Mary's and Charles Counties, and relatives.
From 1819 to 1823, there were no additional arrivals of the Jenkins families in Baltimore City. William S. Jenkins and Henry Jenkins formed a co-partnership in the hat trade, on the corner of Baltimore and Calvert Streets, 1823. From this year until 1827,
43]




there was not one additional arrival, but, in 1 827, Lewis A. Jenkins, from Charles County, opened a commission house on Pratt Street, No. 8; among the first of his name as a merchant.
In,183o, Thoma's E. Jenkins, Merchant, and Louis William Jenkins, Attorney- at-law, on Fayette Street, commenced business.
in 1831, Austin Jenkins succeeded to his father's business-Saddlery, HardWare-established in 1796.
Michael Jenkins commenced' business as Cabinet maker in 1799, and was succeeded by his son Anthony in 1831.
In 1835,- Courtney Jenkins, Attorney, and Steigers and Jenkins, grocers and commission merchants, commenced business on Gay Street.
In 1837, George T. Jenkins, merchant, also Henry Jenkins and Lewis W. Jenkins, commenced business. From this date, 1837, there were many additions of the name and family, doing active business in the City.
A very distinguished and well-known Statesman, says: "Like you, I am proud of our forefathers, and of the lineage from which we have sprung." We can truthfully say of Wales-the world knows her history-Wales was overrun by hordes of Saxons, Danes' and Norsemen, but was never *sub dued :---"The hardy Danes have faded into the shadow of a remembrance, but Wales still- lives. Her traditions have been kept alive, as has been no other nation on the face of the globe; her old-time customs are loved, and are followed as they were in the good old days, a fact of which all Welshmen are proud, and their descendants should be proud, also. Yes, we have a right to be very enthusiastically proud of the land of our ancestors, of her literature, and civilization, which is older than the Gospel. It is true that Wales occupies a small place on the map of the world. It is not physique that makes the man, but intellect and character; it is not a vast territory that makes a country, but the quality of her productions in all the fo rms of human activity. Yes, Wales is a small country, but she is foremost in resources, rich in minerals, rich in art and music- but richer than all is she, in that which constitutes the real wealth and active prosperity of a Nationin her Women."
Amongs 't the women of our particular ancestry, we are proud to find all kinds that are worthy of admiration and reverence. Besides the notable number, who have, often in youth and beauty, dedicated themselves to the service of Christ and his Church, there
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have been, and are still, many who remain in the world, but do an angel's part to God's poor "who are always with us."
Literature has known their names and themes-music and art also-whilst for general intelligence and womanly -traits and virtues, and often beauty, we need envy no other family. In every generation the name of Jenkins has been truly a synonym for charity amongst their woman kind.
This effort of the writer is very far from being complete, though having taken considerable pains to give as accurate a genealogy as possible, of the older members of the family. In instances, I consulted the younger, though with little benefit,; I have been compelled to follow on down to, the present time, and in many cases, especially in the Counties, could not trace the, descent beyond the second or third generation. In some few instances, however, gave up in despair, and sincerely hope that some of the branches of the family will be able to trace their ancestors to the period where I have failed.
I am sensible that I have not adopted the best arrangement in my genealogy, and will have rendered myself liable to much criticism; and for my default, I plead that I had advanced far in my effort, when I saw I had to alter it, without writing the work anew. I sincerely hope that'some of the ancient and most noteworthy names of the f amily are not passed over.
Imperfect as is this effort of mine, I beg to submit it to the members and friends of the Jenkins under the confident expectation that they will be indulgent.
451










MICHAEL JENKINS,
Son of Thomas Courtney and Louisa Carrell Jenkins




1Ztdc1ae (c, ourtney) ,3nkins
ICHAEL JENKINS was born in Baltimore City at No. 6o8 North Calvert Street, one of the houses known as Waterloo Row, on the 27th of December, Saint John's Day, in the year 1842..
Waterloo Row was situated at what was then the extreme northern end of Baltimore, adjacent to Belvedere, the estate and residence of General John Eager Howard. He is the youngest son of Thomas Courtney Jenkins and his wife Louisa Carrell of Philadelphia, who was the daughter of John Carrell and Judith Moore.
He was educated at the Misses Cotringer's School and 'Joseph Clark's Academy. He entered Mount Saint Mary's College in 1856 and graduated there in 1862..
On October 4th, 1866, Mr. Jenkins married Mary Isabelle Plowden Jenkins, daughter of Austin Jenkins and Mary Anne Plowden Jenkins.
Mr. Jenkins entered the firm of Jenkins Brothers on leaving college, and on the death of his father on December 24th, 1881, he became prominently interested in railroad and transportation affairs and succeeded Mr. George Appold as President of the Merchants and Miners Transportation Company.
On the death of Mr. B. F. Newcomer on March 3 ist, 1901, he was urged to take the Presidency of the Safe Deposit and Trust Company, which he did and still occupies that office.
Mr. Michael Jenkins is one of Baltimore's leading financiers and business men, and has often been solicited to take public office, but his retiring and modest nature has always kept him out of political affairs.
Mr. Jenkins is very prominent in the Catholic Church, and is both a charitable and useful citizen and a most highly respected and beloved man.
471










MRS. MICHAEL JENKINS,
ne Iel Plowden Jenkins




RS. MICHAEL JENKINS, the eldest daughter of Austin Jenkins and Mary Anne Plowden Jenkins, was born October the 2.d, j844. She was educated at Eden Hall Academy,- near Philadelphia.
Mrs. Jenkins has always been very prominent in social and charitable affairs and conspicuous for aristocratic beauty and gentle,' loving nature, which endear her to all who know her.' On May 29th, 19oS, the second year of his pontificate, Pope Pius the Tenth honored Mrs. Jenkins by bestowing upon her the title of the Duchess of Llewellyn.
491




[From the Catholic Herald.]
LINES, INSCRIBED TO THE MEMORY OF WILLIAM JENKINS, JR., WHO
DIED SUDDENLY, -AT NEW ORLEANS, ON THE 27TH ULT., AGED 27, By ANNA HANSON DORSEY. BALTIMORE, MARCH
10, 1838.
"A funeral, train,' with solemn steps and slow, Came gliding past. Men's faces wore a shade Of grief, and eyes which seldom felt the dew, Of tears, were wet, and manly cheeks grew pale As feeling ushered up each burning drop From their full hearts; for he who lay beneath The gloomy 'pall, and nodding hearse plumes,. died When life was young, and in its brightest flash, When 'rainbow arches seemed to span each wish, And cast a star-light brilliance o'er a world Of hopes and smiles, when every dream, perchance, Was but a dream of joy, of love, of home; And yet' he died f ar f rom that sweet- home; How like a glance of light, his thoughts pierced through The flight of time, until they reached his aged father's hearth, And heard, f rom every lip, the silvery tones Of gladsome joy and love's own welcome sweet, And gazed upon the scenes his childhood knewThe sun-lit vines and trees, the bright blue stream; But Death chilled that fond dream, and all of life and light was stilled.
The lonely sentinels which beam on high, to cheer the Midnight
Watch,
*Kept o'er him, in death's agony, Its brief and bitter pain, and these were all For slumber, and its heaviness of dreams, Sealed up the eyes of those who would have wept Vivid tears and murmured words of kindly thought, To soothe the stranger's passage to a stranger's grave. They laid him in the silent mould, beneath The fragrant orange trees whose blossoms wave In a perpetual and balmy air; As balmy in that southern land as if The winds stole past the gates of Paradise.
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FAREWELL.
"A Father's tears like rain-drops gushing,
Fall upon thy memory's shrine,
A sister's brow with anguish flushing Tells a sadder dirge than mine.
FAREWELL.
"Thy brother's silentw~oe gives token,
Of grief which fond hearts only feel, To see so rudely broken, sadly The chain around love's signet seal.
FAREWELL.
"Thy mother's spirit sure will greet thee,
In that far off shadow 'bourne,
And guardian angels surely meet thee, Telling of hopes, that never mourn.
-FAREWELL.
"God and our holy Mary, speed thee
To thine everlasting rest.
The prayers of saints, and martyrs, lead thee C
To thy Saviour's breast."







J CARRELL JENKINS,
Son of Thomas Courtney and Louisa Carrell Jenkins







CHURCH OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST
FRONT ROYAL, VA.







TABLET IN CHURCH OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST
FRONT ROYAL. VA.







neiitsceflceg
Bly COLONEL JENKINS OF FLORIDA.
NY neglect of our Forefather's early history can only be compared to a want of a genuine pride of birth and place, and its beginnings. If we, have no love for our ancestry, we surely can have but little for our country.
It is no egotism, but simply truth to assert that no other one of his name affords a picture more absorbing in manly deeds of daring-if fairly written-than .C. T. Jenkins, of Florida, who was one of the original settlers of Hernando County, and a resident for Fifty-four (54) years.
The following reminiscences were written by Mr. Jenkins, several years ago, and among others were published in "Florida Crescent-:"
"Hernando has a history rich in fact and romantic in incident, and one claiming a pen far abler than mine to picture to you the midnight attack or deadly ambuscade of the-hidden red foe who lurked in every swamp and hammock in the country; of the rough struggles and many privations of the hardy pioneer, who, with literally rifle in one hand and plow handle or hoe in the other,. kept the savage at bay while he cultivated the corn and potatoes that were to feed his little ones, what I shall say in these articles shall be facts from history, but history must have a foundation on which to rest, so I will proceed to locate Hernando historically.
"Hernando County was originally a part of Alachua County, or Alachua -Plains, which embraced, the present Counties of Alachua, Levy, Marion, Sumfter and Hernando.
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"The Hon. David L. Yulee was a delegate from the Territory of Florida in Congress, when the Seminole war had been raging for seven or eight years, and the United States Army here was completely worn out in the unequal contest, and from some cause, unexplained, was unable to accomplish anything. The Government had expended over sixty millions of dollars without any return (perhaps this immense expenditure explains the failure of the armed forces operating here).
"Conceiving that he knew a remedy, Mr. Yulee introduced a Bill into Congress, familiarly known as the Armed Occupation Act, and with the aid of Hon. T. H. Benton, in the Senate, the bill became a law on the Fourth of August, 1842.
"The purpose of the Act was to drive the Indians f rom the country by occupying the land with actual settlers. The Act limited the Government in. its issue of permits to 1250, to be issued to ablebodied men, the heads of families. 'None others could obtain permits, and the male members were to constitute a full regiment, to be under military organization and ready at any moment for duty. The Act further provided that, in consideration of such occupation and service, they should receive a fee simple title, at the expiration of five years, to the land they had occupied and cultivated, and one year's rations. The Government gave the land, according to promise, but only issued one month's rations to such of the settlers as were convenient, or who came and demanded the same. Many of the more remote ones did not get the month's rations even, and were forced, in consequence, to abandon their claims and return to their old homes.
"The Occupation Act opened all the country lying South of the dividing townships 9 and TO, which line runs from Deadman's Bay, on the Gulf, through Oldtown and Gainesville, to Matanzas Inlet, on the Atlantic Coast. Of the 125o armed occupants, the territory, now known as Hernando, secured about 4oo settlers. Of these only about Two Hundred and Fifty remained upon the land, owing to the failure of the Government to comply with its compact, and the constant inroads of the savages, which prevented, in many instances, the making of any crop whatever. Then starvation did what the red men could not do-forced the pioneer to seek his old home.
"I know whereof I write, for I was one of the original settlers who remained to endure and to now write up the hardships, trials and privations, dangers and sufferings of the pioneers. There are but few of us left, but these few will testify to the truth of what I
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say. I have often wondered how we ever stood the evils and inconveniences. Those were indeed times that tried men's souls. These people were mostly from East and Middle Florida, men inured to the hardships of frontier life, but they and their wives often surprised me by their fortitude and courage. They were *almost'all old Indian fighters, and right well did they do their part in conquering the Indians and driving them to the Everglades and to peace. Several times the hardy pioneer was forced to 'take his all and fortify for protection in block-houses.
"Tampa was then only a military post, with no,.store, or any other accommodation whatever, for the settler, and for the first year or two, we were compelled to attend U. S. Court, at Newnansville, twelve miles North of Gainesville. Here, too, was the nearest store. just imagine, if you can, a journey of from seventy-five to one hundred and fifty miles, through an almost unbroken wilderness, with possibly a hidden foe on every side, to procure *the necessities of life. I confess the task of giving any adequate description through this medium entirely beyond my power.
"Had the Government complied as faithfully in its engagements as the settlers did with theirs, all, would'have been able to hold their ground and make plenty for the succeeding years, but the failure to supply the rations resulted most dis astrously 'to.' the settlers in every instance, and prolonged the struggle for occupation for several years and at the cost of many lives. Congress waked to a tardy recognition of its injustice and passed an Act amendatory of the Armed Occupation Act, granting an additional 'one hundred and sixty acres of land to each settler, but hampered it by allowing only those who had no water on their land to avail themselves, and then, even, only on the payment of $1.25 per acre.' It is'needless to say that very few were able to avail themselves of this semi-liberal proposition.
"The people who remained were sober, industrious, *kind and moral, and for hospitality and honesty they had no equals-characteristics which I am proud to say they transmitted to their descendants, the much abused and laughed at 'Florida Cracker,' who, 6 by the way, often turns up in high places, but like the typical 'Yankee,' you don't know him then.
"Now for something about the river that forms our Northern and Eastern boundary. The orthography of the name is wrong, it should be Ouithlacoochee, and means :-'roaring river.' There is a Withiacoochee, which rises in Georgia and empties into the Suwannee, at Ellaville; whether the two names are intended to be
55]




the same I cannot tell. Our Quithiacoochee rises in Polk and Sumter Counties, on the table lands of the backbone of Florida, one flowing almost due West across Sumter County, the other, nearly North from its source, in Polk County. These two streams unite near the centre of township twenty-two, range twenty-one.
"Having located the heads of the river, I will now go to the mouth and come up.
"When the river debouches into the Gulf of Mexico it has two mouths, one on each side of Shell Island, better known as Chamber's Mill. For two miles from the mouth the river is shallow, at low tide, only about two feet of water covering the lime and shell rock bottom, and the water is as clear as crystal. Having passed these two miles, the river deepens to ten and twenty feet, at Fort Clinch, at the head of tide water. From Fort Clinch to Horn's Bridge there are ten different falls or rock shoals, and here the river proves the justice of the claim to the name of roaring river. Late surveys show that the river level at Camp Izzard, thirty-five miles up the river, is one hundred and thirty feet above the level at its mouth. So there is good reason why the water should rush with precipitant haste over the shoals. The falls are all below Horn's Bridge, no rocks show from the surface above, and the river changes from the rushing, roaring torrent to the placid lake in appearance, with scarcely any current, and not a ripple, save that made by the passing breeze.
"Like everybody else, I have my theory about improving this river, and my suggestion is just the reverse of all others, viz: Build a solid rock dam across the river at Horn's Bridge, sufficiently high to maintain an average depth of water above it at all seasons of the year, this will enable boats to navigate the river at all times, and not only to traverse the river, but all the lakes in connection therewith. This steady depth of water would insure health, as there would be no surface alternately covered and uncovered to create sickness; again, this arrangement would create a magnificent water park, embracing all the lands and islands of Charles Apopka, the River and Panasofka. Thousands of dollars have been expended on the so-called improvement of this river, with no perceptible good, but rather, I think, a'positive injury. I have seen the river below Horn's Bridge almost dry in places, for months. For
instance, from 1848 to 185 a small skiff had to be hauled over no less than six flights of these rock stairs I have told you about, besides working through the rapids. I know whereof I speak, for I ascended the river four times, between the years mentioned, in search of live oak, cedar and pine for the naval service. I found
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all that I wanted, but the Government had to abandon the selection on Account 'of the difficulty, experienced in getting the timber over the shoals and down to deep water.
"Let us go back~t6 the Park scheme; there is nothing imp racticable in it. Take advantage of the dry season, cut canals six to ten feet wide, connecting the various lakes, build bridges, connecting the- islands one with another, re-christen Tompkinsville the Venice of Florida, put your dam across- the river at Horn's Bridge, provide the requisite gondolas, then, when the moon shines in all its beauty, and the balmy breath of the 'Gulf is, laden with the sweet perfume of flowers, and sweeter song. from the rosy lips and pearly throats of beauty, float over the tranquil waters, happy in the consciousness of having provided for posterity the most delightful place on earth for devoted swains and loving maids to while away the sweet hours of courtship. Let us finish the work nature has begun and make of the Charla Apopka the most beautiful spot earth holds.. I shall never f orget the first time I saw it. 'One bright morning, the water sparkling like diamonds under the rising sun, the dew 'drops glistening on the leaves, the birds chanting anthems of praise for the beautiful day, while the deer, disturbed by the unwonted presence, bounded off through the primeval forest.
"Now fora bit of. history :-To make this disjointed reminiscence as connected as possible,. I will go back to the mouth of the Ouithlacoochee, and take up the historical points along the river as I come to them, and the first place of note is, or 'rather was (for it is all gone now), the, old block-house, located in section three, township seventeen, range sixteen. During the early part of the Seminole' war,. and after the battle of t'he Ouithlacoochee, the officer in command of the forces, General Gains, I think it was, ordered Captain 'Holloman, of the Florida volunteers, with his command,' to move down the river as scouts; near 'the block-house, and on the North. bank, the side hie was moving on, Captain Holloman discovered an. Indian canoe, this hie appropriated, and proceeded to cross his command into what is now Hernando, a few at a time. The task had barely been accomplished, when he was attacked by a small body of Indians whom he repulsed, but the red foe hung so closely around that mischief was evident, and the Captain cut off from retreat by the river, went to work to construct a block-house on the most approved pattern. Results demonstrated the wisdom of his move. The house was not quite finished, except in defensiveness, when' a large body of Indians scooped down on the devoted command in anticipation of an easy victory,'which was not to be theirs. Their 'assault was a furious one, but they were repulsed. The siege 571




was regularly laid, and the slightest visible movement on the part of the besieged, drew the fire of the red man's rifle. For ten days the constant assaults were kept up, and it became evident that something had to ber done, and the little garrison cast lots to see who should make the attempt to bring succor to the beleagured garrison. The lot felt on two heroes, whose names, I am sorry to say, I have forgotten. There was but one way, to take the canoe and work their way up the Gulf to St. Marks, with every possible chance that if they escaped the keen eyes and deadly rifles of the red men, they would fall victims to the merciless gales on the Gulf.
"The die cast, our two heroes began making their preparations, which, owing to the scant rations and scantier personal impedimenta, consumed but little time. The canoe, which had rendered them such valuable assistance in getting into their unpleasant predicament, was thoroughly overhauled and put in the best possible trim between the watches and sortees. It was essential that the savages should not suspect the attempted escape and rescue, for suspect and defeat were synonymous terms. The darkest hour of an unusually dark night was selected for the perilous venture, and the gallant f ellows, having received their orders from their commander, left with trusted friends their last wishes and farewell words to friends and loved ones, in case their desperate venture failed, and received, in return, the messages, for home from their beleagured companions, bade farewell to all, and silently crept into the frail vessel that was either to bring relief to their comrades or carry them to their long home. Rations had grown so scant during the siege, which had now lasted ten days, that they took nothing, save their rifles and a few *rounds of ammunition, with them; with these they lay down in the boat, pushed it softly into the current and drifted silently down the stream. The darkness was so intense that it was impossible to tell if they were moving even, or if moving, whether or not they were near the shore or in mid-stream. The only chance was to feel, and that very gently, lest a dry branch or rustle of leaves, touched too rudely, should awaken the vigilant foe to their presence. Once their hearts almost ceased their pulsations as a sudden stir and sound from the land they had just left made them think for a moment that their attempt had been discovered, but the sudden plunge into the water assured them that it was some animal or loose earth dislodged.
"After what seemed almost an eternity, the rocking of the boat and the phosphorescent gleam of the water told them that they had reached the Gulf, and they could scarcely repress a shout of joy over
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the safe accomplishment of the most difficult portion of their journey, but prudence forbade any such ebullition, and they set themselves to the' task of unwinding the knotty problem before them. They were in the Gulf, but when did they get into it? North or South of Shell Island? How f ar were they out? Where was the land and how far off was it? were the questions that rapidly presented themselves. After a whispered consultation they determined to paddle ahead and trust to luck. Fortune favored them, and in a short time they heard the steady swash of the waves on the beach, to t heir right. This showed them that they were not only out of the river but on the right course, and they paddled with desperate energy through the remaining hours of darkness, and as day dawned they had the pleasure of seeing that they had left the river far behind them. Hiding by day, and forced to seek food and travel by night only, they were three weeks making the journey to St. Marks, a distance of only about one hundred and thirty miles. Once there the news spread rapidly, and as Captain Holloman and most of the Company were from Jefferson County, the people felt great personal interest in their situation. The excitement around Tallahassee was intense, and Jefferson and Madison were almost wild with impa-, tience to fly to the rescue. Young Leigh Reed, afterwards Gen. Leigh Reed, one of the bravest and daring young men of the times, was the leader. Volunteers were abundant, and the dashing leader could pick the best. Daniel Ladd, one of'our oldest citizens, furnished a small steamer and abundant supplies for the relief of the garrison. As quickly as could be the expedition got under way, but, hurry as fast as they could, almost thirty more precious days were consumed ere the rescue could be effected. In the meantime the Indians, ignorant of the escape of any of the garrison, and sure of ultimate triumph by starvation, if nothing else, prosecuted the siege in the most leisurely manner. They made a number of assaults and feints, and several attempts to drive the garrison by fire, but every attempt failed with severe loss to themselves. That they maintained a vigilant watch was conclusively proved by the crack of the rifle and the zip of the savages' bullet in answer to every visible movement on the part of the besieged. These sharp shooters laid two of the gallant fellows low, and death, through starvation and disease, laid his icy fingers on three others. The great danger hovered over the devoted fellows, and it required but little stretch of the imagination for them to see him as they received their ration of a dozen grains of corn daily, carefully counted out, to see his fleshless fingers pointing an one side to starvation, on the other, to the quicker and
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more merciful death by the foeman's rifle. just as hope, who's flattering tales had nerved them to endure, was about to leave them to despair, the gallant Reed and his men fell on the surprised savages, and the work, though short, was decisive, and the rescue complete. It would be an impossible task to describe the delirium of joy that swept over the hearts of the poor pent up fellows as they hear ,d the shots and shouts of their friends, and realized that their comrades had, in the eleventh hour, brought relief. I must leave this to the imagi 'nation of my readers.,
"General Leigh Reed was from the State of Tennessee. He came to Tallahassee in 1 834,,and commenced practicing Law. He was young, ambitious and soon came to the front. He identified himself with the democratic party and soon became its leader. His first wife was the daughter of Captain John Bellamy, of Jefferson County. His second wife was the daughter of Governor John Branch, of North Carolina. Both were amiable and beloved women.
."He, was fully six feet high and well proportioned, no surplus about his person, light complexion and light red hair, a keen blue eye, and in- general outline made a perfect model man, and commanded the admiration of every one. He was neat in his appearance and temperate in his habits, Which gave him the dash of a soldier and a hero-the Bayard of Florida.
"He soon made his, mark in -the politics of the State, by the firm stand he took on the leading questions of the day. Bank or no bank' was the issue. He was a strong anti-bank man of the Jackson stripe. Bold as 'Old Hickory' 'in his opinions, and fully as honest in his belief, nothing could daunt him. When he said yes, you could find him there. Fearless as a lion when he made up his mind, and true as the North star to his friends and to the cause he defended.
"At that time the politics of the State were high and decided. There was no doing'as now. Every one had to stand square by his opinions. The Whig party, particularly about Tallahassee and in Leon County, comprised the wealth and a greater portion of the ablest talent of the, State. The democrats were the loco f oco party at that time. The Whigs got the President, Governor R. R. Reid was removed and Governor R. Call was reappointed. There was great rejoicing. Governor R. Call was very popular, but did not hold that office long.. Governor John Branch was appointed in R. Call's place. Then came the muddle. The Union Bank 'went by the board,' things looked dark and gloomy. The change had to take place. The bank and its friends had to go. General Leigh Reed
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being the leader of the anti-bank party had to be made a sacrifice. The combination commenced their work of sending challenges to him, one after another, he took no notice of them, but he had made up his mind and said: 'I do not intend to fight dung-hill chickens, but when the game cock sends me his card, I will attend to him. Every one knew who that man was-no less than Colonel. A. Alston. There was no dodging then. The challenge was made and accepted, and at Miccoseekee lake the duel came off. Colonel Alston was of that notable family of South Carolina. Greek met Greek. General Leigh Reed, on that occasion, was attended by Captain Guion, of the U. S. Army; Colonel Joseph Branch, now of Nashville; L. Branch, who became a Confederate General, and Nat Walker. Colonel A. Alston had as his seconds: Captain Gillard, Hugh Fisher and Doctor Randolph. That duel was one of the most notable that ever occurred in the 'State. Both parties had their friends, and the whole State was more or less interested. Colonel Alston had the choice of weapons used, and he chose a heavy rifle, Ione- half ounce balls, distance twelve yards. Earth mounds were ,rais ed and each took his stand as all preliminaries were made. Reed examined his mound and stripped himself of all his clothing except his pants, His coolness surprised every one on the ground. At the word ready, one, two, three, fire! Alston being quick and active, fired first and missed his man. Reed cool and like a stone wall,. fired in time. *The f atal bullet struck the heart of Alston. All was over. The parties returned from the field to their homes. No words were spoken.
"But did it end there? General Leigh Reed, being the leader of the democratic party, was elected to the legislative 'council. His friends, particularly Nat Walker, elected him Speaker of the House. That made things more bitter. Bitter was the feeling of each party. While attending to his duties for his County,, at 'the Capital,'one night, while he was coming from the dining room, after supper, he met a crowd of men, and some one made an attempt to assassinate him, and with a large knife ripped his abdomen open. Horrible was the sight; a cry for vengeance was equal to the Seminole war
whoop.al Reed got over this awf 'ul wound and soon he was himself again. His heroic action in the Indian war was known to all, and particularly the deliverance of Captain Holloman and his brave men, who had been left on the Withlacoochee river in a block-house, surrounded by Indians, over six weeks, was a daring and heroic act, and the whole State looked upon him as the Saviour of these men. He was, also, at that time, U. S. Marshal for the State. I was one of his
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deputies, and judge P. Wall, of Tampa, and I, are the only ones of his deputies now living.
"Did his enemies stop here? No, they kept up a still hunt, until they assassinated him. He was coming from the Court house, after delivering up his papers of office, May Dennis and Joe Branch, his brother-in-law, were with him. Monroe Walker was then U. S. Marshal of Florida in his place. The political situation was deplorable. The whigs, jubilant over their success, had again the reins in their hands, and made things lively in the Capital of Florida.
"Harrison only lived one month and a change came over the spirit of their dream s. When President Tyler came into office he took the case, in hand and quieted affairs in Florida. He looked the whole country over for a man to fill 1 the office of U. S. Marshal. He found Major Camp. He was from Chicago. He had all the requirements to fill the place, and by his firm and rigid manners and policy he soon had things straightend up. His rough and fearless way -of a western frontiersman gave him the name of a good officer.
"General Leigh Reed was truly an honest man, no dark spots on any of his transactions. As a lawyer he stood high; as a statesman he had no equal-; as a soldier he was a hero; as a man, he was a man among men. He was killed by parties, who hid themselves in a small house, while passing with Colonel Dennis and Colonel Joe B ranch, on the streets of the Capital of Florida, in sight of his wife, who was a few yards from him in her carriage, in broad daylight. What a. day that was in Tallahassee. The three men who did this cowardly act were half way tried and acquitted, but justice was at last meeted out to them by Him who knows all things and can quiet the sea. I was one of General Reed's tried deputies. I had his good will till death. Had he escaped that day, he would have gone to Texas to live. I was to accompany him to share his fortune.
"The people mourned his loss, how deeply, no one knows but a few living men. At one time the people in the country were arranging to go to Tallahassee to have revenge, but his relatives stopped that kind of work. He has left a name behind that few of us can follow.
"Among those who took a lively interest in the welfare of the early settlers of Hernando County, I must not forget to name Major John Parsons and General Sam Russ-ell, who were, in those days, Register and Receiver at the Newnansvilie Land Office, an office then just created. Having served in the wars with many of our people, they were well known to all of them, either personally or by reputation. I do not know that they received those places as a
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reward of merit, I am rather inclined to the opinion that the positions were conferred on them because it took some grit about that time to hold an office in Florida. A fellow was likely to meet a hot bullet at most any time; at any rate, they held the offices and discharged the duties thereof to the entire satisfaction of the people, and if the Government was not pleased I never -heard of it. Both Major Parsons and Mr. Yulee became citizens of Benton County, and the people, appreciating their services, sent one to the Legislature and the other to the Senate of the United States. It is needless to say that each filled his place acceptably to his constituents, and now I will go back to the red men again.
"Everything had been quiet up to the 2oth of September, 1941, to all appearances no danger was to be apprehended, but we were over a sleeping volcano, as the result proved. On the date above mentioned Mr. J. McDonald (who I think still lives near Archer), in company with Mrs. Crum, the wife of Richard Crum and m other of Captain Wm. Tucker, and the wives of David Hope and William Hearne, and the ten year old daughter of the latter, were going from Choocochara to Captain Tucker's place, on the Southeast side of the Tucker Prairie, when they were ambushed by a party of Indians. Mr. McDonald was badly wounded, but made his escape; Mrs. Crum was killed outright, and Mrs. Hearne was saved from a fate, perhaps worse than death, by being thrown out of the buggy into a bunch of high palmettoes, where she had the presence of mind to stay still until the savages withdrew, which they soon did, for fearing that having failed to slay all, the vengeance of the whites would be swift and sure, they left at once. Mr. McDonald made his way back to the settlement, and for a while a scene of wild confusion ensued, but the people soon got over the ripple and armed for the pursuit, too late, however, to overtake the wily foe, who, having struck the blow, at once left the scene, and the scouts, guards and tramps of the settlers were productive of nothing, save weariness and anxiety-the Indians had gone. The men did not dare gq very far away because of the unprotected condition of their wives and children.
"There was considerable excitement and alarm for a short time, but in a few days it was all over and matters were moving along as usual ; --right here let me say that the ladies were the bravest of the settlers; when the men talked of backing out and leaving, the women were for pushing ahead and mastering the foe. My feeble pen is unequal to the task of doing them even simple justice. In one of our scouting expeditions, I, with a few comrades, discovered a small
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field of corn and pumpkins in the Annuttaliga Hammock, about two miles west of where judge A. Mayo now lives, we destroyed what we could not carry off, but beyond this sign, saw nothing whatev ,er of Indians. We kept up our scouting and picketing for some time, but it was gradually dropped, and we were back in~ the old indifferent groove again, so careless will men become from familiarity with dangerous things. The peril is not thought of until it faces us. I remember. one instance well. I had been cooking our breakfast, Win. Coffee, my chum, was out in the lot attending to his horse, I heard a noise. and looked up to see two strapping Seminoles about one hundred yards away from the house; if the little hair I had,, had suddenly changed to wire, it could not have stuck out stiffer than it did then. Another glance showed me the commanding figure of Captain Pope Hunter with them, and looking further, again I saw Coffee approach them and directly shake hands. I knew then i t was all right, but my hair didn't find it out for some time. .After *a little talk, Captain Pope and the Indians left and went into the hummock, just above the James Thompson place, where McCall now lives. As soon as Coffee smelt how excited I was-I had burned the bacon to a crisp-told me the Indians had come from the Cedar Keys to Crystal River with Captain Casey, the Indian agent, who had gotten Captain Pope to come with them to the Annuttaliga Hammock as a protection to the Indians. In about two or three hours Pope and his Indians returned, stopping a few minutes to rest, and the Captain told us that the Indians went to the old (Harris) Indian field,,about one and a half miles from Coffee's donation, and dug up from under a peach tree their buried treasure, amounting to about $iooo, which they had divided, putting it in two deer skin walle *ts 'which they carried '. We kept our information secret, determining at some future time to look it over ourselves. Well we did., I took up every blessed tree in that field and moved it to the Jenkins place, now known as the Win. Baker place. I didn't' find any money, the red rascals had made a clean sweep of all the money, and the trees died, so I lost my wor k besides.
"We had alarms in 1844 and in 6853. We also had what is known as the 'Daniels' War,' commencing in Levy County and working Southward. General Wit Smith, commanded the volunteers, and at three separate times the settlers had to build blockhouses for protection. But perhaps some of my readers don't know what a block-house is, so I will tell them that it is a pen built of heavy logs eight or ten feet high, over this is placed a course of logs for a ceiling of the lower pen and a floor of the upper pen; this
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flooring projects two or three feet over the lower story and flush with the ends of the floor another pen is built, making the upper room considerably the largest room; in the walls of both rooms loop holes are cut and small holes were also cut in the floor of the upper story, this was to prevent the enemy secreting and protecting himself against the walls of the house and smoking the defenders out.
In 1 856, the house of Captain R. D. Bradley was attacked just about supper time, the surprise was complete, and two of his children fell victims to the deadly rifles of the red men; one of the children was killed in the hall of the house-which was a double pen, log structure.~ Our present Collector of Revenue, Bob Bradley, who was a boy then, behaved with great gallantry, and was, if I remember right, wounded. As soon as the attack was repelled the alarm was sounded and pursuing parties organized, who followed the Indians for several days and far to the South, but failed to overtake them. In all the attacks and alarms, the people behaved with great' ( coolness and bravery.
"Having secured a Preacher for our settlement in 'Hernando,
the Reverend Mr. Rodgers, the next thing in order was a wedding.
So one bright morning my chum W. S. Coffee, announced to me that he intended to utilize the preacher by taking unto himself
a wife.
"He was not a joking man, so I knew he was in sober earnest.
Major Garrison passed our house in a day or so on hisway to Newnansville, and by him Mr. Coffee sent for his marriage'license, and two weeks after took to wife Miss Jane Allen. just think of it, one hundred miles to get a license, wouldn't that set some of the present generation back? I do not know that the wedding and trouseau.
will interest my young readers, but I will tell them of it nevertheless.
Now boys, stand up and say just how many of you would like this style for a groom: He wore a f ull suit of the coarsest homespun Georgia jeans with brogan shoes. The bride was attired in ten cent calico with flowers from the wild woods; these and the fine form, handsome face, rosy cheeks and innocent spirit God gave her, were the only ornaments she had. No ribbons, silks or satins, or adornments of art to set off her charms; but she was good, pure and beautiful enough for any man to be proud of without the furbelows and fashions of the present day. Young ladies, how many of you would
like to start in life as she did? I'll answer for you-not one!I
"Next in order I chronicle the first birth, that of Isaac N. Garrison, son of Major Isaac Garrison, at Choocoochattee. All of us know our old friend Isaac, who now lives with his mother at Bay
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Port, striving hard. to win a livelihood. May success attend him is the hearty wish of all who know him. The next child to see the lightwas a girl, the daughter of James A. Boyett at the same place. Both of these- children were born in 1842, soon after our arrival in the promised land. The people carried out the Divine command to increase and multiply, and, if the Crescent is a truthful chronicler of events, they have stuck mighty close to the text ever since.
"Our first lawyer was Colonel Bird M. Pearson; he came and located at Mount Airy, now Dr. J.,S. Snow's place, on Lake Lindsay, and soon had an extensive legal practice all over the Southern circuit. He had four interesting children and his wife was one of the most intelligent and accomplished ladies in the county. The Colonel was a large planter and made from eighty to one hundred hogsheads of sugar per annum, besides large crops of cotton and corn. He was finally appointed one of the judges of the Supreme Bench; a position he held up to the -date of 'his death, which occurred a few years before the war of 1861.
"Perhaps a bit of political history may be interesting just here, so I will give the list of Representatives who served the people in the Legislature up to the present time. They were: James Stanley, M. Garrison, Major Isaac Garrison, Dr. L. Rogers, Chas. Russell, C. T. Jenkins, John Parsons, M. C. Peterson, James Nicks, John L. Taylor, Samuel Hope. In the Senate were: R. L. Bradley, Joseph Taylor, John Eubanks, up to 1861. From the time of the formation of Benton County through all the changes, this County has been true to *its first principles and overwhelmingly Democratic. At the first election 'ever held here but three Whig votes were cast, and the proportion has stayed at about the same thing ever since among the intelligent voters of the county. I am perfectly 'willing to concede to every man the right to his own opinion. politically, but I am not willing, to .change the politics of the County with the manuf actured vote that was the offspring of. emancipation.
"I have avoided mentioning any of the numerous skirmishes and combats with the roving bands of Seminoles, in which I was engaged while 'doing my duty as U. S. Live Oak Inspector, but they were of frequent occurrence-though in -number small. It was only when the Seminoles under the noted Alligator, in his destructive raids, that severe fighting had to be done, in all Southern and Westemn Florida."










WILL OF THOMAS JENKINS OF CHARLES COUNTY.
In the name of God, Amen,
I Thomas Jenkins of Charles County being weake and infirm of Body but of sound and perfect sence thanks be to God, do make', constitute ordain and appoint this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following, making void all Will or Wills, Testament or Testaments whatsoever formerly by me made. FIRST 'I' bequeath my soul into ye Hands of my Savior Jesus Christ trusting through His merrits and passion everlasting salvation, and my Body' to the Earth to be buried in such decent manner as my executrix and executor hereafter mentioned shall think fitt and convenient. ITEM: First I will and desire that my just debts be truly paid and satisfied.
ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son Edward Jenkins the plantation whereon he now lives being one hundred and twenty acres of land I bought of Mr. Charles Pye, called Pyes Hardshift which I give to the said Edward Jenkins and his heirs forever.'
ITEM: I give and bequeath unto .my son William Jenkins and his heirs forever, the other half of the said tract of land Pyes Hardshift, being one hundred and sixty acres of land where he has now a plantation.
ITEM: My will and desire is, that my two sons Edward and William Jenkins, nor their heirs nor either of them shall not take advantage of survivorshipp if any thing happen of death of either of them before division be made.
ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son George Jenkins and his heirs forever after my wife Ann Jenkins decease, this plantation
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Full Text

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Ap. Thomas Jenkins, was born, 1645; married, 1670; died, 1727. He was buried at Saint ThomasÂ’ Church. His wife died two years after, and was placed in the family lot, both greatly lamented. Issue are as follows: Edward, William, George, Mary, Elizabeth and Ann. Among those who came, in company with Thomas Jenkins (original), were: Charles Ballard, Francis Tench, Jane Tench, Winifred James, Rice Jones, Auther Norwood, John Simpson, Christopher Berry, Edward Mattingly. John Clotman, John Pasey, Robert Cornich, Thomas Batchelor. John Austin, John Grand, John Toy, Mary Sparks, John Lewis, George Hart, John Hart, Thomas Parson, William Philips. William West, All these settled and received land grants of one hundred acres each. Some few located in Kent afterwards, but, not finding a proper welcome, and for their welfare, returned to St. MaryÂ’s. Among these were: John Jenkins, Henry Jenkins, Thomas Edelin, Thomas Thompson Peter Robinson. [14

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“Austin Jenkins, second son of Edward Jenkins, was born in Baltimore, 1806; married Margaret Jenkins, of Charles County, 1839. He died 1888. He was one of the most esteemed members of his name, and of the community in which he moved. Was a man of singular integrity and keen judgment in affairs of business matters, and made an honorable record among the progressive men of Baltimore. He was a man of clear judgment, and of unimpeach able integrity of life. The children of Austin Jenkins were: — Edward Austin, Isabel, Harriet, Mary Plowden, Thomas Mere dith, and Francis De Sales.” “Alfred Jenkins, son of Edward Jenkins, born in 1810. Mar ried Elizabeth Hickley in 18—; died 1875. Issue:—Ellen, Annie, Mary, a Visitation Nun, Alfred, Robert, Rosa, a Sister of Charity, and Elizabeth. He was a well-known and highly esteemed citizen.” “Joseph W. Jenkins, was the fifth son of William Jenkins of Oak Hill, born 1813. He was married first to Mary Hawkins, of Philadelphia. There was issue two children:—William F. and Matilda. “His second wife was Gertrude Seckel; the children born to them are:—Henry, Frederick and William. On reaching man hood, he was given an interest in the business by his brother Thomas, and became a member of the firm of Poland, Jenkins and Company, in which he continued until the end of the war of 1865. During the war, and subsequent to the war, he was engaged in the cotton busi ness. He was for a long time President of the Despard Coal Com pany. Mr. Jenkins took a great interest in the development of the South after the war, and had a considerable share of all the im provements going on in Texas and Alabama. He was largely concerned in the improvements about Curtis Bay Car Works. At the time of his death, February, 1897, he was the oldest member of the Jenkins family in Baltimore, and was the oldest member of the Cathedral. He was a man of fine personality, and of a generous, kindly nature.” “William S. Jenkins, son of Edward Jenkins and Ann Spauld ing, brother of Edward Jenkins, of Long Green, also of Alfred Jenkins, of Baltimore. He was born in Baltimore, and in early life, after a proper time at school, was taught the trade of making fur hats. When arriving of age, he entered into partnership with Henry Jenkins, Baltimore and Calvert Streets, where he carried on a large business. “He was a member of the Fifth Regiment Volunteers, in the war of 1814, in defense of Baltimore. After years, he moved to 31 ]

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Conawago, Pennsylvania. He was a first cousin to Thomas Jenkins. His only daughter married Dr. Felix Jenkins of Baltimore, her cousin.” “John Joseph Jenkins, of Saint Mary’s, was born, 1785. Mar ried Mary Ann Plowden, 1809. Issue:—George Plowden, Caroline, Edmond, Mary, Cecilia, Margaret and John W. Jenkins. He died, 1845. George, married Henrietta Davis; Caroline, married M. Courtney Jenkins; Edmond married M. A. Morton; Mary, married Doctor Thomas Davis; Cecilia, married Doctor Edward Miles; Margaret, married Austin Jenkins; John W., married Emily Gardiner.” “Judge John J. Jenkins, was, without any disparagement to others of the name, one of the most distinguished. He lived, with out a single blemish, filling every requisite that goes to make the man. He was a scholastic gentleman, a benevolent neighbor, and reverential to his Maker. He was exceedingly popular, was State Senator, Judge of his District, and filled many important trusts.” “William Jenkins, the first, son of Ap. Thomas Jenkins (who was the first of the name to settle at Long Green, about 1740), was the father of Thomas Courtney Jenkins, who made application and received a Patent for the Long Green tract. Thomas Courtney Jen kins having never married he died without issue, leaving the entire property to his brother, Michael Jenkins. Since then, 1740, the Estate has ever remained in that branch of the Jenkins family.” It will be seen that from the first and original Ap. Thomas Jenkins, the whole of the Catholic Jenkins of Maryland, for one hundred years, from 1640 to 1740, as recorded, resided in Saint Mary’s and Charles Counties, as under the Colony both Counties were undivided. Long Green, in Baltimore County, in the year 1740, and before, was simply a forest of “Mighty Oaks” and sparkling rivulets, hills and dales. No white man had ever made application for patent grants beyond the Gunpowder, except along the water front of the Chesapeake. The whole tract, of two to five thousand acres, were untramped and almost an unknown wilderness. The Catholics, of Saint Mary’s, worried over the uncertain trend of affairs in the Colony, by the unconciliatory laws of the Penal Acts, then in full force, began leaving their homes, in great numbers, for new and congenial locations, where there was a pos sible chance of their observance, and, as they hoped, exercise of their religious convictions. And they found that in all its desire, in the peaceful valley of Long Green. [ 32

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O^elKLtor? of Cl^it (Breen In Wales. HE circumstances which immediately preceded the war in which the Welsh were finally an nexed to the English Kingdom, are in sub stance as follows: Llewellen, the last and one of the bravest of Welshmen, was, in the year 1277, obliged to sue for peace from Edward I., of England. The terms were, besides the pay ment of money, Llewellen was required to go to England every Christmas, to do homage to the King. “The Barons of Snowdon,” with other noblemen of the most wealthy families in Wales, attended Llewellen to London, when he want there, at Christmas, to do homage to Edward, and bringing, as their usual custom, a large retinue with them, to a vil lage near by. The place did not suit, because there was not milk enough for the numerous train—they liked neither wine nor ale— and, though very plentifully entertained, were much angered at the new manner of living. They were still more angered at the crowds of people staring at them as if they were unnatural beings. They were so angered, that they at once determined to rebel on reaching home, and die in their own country rather than ever go again to London, as subjects to Edward or England. The war which ensued was a severe one, and contested inch by inch. Edward invaded Wales by land and by sea. He sent the whole Naval Fleet to Anglesay. In the struggle at Anglesay, the Welsh King was slain, when his brother, Llewellen, said: “Wales has lost the finest feather in her cap.” The brother of the King carried on the war, but was unsuccess ful, finally captured and beheaded. The contest continued four 35 ]

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INTERIOR VIEW AT LLEWELLYN

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there was not one additional arrival, but, in 1827, Lewis A. Jenkins, from Charles County, opened a commission house on Pratt Street, No. 8; among the first of his name as a merchant. In 1830, Thomas E. Jenkins, Merchant, and Louis William Jenkins, Attorney-at-law, on Fayette Street, commenced business. In 1831, Austin Jenkins succeeded to his father’s business—Sad dlery, Hardware—established in 1796. Michael Jenkins commenced business as Cabinet maker in 1799, and was succeeded by his son Anthony in 1831. In 1835, Courtney Jenkins, Attorney, and Steigers and Jenkins, grocers and commission merchants, commenced business on Gay Street. In 1837, George T. Jenkins, merchant, also Henry Jenkins and Lewis W. Jenkins, commenced business. From this date, 1837, there were many additions of the name and family, doing active business in the City. A very distinguished and well-known Statesman, says: “Like you, I am proud of our forefathers, and of the lineage from which we have sprung.” We can truthfully say of Wales—the world knows her history—Wales was overrun by hordes of Saxons, Danes and Norsemen, but was never subdued:—“The hardy Danes have faded into the shadow of a remembrance, but Wales still lives. Her traditions have been kept alive, as has been no other nation on the face of the globe; her old-time customs are loved, and are followed as they were in the good old days, a fact of which all Welshmen are proud, and their descendants should be proud also. Yes, we have a right to be very enthusiastically proud of the land of our ances tors, of her literature, and civilization, which is older than the Gos pel. It is true that Wales occupies a small place on the map of the world. It is not physique that makes the man, but intellect and character; it is not a vast territory that makes a country, but the quality of her productions in all the forms of human activity. Yes, Wales is a small country, but she is foremost in resources, rich in minerals, rich in art and music—but richer than all is she, in that which constitutes the real wealth and active prosperity of a Nation— in her Women.” Amongst the women of our particular ancestry, we are proud to find all kinds that are worthy of admiration and reverence. Besides the notable number, who have, often in youth and beauty, dedicated themselves to the service of Christ and his Church, there [44

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WILL OF MICHAEL JENKINS of Baltimore County. In the name of GOD, AMEN. I MICHAEL JENKINS of Baltimore County, in the State of Maryland, being in perfect health, and sound memory, do make this my last Will and Testament, and dispose of my Estate in the following manner after my decease. Viz: my Will and desire is that my loving Wife Charity Jenkins, do live on and make use of my dwelling Plantation called JenkinsÂ’s purchase, and Ninety Acres of BrownÂ’s Farm during her natural life, provided She do not clear none of the Wood Land; and after her decease, I give and bequeath my said Dwelling Plantation called JenkinsÂ’s Purchase, and Ninety Acres of BrownÂ’s Farm unto my Son Josiah Jenkins, to him, and to the heirs of his body Lawfully begotten forever. I also give and bequeath unto my said Son Josiah Jenkins a Tract of Land called JamesÂ’s Chance to him and his Heirs forever, also a Negro Boy called Bill. ITEM, I also give and bequeath unto my loving Wife, Charity Jenkins a Negro fellow called Davy, and a Negro Girl called Priss and a Negro Girl called Suke, and a Negro Woman called Nell. ITEM, I give and bequeath unto my Son Edward Jenkins, two hundred and twenty four Acres of Land, situate in Harford County, being part of a Tract of Land called BrooksÂ’s Cross, to him and his heirs forever, and a Negro Boy called Jack. ITEM, I give and bequeath unto my Son Michael Jenkins two hundred Pounds Current Money, and a Negro Boy called Bob. ITEM, I give and bequeath unto my Son Thomas Courtney Jenkins a Negro fellow called Frank. ITEM, I give and bequeath unto my Son William Jenkins, a Negro Boy called Mark. ITEM, I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Sarah Hearn, a Negro Boy called Stephen. ITEM, I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Mary Jenkins a Negro Girl called Bet, and a Negro Boy called Jem. ITEM, I give and bequeath unto my Daughter, Ann Hopkins, a Negro Girl called Charity, and a Negro Boy called Harry. ITEM, I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Elizabeth Jen kins, a Negro Boy called Charles, and a Negro Girl called Phebe. ITEM, My Will and desire is that my Son Josiah Jenkins, or his heirs, shall keep and maintain and clothe his Brother Ignatius Jenkins sufficiently, during his natural life, that is to say in a suffi cient manner, and decently clothed. I also give and bequeath unto 85 ]

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Colonial Wills JENKINS, JOHN (1701-03), Liber T. B., Folio 444. JENKINS, FRANCIS (1710-14), Liber W. B. No. 5, Folio 65. JENKINS, RICHARD (1710-14), Liber W. B. No. 5, Folio 586. JENKINS, THOMAS (1718-19), Liber T. B. No. 1, Folio 106. JENKINS, WILLIAM (1720-21), Liber T. B. No. 3, Folio 382. JENKINS THOMAS (1726-29), Liber C. C. No. 2, Folio 251. JENKINS, ANN (1726-29), Liber C. C. No. 2, Folio 836. JENKINS, ENOCH (1734-38), Liber T. D. (Wid. elect), Folio 17. JENKINS, ENOCH (1734-38), Liber T. D. (nunc), Folio 19. JENKINS, RICHARD (1734-38), Liber H. D., Folio 318. JENKINS, WILLIAM (1754-56), Liber B. T. No. 1, Folio 381. JENKINS, COURTNEY THOMAS (1756-60), Liber B. T. No. 2, Folio 370. JENKINS, DANIEL (1756-60), Liber B. T. No. 2, Folio 735. JENKINS, EDWARD (1760-64), Liber D. D. No. 1, Folio 122. JENKINS, WILLIAM (1760-64), Liber D. D. No. 1, Folio 318. JENKINS, JOSIAS (1760-64), Liber D. D. No. 1, Folio 371. JENKINS, THOMAS (1760-64), Liber D. D. No. 1, Folio 402. JENKINS, SUSANNA (1760-64), Liber D. D. No. 1, Folio 1031. JENKINS, ELIZABETH (1764-65), Liber C. G. No. 1, Folio 91. JENKINS, JOHN (1769-70), Liber W. D., Folio 306. JENKINS, GEORGE (1774-76), Liber W. F. No. 1, Folio 138. JENKINS, JOSEPH (1774-76), Liber W. F. No. 1, Folio 501. JENKINS, HENRY (1774-76), Liber W. F. No. 1, Folio 530. JENKINS, GEORGE (1774-76), Liber W. F. No. 1, Folio 590. JENKINS, WILLIAM, Jur. (1774-76), Liber W. F. No. 1, Folio 639. JENKINS, JOHN, St. Marys, 1789. JENKINS, MARY, St. Marys, 1788. JENKINS, WILLIAM, St. Marys, 1789. JENKINS, MARY, St. Marys, 1807. JENKINS, JOSEPH, St. Marys, 1796. JENKINS, AUGUSTINE, St. Marys, 1796. JENKINS, WILLIAM, St. Marys, 1795. JENKINS, EDMOND COURTNEY, St. Marys, 1798. 91]

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The Baptistry is a beautiful little octagonal compartment hav ing on four of its sides windows filled with types of the Sacrament from the Old Law, and these, though the openings are small, are far from being on that account the least important windows in the Church. In the first is shown Noah saved from the Ark, to which the dove is returning with the Olive Branch; the next one represents his sacrifice in thanksgiving; the rainbow appears in the heavens and the Ark is seen lodged on the peak of Mt. Ararat. The third represents Moses striking the Rock, while in the background the Israelites are pressing forward to the life-giving water. The last is the Passage of the Red Sea when Moses led the Israelites in safety across the bed of the sea dry shod, the waters of which were divided and formed for them a wall on the right hand and on the left closed upon the host of Pharaoh and destroyed them. Remarks of Archbishop Gibbons at the Laying of the Cor nerstone of the Corpus Christie Jenkins Memorial Church, Baltimore, Md., on the i8th of April, 1886. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, Amen. The citizens of Baltimore and of Maryland, my dear friends, esteemed it a great honor and privilege to erect to George Washington the beautiful monument which adorns Mt. Vernon Place; and we are told that Cardinal Wolsey esteemed it a great privilege to erect and present to his sovereign and king, Henry VIII, a beautiful palace in Hampton Court. Now, if it is a great honor for citizens to erect a monument to the Father of his country, if it is a great honor for a subject to present a palace to his king, how much greater is the honor and the privilege for a Christian man to erect a temple in honor of his God, the King of Kings and Lord of Lords? So great is the privilege of rearing a temple to Almighty God, that in the Old Law when it was a question of erecting a House of Prayer to the Almighty, the plan was conceived by one king, it was carried into execution by another and was repaired and adorned by a third. King David conceived the plan of a temple to Almighty God, King Solomon carried his fatherÂ’s project into execution, and King Joas and other kings of Israel repaired and adorned the Temple. And, my dear friends, even in the Christian Dispensation, from the days of Constantine the Great, down to a comparatively recent period, it was kings, princes and emperors in conjunction with the chief pastors of the Church, that for the most part raised in their 97 ]

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^Leonard (Talvert’s Cannon AN HISTORIC GEM. N the 22nd of November, 1663 (thirteen years after the first voyage of the Mayflower to Plymouth), a party of 200 Catholics led by Leonard Calvert, sailed from Cowes, Isle of Wight. The little fleet consisted of two ves sels:—The “Ark,” an emblem of safety and refuge; and the “Dove,” an emblem of peace. The former was a ship of 300 tons, and the latter a pinnace of 50 tons, on which flew the Governor’s flag. On their voyage they stopped at the Canary Islands, Barbadoes, and other isles, reaching Cape Henry, Virginia, February 24, 1664. Remaining in Virginia until the 3rd of March following, proceeding up the Potomac, which they named Saint Gregory, as far as Mount Vernon is now; returning, they landed on the Island now known as Blackston’s. On the 25th of March, the voyagers held the first Catholic services ever held in the limits of the English possessions. On the bank of a river, which they named St. Mary’s, the first settlement was made, and it was ushered into existence with appropriate religious as well as military services, with the cannons of the “Ark” and the “Dove.” When the Government of the Colony was removed from St. Mary’s to Annapolis, the settlement fell into decay—the “Ark” and the “Dove” dismantled and destroyed, the cannons thrown into the river, and for one hundred and twenty years lay in a bed of mud— unknown. It was simply a matter of tradition only, until a manu script copy of the purchase and arriving of the two vessels was brought to light by Captain Lewis Carbarry, of St. Mary’s, by rum maging among some old weather-worn documents, then stowed 105 ]

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3*fuittin
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\

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Saint Mary’s, Charles and Prince George’s, that the bulk of our Revolutionary soldiers came. There was scarcely a battle of im portance fought by our army in which one or more of the name was not engaged. But for their religious convictions, few of them ever could receive commissions or even promotion, but this, as proved, was of no hindrance to their patriotism and love of Coun try, and for this reason then, 1775 until 1782, the list of Maryland Officers, one can scarcely see the name mentioned in history as then written. Nevertheless, much of their blood has stained the battle ground in many of our conflicts at home and abroad, in the Military and Naval service. It is a well authenticated fact that George Calvert, Second Lord Baltimore, who was of the Catholic religion, obtained the Grant from King Charles, of land, in his Province, to be an asylum for those of his religion, from persecution of the times, appointed his brother Leonard, the Governor of his Colony, joined in com mon with himself one Thomas Cornwallis, Esq., and about two hundred Colonists were sent over to the Colony in 1634. All of them Catholics, and many of them gentlemen of fortune:—their settlement upon the continent, they declared, was a desire for the unmolested practice of their religious convictions. These two hundred settlers were favorably known for many years as the pioneers. This should be remembered, our fathers have descended to the grave before us, ourselves are following them to the tomb; our children and our kindred shall mourn for us, and shall be lamented in their turn by others; and so the stream of time will roll on, bear ing the successive generation to the Ocean of Eternity, till the day of our immortality dawns, and we shall all, all live again for all Eternity. The year of 1664, has been regarded by some of our historians as the “dark hour” of the Catholic settlers then in Saint Mary’s. This was due to the great disorder concocted, and carried out, by the adherents of Clayborne, who had entered upon the settlement in sufficient numbers to give great trouble. They began to make a war of outrage and oppression upon all who differed with them politically, and those who supported the Laws of the Colony. Even the Missionaries, who had avoided politics of the day, were seized, and their stations plundered, and they sent away in chains to England. They finally took possession of all the provincial records, mutilated and destroyed them, so that it was near impos sible to obtain any accurate data prior to 1664. 11 1

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Michael. His plantation, in Charles County, was equally divided between his sister Jane and Ignatius and Joseph. William Jenkins’ “rent roll” comprised the following planta tions and tracts of land: “Poplar Point,” “Saint Thomas,” three of this name, formerly owned by Thomas Mattingly, Thomas Reeder, Thomas Spaulding, Sr., and Thomas Spaulding, Jr.; “Lyndsie,” “Pye’s Shift,” “Jenkins’ Chance,” “Stump,” “Vale,” “Blithwood,” “Brand’s Discovery,” “Batchellor’s Hope,” “The Maze,” “Three Thirds,” “Mill Lot,” “Fox’s Range.” In person and individually, he was said to be a typical Welsh man, and given to austerity, redeemed by great benevolence. William Jenkins, son of Michael, was born 1769, married Ann Hillen, daughter of Solomon Hillen, of Baltimore County, who, however, lived but a few years. He then married Eleanore, daugh ter of Mark Wilcox, of Philadelphia. William Jenkins, when only a youth, volunteered as a private in Captain Banteleu’s Cavalry, “Light Horse,” and served until disbanded, in 1783. He served at North Point, in the Mechanical Volunteers. He was a Delegate to the State Convention, in 1785; he also held many responsible positions, both public and private. He was one of the original Trustees of the Cathedral, and very liberal in his aid to the Church throughout life. In person he was finely formed, of a commanding presence; in his dress he always followed the fashion of the old school; he wore a que, as had been worn from manhood. His father, Michael Jenkins, left him no inheritance. In the year of 1779, there were but three of the name in Bal timore Town, and but few in the County. In the Town were Edward, Thomas and William. They began business at that time. William Jenkins became a partner with Robinson Jones, on Wide Water Street. Thomas Jenkins, merchandised, on South Street. These three young men were soon after followed by several relatives, from St. Mary’s and Charles Counties. Among them were Michael, Henry, William, Valentine, Felix, Frederick and Lewis A. Jenkins, of Charles County, and Jason, James, Ignatius, from Saint Mary’s. William Jenkins, of “Oak Hill,” died February, 1843. The writer of these briefly written notices of the original of the Balti more family of Jenkins, would do himself injustice if he did not pay tribute to the worth of the above Mr. Jenkins. This can be said in a few words: He was one of the most esteemed of our citizens, none more honorable or more charitable, a man of integ rity and of good business judgment, he made for himself an hon[ 22

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of Ap. Thomas Jenkins, who was born 1640, Anglesay, and who came to Saint Mary’s at the instance of Lord Baltimore. It is known that he was about twenty-five years of age on reaching the Colony in Maryland. Ap. Thomas Jenkins was married to Ann Spaulding, of Saint Mary’s; died 1727. Issue six children:—Edward, William, George, Ann, Elizabeth and Mary. William Jenkins, son of Thomas, born 1673, married Mary Courtney 1717; died 1753. Michael Jenkins, son of William, born 1736, married Charity Wheeler, of Harford County, 1761; died 1802 (Long Green). William Jenkins, son of: Michael, born 1767, married Ellen Wilcox, of Pennsylvania, 1801; died 1843. Thomas Courtney Jenkins, son of William, born 1802, married Louisa Carrell, of Pennsylvania, 1829; died December 24th, 1881. Michael Jenkins, son of Thomas Courtney, was born in Bal timore, December 27, 1842. Married Isabel Jenkins, daughter of Austin and Margaret Jenkins, on October 2, 1866. This Michael Jenkins, worthy successor of a long line of antecedents bearing the name nobly, is now one of Baltimore’s most illustrious citizens. In the walks of life, both domestic and public, he bears all the characteristics of the true gentleman. Engaged in many enterprises of business, yet finding time for a kindly hearing to the call of charity, or to lend a helping hand to many institutions for the bet terment of his less fortunate fellow-creatures. May he long be spared to the community that would sadly miss his loss. Commencing again with William Jason Jenkins, Ensign in the English Navy, who was born in the year 1615, at Anglesay, Wales, and was married in the year 1636, at London, and who was the brother of Sir Lional Jenkins, then the Chief Secretary to the “Admiralty Board” of the British Navy, Whitehall, London, and who was the father of Ap. Thomas Jenkins, who was born 1640, and who came to Saint Mary’s at the instance of Lord Baltimore’s Secretary, Sir Lional Jenkins. It is known that he was near twentyfive years of age on reaching Maryland. Ap. Thomas Jenkins, born 1640, was married to Ann Spauld ing, 1670, at Saint Mary’s. He died 1727; Charles County. He left six children, three sons and three daghters:—Edward, William, George, Ann, Elizabeth and Mary. George Jenkins, third son of Ap. Thomas, was born 1673, mar ried Susannah Gardiner, 1698, died 1727, both of Charles County. [ 24

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Josiah Jenkins, youngest son of Michael Jenkins and Ann Wheeler, of Baltimore County, was born, 1781. Married Elizabeth Hillen, 1805, and died 1823. Issue:—John Hillen, Ann M., Michael, George, Sarah, Josiah and Ellen. John Hillen, married Elizabeth White; Ann M., married Mark Wilcox Jenkins; Michael, never married; George, married Lydia Armour; Sarah, married Edward F. Jenkins; Josiah, mar ried Augusta Wilson; Ellen, married Philip P. George. After the death of Josiah and wife, John Hillen Jenkins owned the home place until his death, and left it to his brother, George Jenkins, who was born at Long Green, September 10, 1810. He married Lydia Armour, 1839. Issue, twelve children:—Elizabeth, Mary, Ann, Maria, Richard Hillen, Josephine, Fannie Lawrence, Talbot, Cecilia Corrine, William Armour, Francis, George and Lycurgus. George Jenkins, at his death, left the home place to his wife, Lydia, who, at this writing, is living there. 33]

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It is creditable indeed to the name, that during the entire struggle for our Independence, there were none of the family known to be adherents of the Crown of England, but, to an individual, were, all of them, on the side of the Rebellion. This, of itself, is something to be proud of—if not, why not? True, the whole tier of the lower Counties of Maryland were on the side of self-govern ment, yet it is a question if any one family has a better showing. The year of 1800 may be claimed as the dawn of Baltimore’s history, which followed the dark and eventful night of the Revo lutionary war. Baltimore is indeed replete with historical events, as far as it can be applied to a City of only 20,000 people at the beginning of the new century. From this beginning of a new era, the people of Baltimore insisted upon new methods, and the old formalities were laid aside. New people with new ideas came, and with them progressiveness in every form, so that to-day Baltimore has her place in the front as among the most intellectual and rep utable, as financially, commercially and enterprising a community as there is on the Western Continent. Thomas Jenkins, second son of William J. and Elizabeth Mitchell, of Cob Neck, Charles County, was born at Saint Thomas’, Charles County, January 12, 1751. He married Mary Corry, nee Neale August 27th, 1780. Died, October, 1821. He was the son of George Jenkins and Susanne M. Gardiner, of Charles County. Mary Corry, his wife, who was much younger, was the daughter of Henry Neale, son of Anthony Neale, who mar ried Elizabeth Roswell, and the grandson of Captain Neale, who was the first of the Neales who came to Maryland. His estate was known as Wallston Manor, and was then all of the Cob Neck grant in Charles County — one thousand acres. Captain Neale’s eldest son, James, inherited the manor, and married Elizabeth Calvert, a relative of Charles Lord Baltimore. Anthony’s great grandfather was the second son of the Captain, and brother of James Neale. The parents of Mary Corry died young, and she was adopted by her aunt, Elizabeth Neale, who married John Lancaster, of Charles County. At the age of sixteen, this aunt, Elizabeth Neale, married her to Doctor Corry, whose mother was first cousin to Mrs. Lan caster and second cousin to Mary Corry. Doctor Corry died within a year, leaving one son, Leslie, who married and died within one year, leaving one daughter, who became a nun, known as Sister Andrea. Mary Corry, a young widow, married Thomas Jenkins, son of William Jenkins and Annie Mitchell. 37 ]

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MRS. MICHAEL JENKINS, nee Isabella Plowden Jenkins

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“The Hon. David L. Yulee was a delegate from the Territory of Florida in Congress, when the Seminole war had been raging for seven or eight years, and the United States Army here was com pletely worn out in the unequal contest, and from some cause, unex plained, was unable to accomplish anything. The Government had expended over sixty millions of dollars without any return (perhaps this immense expenditure explains the failure of the armed forces operating here). “Conceiving that he knew a remedy, Mr. Yulee introduced a Bill into Congress, familiarly known as the Armed Occupation Act, and with the aid of Hon. T. H. Benton, in the Senate, the bill became a law on the Fourth of August, 1842. “The purpose of the Act was to drive the Indians from the country by occupying the land with actual settlers. The Act limited the Government in its issue of permits to 1250, to be issued to ablebodied men, the heads of families. None others could obtain permits, and the male members were to constitute a full regiment, to be under military organization and ready at any moment for duty. The Act further provided that, in consideration of such occupation and service, they should receive a fee simple title, at the expiration of five years, to the land they had occupied and culti vated, and one year’s rations. The Government gave the land, according to promise, but only issued one month’s rations to such of the settlers as were convenient, or who came and demanded the same. Many of the more remote ones did not get the month’s rations even, and were forced, in consequence, to abandon their claims and return to their old homes. “The Occupation Act opened all the country lying South of the dividing townships 9 and 10, which line runs from Deadman’s Bay, on the Gulf, through Oldtown and Gainesville, to Matanzas Inlet, on the Atlantic Coast. Of the 1250 armed occupants, the territory, now known as Hernando, secured about 400 settlers. Of these only about Two Hundred and Fifty remained upon the land, owing to the failure of the Government to comply with its compact, and the constant inroads of the savages, which prevented, in many instances, the making of any crop whatever. Then starvation did what the red men could not do—forced the pioneer to seek his old home. “I know whereof I write, for I was one of the original settlers who remained to endure and to now write up the hardships, trials and privations, dangers and sufferings of the pioneers. There are but few of us left, but these few will testify to the truth of what I [ 54

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say. I have often wondered how we ever stood the evils and incon veniences. Those were indeed times that tried men’s souls. These people were mostly from East and Middle Florida, men inured to the hardships of frontier life, but they and their wives often sur prised me by their fortitude and courage. They were almost all old Indian fighters, and right well did they do their part in con quering the Indians and driving them to the Everglades and to peace. Several times the hardy pioneer was forced to take his all and fortify for protection in block-houses. “Tampa was then only a military post, with no store, or any other accommodation whatever, for the settler, and for the first year or two, we were compelled to attend U. S. Court, at Newnansville, twelve miles North of Gainesville. Here, too, was the nearest store. Just imagine, if you can, a journey of from seventy-five to one hundred and fifty miles, through an almost unbroken wilder ness, with possibly a hidden foe on every side, to procure the neces sities of life. I confess the task of giving any adequate description through this medium entirely beyond my power. “Had the Government complied as faithfully in its engage ments as the settlers did with theirs, all would have been able to hold their ground and make plenty for the succeeding years, but the failure to supply the rations resulted most disastrously to the settlers in every instance, and prolonged the struggle for occupation for several years and at the cost of many lives. Congress waked to a tardy recognition of its injustice and passed an Act amendatory of the Armed Occupation Act, granting an additional one hundred and sixty acres of land to each settler, but hampered it by allowing only those who had no water on their land to avail themselves, and then, even, only on the payment of $1.25 per acre. It is needless to say that very few were able to avail themselves of this semi-liberal proposition. “The people who remained were sober, industrious, kind and moral, and for hospitality and honesty they had no equals—char acteristics which I am proud to say they transmitted to their descend ants, the much abused and laughed at ‘Florida Cracker,’ who, by the way, often turns up in high places, but like the typical ‘Yankee,’ you don’t know him then. “Now for something about the river that forms our Northern and Eastern boundary. The orthography of the name is wrong, it should be Ouithlacoochee, and means:—‘roaring river.’ There is a Withlacoochee, which rises in Georgia and empties into the Suwannee, at Ellaville; whether the two names are intended to be 55 ]

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more merciful death by the foeman’s rifle. Just as hope, who’s flat tering tales had nerved them to endure, was about to leave them to despair, the gallant Reed and his men fell on the surprised savages, and the work, though short, was decisive, and the rescue complete. It would be an impossible task to describe the delirium of joy that swept over the hearts of the poor pent up fellows as they heard the shots and shouts of their friends, and realized that their comrades had, in the eleventh hour, brought relief. I must leave this to the imagination of my readers. “General Leigh Reed was from the State of Tennessee. He came to Tallahassee in 1834, and commenced practicing Law. He was young, ambitious and soon came to the front. He identified himself with the democratic party and soon became its leader. His first wife was the daughter of Captain John Bellamy, of Jefferson County. His second wife was the daughter of Governor John Branch, of North Carolina. Both were amiable and beloved women. “He was fully six feet high and well proportioned, no surplus about his person, light complexion and light red hair, a keen blue eye, and in general outline made a perfect model man, and com manded the admiration of every one. He was neat in his appear ance and temperate in his habits, which gave him the dash of a soldier and a hero—the Bayard of Florida. “He soon made his mark in the politics of the State, by the firm stand he took on the leading questions of the day. Bank or no bank was the issue. He was a strong anti-bank man of the Jackson stripe. Bold as ‘Old Hickory’ in his opinions, and fully as honest in his belief, nothing could daunt him. When he said yes, you could find him there. Fearless as a lion when he made up his mind, and true as the North star to his friends and to the cause he defended. “At that time the politics of the State were high and decided. There was no doing as now. Every one had to stand square by his opinions. The Whig party, particularly about Tallahassee and in Leon County, comprised the wealth and a greater portion of the ablest talent of the State. The democrats were the loco foco party at that time. The whigs got the President, Governor R. R. Reid was removed and Governor R. Call was reappointed. There was great rejoicing. Governor R. Call was very popular, but did not hold that office long. Governor John Branch was appointed in R. Call’s place. Then came the muddle. The Union Bank ‘went by the board,’ things looked dark and gloomy. The change had to take place. The bank and its friends had to go. General Leigh Reed [60

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deputies, and Judge P. Wall, of Tampa, and I, are the only ones of his deputies now living. “Did his enemies stop here? No, they kept up a still hunt, until they assassinated him. He was coming from the Court house, after delivering up his papers of office, May Dennis and Joe Branch, his brother-in-law, were with him. Monroe Walker was then U. S. Marshal of Florida in his place. The political situation was deplor able. The whigs, jubilant over their success, had again the reins in their hands, and made things lively in the Capital of Florida. “Harrison only lived one month and a change came over the spirit of their dreams. When President Tyler came into office he took the case in hand and quieted affairs in Florida. He looked the whole country over for a man to fill the office of U. S. Marshal. He found Major Camp. He was from Chicago. He had all the requirements to fill the place, and by his firm and rigid manners and policy he soon had things straightend up. His rough and fearless way of a western frontiersman gave him the name of a good officer. “General Leigh Reed was truly an honest man, no dark spots on any of his transactions. As a lawyer he stood high; as a statesman he had no equal; as a soldier he was a hero; as a man, he was a man among men. He was killed by parties, who hid themselves in a small house, while passing with Colonel Dennis and Colonel Joe Branch, on the streets of the Capital of Florida, in sight of his wife, who was a few yards from him in her carriage, in broad daylight. What a day that was in Tallahassee. The three men who did this cowardly act were half way tried and acquitted, but justice was at last meeted out to them by Him who knows all things and can quiet the sea. I was one of General Reed’s tried deputies. I had his good will till death. Had he escaped that day, he would have gone to Texas to live. I was to accompany him to share his fortune. “The people mourned his loss, how deeply, no one knows but a few living men. At one time the people in the country were arranging to go to Tallahassee to have revenge, but his relatives stopped that kind of work. He has left a name behind that few of us can follow. “Among those who took a lively interest in the welfare of the early settlers of Hernando County, I must not forget to name Major John Parsons and General Sam Russell, who were, in those days, Register and Receiver at the Newnansville Land Office, an office then just created. Having served in the wars with many of our people, they were well known to all of them, either personally or by reputation. I do not know that they received those places as a [ 62

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reward of merit, I am rather inclined to the opinion that the posi tions were conferred on them because it took some grit about that time to hold an office in Florida. A fellow was likely to meet a hot bullet at most any time; at any rate, they held the offices and dis charged the duties thereof to the entire satisfaction of the people, and if the Government was not pleased I never heard of it. Both Major Parsons and Mr. Yulee became citizens of Benton County, and the people, appreciating their services, sent one to the Legisla ture and the other to the Senate of the United States. It is needless to say that each filled his place acceptably to his constituents, and now I will go back to the red men again. “Everything had been quiet up to the 20th of September, 1841, to all appearances no danger was to be apprehended, but we were over a sleeping volcano, as the result proved. On the date above mentioned Mr. J. McDonald (who I think still lives near Archer), in company with Mrs. Crum, the wife of Richard Crum and mother of Captain Wm. Tucker, and the wives of David Hope and William Hearne, and the ten year old daughter of the latter, were going from Choocochara to Captain Tucker’s place, on the Southeast side of the Tucker Prairie, when they were ambushed by a party of Indians. Mr. McDonald was badly wounded, but made his escape; Mrs. Crum was killed outright, and Mrs. Hearne was saved from a fate, perhaps worse than death, by being thrown out of the buggy into a bunch of high palmettoes, where she had the presence of mind to stay still until the savages withdrew, which they soon did, for fearing that having failed to slay all, the vengeance of the whites would be swift and sure, they left at once. Mr. McDonald made his way back to the settlement, and for a while a scene of wild confusion ensued, but the people soon got over the ripple and armed for the pursuit, too late, however, to overtake the wily foe, who, having struck the blow, at once left the scene, and the scouts, guards and tramps of the settlers were productive of nothing, save weariness and anxiety—the Indians had gone. The men did not dare go very far away because of the unprotected condition of their wives and children. “There was considerable excitement and alarm for a short time, but in a few days it was all over and matters were moving along as usual;—right here let me say that the ladies were the bravest of the settlers; when the men talked of backing out and leaving, the women were for pushing ahead and mastering the foe. My feeble pen is unequal to the task of doing them even simple justice. In one of our scouting expeditions, I, with a few comrades, discovered a small 63 ]

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Colonial XiPilU—5i£ar?lan& WILL OF THOMAS JENKINS of Charles County. In the name of God, Amen, I Thomas Jenkins of Charles County being weake and infirm of Body but of sound and perfect sence thanks be to God, do make, constitute ordain and appoint this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following, making void all Will or Wills, Testa ment or Testaments whatsoever formerly by me made. FIRST I bequeath my soul into ye Hands of my Savior Jesus Christ trusting through His merrits and passion everlasting salvation, and my Body to the Earth to be buried in such decent manner as my executrix and executor hereafter mentioned shall think fitt and convenient. ITEM: First I will and desire that my just debts be truly paid and satisfied. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son Edward Jenkins the plantation whereon he now lives being one hundred and twenty acres of land I bought of Mr. Charles Pye, called Pyes Hardshift which I give to the said Edward Jenkins and his heirs forever. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son William Jenkins and his heirs forever, the other half of the said tract of land Pyes Hardshift, being one hundred and sixty acres of land where he has now a plantation. ITEM: My will and desire is, that my two sons Edward and William Jenkins, nor their heirs nor either of them shall not take advantage of survivorshipp if any thing happen of death of either of them before division be made. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son George Jenkins and his heirs forever after my wife Ann Jenkins decease, this plantation 67]

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Signed sealed and declared by the said William Jenkins to be his Last Will and Testament, Disannulling all other Will or Wills made by him from the beginning of the World unto the date of these presents. In the presence of us William Swiny, John Dillon, Barnaby Roades, Thomas Wynn Taylor. Then follows the Certificate of Thos. Assquith of St. MaryÂ’s County, Deputy Commissary. Dated March 31st 1755* WILL OF THOMAS COURTNEY JENKINS of Baltimore County. In the Name of the Father, Son and Holy Ghost, Amen. I Thomas Courtney Jenkins of Baltimore County in the Province of Maryland being sick of Body but of perfect and sound Memory and Understanding, thanks be to God for the same, Do hereby dis pose of all, every, my Real and Personal Estate wherewith God hath blessed me in Manner and Form as follows: IN PRIMIS: I will and bequeath unto my well beloved Brother Michael Jenkins all my plantation I now dwell on in as Ample Form and Manner as I ever enjoyed or occpied the same. ITEM: I will and require that my said well beloved Brother Michael Jenkins shall enjoy and occupy my personal Estate, Cattle, Movables and for the space of seven years and that at the expiration of Seven, that what is remain ing of my said Personal Estate, after first paying and discharging my Lawfull Debts out of my Movables or Personal Estate as afsd., shall be equally divided between my Brothers Joseph, William, Henry and Ignatius Jenkins and also Jenkins Hagar and Mary Ann Hagar, the children of my deceased sister Mary Hagar, as also my sister Jane Fenwick. ITEM: I will and require my Executor to pay all my Lawfull Debts and do hereby constitute, nominate and appoint my trusty and well beloved Brother Michael Jenkins my sole Executor of this my Last Will and Testament, hereby revoking, disannulling and making void all Wills, Testaments and Bequeathments heretofore ever made by me in my Lifetime. WIT NESS my hand and Seale this Thirtyeth Day of September in the year of our Lord 1757, AND IN THE THIRTY FOURTH YEAR OF MY AGE. THOMAS COURTNEY JENKINS (Seal) Published, Pronounced and Declared as his last will and Testa ment before us. CORNS. BRADY CORNELLS. LYNCH WINIFRED LYNCH

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and my aforesaid son Edward Jenkins my whole and sole Executrix and Executor of this my Last Will and Testament and I do hereby enjoin the said Executrix and Executor to pay off the Legacy of my Daughter, IN WITNESS whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seale this Seventh day of September, Anno Dom. 1760. EDWARD JENKINS Proved the 19th November 1760. WILL OF GEORGE JENKINS of Talbott County. In the Name of God Amen, I George Jenkins the elder of Talbot County in the Province of Maryland now in but a midling state of health but of sound mind and memory, Do make this my Last Will and Testament revoking and making void all other Wills heretofore made. FIRST I give and bequeath unto George Jen kins the son of my eldest brother Thomas Jenkins, one young negro boy named Tim. I give also unto George Jenkins one young Horse named Ceelum. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto Elizabeth Jenkins the daughter of my eldest brother Thomas Jenkins, one young mair named Gift. I give also unto Elizabeth Jenkins, Fifteen Pounds in cash to be paid to her after the expiration of fifteen months after the administration on my Estate. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my well beloved Wife Elizabeth Jenkins the Resudue and all the Remainder part of my Estate, Negros, Goods and Chatties and all other Affects during her Widdowhood and Life and in the case of her marriage if her marriage should be before his death then after her marriage or decease it is my will and desire that the one half of the estate so willed to her as aforesaid should go to George Jenkins as afsd. and the other half to be at her own dis posal and in case George Jenkins should die without heir then all his part of the Estate that he may then be possessed with to go to Mary Jenkins the Daughter of my eldest brother Thomas Jenkins and Elizabeth Jenkins as aforesaid and George Stevens the son of Samuel Stevens to be equally divided between the three. IN TESTI MONY thereof I have set my hand and seal this Fourteenth day of December Seventeen hundred and seventy three. GEORGE JENKINS (Seal) Witnesses: William Stevens Abner Parrott The will is entered for probate July 21st 1774. 75 j

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the residue of my estate be it of what nature or kind soever, after all my just debts are paid, to be equally divided between my three sons John Jenkins, George Jenkins and William Jenkins. Lastly I do constitute, ordain and appoint my said three sons, John, George and William Jenkins, Executors of this my Last Will and Testa ment, hereby revoking all other Will or Wills, Testament or Testa ments, heretofore by me made. Given under my hand and seale this eighth day of August, Anno Domini 1760. SUSANNAH JENKINS Witnesses: Richard Barnes Marght. Garner. PROVED January 29th 1763. WILL OF JOHN JENKINS of Charles County. In the Name of God, Amen, I JOHN JENKINS of Charles County in the Province of Maryland, Planter, being very sick and weake in Body but of sound and perfect Memory and Understand ing, thanks be given unto Almighty God therefor, And calling to mind the Mortality of my Body, and that it is appointed for all men once to die, I doe make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following, that is to say, Principally and first of all I recommend my soul into the hands of God who gave it And my body to the Earth, to be buried in a Christianlike and decent manner, at the discretion of my Executrix hereafter named hoping at the Generali Resurrection at the last day to receive the same again. And as for such Worldly estate with which it hath pleased Almighty God to bless me in this life, I give and dispose of the same in manner and form following. IMPRIMIS My will and desire is that all my just debts and funerall charges be first paid. ITEM: I doe hereby constitute and appoint Elizabeth, my beloved wife, sole Executrix of this my last Will and Testament, to distribute or dispose of my whole estate, Real or Personal after the following manner i. e.—Either to make sale of the whole or any part thereof, as her discretion shall direct in order to pay off my just debts &c and the remaining part after my debts are paid, my will and desire is that my said Executrix reserving one third part to herself, dis tribute and divide the remaining two thirds amongst my children hereafter named (i. e.) first my well beloved daughter Monica, sec ond my daughter Susannah, third my daughter Eleanor and fourthly my beloved son Thomas, and fifth my son John and sixth my son 81 ]

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Edward and lastly my daughter Mary Ann, and likewise my will and desire further is that the child which my said wife is now preg nant with shall have an equal part with those above named. And I do hereby utterly revoke, disannull and make void all other for mer wills, bequests, Legacies, or Executors heretofore by me at any time willed or named, ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last Will and Testament. IN TESTIMONY WHERE OF I have hereunto set my hand and seale this second day of June in the year of Our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred, Sixty and nine. JOHN JENKINS Signed, Sealed, Pronounced and Declared by the above named testator as his last will and Testament in the presence of us: MAXIMILLIAN MATHEWS, JOHN SANDERS and THOMAS CARMICHAEL. Proved August ioth 1769. I certify that Thomas Jenkins, heir at Law to the Deceased, was at the time of taking the above probate a minor. WALTER HANSON, Dep. Com. WILL OF JOSEPH JENKINS of St. Mary's County. In the Name of God, Amen, I JOSEPH JENKINS, of St. Marys County and Province of Maryland, being sick of body but of perfect mind and memory and calling to mind that it is appointed for all men once to die, Doe make and ordain this to be my last Will and Testament in manner and form following, revoking all other wills before by me made and recommending my soul to God who gave it and my body to the Earth to be buried in such decent man ner as my executors hereafter mentioned shall think fit and conve nient. IMPRIMIS: My will and desire is that my just Debts be truly paid and satisfied, therefor it is also my will and desire that the three following parcels of land be sold to help pay my debts, Vizt: Two parcels of land lying on the Bay side, one called part of Bushy Neck, the other called Taylors Chance, containing one hundred and thirteen acres. But if my son John Jenkins will give one guinea per acre for all that is clear of older surveys of the above said lands, it being the price given for it, then he may keep the land. Also one Hundred acres of land adjoining the land I now live on being part of a tract of land called St. Thomas's, lying on the east side of the said tract, but if my son Edmond Courtney Jenkins will [ 82

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group, which is set in a ruby ground, a light silvery tabernacle work enframes the whole. In the lower part of the light, on the Lily of the Annunciation—thus figuring the beginning as well as the end of the great mystery of the Incarnation—is shown in miniature, the crucified Body of our Lord, an image of exquisite beauty. The outside light on the Gospel side is filled with the figure of Melchisedec offering his sacrifice of Bread and Wine, one of the great types in the Old Law of Corpus Christi; his mantle of ruby becomes aglow with finest color in the mid-day rays of the sun. In small compartments in the lower part of the light are also repre sented the Falling Manna of the Desert, and the Loaves of Propo sition from the Holy of Holies; and in small shields at either side are the Wheat and the Vine, emblems of the Blessed Sacrament as the others are the types. St. Thomas Aquinas the “sweet Doctor” of the Blessed Sacra ment fills the opposite window. He is in the black and white habit of the Dominicans, his emblematic star on his breast, and he holds in his hands a pen and a scroll bearing the first words of his “ Lauda Sion Salvatorem.” In the little compartments below are repre sented the Tree of Life and the hearth cake of Elias. In the traceries above these five windows are represented the emblems of the Blessed Trinity,—the Hand of the Eternal Father, the Agnus Dei and the Dove; the sacred monograms I. H. S. and X. P. C. appearing over the outer lights. Turning to the opposite end of the Church, a great Rose win dow looms out above the organ and is filled with rich color. In the centre opening St. Raphael appears leading the youthful Tobias. But he is depicted here rather in his representative character as Prince of the Guardian Angels and the Protector of travellers. He carries in his hands a pilgrim’s staff, and the Fish, which is his special emblem. The City in the distance, the Rages of the story of Tobias, is typical here of the Heavenly City to which all under his guidance and protection are traveling in this “vale of tears.” On a scroll beneath is written the comforting text “He hath given His angels charge over thee.” The ten main windows of the aisles are filled with very elab orate foliated work, containing no figures, but of unusual depth and richness of color. They are alternated in design, one being a con ventional treatment of the Vine, emblematic of the Blessed Sacra ment, and the other the Holy Thorns, which is ingeniously inter twined at regular intervals with a golden crown, signifying the heavenly reward of earthly suffering; in the traceries above the Vine [ 94

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blue beyond the trees. Our Lord’s hand is laid lovingly and ten derly on the shoulder of a little child who leans trustingly against His knee, and others, boys and girls of all ages within childhood, Ethiopian as well as Circassian, are grouped about, looking with love and trust upon Him whose right hand is gently uplifted in benediction upon them. Over the side Chapel is represented the Supper at Emmaus, and over the Chapel of the Blessed Virgin, the Espousals, and each in a beauty and simplicity of treatment which needs no comment of explanation. Over the Chapel of St. Thomas Aquinas is the last of the five, which represents the Cottage at Nazareth, a picture of unique grace and tenderness. St. Joseph, the carpenter, is working with his plane at the bench, his attention for the moment interrupted and directed to the Holy Child, a boy of about 12, who also is at work, and is carrying on his shoulders two heavy pieces of wood which, intersected, have assumed something of the appearance of the Cross. The Blessed Virgin seated near, busy with her distaff, is closely regarding, too, her Divine child, seeming to experience a momentary mental vision of the sorrowful ordeal, thus as it were unconsciously, though graphically prefigured. The angelic pres ence introduced into this picture as always, though invisibly, attend ant upon our Divine Lord on earth is especially beautiful in its rep resentation. The angelic choir is singing and playing musical instruments and forms a background full of charm and interest to the composition which it crowns. Within the Chapel of St. Thomas itself are two small works of great interest on which infinite care and pains have been bestowed; they both refer to the Blessed Sacrament of which St. Thomas was so great a Disciple. The first represents the appearance of the angel to Elijah telling him to “arise and eat” of the miraculous bread and water provided for him; the second figuratively represents our Blessed Lord on the cross, the “Tree of Life,” which in the form of the fruitful Vine enriches with golden berries the ruby colored background. Three angels in richly diapered white garments receive into golden vessels the Precious Blood which pours from the Sacred Wounds to give life and salvation to the world. Across the base of the windows are written the words from the gradual of the mass of Corpus Christi, and above the cross “Consummation est.” The corresponding windows of St. Joseph’s Chapel opposite contain each an angel, the one holding his Lily of Purity, the other the Palm of Victory of a happy death. [96

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soon repose, and the rich and the poor shall bow in adoration before it. To-day, eighteen hundred and ninety years ago saw the circum cision of our Lord, and the shedding of the first drops of that blood which redeemed the world. And now, on this first day of the new year, that same blood shall be offered in the chalice of “everlasting salvation” for the first time on this new altar, offered “whilst angels praise and dominations adore and powers tremble.” How can we express our feelings more eloquently and more appropriately than by the words of the Psalmist, “I have loved, O Lord, the beauty of Thy house and the place where Thy glory dwelleth;” or, as St. Jerome translates, “the place of Thy Tabernacle.” As suggested by the ceremony and especially by the title of this new church, “Corpus Christi,” I desire to call your attention to the subject of the presence of the body of Christ in our temples, and to the beauty in construc tion and the artistic splendor in decoration which that presence inspires and which become “the place of His tabernacle.” The subject of the true, real and substantial presence of Christ on our altars in the Holy Eucharist is one of ineffable interest. To the Catholic this presence is the very life and heart of the Church. As a sacrifice, it is the continuation of that on Calvary; as a sacra ment it is the union of divinity with humanity. Originally, man walked with God in the garden of paradise. Humanity had Deity present with it. When man became disloyal and disobedient, he was driven from the garden of delights and walked no more with God. For four thousand years man, as an exile, wept at the gates of Eden, wept not merely for its lost delights, but supremely for the lost presence of his God. “O, give me back my God, the divine original after which my soul was fashioned—the only thing that can bless and sanctify me,” he cried. His sighs are expressed in these elo quent Antiphons of Advent which are chanted in the office of the Church before Christmas: “O, orient splendor of eternal light and sun of justice, come and illuminate those who sit in darkness and in the shadow of death.” “O, Emmanuel, King and our Lawgiver, Expectation of the Nations and their Saviour, come and save us, Lord, our God.” “O, that Thou wouldst rend the heavens and come down!” At length the new Adam came and before Him the angelic sentinel of the gate lowered his sword of fire. Humanity entered the garden again and not only walked with God, but was one with Him in the hypostatic union. The natures of God and man were united in Christ, but yet the personality of Christ was all divine; the union was not perfect until the body and blood, soul and divinity of 103 ]

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Christ were united with the individual man by the real presence in the Eucharist. Hence, to the Catholic this presence is the very heart of religion from which flows the blood which gives continued life to the Church of God. And to the non-Catholic, whether a believer in the Christian revelation or not, the subject must prove exceed ingly interesting. It is the key to the whole Catholic system. It accounts for the elaborate ceremonial of the Church, the splendor of her temples, the celebacy of her clergy and religious, and many things otherwise without a reason for their being. If this doctrine be true, as the Catholic believes, it is the most interesting and sancti fying in all revelation; if it be false, as the non-Catholic believes, even then it is not without interest, to find out how it could have originated, how the whole Christian world for fifteen hundred years believed it; how three-fourths of the Christian world still believe it most firmly; how its deniers constitute but one-fourth of Christen dom during only one-sixth of the period that Christianity has existed. Thus, whether fact or fraud, truth or superstition, the subject becomes deeply interesting. The rationalist must bear in mind that intellects far greater than his, men like St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas, and the vast procession of the “kings of thought” for nearly nineteen cen turies, have bowed their heads in faith and in adoration before the real presence of the King of Kings in the adorable sacrament of the altar. In accepting it as a truth we believe in but one mystery; in rejecting it as false, we have several mysteries to account for. It is, of course, a mystery difficult to accept. But God respects the human intellect, which He formed, and asks no man to believe without a reason. That reason is in propor tion to the mysterious truth to be accepted. That reason is His own divine word, communicated to man by a messenger who cannot err in its transmission from the divine to the human intellect. Of course, if the messenger can err and deliver a false report, I cannot, without lessening the dignity of my reason, accept and believe a mystery. The Catholic Church is the unerring messenger from the infallible God, and hence I follow my reason in believing a truth delivered by such a messenger already proved to me to be infallible.

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JenKin$ LID. •Sf/xo/iee faffitfernecz Curuz> IPk TffaplAh': 0 X 6112 /&J.‘ |P)^ £<£/* :&tfffijiz;j$y/ 2 £^ fn sf.?-~f*U/S.V:. J/9£ 'll 1 i Vj u M c i' 11 J • i 1 a

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As you go further they multiply to thousands, and on to tens of thousands, and then hundreds of thousands, so that, if all your direct ancestors, for say twenty generations, be added together, they amount to over a million. There is historic evidences at hand, showing that Ap. Thomas Jenkins was a nephew of Sir Leoline Jenkins, of Anglesay, Wales, who, in 1634, was the Secretary to the English Admiralty, Wilkes Street, London, a Catholic; his nephew, at his request, came over to Maryland, in company with Father White, and located first in Saint Marie’s, and, in 1631, settled upon a tract patented to him by Charles Calvert, in Charles County. While history furnishes slightly in the first few years in rela tion to Thomas Jenkins—to his descendants—much has to be drawn from tradition. By tradition I do not mean a mere hearsay, want ing sufficient evidence to deserve belief, but tradition first gathered from reliable sources, coming down, from family to family, in all desirable and uncontradicted proof from generation to generation. Fortunately, testimony, found at the archives, formerly kept at Whitemarsh, Prince George County, corresponds sufficiently with traditionary, to compare, as two rivulets flowing into the same stream, nevertheless, the stream will occasionally be found discol ored, or in other words, obscured. In this effort, my purpose is to introduce the many members of the Jenkins family, in Maryland, to each other, who, perhaps, otherwise would, most of them, remain absolutely strangers. I have thought it may be, at least, interesting for those of one original family from whose name all of the same religious convictions and blood-kin, should learn something of themselves. It should, at least, help them to dwell together as of old, in unity, respecting one another, as well as their name. The effort, so far, has proven much more arduous than at first thought, it would have been, for in order to obtain anvthing like correct data in relation to the genealogy of a family, so numerous as that of the Jenkins, it has been a very difficult task, requiring much correspondence with those connected with the original. Most of those written to have failed to reply, and those who have done so, are, seemingly, at fault, or take little pains to inform themselves or the writer. When I commenced this undertaking I was acquainted with but very few of the name, beyond my immediate connections, but, from one whom I did not expect, I have been able to obtain a valuable fund of information, and without this, I would have given up in sorrow, if not despair. [8

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If there is a spot on the surface of the glorious old State of Maryland, where people of our Faith should meet, it is to be found on the site where the Pilgrims consecrated the land of our fore fathers—“the Land of the Sanctuary.” There has been, for some years, considerable speculation among the several branches of the Jenkins family, in relation to the Family Crest, or “Coat of Arms.” In the United States, so strong was the prejudice against any aristocratic emblem, especially those from England, no one would care to acknowledge having one or even a desire to use one. It was not until within the last generation, or about 1820, that a crest, or “Coat of Arms,” was ever seen, or exposed, in Baltimore. About the time mentioned, when “springs” for vehicles were in use, for family carriages, owners of fashionable ones began to have the panels of the doors engraved, or painted, fancifully, with “Coat of Arms” on them, denoting their Crests, as suited their fancy. Since, however, but particularly shortly after the war of the Rebellion, and when wealthy families became as plentiful as blackberries, there sprung up a wonderful demand for family Crests or “Coat of Arms,” if not for foreign titles. Hence, the enterprising man at once set to work in furnishing them to suit the market—and did a good business, as there were abundant so-called society people to purchase. It mattered little, to them, as to the character of the emblematic Crest. As a matter of fact, no family in America was, or is now, entitled, or can claim a right to any emblem, or crest, whatsoever, unless it can be proven that it was the “Coat of Arms” of their forefathers prior to 1700. Very few can do that in Bal timore. All of those originated, or purchased, since that period, are simply “store goods,” and are not worth noticing, or, indeed, the cash paid for them. It is an indisputable fact, that in Anglesey, Wales, for genera tions, the Jenkins family were among the most favored and worthy in that part of Wales. Anterior to James I., King of England, when Charles the Second, succumbed, the Jenkins, having shared his cause, many shared his fate. True, many were compelled to flee, but their star had forever set, after their blood had flowed freely for their convictions. After days, when Wales became annexed to England, the bloody hand of the Jenkins became an emblem of their defense of Wales, and because of service rendered, in many of England’s battles, and by a Grant, during Elizabeth’s reign, the “Coat of Arms,” with the bloody hand, a cannon supported by a Lion, and I 16

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orable reputation, as an example for his offspring, and one that others might do well to follow. William Jenkins would have been rich without money, an honest name to leave behind is better than money. William Jenkins possessed a large amount of real and personal property in and around Baltimore. His last Will and Testament was made on the 9th of March, 1843. The Will contains many benevolent legacies, numbering many thousand dollars. The entire balance being mostly real estate, he ordered that it be divided into six equal parts for his daughter and five sons. The daughter, Mary Ann, who married Wm. Kennedy, of Phila delphia, inherited the homestead, “Oak Hill,” valued then at eleven thousand dollars. To his son, Thomas Courtney, five acres of land on the West side of the York Road to Sadtlers Lane, valued then at two thousand dollars. To his son, Mark Wilcox, the prop erty known as “Huntington,” with the tannery thereon, valued at ten thousand dollars. To his son, Edward, five acres, adjoining that of Thomas Courtney’s, valued at twenty-five hundred dollars. To his son, James Wilcox, the Oak Hill tannery and the Mitchalia lot, with certain rights reserved, in Oak Hill property, valued at fifteen thousand dollars. To his son, Joseph, five acres on South side of lot of Thomas Courtney’s, valued at two thousand dollars. He also gave to his daughter, Mary Ann, his sons, Mark and Edward, his interest in the store on South side of Water Street and Franklin Lane, valued at five thousand dollars, also the warehouse on Guilford Street and Franklin Lane, valued at twelve hundred dollars. These estates, in 1843, which are herein probated before David M. Perine, Registrar, were then valued at forty-seven thousand dollars. Michael Jenkins, of Baltimore County, was born 1778, mar ried Sarah Worthington, of Baltimore, 1799, died 1831. He was a well-known and enterprising business man in Baltimore, and established the furniture and cabinet business on Light Street, 1799. Early in his youth he joined the First Company of the Fifth Regi ment, then under command of Colonel Upton H. Heath. In the service he was at the battles of Bladensburg and North Point. Commencing with William Jason Jenkins, Ensign in the Eng lish Navy, who was born at Anglesay, Wales, in the year 1615, and who married in London, in the year 1636, and who was the brother of Sir Lional Jenkins, then the Chief Secretary of the “Admiralty Board,” Whitehall, London, and who was the father 23 ]

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MRS. THOMAS COURTNEY JENKINS ne^ Louisa Carrell

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President of the Board of Trade, and fifty years a Director in the Mechanics’ Bank.” Mr. Jenkins was one of the most prominent members of the Catholic Church in Baltimore. He was the first pew holder, and after, the oldest member of the Board of Trustees, of the Cathedral. He married, in 1829, Louisa Carrell, of Philadelphia, a sister of Bishop Carrell, of Covington, Kentucky. In the year 1865, Mr. Jenkins retired from business, leaving the business to his sons, George C. Jenkins, Joseph W. Jenkins and Michael Jenkins. Thomas Courtney Jenkins, was a most courteous gentleman, unostentatious, a plain painstaking man, carefully avoiding all notoriety, and in social and domestic circles he was much prized for his many genial and amiable qualities—benevo lence being his best. It was a maxim of Mr. Jenkins that, “he who receives a good turn, should never forget it; he who does one should never remember it.” There are many of our old citizens, to-day, who will remember the havoc of business and the distress that followed during the year of 1835, then designated as the “Great Crisis,” when our monied institutions refused in aiding anyone, lamentable and really painful examples of distress were presented to verify the truth of the “Shinplaster Panic,” such as never were seen in Baltimore. Many an honest man, who failed to stem the disastrous current, “went under,” and closed up, and “Gone to Texas,” derisively written, was to be seen on his store door. A near neighbor of Thomas C. Jenkins, was among the number of unfortunates, and when some mischievous wag wrote upon the closed door “Gone to Texas,” the next day was seen—“Nary time, come and see.” The neighbor had gone to see Tommy Jenkins, instead of Texas. Liberality is never so beautiful or engaging, as when the hand is concealed that bestows the favor. There never was a greater truism than that, “there is one advan tage in being born a gentleman; it makes him sensible of his man hood, and lays stronger obligations upon him, not to degenerate from these excellencies of his ancestors!” I remember Mr. Jenkins very distinctly—have conversed with him. He was what I have ever cherished, “an Old Schooler.” He carried his cane, and wore plain and faultless clothes. With a serene countenance, the reflection of a pure heart, in walk was slow and dignified. But whenever he moved, he was “the benefactor,” as all admit—“A good name liveth forever.” 29 ]

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years, with unrestricted cruelty. Edward, to restrain the rebellious Welshmen, caused the entire woodland of Wales to be cut down, “not a tree to be standing to hide a Welshman.” The Welsh, from hunger and famine, were enforced to “sue for peace.” During the Civil war, the inhabitants of Anglesay agreed to strongly expressed words of resolutions in behalf of Charles I., and, in consequence, Anglesay was besieged by the Parliamentary forces of Cromwell. The Town and castle did not hold out long against the Britains. But the Welsh, however, obtained an honorable capit ulation. Edward’s ambition, and England’s desire, were at length triumphant. For many years after, Anglesay prospered, but the castle was an incumbrance. It had been surrounded by immense walls, and a moat, or canal, wide and deep, and all the ground outside converted into a marshy soft soil, so that “Horse or footman cannot scale its walls.” In a manuscript, written in 1610, it relates, that “Part of this canal, till very lately, had places for mooring vessels at the quay. The low lands, or vale, are drained, and the whole level made into a healthy tract of natural beauty, and designated under the name of Llyn Green—“Long Green.” A very diligent effort has been made to ascertain, correctly, the names of the Jenkins family who served in the war of Independ ence—the war of 1812; the war with Mexico, as well as that of the Rebellion, of 1861. The result shows that Edward Jenkins, Ignatius Jenkins, Jo seph Jenkins, William Jenkins and Benedict Jenkins were soldiers; and Captain Thomas Jenkins, who was captured at sea, running the blockade, and imprisoned, for nine months, on the prison ship “Jersey,” at Brooklyn, and exchanged for a British officer, is the only one of the family made prisoner during the war. In the war of 1812, those who served in the defense of Balti more, were Captain Josiah Jenkins, William Jenkins, William V. Jenkins, Henry Jenkins, George Jenkins, Edward Jenkins, Michael Jenkins, Samuel Jenkins, Charles Jenkins, James Jason Jenkins, Frederick Jenkins and Felix Jenkins. In the war with Mexico, were:—Mark O. Jenkins, Edmond Jenkins, William H. Jenkins. In the war of the Rebellion, 1861, there were many of the family, but a very large majority on the Confederate side. Alto gether, counting those from the lower Counties and outside of the City, there is known to have been forty-three. Twenty killed and died from wounds. Ten have died from natural causes, and ten are now living. [ 36

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In early life Thomas Jenkins followed the sea, in the employ of the firm of Daingerfields, then largely engaged in the commercial trade of Alexandria, Virginia. When of proper age, he engaged in business for himself, and established a large trade in tobacco at Port Tobacco, Charles County. In course of time he became quite wealthy, owning several sea going vessels. He commanded the ship “Potomac,” and when on a return voyage from the West Indies, his ship was captured, and himself and crew made prisoners by the British Fleet, then off Cape Henry. Captain Jenkins was sent, by order of the British Commander, to New York, and placed in close confinement, on the memorable prison ship, “Jersey,” where he was kept, closely guarded, for nine months. After suffering all the horrors of disease and want, near unto death, he was sent on shore to die, like many others before, but by the protecting hand of Provi dence was restored to health and his friends, by exchange for a British Captain, held by the American army, under General Small wood, who was his neighbor and friend, of Charles County. To the characteristic bluntness of a sailor, he united the most rigid principles of probity, with the finest feelings of humanity. Respected and esteemed by his neighbors, revered and beloved by his children and numerous relatives. He was lamented by all, but none more than the poor of his neighborhood, who, with sorrowful hearts, declared:—“We have lost a friend indeed.” Many of his slaves were given their freedom, a few were dis tributed among his children, to set free when of age. He was buried beside his wife in the grave lot at St. Thomas Church, Charles County. On his return to his home and family, he was offered the com mand of a large ship, then being fitted out at Alexandria. It is well known that General Smallwood, his neighbor and friend, while recruiting men in the three lower Counties of Maryland, and before Captain Jenkins was made prisoner, recommended him to the “Committee of Safety,” some of whom knew him well, to be made a Commander in the Navy, then being organized. He, however, declined all public service of whatever kind, preferring to devote his life to his young wife and family, and never followed the sea. Thomas Jenkins and Mary Corry had five sons; they were:— Henry, William V., Benedict, Felix, Frederick and Louis. The daughters were:—Eliza and Matilda. Eliza became a Nun, and went to Mobile, Alabama, and died there. Matilda married Raphael Semmes, of Georgetown, of “Alabama” fame. [ 38

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and numbered many friends. For the last eight years of his life he was an Officer of the Customs, receiving his appointment from President Jackson, and also from President Van Buren. He died universally regretted, leaving a widow and four chil dren:—Bradford, who died in Texas; Ambrosia, who married Eben Faxon, Architect; she was an exceptionally beautiful woman; Mary and Ignatius Jenkins. Benedict Jenkins, son of Thomas, of Cob Neck, Charles County, was born, 1798. He married Adeline Neal Murray, of Saint Mary’s, in 1821. Issue:—John Thomas, Ellen, Josephine, Rufus, Napoleon and Mary. He died, 1837. His widow and children emigrated to Illinois, 1838. In many instances, where the Jenkins emigrated from Mary land, it is simply perplexing to get any record, thinking, no doubt, the whole State should know from whom they descended, and now their grandchildren can give no positive account who they are, save they were ladies and gentlemen, and the women virtuous. Benedict Jenkins, for many years, held and lived in the old manor at Walston, now in possession of some of the Jenkins family. Felix Jenkins, fourth son of Thomas Jenkins, was born at Cob Neck, Charles County, in 1786. He married Martha Coskery, 1810. Issue, one daughter, who became a Nun. He married a second time, to Francis Wheeler, of Baltimore. Issue, three sons:— Felix, Michael and Albert. Felix, married Annie Jenkins, and became a Doctor of Medicine. He is now a prominent physician of Baltimore. He has three children—a son, also “Dr. Felix”— and two daughters. Charles F. Jenkins, eldest son of Valentine Jenkins, was born in 1810, and is now, probably, the oldest of his name living. He emigrated to Caldwell County, Kentucky, in 1835. Married Miss Arthur Williams, 1838. He started the first tannery in that part of the State; was a member of the Legislature for several years, and was sheriff of the County twenty years, or until the year 1861. He moved to Texas in 1865, and settled, with his entire family of six children and twelve grandchildren, in Eartland County. Five of his sons were killed in the Confederate Army. During the war he was made prisoner several times, and his property destroyed. He was, on one occa sion, ordered to be shot to death. Since his residence in Texas, he has been unusually successful in restoring his losses in Kentucky. 41 ]

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have been, and are still, many who remain in the world, but do an angel’s part to God’s poor “who are always with us.” Literature has known their names and themes—music and art also—whilst for general intelligence and womanly traits and virtues, and often beauty, we need envy no other family. In every genera tion the name of Jenkins has been truly a synonym for charity amongst their woman kind. This effort of the writer is very far from being complete, though having taken considerable pains to give as accurate a gene alogy as possible, of the older members of the family. In instances, I consulted the younger, though with little benefit; I have been com pelled to follow on down to the present time, and in many cases, especially in the Counties, could not trace the descent beyond the second or third generation. In some few instances, however, gave up in despair, and sincerely hope that some of the branches of the family will be able to trace their ancestors to the period where I have failed. I am sensible that I have not adopted the best arrangement in my genealogy, and will have rendered myself liable to much crit icism; and for my default, I plead that I had advanced far in my effort, when I saw I had to alter it, without writing the work anew. I sincerely hope that some of the ancient and most noteworthy names of the family are not passed over. Imperfect as is this effort of mine, I beg to submit it to the members and friends of the Jenkins under the confident expectation that they will be indulgent. 45 ]

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[From the Catholic Herald.~\ Lines, Inscribed to the Memory of William Jenkins, Jr., who Died Suddenly, at New Orleans, on the 27TH Ult., Aged 27, by Anna Hanson Dorsey. Baltimore, March 10, 1838. “A funeral train, with solemn steps and slow, Came gliding past. Men’s faces wore a shade Of grief, and eyes which seldom felt the dew, Of tears, were wet, and manly cheeks grew pale As feeling ushered up each burning drop From their full hearts; for he who lay beneath The gloomy pall, and nodding hearse plumes, died When life was young, and in its brightest flash, When rainbow arches seemed to span each wish, And cast a star-light brilliance o’er a world Of hopes and smiles, when every dream, perchance, Was but a dream of joy, of love, of home; And yet he died far from that sweet home; How like a glance of light, his thoughts pierced through The flight of time, until they reached his aged father’s hearth, And heard, from every lip, the silvery tones Of gladsome joy and love’s own welcome sweet, And gazed upon the scenes his childhood knew— The sun-lit vines and trees, the bright blue stream; But Death chilled that fond dream, and all of life and light was stilled. The lonely sentinels which beam on high, to cheer the Midnight Watch, Kept o’er him, in death’s agony, Its brief and bitter pain, and these were all For slumber, and its heaviness of dreams, Sealed up the eyes of those who would have wept Vivid tears and murmured words of kindly thought, To soothe the stranger’s passage to a stranger’s grave. They laid him in the silent mould, beneath The fragrant orange trees whose blossoms wave In a perpetual and balmy air; As balmy in that southern land as if The winds stole past the gates of Paradise. f 50

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On which Will was thus written: November ist 1757, Corne lius Brady, Cornelius Lynch and Winifred Lynch, the three sub scribing witnesses to the foregoing will, being duly and solemnly sworn on the Holy evangelist of Allmighty God, depose and say that they saw the Testator, Thomas Courtney Jenkins, sign the fore going Will &c. &c. Sworn before me, W. YOUNG, Dpy. Commy. Baltimore Co. WILL OF EDWARD JENKINS of Charles County. In the Name of God, Amen I Edward Jenkins of Charles County being sick and weake in Body but of Sound Mind and Per fect Memory, Do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testa ment first revoking and making void all other Will or Wills by me heretofore made and do acknowledge this to be my Last Will and Testament as Followeth: First I give and bequeath unto my beloved son Edward Jenkins all that Tract of Land called Pore Chance, containing two hundred and twenty five acres to him and his Heirs forever. I also give and bequeath unto my said son Edward over and above a childs part, ye following particulars, Vizt: four negroes, namely, James, Jeremy, Agness, Monacea, as also my feather bed and furniture to him and his Heirs forever. SEC ONDLY, I give and bequeath unto my beloved Daughter Ann Jenkins and her Heirs forever, over and above a childs part, a negro woman named Margaret and three other negroes, as also one feather bed and furniture. THIRDLY I leave and bequeath unto my Loving Wife Mary Jenkins my dwelling house and plantation and all my lands that I am possessed of or entitled to except the tract of Land called Pore Chance already bequeathed to my son, during her natural Life and after her decease to my loving son Edward Jenkins and his Heirs forever. FOURTHLY, I leave and bequeath unto my loving wife Mary Jenkins during her natural life the remaining part of my personal Estate and after her decease to be equally divided between all my children. FIFTHLY, My will and desire is that ye profit or gain of my Water-Mill shall be equally divided between my loving wife, my son Edward and my Daughter Mary Ann and each to be at equal cost and charge of repairing and keep ing the said mill during the natural life of my loving wife and after her decease to my son Edward Jenkins and his Heirs forever. LASTLY, I nominate and appoint my loving wife Mary Jenkins [74

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my Son Ignatius Jenkins, the sum of fifty pounds Current money, and the remaining part of my moveable Estate, I leave to be equally divided between my Wife Charity Jenkins, and my following Chil dren, Vizt, Thomas Courtney Jenkins, William Jenkins, Michael Jenkins, Josiah Jenkins, Mary Jenkins, Ann Hopkins, and Elizabeth Jenkins and Edward Jenkins. I do hereby constitute and appoint my Wife Charity Jenkins, and my Son Thomas Courtney Jenkins, my Executrix and Execu tor, of this my last Will and Testament Hereby revoking all other Wills heretofore made by me. Given under my hand and Seal this Tenth day of March One Thousand Seven hundred and Ninety Seven. MICHAEL JENKINS (Seal) Signed, Sealed, published and pronounced by the said Michael Jenkins, as his last Will & Testament in the presence of us Clement Green Cornelius Donnally Isaac Ford BALTIMORE COUNTY, TO WIT: On the 27th day of January, 1802, came Clement Green and Isaac Ford subscribing Evidences to the aforegoing last Will and Testament of Michael Jenkins late of said County deceased and made Oath &c that they did see the Testator sign and Seal this Will that they heard him publish pronounce and declare the same to be his last Will and Testament, that at the time of his so doing he was to the best of their apprehensions of sound disposing mind, memory and understanding, and that they subscribed their names as Wit nesses to this Will in his presence at his request and in the presence of each other and of Cornelius Donnally the other evidence. Sworn before me, Register of Wills for B. Coty. WM. BUCHANAN RENOUNCI ATION. I renounce all my right and title to the Executrixship of my deceased Husband Michael Jenkins Estate, given under my hand and Seal this 23d February 1802. CHARITY JENKINS (Seal) [ 86

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for fullfilment of duties and receive no commissions for same. And I again affirm this my last WILL and TESTAMENT. Signed May nth, 1842. WILLIAM JENKINS. Austin Jenkins, Anthony H. Jenkins, Basil R. Spaulding, Witnesses Request of late WILLIAM JENKINS for no appraisement of estate was made to OrphanÂ’s Court by all parties in interest and granted. MARY ANN KENNEDY, THOMAS C. JENKINS, MARK W. J., EDWARD J., JAMES W., JOSEPH W. & WILLIAM KENNEDY. DAVID M. PERINE, Registar. .Abstracts of Wills, TSeitkins J^amil? St yCta ryÂ’s (TouixIy JOHN JENKINS of St. Marys County. Will dated March 13th, 1789, and proved August nth, 1789. Gives to Rev. James Walton, 1000 lbs. Tobacco; to Rev. Augustine Jenkins, 20 pounds; to the poor, 10 pounds. To his wife Mary Jenkins, Lands, cattle, household goods, servants. To his son Joseph Jenkins, lands, ser vants, stock, &c. Witnesses to will: Wm. Leigh, Edmond Jenkins and Charles Dent. MARY JENKINS of St. Marys County. Will dated Sep tember 30th, 1788, and proved December 2d, 1788. Makes a bequest to the Revd. John Boarman. Appoints her sons John and Edmond C. Jenkins her Exrs. Children: Sons, John, Joseph, Ed mond Courtney, Augustine. Daughter, Susanna Copper; Grand daughters, Susanna Spalding, Susanna Combs, (dau. of Philip Combs,) Teresa Combs, Mary Combs (daus. of William Combs), Ann Combs; Gr-sons, Robert Combs. Witnesses to will: Robert Hagar and Francis Milburn. WILLIAM JENKINS of St. Marys County. Will dated July 9th, 1789, and proved November 17th, 1789. Children: [ 88

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(Laurel) Registers St. Margarets, Westminster, A. A. Co. JENKINS, EDWARD, son of Susannah Jenkins, born September 2nd, 1698. All Hallows Parish. JENKINS, JOHN, and Frances Pallett of Pr. Geo. Co., married November 5th, 1704. Charles County. JENKINS, ENOCH, son of Dan’l and Elizabeth of Ryckyawdxon, born July 31st, 1694. Mote In referring to the will of JOSEPH JENKINS, of St. Marys County, son of William and Mary, proved 3d of January, 1775, I find he mentions but three sons, JOHN, EDMUND COURTNEY and AUGUSTINE. He appoints his wife, Mary (Nee Coombs), and son John, Executors. MARY JENKINS, of St. Marys County, his widow, died in 1788, making a will bearing date 30th of September, 1788, and proved December 2d of same year. She mentions five children, JOHN, JOSEPH, EDMUND COURTNEY, AUGUSTINE and SUSANNA COOPER. Whether or not Joseph—(she does not give his surname)—and Susanna Copper, were children by her first husband, we are unable to determine from the data at hand. It is more than probable that this Joseph was the son of Joseph Jenkins, her first husband. EDMUND COURTNEY JENKINS of St. Marys County, son of the above mentioned JOSEPH and MARY (Coombs) JEN KINS, his wife, died in the early part of the year 1798. By his will, dated April 30th, 1796, he bequeaths to his brother, IGNA TIUS JENKINS, 100 pounds, and to his wife Elizabeth, whom he appoints his executrix, he leaves parts of two tracts of land, “Truth and Trust” and “St. Thomas,” during her lifetime. This IGNATIUS JENKINS, it would seem, is another child of the said Joseph Jenkins and Mary, not mentioned in the wills of either of his parents. [92

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respective dominions the most magnificent basilicas, some of which subsist even to this day, to attest the piety and munificence of their royal founders. The Constantines of new Rome, the Edwards of England, the Margarets of Scotland, the Louises of France, the Canutes of Denmark, and the Stephen and Elizabeths of Hungary, those monarchs made their reigns conspicuous by the number of magnificent temples which they built and endowed. But the times have changed, my dear brethren, and that which at one time was the exclusive property of kings, is to-day enjoyed by a private family; and though they do not possess royal wealth or royal titles, they prove by their noble and princely munificence that they have royal hearts and royal charity. The only condition they have imposed upon me is, that I might be silent in regard to their name. I could hardly accept this condition, because even if I myself should be silent, the very stones would proclaim the magnificent and noble charity of the family to which I refer. To erect a church to Almighty God, my dear friends, is not only an honor to those who do so, but this act confers inestimable bless ings upon posterity as well as upon the founders of this temple. It has been said with truth that the man who causes a blade of grass to grow, is of benefit to posterity; and if that be so, what shall we say of those who plant the vine of the Lord so that the weary souls may come and take shelter beneath its shade and be nourished by its fruit? Within the enclosure of this temple will be proclaimed the holy religion of Jesus Christ, that same Gospel that gives glory to God and peace to men; that same Gospel that strengthens the weak and comforts the afflicted; that same Gospel that pardons the sinner and holds out to all the blessed promise of eternal life. Within the walls of this church, my dear friends, will be preached that Gospel which has regenerated the world in the past and will save society in the future. Our Divine Saviour called around Him twelve illiterate men, men without wealth, without much of human knowledge, and without any social or political or family influence, and He com manded these men to effect the most mighty moral revolution that has ever taken place from the beginning of the world. He com manded them to destroy idolatry from the face of the earth and to establish instead the worship of the one, true and loving God. He commanded them to uproot their darling passions from the hearts of men and to plant therein the peaceful reign of Jesus Christ. What were their credentials? The Gospel was all the credential they had. What weapons were placed in their hands? Their only weapon was the sword of the spirit which is the word of God, and [98

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away in the basement of the State House at Annapolis. Then Cap tain Lewis Carbarry calling to his aid several of his neighbors near the old settlement, commenced a search for these long-lost treasures. After a long and tiresome hunt, they were found—rescued from their watery bed, pitted with rust, and deprived of their weight by corrosion until made unfit for use. For a while it was undecided just what disposition to make of them, but finally they were sent to Georgetown and placed on the College grounds, where these his toric Lord Baltimore cannons now mount guard at the Eastern entrance to the New Buildings, on a grassy mound, supported by their trunnions. A reverential relic of Cecilius Calvert, Lord Ab solute Proprietary of the Province of Maryland, and Avalon, Lord Baron of Baltimore, A. D. 1663.

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ST. ANN’S CHURCH Erected on Old Homestead, “Oak Hill,” by William Kennedy and his wife Ann Jenkins, daughter of William Jenkins and Ann Hillen

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^Extract From an Account Related by Col. Cyprian T. Jenkins. FTER the State of Florida decided to withdraw from the Union, 1861, there was immediately an exodus of the negro slaves from the upper tier of the Plantations to the Hammocks and Everglades in the lower territory of the State. Many of these negroes entered the Indian Res ervation, and joined in the many raids, of a very destructive character, to the thinly settled loca tions bordering on the West coast, from Tampa away down to the “Keys.” For many months after the first battle between the two contestants of Bull Run in 1861, it required every available man in the State, not already enlisted, to remain at home and defend his own homestead from all assailable points on the whole line of the State coast both East and West, which of itself was of immense proportion of the most difficult character for defense. For this work, there were organized three regiments of rifles, divided into squads of two or three companies each; in one of these I enlisted as a private, and subsequently was elected Captain, but I had already received a commission as Lieutenant Colonel of the Fourth Regiment from the Governor, which I held in reserve. It was while on duty on the Wacassa Bay, and along the lower Panscoe Landing, engaged in forwarding cotton for the blockading runners from various plantations nearby, I had my first eventful mishap, but to me a rather remarkable incident;—one, I think, should be recorded. 109 ]

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HESE Memoirs are affectionately dedica ted to the AuthorÂ’s cousin, Ambrosia Jen kins Faxon, whose kind assistance in tracing correct line age, both in foreign countries and in lower Maryland, have been most valuable in the correction of this Monograph.

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rtufnnj from /wr7DW£f$ Pe*er fov 7j if of votes etireri rwirf arJl-fced? Tnccfr/rom‘ ifie Snore\ ye muytKno^anJdare: T &*rk*hh*ad

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We all know full well how deeply impressed upon the mind is the story of the religious wars of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth centuries; when Protestant Puritans, of England, contested to the death “for the Faith within them.” We all know the seeds inherited there, were soon transplanted here in the New World— transmitted from parent to child. This bigotry soon found a place in the several colonies, and raged with unrelenting fury in South ern Maryland. True it is that the tempestuous storm was partially dormant, slumbering, yet dangerous, ever ready to burst forth upon the slightest protest. It was in this unnatural and unwarranted strife, among the early settlers in St. Mary’s and Charles Counties, a contest over the removal of the Colonial Records from Saint Mary’s City to Annapolis, that many of the most valuable deeds of estates and records of marriages, births and deaths, of these two Counties, were destroyed. It has been written, that many of these papers, official documents, were used for gun wad, by the contend ing parties, for and against the removal of the archives to the present location, the State Capitol, Annapolis. It is known that in consequence of this long and unprovoked strife, many of the Jenkins family migrated to Baltimore Town and County, some to Frederick and Harford Counties, while some went West to Kentucky and Ohio. By this unmerited persecution, there are more of the family name in these localities than there is in our original home, Maryland. There is a tradition, as well as a written account, of the destruc tion of many valuable papers in 1664, at St. Mary’s Settlement, when Leonard Calvert died. Calvert, by power vested in him by his brother, named one, Thomas Green, his successor, as Governor. During the space of fourteen years he had administered the affairs of the Colony with a devoted interest and unselfish devotion. But a difficulty had occurred among the troops employed by him to protect the Colony from Indian intrusions from the Virginia side of the Potomac. Not being able to satisfy the claims as demanded of him, they destroyed all of his papers, documents and other valu ables. It is related, that a vacuum of, at least, twenty years of his torical incidents of the Colony resulted. In 1636, the Catholic Mission numbered four Priests, includ ing Father White, who was coadjutor, and these were constantly employed among the Indians then in, and nearby, the settlement. Peace and contentment prevailed. 9 ]

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the motto: “The red hand forever,” became the property of the Jenkins, of Wales. The following Appendix may be of interest: X5l)eTlor6s"p roprietar? of 5ttar£lan6 1632, Cecilius Calvert, Second Lord Baltimore. 1675, Charles Calvert, Third Lord Baltimore. 1715, Benedict Leonard Calvert, Fourth Lord Baltimore. 1715, Charles Calvert, Fifth Lord Baltimore. 1751, Frederick Calvert, Sixth Lord Baltimore. 1633, Leonard Calvert, Governor. 1647, Thomas Green, Governor. 1649, William Stone, Governor. 1654, Commissioners Under the Parliament: 1658, Josiah Fendall, Governor. 1661, Philip Calvert, Governor. 1662, Charles Calvert, Governor. 1667, Charles, Lord Baltimore, Governor. 1678, Thomas Notery, Governor. 1681, Charles, Lord Baltimore, Governor. 1685, William Joseph, President of Deputies. 1689, Convention of Protestant Association. 3\o?al Governors b? ^Appointment 1692, Sir Lionel Copely. 1693, Sir Edmond Andros. 1694, Francis Nicholson. 1699, Nathaniel Blackstone. 1703, Thomas Tench. 1704, John Seymour. 1709, Edward Lloyd. 1714, John Hart. 17 ]

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"proprietary (Boveritment 1715, 1720, 1727, 1732, 1733, 1735, 1742, 1747, 1752, 1753, 1769, 1774, 1775 1776, John Hart. Charles Calvert. Benedict Leonard Calvert. Samuel Ogle. Charles Calvert. Samuel Ogle. Thomas Bladen. Samuel Ogle. Benjamin Tasker (President). Horatio Sharpe. Robert Eden. Convention of Safety, Council. w 3totes from tl)e -Archives 1642. Leo Leonard Calvert, Governor. The Indians, as related by Father White, “became exceedingly troublesome, and it became necessary to organize a Company, from the settlers, to resist them. Three good and trusty men, were given the authority to raise and equip a Company. The Commissioners were: Richard EdELEN, James MIDDLETON and IGNATIUS JEN KINS — Richard Gardiner, to be put in command.” Commencing with the Revolutionary period of 1775, a great boon broke over the entire portion of lower Maryland, in the very beginning, when it became known among the people of St. Mary’s and Charles Counties, they, with one accord, hastened to bury all private animosities, all memory of past persecutions, to wash out all invidious distinctions, and, in the name of God and posterity, to unite in defense of the common rights of man—Freedom of one’s convictions. No less an authority than the historian, Dr. Shea, has given the weight of his name to this declaration: “The Catholics spon taneously, universally and energetically, gave their adhesion to the [18

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George Jenkins left three sons: George (died single), John, and William, who married Elizabeth Mitchell, and one daughter, Hen rietta, who married Marmaduke Semmes. William Jenkins, son of George and Susannah Gardiner, was born 1720, married Elizabeth Mitchell, 1738, both of Charles County; he died 1793, and left seven children (two sons and five daughters) : Thomas, George, Henrietta, Ellen, who married Edelen, and three other daughters,—one married Edelen, another Ward and another Pye. Thomas Jenkins, son of William and Ann Mitchell, was born 1751, and married Mary Corry (Neale), 1780; died 1821; both of Charles County. He left six sons and two daughters:—Henry, William, Felix, Benedict, Frederick and Louis A., Elizabeth and Matilda. William Valentine Jenkins, second son of Thomas, was born 1783, married Ann Maria Wells, 1807; died 1854. He left eleven children, ten sons and one daughter:—Mary Josephine, Charles F., Cyprian Thomas, Leolini Augustus Ludlow, Frederick, Ambrose, William, Octavius, Fenwick and Constantine. William Henry, the seventh son of William Valentine, was born 1819, married Catharine Ann Lawrence, 1847. His sons are Cyprian Thomas, Leolini, Augustus Ludlow, Frederick, Ambrose, Carroll, and one daughter, Catharine A. “Edward Spaulding and wife Margaret, and two children, came to Saint Mary’s County in the year of 1632, from Jamestown, Virginia. Ann Spaulding, his granddaughter, born in Saint Mary’s, married Thomas Jenkins, the original Jenkins of Saint Mary’s. William Spaulding and Michael Jenkins, came in 1655. Francis Gardiner, Edwin Edelen, Thomas Courtney, Philip Coombs, Robert Mathew, Enoch Fenwick, Edward Courtney, Michael Wheeler, Francis Jenkins, John Jenkins, Stephen Tarleton, Edward Mattingly, Ignatius Jenkins, came in, and settled in 1656.” “Augustine Jenkins, S. J., was a native of Maryland, born Janu ary 12, 1742, and entered the Society, September 7, 1766. After his studies and ordination, at Liege, he returned to Maryland, arriv ing on May 24, 1774. He was a zealous and successful missionary, 25 ]

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Among the many worthy and noted Planters, who left for other locations, were Henry Jenkins, with his entire family of eight chil dren; also, his brother William, with his family of thirteen chil dren, for Kentucky. “Thomas Courtney Jenkins, of Saint Mary’s, who originally owned the Long Green property, in 1754, and who died in 1757, at ‘Charlotte Hall,’ in Saint Mary’s County, and who was buried in that County, was a man of remarkable personality. A descriptive account of his appearance was written, and was, for a long while, in the possession of Captain Benedict Ignatius Jenkins, as late as 1838. Captain Jenkins, for many years, was a Pilot and Captain of the Steamer Fredericksburg, and also the Columbia, then run ning between Baltimore and Washington.” In the above mentioned article, the writer says of his dress: “I noticed that he was dressed in what I took to be a neat suit of black velvet clothes, he wore a beaver fur hat and close fitted knee breeches, silk socks with lowcut shoes, with bright silver buckles, his vestcoat was large and with flaps, with watch fob. He had a bunch of colored ribbon hanging down in front attached to a watch (presumably). His face was clean shaven and exceedingly good-looking.” He was thirty-four years of age when he died, being the pos sessor of a large fortune for the time in which he lived and was well educated. There is no doubt he was, personally, a fine looking gentleman, as is well known, a most generous and worthy Christian. He never held any position under the Colony or State. “Thomas Courtney Jenkins, the second, was born in Baltimore, March, 1802, and was the eldest son of William Jenkins. He received a classical education at Saint Mary’s College, Emmitsburg. After having been thoroughly educated and fitted for gen eral business, he entered into his father’s office on Water Street. About 1822, he was given an interest in his father’s establishment, where he remained until 1828. He then formed a co-partnership with Mr. Adam Poland, and founded the business firm of Poland and Jenkins. Mr. Jenkins from the start was a business man. He became a Director in the Mechanics’ Bank, as well as other bank institutions, for over forty years. He was a Director in the Savings Bank many years. He was one of the original organizers of the Parkersburg and Central Ohio Railroad and Northern Central Railroad, and always took an active part in City and State improve ments. He was the first among the organizers of the Merchants’ and Miners’ Transportation Company, and when successful in the enterprise, was elected its first President. He was, also, for a while, [28

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William Valentine Jenkins, second son of Thomas Jenkins, of Cob Neck, was born February, 1783, and married November 7, 1807, Ann Maria Wells, of Baltimore, In 1809, he established a business for himself on the York Road, and afterwards at Huntington. In 1829, he erected a tannery on Jenkins lane on Cold Stream property, where he continued until the great crisis in 1837, when he retired from business. He was appointed by the President, Andrew Jackson, to a position in the Custom House, and continued in this office until his death, in 1834. He left a large family, but several of them had emigrated West. His children were:—Mary Josephine, who mar ried Richard Wright, of Georgetown. Charles Francis, who went to Kentucky, and after to Texas. Cyprian Thomas, who went to Florida. Leoline Wells, who died at the College at Georgetown, a student for the Priesthood. Augustus Ludlow, who died in Bal timore, in 1838, was clerk to Fire Insurance Company. Frederick O., who went to Woodville, Miss., and died there in 1839. Am brose Marechall, who went to Kentucky and married and died there. William H., now living in Baltimore. Octavius Mark, who went to Kentucky, and married and died there. Enoch Fenwick, died in Baltimore. Constantine D., now living in Baltimore. Cyprian Thomas Jenkins, son of William Valentine Jenkins, was born at the old homestead, “Huntington,” 1811; married in 1857; died 1893. No one of his name had a more remarkable history. He learned the trade of Tanner and Currier, and, w r hen of age, he went to Florida, then a wilderness and in a very uncivilized condition, and was instrumental largely in making the history of that territory throughout the Seminole war, and for years after. Mr. Jenkins held many important positions in the service of Florida, as a territory and State. His first commission was from President Jackson, as an Inspector of Government Lands, a position he held until 1861. He was the first settler in the Hernando Coun try, then in possession of the Seminoles. He witnessed the first wedding in that unsettled country, and saw the first white child born there. He raised a Company of mounted rangers in the Seminole war, and gave the command to Colonel Bailey, a military officer of renown. In this troop, he acted as a scout and interpreter during the desperate conflict with the Seminoles. He volunteered to rescue Colonel Dade’s command, and was within a mile when the command was slaughtered. Owing to a wide river and morass, he was unable to reach Dade in time. 39]

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5tlary Isabella fl low6en 3ettkitis RS. MICHAEL JENKINS, the eldest daughter of Austin Jenkins and Mary Anne Plowden Jenkins, was born October the 2d, 1844. She was educated at Eden Hall Academy, near Philadelphia. Mrs. Jenkins has always been very promi nent in social and charitable affairs and conspic uous for aristocratic beauty and gentle, loving nature, which endear her to all who know her. On May 29th, 1905, the second year of his pontificate, Pope Pius the Tenth honored Mrs. Jenkins by bestowing upon her the title of the Duchess of Llewellyn.

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Farewell. “A Father’s tears like rain-drops gushing, Fall upon thy memory’s shrine, A sister’s brow with anguish flushing Tells a sadder dirge than mine. Farewell. “Thy brother’s silent woe gives token, Of grief which fond hearts only feel, To see so rudely broken, sadly The chain around love’s signet seal. Farewell. “Thy mother’s spirit sure will greet thee, In that far off shadow bourne, And guardian angels surely meet thee, Telling of hopes, that never mourn. Farewell. “God and our holy Mary, speed thee To thine everlasting rest. The prayers of saints, and martyrs, lead thee To thy Saviour’s breast.” 51 ]

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was regularly laid, and the slightest visible movement on the part of the besieged, drew the fire of the red man’s rifle. For ten days the constant assaults were kept up, and it became evident that some thing had to be done, and the little garrison cast lots to see who should make the attempt to bring succor to the beleagured garrison. The lot fell on two heroes, whose names, I am sorry to say, I have forgotten. There was but one way, to take the canoe and work their way up the Gulf to St. Marks, with every possible chance that if they escaped the keen eyes and deadly rifles of the red men, they would fall victims to the merciless gales on the Gulf. “The die cast, our two heroes began making their prepara tions, which, owing to the scant rations and scantier personal impedi menta, consumed but little time. The canoe, which had rendered them such valuable assistance in getting into their unpleasant pre dicament, was thoroughly overhauled and put in the best possible trim between the watches and sortees. It was essential that the sav ages should not suspect the attempted escape and rescue, for suspect and defeat were synonymous terms. The darkest hour of an un usually dark night was selected for the perilous venture, and the gallant fellows, having received their orders from their commander, left with trusted friends their last wishes and farewell words to friends and loved ones, in case their desperate venture failed, and received, in return, the messages for home from their beleagured companions, bade farewell to all, and silently crept into the frail vessel that was either to bring relief to their comrades or carry them to their long home. Rations had grown so scant during the siege, which had now lasted ten days, that they took nothing, save their rifles and a few rounds of ammunition, with them; with these they lay down in the boat, pushed it softly into the current and drifted silently down the stream. The darkness was so intense that it was impossible to tell if they were moving even, or if moving, whether or not they were near the shore or in mid-stream. The only chance was to feel, and that very gently, lest a dry branch or rustle of leaves, touched too rudely, should awaken the vigilant foe to their pres ence. Once their hearts almost ceased their pulsations as a sudden stir and sound from the land they had just left made them think for a moment that their attempt had been discovered, but the sudden plunge into the water assured them that it was some animal or loose earth dislodged. “After what seemed almost an eternity, the rocking of the boat and the phosphorescent gleam of the water told them that they had reached the Gulf, and they could scarcely repress a shout of joy over [ 58

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the safe accomplishment of the most difficult portion of their jour ney, but prudence forbade any such ebullition, and they set them selves to the task of unwinding the knotty problem before them. They were in the Gulf, but when did they get into it? North or South of Shell Island? How far were they out? Where was the land and how far off was it? were the questions that rapidly pre sented themselves. After a whispered consultation they determined to paddle ahead and trust to luck. Fortune favored them, and in a short time they heard the steady swash of the waves on the beach, to their right. This showed them that they were not only out of the river but on the right course, and they paddled with desperate energy through the remaining hours of darkness, and as day dawned they had the pleasure of seeing that they had left the river far behind them. Hiding by day, and forced to seek food and travel by night only, they were three weeks making the journey to St. Marks, a distance of only about one hundred and thirty miles. Once there the news spread rapidly, and as Captain Holloman and most of the Company were from Jefferson County, the people felt great personal interest in their situation. The excitement around Tallahassee was intense, and Jefferson and Madison were almost wild with impa tience to fly to the rescue. Young Leigh Reed, afterwards Gen. Leigh Reed, one of the bravest and daring young men of the times, was the leader. Volunteers were abundant, and the dashing leader could pick the best. Daniel Ladd, one of our oldest citizens, fur nished a small steamer and abundant supplies for the relief of the garrison. As quickly as could be the expedition got under way, but, hurry as fast as they could, almost thirty more precious days were consumed ere the rescue could be effected. In the meantime the Indians, ignorant of the escape of any of the garrison, and sure of ultimate triumph by starvation, if nothing else, prosecuted the siege in the most leisurely manner. They made a number of assaults and feints, and several attempts to drive the garrison by fire, but every attempt failed with severe loss to themselves. That they maintained a vigilant watch was conclusively proved by the crack of the rifle and the zip of the savagesÂ’ bullet in answer to every visible move ment on the part of the besieged. These sharp shooters laid two of the gallant fellows low, and death, through starvation and disease, laid his icy fingers on three others. The great danger hovered over the devoted fellows, and it required but little stretch of the imagi nation for them to see him as they received their ration of a dozen grains of corn daily, carefully counted out, to see his fleshless fingers pointing on one side to starvation, on the other, to the quicker and 59 ]

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On the back of the foregoing will was thus endorsed, Vizt: On ye 3d December 1729 came Matthew Stone and Martha Walley, made Oath on the holy Evangelist that they saw Ann Jenkins sign and seal the within Instrument of writing and heard Her Publish and Declare the same to be her Last Will and Testament and that at ye time of her so doing she was off sound and Perfect Memory to the best off their knowledge. Sworne Before S. HANSON, Dy. Comm. WILL OF THOMAS JENKINS of Talbott County. IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN. I, THOMAS JEN KINS of Talbott County in ye province aforesaid, Wheelright, being sick and weak in body but yett of perfect Sence and memory, Blessed be ye Lord for it, and calling to mind ye uncertainty of this life and yt all flesh must yield unto death when it shall please God to call, Doe make this my last Will and Testament, revoking and annulling all and singular all other wills or will, testaments or testament by me made or declared, either by word or writing, and this only to be taken for my last Will and Testament and none other, By these presents First I bequeath my Soul to God yt gave it me and my body to be buried in Christianlike manner at ye dis cretion of my executors hereafter named. And as for my temporal Estate as it hath pleased ye Lord to bestow upon me, I give and bequeath in manner and form following: IMPS. After my just debts are honestly paid I give unto my Eldest son MATTHEW JENKINS one negro name Sambo and one negro woman named Bridgett to his own disposal forever. 2ndly. I give unto my young(est) son WALTER JEN KINS, one negro man called Robin at his own disposal forever. 3dly. I alsoe give unto my son Walter Jenkins one large Lingscutt Chest. I give unto my eldest son one Winscutt Cobbard. 4thly. I give unto my daughter MARGARETT BARNETT one servant woman named Hanna March to her own proper use and behoof forever. 5thly. My will is that all the rest of my personal estate that I have not allready bequeathed be equally divided between my two sons (viz) Matthew and Walter Jenkins for their own proper use and behoof forever. 6thly. I Constitute, Appoint and Ordain my two sons Matthew and Walter Jenkins to be my sole Executors, to see this my last Will and Testament. [ 70

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WILL OF GEORGE JENKINS or Charles County. In the Name of God Amen, I George Jenkins being weake in Body but of sound Judgement and Memory do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament and my Soul I bequeath to my blessed Redeemer, my Body decent Burial to the Earth and as for my Temporal Estate,—I bequeath to my sister Harriett Simms' three sons, Thomas, Edward and Marmaduke, the one third part of my whole Estate after my Just Debts are discharged to be equally divided between them and the three above named, to them and their Heirs forever. I bequeath to my brother John's three sons Thomas, John and Edward, one other third part of my said estate to be equally divided between them and to be paid them when they come of Age by my Executor hereafter to be named, to them and their Heirs forever. I bequeath to my Brother William's three sons Thomas, George and John the other third part of my said estate to be equally divided between them, to them and their Heirs forever. I bequeath to my niece Monica Simpson one Heiffer and Calf to her and her Heirs forever. I bequeath to my Niece Susannah Smith one Heiffer and Calf to her and her Heirs forever. I bequeath to Mary Doing the sum of Five Pounds Common Currency to be paid out of my Estate before the above mentioned division be made. I bequeath to Miss Elizabeth Simpson the sum of Five Pounds the like currency to be paid as above. I bequeath to the daughter of a certain Margaret Gardiner if alive Five Pounds the like currency to be paid by Executor when of age. I appoint my brother William and the above named Thomas Simms joint Executors of this my Last Will and Testament. IN WIT NESS whereof I have hereunto affixed my hand and seal this 21st day of June 1775. GEORGE JENKINS (Seal) Signed, Sealed and Published in the presence of THOMAS SANDERS THOMAS SIMPSON Charles County, Maryland. Will entered for probate August 17th, 1775. [76

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windows are emblems again of the Blessed Sacrament, the Agnus Dei, the Pelican in her Piety, the Vine, the Wheat, the Chalice, and finally a lamp burning as it were, perpetually, in its honor. The two end windows of the aisles are made the memorial windows. In the first, St. Thomas, Apostle, bears his emblem, a carpenters’ square; and St. Margaret, Queen of Scotland, in her royal robe of ermine and crowned, carries about her waist a large purse, by which, and her extended open hand, is indicated her neverfailing charity to the poor. The rich gold and black diapering of her tunic with her national thistle pattern, no less than the ermine fur of her mantle, are beautiful examples of glass painting. The canopy work above is gracefully and ingeniously designed of lilies entwined, and the ruby ground dispersed with a pattern of oak leaves gives the figures a rich setting which, though a subordinate, is by no means the least beautiful part of the composition. In the tracery above is represented the Reposo ” on the way to Egypt, showing the parental care in the Holy Family—this window being a memo rial of the parents of the Founders, whose names appear in the inscription beneath. The corresponding window on the other aisle commemorates the grandparents of the Founders, and the tracery above shows again a Holy Family subject, representing St. Joachim and St. Ann, the grandparents with the Blessed Virgin, mother of the Holy Child. The figures in the main window are St. William of York, Arch bishop of that ancient See, and St. Helen; the former is vested in chasuble and pallium and carries in his left hand his pastoral staff, while the other is uplifted in benediction. St. Helen wdth her hands reverently covered holds the True Cross, towards which her face is instinctively turned. The blue ground in which both figures are set is exquisitely diapered with the English rose, in allusion to the nationality of both saints. The inscription below reads: Near to this memorial, over the entrance to the Baptistry, is the first of five circular windows, each filled with a picture subject from the Gospels. Our Lord is here represented being baptized by St. John in the Jordan; on either side angels are introduced as in ador ation, and holding the sacred garments. Fishes are seen in the stream as symbolizing life-giving or “living water.” The next of this series over the Mortuary or St. Joseph’s Chapel represents the Blessing of Little Children, and is an especially beau tiful composition. Our Blessed Lord is seated on a mound within a wooded garden. Doves, emblems of the simplicity and purity of childhood, flutter around in pretty white contrast wdth the beautiful 95 ]

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to the gallant old warrior, whose estate on the river at Homosassa is altogether most delightful. The programme for the day consisted of a feast unsurpassed hitherto in these regions, of which all partook of with delight, and an address to the old Colonel by Colonel Durm, on behalf of the gathering crowd, and a reply by Colonel Jenkins, who gave in a concise and lucid manner his forty-seven years of experience on the Homosassa River and Hernando territory, includ ing all the everglades in the Seminoles district of the entire West and South Florida. In his remarks Mr. Jenkins referred to his many desperate encounters with the Seminoles, as well as the trials and vicissitudes he underwent in the struggle while in command of the Fourth Florida Regiment in the Rebellion of 1861. But this was not new as many of his old comrades willingly testified. That he was a ‘hard and desperate fighter’ all Floridians knew. “In his concluding words, spoken, Mr. Jenkins became affect edly moved when he referred to his old home in Baltimore—saying: ‘I cannot expect that I will ever visit my old home again, but the memory of my boyhood and my relatives will not, cannot be erased from my mind, my heart still throbs for old Maryland.’ Mr. Jen kins, was by one accord of all, selected for the State Senate, he how ever, declined, giving his reason that he was from age unfit and unable to do his State justice, and that he had already a surfeit of Legislature obligations.”

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"3 S2Cr property of 1 lie Bishops of Richmond DECEMBER 1935

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Mtemoir of Saint Mtaqp’s (Toloa? T is a matter of history that the costume of our forefathers, of Saint Mary’s, during the reign of Charles I, was the most picturesque ever known, and a glimpse of it can be seen today in some of the Jenkins’ family household. The well-kept silver, their venerable dwellings, and furniture in them, are to be seen in some instances. In the days of our ancestors, on their plantations, Tobacco was the great prod uct, and no other was considered marketable. Tobacco was the money of the planter, and, being in great demand, agents, from England, were on hand at all the recognized landings to purchase. For many years, these Tobacco plantations were easily approached by deep water, sufficient for the trading ships from Europe. It was nothing strange to see from twenty to forty vessels lying at the various shores, loading tobacco—then packed in bales. These traders seldom used coin, as the goods brought over were generally needed by the planters, and were exchanged for the tobacco. For years this tranquility predominated, and the people of the Colony were happy and contented, but the dark and stormy cloud, that hung over Wales and England, reached across the sea to the Colony. Soon the rainfall of hatred and bigotry and of envy broke loose over the hitherto happy Colony. Men, who had all along been contented and neighborly, began to assail the only Church, which they knew had been their friend and protector, extending a cherishing care of much that then, as now, contributed to the civilization w$ have greatly glorified. 15 ]

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“Louis William Jenkins, son of T. Courtney Jenkins and Robinia Hillen, of Long Green. Mr. Jenkins, was a lawyer of reputation and an orator of great ability and wonderful eloquence and force. He, on one occasion, served in the State Legislature, and although frequently offered Official positions, invariably refused. He was exceptionally popular with the people and num bered many friends. Official favors were frequently offered him by the President, and, as an incentive, gave him the privilege to choose one, but, as on former occasions, he refused.” “James Wilcox Jenkins, fourth son of William Jenkins, of Oak Hill, was born 1808. Married Margaret Kennedy, of Pennsyl vania, March, 1833. Issue eight children:—Charles Kennedy, Ed ward, Ellen, William Spaulding, Louis De Barth, James Wilcox, Mary Joseph and Thomas Courtney. Mr. Jenkins learned the business of the firm of William Jenkins and Sons—York Road Tannery—which he carried on during life. He was a thorough going business man and held a high place among those engaged in the Leather Trade all over the Town.” “Mark Wilcox Jenkins, was born at Oak Hill, in 1804. Mar ried Ann Maria Jenkins, of Long Green; died 1871. “Mr. Mark Jenkins, was the oldest son of William Jenkins, ‘Oak Hill.’ As soon as Mark Jenkins arrived at the proper age, he was placed in charge of the property of his father, known as ‘Huntington,’ comprising about five acres, on which was an exten sive Tannery. On his father’s death, 1843, he became the sole owner and proprietor, doing a very lucrative trade. He conducted this tannery until his age and infirmities bid him retire. He then, until his death, lived on his Long Green property, ‘Hillen Dale.’ Issue:—John W., Bettie Hillen, Nellie, William and Michael Hillen.” “Edmund Plowden Jenkins, was born, 1844, in Charles County. Married Martha Lee Jenkins; died, July 7, 1896. “He was the son of the late Senator from Charles County, and a grandson of Judge John J. Jenkins, both of whom were prominent men, and served their Country with distinguished credit for gen erations. Never was a son worthier. He was a man of absolute integrity, true to his trust, great or small; intellectual, modest, vir tuous, and a thorough gentleman. He was, for twenty-five (25) years, paymaster of the B. & O. Railroad, and a devoted officer in the service from boyhood. During the administration of his office, it is enough to say that he disbursed one hundred and twenty mil lions of dollars without the loss of a penny, or the loss of an hour in rendering his accounts.” [ 30

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MRS MICHAEL JENKINS, nee Isabella Plowden Jenkins

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He was in many desperate encounters with the savages during the campaign of 1836-8. Mr. Jenkins was a member of the first Legislature, 1852, and re-elected for four terms, of two years each. He was appointed the Government Timber Agent, and held this position eight years. He was re-elected to the Legislature in 1861, and also under the Con federacy, in 1863. He organized the first railroad ever seen in Florida. In the Civil war, he served as Captain, and after as Colonel of the Fourth Florida Regiment, doing duty on the West coast of Florida. His Regiment, after one year, was reduced in number to a mere squad, and was, with himself, taken prisoner near Newnanville. Colonel Jenkins, after capture, was sent first, to Taylor, then to Fort Lafayette, and tried by a Court Martial, and condemned to death. Through the influence of a Baltimore lady, the wife of an Union Officer, he was committed to imprisonment at Fort Warren, Boston, for life. After twenty-six months in prison, he was liber ated. He returned to Florida, stopping on his way in Baltimore with his relations and friends. On his arrival in Florida, almost penniless, he was appointed Surveyor of Hernando County, and served as Surveyor for ten years or more. He purchased and set tled on a large tract of land on the Crystal River, where he had a large and productive orange grove and a fine farm, to the end of his days. He left a wife and three children, who reside on the place near Homosassa, Florida. Henry Jenkins, eldest son of Thomas Jenkins, of Cob Neck, was born in Charles County, October 31, 1781. He married Ann Harrison, in 1809. He died in 1869. Henry Jenkins conducted, for many years, the hat, cap and fur rier business, corner of Baltimore and Calvert Streets. Issue, four children:—Margaret, Elizabeth, Anastasia and Thomas P. Jenkins. Margaret became a religious, and was Superior of a Convent at Brooklyn. Elizabeth married Samuel Brown, of Howard County. Anastasia married Charles Wood, of Richmond, Va., and Thomas P. married E. M. De Ronceray, of Baltimore. Louis A. Jenkins, son of Thomas Jenkins, of Cob Neck, Charles County, was born on his father’s estate “Walston,” and married Mary Boarman, of Charles County. Louis Jenkins received his education at Georgetown College, and soon after entered into business as a commission merchant on Light Street, Baltimore, with success. He was a very popular man [40

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MICHAEL JENKINS, Son of Thomas Courtney and Louisa Carrell Jenkins

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CHURCH OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST FRONT ROYAL, VA.

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TABLET IN CHURCH OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST FRONT ROYAL, VA.

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Reminiscences Colonel Jenkins of Florida. NY neglect of our Forefather’s early history can only be compared to a want of a genuine pride of birth and place, and its beginnings. If we have no love for our ancestry, we surely can have but little for our country. It is no egotism, but simply truth to assert that no other one of his name affords a picture more absorbing in manly deeds of daring—if fairly written—than C. T. Jenkins, of Florida, who was one of the original settlers of Hernando County, and a resident for Fifty-four (54) years. The following reminiscences were written by Mr. Jenkins, sev eral years ago, and among others were published in “Florida Crescent:” “Hernando has a history rich in fact and romantic in incident, and one claiming a pen far abler than mine to picture to you the midnight attack or deadly ambuscade of the hidden red foe who lurked in every swamp and hammock in the country; of the rough struggles and many privations of the hardy pioneer, who, with liter ally rifle in one hand and plow handle or hoe in the other, kept the savage at bay while he cultivated the corn and potatoes that were to feed his little ones, what I shall say in these articles shall be facts from history, but history must have a foundation on which to rest, so I will proceed to locate Hernando historically. “Hernando County was originally a part of Alachua County, or Alachua Plains, which embraced the present Counties of Ala chua, Levy, Marion, Sumter and Hernando. 53 ]

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whereon I now live containing one hundred and fifty acres of land called by the name of Lynsie. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my daughter Ann Spauld ing and her heirs forever, one hundred acres of land called St. Thomases. ITEM: I give unto Mr. Peter Attwood one thousand pounds of Tobacco, or his successors. I give unto my granddaughter Sarah Simpson my negro woman Mary, to her and her assignes. I give unto Elizabeth Winsor five hundred pounds of Tobacco, to her and her assignes. I give unto my son George Jenkins after my wife Ann Jenkins decease, my negro man Thomas, to him and his assignes. I give unto my son George Jenkins after my wife Ann Jenkins decease, two sixth parts of my personal Estate exclusive of my said wifes thirds. I give unto my sons and daughters after my said wife’s decease, Viz.: Edward Jenkins William Jenkins, Elizabeth Edlen, Ann Spaulding the remainder of my personal Estate exclusive of my wifes thirds. I give unto my daughter Mary Norris five shilling sterling in full barr of any further claim of any part of my Estate, constituting, ordaining and appointing my loving wife Ann Jenkins and my son George Jenkins my whole and sole Executrix and Executor of this my last Will and Testament as WITNESS of my hand and seal this First day of November 1726. Thomas Jenkins Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said Thomas Jenkins to be his last Will and Testament before us— Will Chandler Patrick Boyle Martha Waldy Att the foot of the foregoing will was thus written, Viz: Charles County October 31, 1727. Then came William Chandler and Martha Waldy and made oath on the Holy Evan gelist that they saw Thomas Jenkins sign and seal the within instru ment of writing and heard him publish and declare the same to be his last Will and Testament and that at the time of his so doing he was of sound and perfect memory to the best of their judgment and [ 68

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they likewise declare that Patrick Boyle was present at the same time and subscribed as a witness. Swo 11 :: before S. Hanson, Dy. Com. WILL OF ANN JENKINS of Charles County. In the Name off God amen, I Ann Jenkins off Charles County, being sick and weake of body but off sound and perfect sence and memery, thanks be to Almighty God for which, I doe make and ordain this my last Will and Testament making void all other Wills by me made heretofore. First I recommend my Soul into the hands of Almighty God hoping through the death and passion off our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ to have eternal Salvation, and my body to the Earth to be decently buried at the discretion off my Executors hereafter named. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my well beloved friend Elizabeth Windsor, one ffeather bed whereon she lies in, with the furniture thereunto belonging and one chest which usually stands in Betty Windsors roome as also one horse to Elizabeth Windsor which Mr. Robert Deyne has in his possession a breaking, as also I give to Elizabeth Windsor the one half of my wearing apparel. ITEM: I give the remaining part of my wearing apparel to my well beloved daughter Mary Norris. Memorandum: The things above mentioned given to Eliza beth Windsor with her own wearing apparel not mentioned is in full satisfaction of all debts, dues and demands agnt. my Executors hereafter mentioned. LASTLY: I nominate and appoint my two sons Edward and William Jenkins, jointly my whole Executors off this my last Will and Testament giving to them, their heirs, executors or adminis trators all and singular the rights and credits belonging to me in any kind whatsoever to be equally devideed between them after my debts and legacies are complied with. IN WITNESS whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seale this twenty fifth day off June Anno Dominie One thousand seven hundred twenty and nine. Witnesses: Mattw. Stone Martha Waldy Ann Jenkins 69]

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7thly. And further my will is that my Son-in-law THOMAS BARNETT have ye bringing up of my son Walter Jenkins till he come to ye age of Sixteen years, and yt my said Son-in-law Thomas Barnett have ye management of my said son Walter, his part, untill he comes to ye aforesaid age of Sixteen years, and then to deliver the said part of my estate to my said son Walter into his own pos session. IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have sett my hand and seal this 22d day of Aprill Anno 1719. THOMAS JENKINS Signed, sealed & delivered to be my last will and Testament in the presence of WM. THOMAS, THOMAS BARNETT and HOWELL POWELL. The aforesaid will was thus endorsed: 19th of May 1719. Then came Thomas Barnett and Wm. Thomas, also Howell Powell, subscribing evidences and made oathe, &c, &c. WILL OF WILLIAM JENKINS of St. Mary's County. In the Name of God Amen, I William Jenkins of St. Mary's County in the Province of Maryland, being in HEALTH and sound Judgement, thanks be to Almighty God, do make my Last Will and Testament in manner and form following, and FIRST I recommend my Soul to God hoping for eternal Salvation through the Merits of his Blessed Son Jesus Christ my Savior, my body to be Decently InterrÂ’d without Pomp by my Executor Hereafter mentioned. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my Loving Wife Mary Jenkins a Tract of Land Called Tuesdays Work, containing twenty four acres during her natural life and after her decease to my son Ignatius Jenkins and his Heirs forever. ITEM: I give and bequeath to my son Henry Jenkins, One Hundred and fifteen acres, part of a tract called Salem to him and his Heirs forever, beginning at the Beginning Tree running with the two first Lines until a parallel Line drawn with the given Line will contain said number of acres of land called Salem. ITEM: I give and be queath unto my son William Jenkins all the remaining part of said tract of Land called Salem, and his Heirs forever. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son Ignatius Jenkins, One hundred acres of Land, part of a Tract called St. Thomases, and One Hundred acres of Land, part of a Tract called Truth and Trust where Elizb. White formerly lived, and his Heirs forever. 71]

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WILL OF WILLIAM JENKINS of Baltimore County. In the Name of God, Amen, I WILLIAM JENKINS of Baltimore Co. in the Province of Maryland, Planter, being sick and weak but of sound and perfect memory, thanks be to Almighty God, and knowing the uncertainty of this transitory World, Doe make and Ordain this to be my Last Will and Testament in Manner and Form as followeth. FIRST I bequeath my Soul unto God that gave it me and to Jesus Christ who redeemed it and to the Holy Ghost who sanctified it, hoping that through the meritorious Death and Passion of Jesus Christ my Savior and Redeemer, to receive full pardon and foregiveness for all my sins. As for my Body, It to be buried in Chris tian Burial at the discretion of my Executrix hereafter mentioned. And as touching such worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased Almighty God to bless me in this life, I give, devise and dispose of the same in ye following manner and form. Imprimis: I give and bequeath unto my son William Jenkins Fifty acres of land with the houses and improvements made on it, being a piece of land out of a tract of land called Freelands Mount, after his mother Sarah Jen kins decease, and I doe likewise give him all my wearing clothes and a horse called Blaze. Item: I give and bequeath unto my son Francis Jenkins Five pounds currency to be delivered him at the day of marriage. Item: I give and bequeath unto my son Thomas Jenkins, Five pounds currency to be paid him at the day of mar riage. Item: I give and bequeath unto my daughter Sarah Jenkins, Five pounds currency to be paid her at the day of marriage. Item: I give and bequeath unto my daughter Alice Jenkins Five pounds currency to be paid her at the day of marriage: Item: I give and bequeath unto the child as my beloved wife Sarah Jenkins now goes with, Five pounds currency to be paid him or her at the day of mar riage. Item: And as for the rest of my Estate I doe leave it all to be at my beloved wife Sarah JenkinsÂ’ disposal. Lastly I doe make and ordain my beloved wife Sarah Jenkins, my sole Executrix of this my Last Will and Testament, revoking all other wills and testa ments heretofore made by me. IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto sett my hand and seale this 22d day of November Anno Dom. 1720. WILLIAM JENKINS Signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of Thomas John son, John Duley, James Craford and Thomas Knight. PROVED May 2d 1721. 77 ]

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WILL OF THOMAS JENKINS of St. Mary's County. In the Name of God Amen, ye twenty second day of Novem ber, Seventeen hundred and Sixty, I Thomas Jenkins of St. Marys County ye Province afsÂ’d, Planter, being of perfect mind and mem ory thanks be given unto Almighty God therefor, calling unto mind ye mortallity of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die Doe make and ordain this my Last Will and Testa ment, that is to say principally and first of all I give and recommend my soul into ye hands of God who gave it me, and my body I recom mend unto ye earth to be buried in a decent and Christian burial at ye discretion of my Executors nothing doubting but that at ye Gen erali Resurrection I shall receive it again by ye Mighty Power of God, And as touching such worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give, devise and dispose of ye same in ye manner and form following: IMPRIMIS I give and bequeath unto my loving son William Jenkins One Hundred acres of land lying near ye Bay side, known by ye name of Edenborough, to him and ye Heirs of his body lawfully begotten forever, and if it so William Jenkins should die without lawfull issue, then ye said One Hundred'Acres of Land to fall to my loving son Thomas Jen kins and ye heirs of his body lawfully begotten forever, and in case my son Thomas Jenkins should die without lawfull issue, that then ye said (land) to be divided equally between my loving daughters Jean, Eleanor and Elizabeth Jenkins, to them and ye heirs of their Bodys Lawfully begotten forever, And in case of ye said daugh ters, Jean, Eleanor and Elizabeth Jenkins, should die without any lawfull issue, that then ye land aforementioned to fall to ye Ann White and ye heirs of her Body lawfully begotten forever. Item: I give and bequeath unto my loving son William Jen kins One new feather bed and furniture, One large iron Pot that holds ten gallons, one pair Pothooks and one iron Bunning Petrack, one large iron Pestil, one large iron Spit, one young horse of three years old or Mare and Thirty Shillings to buy a Bridle and Saddle, ye aforesaid horse to be delivered to ye aforesaid William Jenkins when he arrives to ye age of Eighteen years, Also my desire is that my son William Jenkins be at age when he arrives to ye years of Eighteen. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my loving son Thomas Jenkins, One Hundred acres of land known by ye name of Poplar Point to him and the heirs of his body lawfully begotten for ever. And in case ye said Thomas Jenkins should die without lawfull issue, that then ye said land to fall to my daughters, Vizt: Jean, [ 78

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Eleanor and Elizabeth Jenkins to them and their heirs forever. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my loving son Thomas Jenkins, One new feather bed and furniture, one Iron Pot and Hooks, One Iron Spit, and Iron Running Potrack, One Iron Pestil and one young Horse or mare of three Pounds ten shillings value and Thirty Shillings to buy Bridle and Saddle with, ye horse or mare to be delivered to him at ye age of Eighteen years. ITEM: I will and ordain that ye rest of ye land willed to my son Thomas Jenkins be applied towards schooling him four years. ITEM: I will and ordain that my two sons aforementioned, William and Thomas Jen kins, be at age when they arrive at Eighteen years but not inherit ye land untill they arrive to Twenty-one years and that my Son William Jenkins see that there be no waste nor sale of any timber growing on ye said lands, untill he shall arrive at full age. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my loving daughter Jean Jenkins One feather bed and furniture, one Iron Pot and Hooks, One gold Ring ye Posey, Friends Gift, to be delivered to her at ye age of sixteen years or day of marriage and Twenty Shillings Sterling to be applied for her schooling. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my loving daughter Eleanor Jenkins one new feather bed and furniture, One Iron Pot and Hooks and Five Pounds Sterling and Twenty Shil lings to be applied for her schooling. Ye aforesaid effects to be delivered to her at ye age of Sixteen years or day of marriage. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my loving daughter Elizabeth Jenkins, One new feather bed and furniture, One Iron Pot and Hooks and Twenty Shillings sterling to be applied to ye use of her schooling also Five Pounds Sterling, to be delivered her at ye age of Sixteen years or day of marriage. ITEM: My will and desire is that my loving daughter Eleanor Jenkins shall have my negro boy named Ignatius, to her and her heirs forever, and to be delivered to her at ye age of Sixteen years or day of marriage, also my desire is that ye aforesaid negro be in ye care of my wife and my son William, untill she comes of age. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my loving daughter Elizabeth Jenkins my negro boy named Tob, to her and heir heirs forever, and to be delivered to her at ye age of Sixteen years or day of marriage, also my desire is that ye said negro be in ye care of my wife and my son William until she comes of age. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my loving son William Jenkins two negros, Vizt. Prince and Dinah, resurving from ye increase of ye Wench ye first two children she bears that live to six months old. My desire is that my daughter Jean shall have ye first child that arrives to ye age afsd. also my desire is that my son Thomas Jenkins 79 ]

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find ten shillings sterling per acre for the above said land to help pay my debts, then he may take the land. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son John Jenkins all the remaining part of my land lately bought of Col. Barns and lying on the Bay side, to him and his heirs forever. Also one other tract of leased land called Deer Park and all my part of a tract of leased land called Vaughns Hills to him and his heirs forever, after his mothers death. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my loving wife Mary Jenkins during her natural life my house and plantation whereon I now live with all my part of a tract of land called Truth and Trust. ITEM : I give and bequeath unto my son Edmond Courtney Jenkins after his mothers death my house and plantation whereon I now live with all my part of a tract of land called Truth and Trust; and also all the remaining part of a tract of land called St. Thomas’s, but if the said Edmond should die and leave no Heir of his body lawfully begot ten, then it is my will that my son John Jenkins and his heirs shall have all the said lands forever. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son Augustine Jenkins, Three pounds sterling. ITEM: I give and bequeath the remaining part of my Estate to be equally divided between my wife and my two sons John Jenkins and Edmond Court ney Jenkins. Lastly I constitute, appoint and ordain my loving wife Mary Jenkins and my son John Jenkins my lawfull and sole Execu tors of this my last Will and Testament IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seale this Thirty-first Day of October One thousand seven hundred and sev enty-four. JOSEPH JENKINS Signed, Sealed and delivered in the presence of us— Joseph Millard Mary Ann Hagar Edward Warren PROVED January 3d 1775. WILL OF WILLIAM JENKINS of St. Mary's County. In the name of God, Amen, this ninth Day of September in the year of our Lord, One thousand Seven hundred, Seventy and five, I, WILLIAM JENKINS of St. Marys County in the Province of Maryland, Planter, being sick and weake of Body but of perfect, sound and well disposing memory, thanks be given unto Almighty 83 ]

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God therefor, calling to mind the mortality of my Body and know ing that it is appointed for all men once to die, Doe make and ordain this my last Will and Testament. And first of all I give and recom mend my soul into the hands of Almighty God and my body I rec ommend to the Earth to be buried in decent Christian burial at the discretion of my Executor hereafter mentioned. And as touching such worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give devise and dispose of the same in manner and form following: IMPRIMIS: I give and bequeath unto my son Thomas Jenkins all my lands and improvements to him and the heirs of his body lawfully begotten forever, and in case my said son Thomas Jenkins should die without lawful issue, that then the said land to fall to my daughter Mary Jenkins and her lawful issue forever, for want of which it shall fall to my brother Thomas Jenkins and his heirs. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my daughter Mary Jen kins the three following negros, vizt: Dinah, Suk and Agness, and all the increase that they shall ever bear after the date hereof. And all the Rest of my estate, if any after my just debts are paid, to be equally divided between my two children, Mary and Thomas Jen kins and their heirs forever, excepting provisions hereafter men tioned. My desire is that if my Mother be left in a desolate widow state that ten pounds of my estate be applied towards her assistance. My will and desire further is that all the cloth my family can get spun and wove out of the wool cotton and flax between this and the first day of January next be applied to the familys use and not be appraised in my estate. My desire is that my family live up upon my living until the first day of January at which time it is my desire that all my estate then remaining be appraised, Provision and every thing else, excepting my crop of Tobacco, which I should be glad to be kept out untill a Markett that there may be nobody looser. Lastly I constitute and appoint my well beloved wife Brittannia Jenkins whole and sole executrix of this my last Will and Testament IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seale the day and year first above written. WILLIAM JENKINS, Junr. Signed, Sealed and delivered in the presence of us— PHILIP EVANS JOHN EVANS ANN EVANS Proved April 17th 1776. [ 84

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WILL OF WILLIAM JENKINS of Baltimore County, Probated. David M. Perine, “Registar.” In the name of God, Amen. I, WILLIAM JENKINS of Baltimore County, State of Maryland, being in good health, both of body and mind, do make and declare this to be my last WILL and TESTAMENT. I will and bequeath to my daughter, MARY ANN KENNEDY, all the household effects, plate and house ser vants now in “Oak Hill” and also all right to Pew No. 64 in the Cathedral, to her and assigns forever. To my sister, ELIZABETH WELSH, the sum of sixty dollars per year in half yearly payments during her life. To the Arch Bishop of Baltimore, the sum of five hundred dol lars to help erect Calvert Hall provided a cast of Lord Baltimore and Father White, S. J., be placed in front. To the Carmelite Con vent, one hundred dollars for prayers. St. Mary’s Female Orphan Asylum, one hundred dollars. St. Vincent’s Male Orphan Asylum, one hundred dollars. After payments of all just debts against me at death and funeral expenses, I order my estate to be divided in six equal parts for my daughter and sons. My Oak Hill property to be given to my daugh ter, M. A. KENNEDY, with water rights reserved to my son, JAMES, as will be seen further valued at $11,000.00. To my son, THOMAS C., Five acres of land W. S. of York road to Sadler’s lane, val. $2,000. To my son, MARK W., my tan yard, HUNT INGTON & Mt. Charity, val. $10,000. To my son, EDWARD, Five acres adjoining that of THOMAS C., val., $2,500. To my son, JAMES W., my Oak Hill tannery and “MICHALIA LOT” with water rights reserved in Oak Hill property, val., $15,000. To my son, JOSEPH W., Five acres S. S. of lot of THOMAS C., val. $2,000. I also give to my daughter, MARY ANN and my sons, MARK and EDWARD, my interest in store S. S. of Water St. & Franklin Lane, val. $5,000, equally, as also my warehouse, Guilford St. & Franklin Lane, val., $1,200. I appoint my sons, THOMAS C., & MARK W., and my sonin-law, WILLIAM KENNEDY, Executors of my estate, impowering them to do as they think best for settlement of same. It is my wish that no appraisement be made and that my Executors give bond 87 ]

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with that weapon they went forth and established empires for their Master which exist to this day. Each one of the most powerful empires of the past has faded, and whilst thousands and millions have this morning bent the knee in honor of Jesus Christ, there is none so poor to-day as to do reverence to a Caesar or an Alexander. Within this church will be preached that Gospel that tamed the savage nature of man and that has converted the fiercest barbarian of the North into the gentle and humane Christian. The Goths and the Vandals and the Visigoths rushed down from the North and invaded the fairest portions of Italy and dismembered the Roman Empire; but they were conquered in turn by submitting to the sweet yoke of the Gospel that shall be preached here. It is a remarkable fact, my dear friends, that the most striking, the most majestic style of architecture, the Gothic architecture, which shall be adopted in the construction of this church is derived from the Goths, who after their conversion, reproduced in stone and in marble the tall columns and towering arches of their native forests. Within this temple, my friends, no politics shall ever be preached but what shall conduce to the welfare of society and of man. Jesus Christ, yesterday and to-day and the same forever. Jesus Christ and Him crucified. The same Gospel that our Divine Saviour preached upon the Mount; that is the only Gospel you will hear from the pastors of this church. The same holy lessons of morality that Peter preached in Rome, that Paul preached in Athens, that James preached in Jerusalem, that John preached in Ephesus, the same Gospel that St. Austin preached in Hippo, that Remigius preached in France, that Patrick preached in Ireland, that Augustine preached in England, the same Gospel of civil and of religious liberty that was planted on the shores of the Chesapeake two hundred and fifty years ago by Lord Baltimore and his band of Jesuit Missionaries—that is the same Gospel of liberty, civil and religious, that shall be preached from the pulpit of this church. Now, my brethren, let your imagination in its highest flights and in its broadest range conceive the number of children that year after year will be regenerated in the waters of baptism in this church; contemplate the number of youths of both sexes that will be strengthened by the grace of the sacrament of Confirmation; con sider the number of souls that will be strengthened and nourished in this temple by the Holy Sacrament of the Eucharist; and picture to yourselves the number of times that the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass will be offered within these walls; contemplate the long line of penitents coming to this church to receive pardon and absolution 99 ]

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THE CHAPEL AT LLEWELLYN

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The Jenkins Family of Maryland

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preface EFORE I commence to write up my reminis cences—written some years ago and published in the Baltimore American—it occurred to me that I would make an effort to include something about my ancestors, commencing with Ap. Thomas Jenkins, the original of the long line, who at that name came to America and of whom I claim to be a descendant. It never occurred to me how difficult such a task, and how hard it is, when undertaken, and what patience one must possess. It is a common inheritance we all have of boasting of the number of our ancestors, but few seem to be aware of the grounds they have for this vanity, except traditionally. It surely never occurs to most, that there is little or nothing one can rely upon that can be found recorded, for in most of our County records very little mention is to be found of family records; in some, especially that of births, marriages, or deaths. These were only to be seen in families alone, and are exceedingly scarce at this period. If one will take the trouble to count back for even one hun dred years, in a direct line, he will be astonished to see the result— First, you have two — father and mother; next step, you have four—two grandfathers and two grandmothers; each of these has a father and mother; so you have four great-grandfathers and four great-grandmothers. Each of these, again, has two parents, so that, at the fourth generation back, you have sixteen ancestors; at the fifth, you have thirty-two; at the sixth, you have sixty-four; at the seventh, you have one hundred and twenty-eight. 7 ]

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A list of emigrants from Saint Mary’s Colony, who departed to find other locations more in accordance with their religious con victions, were from the Jenkins family, as follows: Philip Jenkins, Francis Jenkins, Marc Jenkins, James Jenkins, Howell Jenkins, Morgan Jenkins, Stephens Jenkins, Mathiew Jenkins, Richard Jenkins, and William Jenkins. Some of these immigrated from Wales, in 1670, and until 1680. They were brought over under the protection of Sir Leolini Jenkins’ Agency. Most of them located on the border of Pennsyl vania, some few located in Kentucky, and established a Colony near Bordenstown, where a number of their descendants are now known, all of them holding on to their religious sentiments. In 1658, Josiah Fendall, Governor:—A commission was issued to Captain Christopher Russell, to be Captain of a Company, in Charles County, late under Captain John Jenkins. This displeasure is in consequence of said Jenkins’ refusal to take the oath imposed upon all who hold positions under the penal laws in force. Captain John Jenkins, a year after, 1659, with his family of two sons and one daughter, moved to “Carter’s Inheritance,” in Prince George County, and was one of the pioneers of his name in that County, now containing many influential and worthy members of the original Jenkins family. Ap. Thomas Jenkins (original), son of William Jason Jen kins, was born 1645. “Jason” was the only brother of Sir Leolini Jenkins, who was the Secretary of the British Admiralty, Fleet Street, London. Jason Jenkins, when about eighteen years of age, was appointed by the Admiralty, an Ensign, in the Royal Navy. He first served under Admiral Robert Holmes, Knight, and was on the Admiral’s ship, “Hector,” when the British Fleet aided in expelling the Dutch Governor of New Amsterdam (New York) in 1665. Ensign Jenkins was also in the great Naval battle with the Dutch Fleet in the English Channel, against De Ruter, in 1669, in which the English Fleet, under the Duke of Albemarle, won the most memorable victory then known in history. From this authenticated information, all else is conjecture or tradition. It is said by some of our name that he “became offended, grossly, by his brother officers, because he refused to take the prof fered oath to renounce his religious convictions, and subsequently resigned, and went to Spain. Once in Spain, he soon became a [12

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favorite, and was in a position in the Spanish Navy. It is said he was an officer of high rank and a valuable one.” Although efforts have been made to trace his career, there never was any reliable information learned, but it is certain that he never was in Maryland, as some suppose. It is conceded that in the United States, most family lines do not go back earlier than the year 1700. It is fortunate that in Maryland, on both the Eastern and Western shores of the State, there are many family records to be found of interest. Among them are several in relation to the genealogy of Thomas Jenkins, the original, whose ancestors came over with the first two hundred. “COPY 1. “November 15 th, 1670. Thomas Jenkins, of Charles County, came, and proved right to one hundred acres of land for his transportation of himself and Ann, his wife, unto this Province, to inhabit in anno, 1670. Warrent then is sued in the name of the said Thomas Jenkins for one hundred acres of land, it being due him for the con sideration mentioned.” Among the Records found in the Record Office, Annapolis, some few are Last Wills and Testaments in manner and form fol lowing, but in brief detail, are first: “Thomas Jenkins, who bequeaths to his son George, his plantation; his son William, one hundred acres of land; to his only daughter, one hundred acres of land, and one thousand pounds of tobacco. He gives to his wife, Ann Spaulding, one entire third of all his pos sessions.” Witnessed by, William Chandler, P. Boyle, M. Waldy, and proven by Esquire S. Hanson, Dy. Com. The date 1706. The Wills of William Jenkins, Michael Jenkins, Josiah Jenkins and Jason Jenkins, are found recorded. Thomas Jenkins was, at the time of his immigration, probably, about twenty-five years of age, and soon after married Ann Spauld ing. In 1680, he is in possession of a tract of land called “Popular Point,” containing 100 acres. Later, in 1682, he obtained warrants for the following tracts, in Charles County: “Lyndsie,” 150 acres; “Saint Thomas,” 150 acres; “Pye Nardshift,” 325 acres; all of which he purchased from Charles Pye. 13]

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cause of America, and when the time came, there was no faltering, no division. Every Catholic in the Country was a Whig. There were no Catholic Tories.” The present State House was only completed in the year 1697, in the Ninth year of William III., and for this reason, the most valuable papers of the Colony, prior to 1697, never found a place in its archives. No official record was ever made of the arrival of immigrants prior to 1820, or none has ever been discovered filed or recorded. It is well known that the Negro slaves were about nineteen, per cent of the population, prior to 1800. But no record of the Negro, except in cases of traffic, or where mentioned in testamentary Wills, when given their freedom, for example:—Joseph Jenkins, a large land owner of Saint Mary’s County, in his Will, dated 1709, said: “I give liberty to, and hereby set free, emancipate, all my Negros, without exception.” Every Catholic Jenkins who came over to the Colony of Mary land, from the beginning, at the instance of Sir Lionel Jenkins, the Secretary and friend of the Lord’s Barons, of Baltimore, were Welshmen. The Jenkins, who came over from Devonshire, Eng land, were Protestants, and Englishmen—none of them settled in Saint Mary’s or Charles. Records prove that they located in Kent, Dorchester and Somerset Counties principally. During the struggle for independence, many of these left for more congenial locations. It has been frequently asked: “Why is it that we see no Welsh landmarks, or names of villages, or even of plantations?” Simply for the reason, the settlers were more Catholic than Welsh. In the year 1667, the civil and religious privileges enjoyed by the people of the Colony became known. Catholics, as well as others, from abroad, sought an asylum in St. Mary’s, and were given the rights of citizenship, had the effect of introducing some French, Spanish and Bohemians into the colony, many of them bringing their families, and, in some instances, their chaplains, who at once became Missionaries, going about performing the rites of the Church, when needed. It was 1669, when two additional lay brothers, or coadjutors, Members of the Society of Jesus, aimed to assist these already in the Colony, and who, for a few years, remained in the little settle ment of Saint Mary’s, and it was one of these priests who married, in 1669, Ap. Thomas Jenkins to Ann Spaulding. The marriages recorded, and found in possession of some of the family name, and Letters Testamentary in Deeds and Wills, officially recorded, for 19 ]

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the first hundred years, or rather, from the year 1649 until 1748, may prove to be interesting reading by the present generation of the Jenkins family. Since 1748, there has been little or no difficulty to ascertain information in any of the several Courts of the State, if desired. For this reason, and the fact of their great number, it might prove monotonous. The first marriage, on this Continent, of any of the Jenkins (Catholic) family, was that of Ap. Thomas Jenkins, to Miss Ann Spaulding, at Saint Mary’s, by Father Altham, S. J., in the year of 1669. This was followed by Michael Jenkins, in 1670, who mar ried Miss Jane White, both of Saint Mary’s Colony. It is proposed here only to give the names of the families inter married, during the hundred years, in the Colony of Saint Mary’s and Charles. In several instances there were two and three mar riages of the same family name: Edelin, Courtney, Neale, Wheeler, Gardiner, Plowden, Norris, Calvert, Coombs, Simpsons, Gould, Taney, Boarman, Pye, Lancaster, Cory, Hager, Hemmersley, Mitchell, Fenwick, Semmes. During the year of 1754, when the Catholics, of Saint Mary’s and Charles, were required to pay taxes on their lands, double the amount exacted from other religious sects, many of the Catholic residents, to protect themselves from this offensive order, left for other locations, where a full liberty of conscience prevailed. Hap pily all oppression of this character, in latter days, a revolutionary change, has silently been affected among the various sects of the present century. It was during this unjustifiable and discordant tax imposed upon the Catholic Church, that many of the Jenkins family emi grated elsewhere, so that it is near impossible to trace them. George Jenkins, son of Ap. Thomas Jenkins, was born 1675, he married Susannah Gardiner, and located in Prince George County. He died, intestate, in 1727. His wife died in Charles County, 1763. In her Will, she mentions four children :—George, John, and William, and Henrietta who married Marmaduke Semmes, of Charles County. [ 20

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and it appears, from a letter in the archives, that at Easter, 1787, he had one thousand and forty-nine communicants. He died Feb ruary 2, 1800, aged 58 years. Francis Jenkins, S. J., and Charles Jenkins, S. J., were of Saint Mary’s County. In addition to these herein mentioned, are T. Meredeth Jenkins, Priest, and Oliver Jenkins, Priest, of Baltimore.” “Michael Jenkins, grandson of Ap. Thomas Jenkins, was born 1736, in St. Mary’s County. In 1761, he married Charity Wheeler, of Harford County, she was the daughter of Thomas Wheeler, High Sheriff of Harford County, 1773. M. Jenkins died, 1802, in Baltimore County, Long Green. The homestead was known as ‘Pye’s’ or ‘Purchase,’ a select tract of about one hundred acres of Long Green valley. He was the owner of a number of Land Patents in St. Mary’s, some of them being in possession of his descendants. ‘Homewood,’ ‘Saint Giles,’ ‘Two Brothers,’ and ‘Hearts Delight,’ are of them.” “Edward Jenkins, son of William, ‘Oak Hill,’ third son, was born 1806, married Julianna Elder, of Baltimore, May, 1829. Issue of children:—Mark, Paul, James, Elizabeth, Edward, Court ney and Helena.” “Joseph W. Jenkins, son of William, ‘Oak Hill,’ sixth son, was born March, 1814, married Mary Hawkins, of Philadelphia. Issue of six children:—Gertrude, Fielding Lucas, William F., Matilda, Joseph and William.” “Edward Jenkins, the first son of Ap. Thomas Jenkins, born 1666, married Annie Gardiner (of Clement Gardiner), 1669. Issue eleven children:—John, Clement, Henry, Thomas, Catharine, Ignatius, Richard, Felix and John the second, died 1699, and two who died infants.” “Edward Jenkins, son of Thomas and brother of William, Henry, Thomas Courtney, Michael, Ignatius, Joseph, Jane and Mary. He was born 1680, married Mary Ann Simpson, died 1753. He was a large land holder, and resided on a plantation known as ‘Pye’s Hardshift.’ He owned an immense number of slaves. In 1723, he purchased 22; acres in Charles County. In 1740, in com pany with Captain Milburne and other young men, the following members of the Jenkins family emigrated to the West, and located in Kentucky, and have many descendants now living in that State, namely:—David, George, Francis, Enoch. Edward Jenkins, in 1:738, purchased three hundred and thirty-three acres, and in 1740, two hundred and forty-nine acres, immediately adjoining his origi nal tract, known as the ‘Maize.’ He left at his death eight children.” [26

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Mlic^ael ((Tourttte?) "Jenkins ICHAEL JENKINS was bom in Baltimore City at No. 608 North Calvert Street, one of the houses known as Waterloo Row, on the 27th of December, Saint JohnÂ’s Day, in the year 1842. Waterloo Row was situated at what was then the extreme northern end of Baltimore, adjacent to Belvedere, the estate and residence of General John Eager Howard. He is the youngest son of Thomas Courtney Jenkins and his wife Louisa Carrell of Philadelphia, who was the daughter of John Carrell and Judith Moore. He was educated at the Misses CotringerÂ’s School and Joseph ClarkÂ’s Academy. He entered Mount Saint MaryÂ’s College in 1856 and graduated there in 1862. On October 4th, 1866, Mr. Jenkins married Mary Isabelle Plowden Jenkins, daughter of Austin Jenkins and Mary Anne Plowden Jenkins. Mr. Jenkins entered the firm of Jenkins Brothers on leaving college, and on the death of his father on December 24th, 1881, he became prominently interested in railroad and transportation affairs and succeeded Mr. George Appold as President of the Merchants and Miners Transportation Company. On the death of Mr. B. F. Newcomer on March 31st, 1901, he was urged to take the Presidency of the Safe Deposit and Trust Com pany, which he did and still occupies that office. Mr. Michael Jenkins is one of BaltimoreÂ’s leading financiers and business men, and has often been solicited to take public office, but his retiring and modest nature has always kept him out of political affairs. Mr. Jenkins is very prominent in the Catholic Church, and is both a charitable and useful citizen and a most highly respected and beloved man.

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J CARRELL JENKINS, Son of Thomas Courtney and Louisa Carrell Jenkins

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the same I cannot tell. Our Ouithlacoochee rises in Polk and Sum ter Counties, on the table lands of the backbone of Florida, one flowing almost due West across Sumter County, the other, nearly North from its source, in Polk County. These two streams unite near the centre of township twenty-two, range twenty-one. “Having located the heads of the river, I will now go to the mouth and come up. “When the river debouches into the Gulf of Mexico it has two mouths, one on each side of Shell Island, better known as Chamber’s Mill. For two miles from the mouth the river is shal low, at low tide, only about two feet of water covering the lime and shell rock bottom, and the water is as clear as crystal. Having passed these two miles, the river deepens to ten and twenty feet, at Fort Clinch, at the head of tide water. From Fort Clinch to Horn’s Bridge there are ten different falls or rock shoals, and here the river proves the justice of the claim to the name of roaring river. Late surveys show that the river level at Camp Izzard, thirty-five miles up the river, is one hundred and thirty feet above the level at its mouth. So there is good reason why the water should rush with precipitant haste over the shoals. The falls are all below Horn’s Bridge, no rocks show from the surface above, and the river changes from the rushing, roaring torrent to the placid lake in appearance, with scarcely any current, and not a ripple, save that made by the passing breeze. “Like everybody else, I have my theory about improving this river, and my suggestion is just the reverse of all others, viz: Build a solid rock dam across the river at Horn’s Bridge, sufficiently high to maintain an average depth of water above it at all seasons of the year, this will enable boats to navigate the river at all times, and not only to traverse the river, but all the lakes in connection there with. This steady depth of water would insure health, as there would be no surface alternately covered and uncovered to create sickness; again, this arrangement would create a magnificent water park, embracing all the lands and islands of Charles Apopka, the River and Panasofka. Thousands of dollars have been expended on the so-called improvement of this river, with no perceptible good, but rather, I think, a positive injury. I have seen the river below Horn’s Bridge almost dry in places, for months. For instance, from 1848 to 1855, a small skiff had to be hauled over no less than six flights of these rock stairs I have told you about, besides working through the rapids. I know whereof I speak, for I ascended the river four times, between the years mentioned, in search of live oak, cedar and pine for the naval service. I found [ 56

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all that I wanted, but the Government had to abandon the selection on account of the difficulty experienced in getting the timber over the shoals and down to deep water. “Let us go back to the Park scheme; there is nothing impracti cable in it. Take advantage of the dry season, cut canals six to ten feet wide, connecting the various lakes, build bridges, connecting the islands one with another, re-christen Tompkinsville the Venice of Florida, put your dam across the river at Horn’s Bridge, provide the requisite gondolas, then, when the moon shines in all its beauty, and the balmy breath of the Gulf is laden with the sweet perfume of flowers, and sweeter song from the rosy lips and pearly throats of beauty, float over the tranquil waters, happy in the consciousness of having provided for posterity the most delightful place on earth for devoted swains and loving maids to while away the sweet hours of courtship. Let us finish the work nature has begun and make of the Charla Apopka the most beautiful spot earth holds. I shall never forget the first time I saw it. One bright morning, the water sparkling like diamonds under the rising sun, the dew drops glisten ing on the leaves, the birds chanting anthems of praise for the beau tiful day, while the deer, disturbed by the unwonted presence, bounded off through the primeval forest. “Now for a bit of history:—To make this disjointed reminis cence as connected as possible, I will go back to the mouth of the Ouithlacoochee, and take up the historical points along the river as I come to them, and the first place of note is, or rather was (for it is all gone now), the old block-house, located in section three, township seventeen, range sixteen. During the early part of the Seminole war, and after the battle of the Ouithlacoochee, the officer in command of the forces, General Gains, I think it was, ordered Captain Holloman, of the Florida volunteers, with his command, to move down the river as scouts; near the block-house, and on the North bank, the side he was moving on, Captain Holloman discov ered an Indian canoe, this he appropriated, and proceeded to cross his command into what is now Hernando, a few at a time. The task had barely been accomplished, when he was attacked by a small body of Indians whom he repulsed, but the red foe hung so closely around that mischief was evident, and the Captain cut off from retreat by the river, went to work to construct a block-house on the most approved pattern. Results demonstrated the wisdom of his move. The house was not quite finished, except in defensiveness, when a large body of Indians scooped down on the devoted com mand in anticipation of an easy victory, which was not to be theirs. Their assault was a furious one, but they were repulsed. The siege 57 J

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field of corn and pumpkins in the Annuttaliga Hammock, about two miles west of where Judge A. Mayo now lives, we destroyed what we could not carry off, but beyond this sign, saw nothing what ever of Indians. We kept up our scouting and picketing for some time, but it was gradually dropped, and we were back in the old indifferent groove again, so careless will men become from famil iarity with dangerous things. The peril is not thought of until it faces us. I remember one instance well. I had been cooking our breakfast, Wm. Coffee, my chum, was out in the lot attending to his horse, I heard a noise and looked up to see two strapping Seminoles about one hundred yards away from the house; if the little hair I had, had suddenly changed to wire, it could not have stuck out stiffer than it did then. Another glance showed me the com manding figure of Captain Pope Hunter with them, and looking further, again I saw Coffee approach them and directly shake hands. I knew then it was all right, but my hair didn’t find it out for some time. After a little talk, Captain Pope and the Indians left and went into the hummock, just above the James Thompson place, where McCall now lives. As soon as Coffee smelt how excited I was—I had burned the bacon to a crisp—told me the Indians had come from the Cedar Keys to Crystal River with Captain Casey, the Indian agent, who had gotten Captain Pope to come with them to the Annuttaliga Hammock as a protection to the Indians. In about two or three hours Pope and his Indians returned, stopping a few minutes to rest, and the Captain told us that the Indians went to the old (Harris) Indian field, about one and a half miles from Coffee’s donation, and dug up from under a peach tree their buried treasure, amounting to about $1000, which they had divided, putting it in two deer skin wallets which they carried. We kept our information secret, determining at some future time to look it over ourselves. Well we did. I took up every blessed tree in that field and moved it to the Jenkins place, now known as the Wm. Baker place. I didn’t find any money, the red rascals had made a clean sweep of all the money, and the trees died, so I lost my work besides. “We had alarms in 1844 and in 1853. We also had what is known as the ‘Daniels’ War,’ commencing in Levy County and working Southward. General Wit Smith, commanded the volun teers, and at three separate times the settlers had to build block houses for protection. But perhaps some of my readers don’t know what a block-house is, so I will tell them that it is a pen built of heavy logs eight or ten feet high, over this is placed a course of logs for a ceiling of the lower pen and a floor of the upper pen; this [ 64

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flooring projects two or three feet over the lower story and flush with the ends of the floor another pen is built, making the upper room considerably the largest room; in the walls of both rooms loop holes are cut and small holes were also cut in the floor of the upper story, this was to prevent the enemy secreting and protecting him self against the walls of the house and smoking the defenders out. In 1856, the house of Captain R. D. Bradley was attacked just about supper time, the surprise was complete, and two of his children fell victims to the deadly rifles of the red men; one of the children was killed in the hall of the house—which was a double pen, log structure. Our present Collector of Revenue, Bob Bradley, who was a boy then, behaved with great gallantry, and was, if I remem ber right, wounded. As soon as the attack was repelled the alarm was sounded and pursuing parties organized, who followed the Indians for several days and far to the South, but failed to overtake them. In all the attacks and alarms, the people behaved with great coolness and bravery. “Having secured a Preacher for our settlement in Hernando, the Reverend Mr. Rodgers, the next thing in order was a wedding. So one bright morning my chum W. S. Coffee, announced to me that he intended to utilize the preacher by taking unto himself a wife. “He was not a joking man, so I knew he was in sober earnest. Major Garrison passed our house in a day or so on his way to Newnansville, and by him Mr. Coffee sent for his marriage license, and two weeks after took to wife Miss Jane Allen. Just think of it, one hundred miles to get a license, wouldn’t that set some of the present generation back? I do not know that the wedding and trouseau will interest my young readers, but I will tell them of it nevertheless. Now boys, stand up and say just how many of you would like this style for a groom: He wore a full suit of the coarsest homespun Georgia jeans with brogan shoes. The bride was attired in ten cent calico with flowers from the wild woods; these and the fine form, handsome face, rosy cheeks and innocent spirit God gave her, were the only ornaments she had. No ribbons, silks or satins, or adorn ments of art to set off her charms; but she was good, pure and beauti ful enough for any man to be proud of without the furbelows and fashions of the present day. Young ladies, how many of you would like to start in life as she did? I’ll answer for you—not one! “Next in order I chronicle the first birth, that of Isaac N. Gar rison, son of Major Isaac Garrison, at Choocoochattee. All of us know our old friend Isaac, who now lives with his mother at Bay 65 ]

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Port, striving hard to win a livelihood. May success attend him is the hearty wish of all who know him. The next child to see the light was a girl, the daughter of James A. Boyett at the same place. Both of these children were born in 1842, soon after our arrival in the promised land. The people carried out the Divine command to increase and multiply, and, if the Crescent is a truthful chronicler of events, they have stuck mighty close to the text ever since. “Our first lawyer was Colonel Bird M. Pearson; he came and located at Mount Airy, now Dr. J. S. Snow’s place, on Lake Lind say, and soon had an extensive legal practice all over the Southern circuit. He had four interesting children and his wife was one of the most intelligent and accomplished ladies in the county. The Colonel was a large planter and made from eighty to one hundred hogsheads of sugar per annum, besides large crops of cotton and corn. He was finally appointed one of the judges of the Supreme Bench; a position he held up to the date of his death, which occurred a few years before the war of 1861. “Perhaps a bit of political history may be interesting just here, so I will give the list of Representatives who served the people in the Legislature up to the present time. They were: James Stanley, M. Garrison, Major Isaac Garrison, Dr. L. Rogers, Chas. Russell, C. T. Jenkins, John Parsons, M. C. Peterson, James Nicks, John L. Taylor, Samuel Hope. In the Senate were: R. L. Bradley, Joseph Taylor, John Eubanks, up to 1861. From the time of the formation of Benton County through all the changes, this County has been true to its first principles and overwhelmingly Democratic. At the first election ever held here but three Whig votes were cast, and the pro portion has stayed at about the same thing ever since among the intelligent voters of the county. I am perfectly willing to concede to every man the right to his own opinion politically, but I am not willing to change the politics of the County with the manufactured vote that was the offspring of emancipation. “I have avoided mentioning any of the numerous skirmishes and combats with the roving bands of Seminoles, in which I was engaged while doing my duty as U. S. Live Oak Inspector, but they were of frequent occurrence—though in number small. It was only when the Seminoles under the noted Alligator, in his destructive raids, that severe fighting had to be done, in all Southern and West ern Florida.”

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ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son Ignatius Jenkins One Hundred acres of Land called RyeÂ’s Hardshift in Charles County, and his Heirs forever. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son Henry Jenkins One Hundred and Ninety acres of Land, part of a Tract called Truth and Trust, on the North side of Joseph JenkinsÂ’ land, being part of said Tract, and his Heirs forever. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son Henry Jenkins a Tract or Parcel of Land on which my Quarter now stands being part of a Tract called Truth and Trust containing about Seventy acres and also a Tract of Land called Foxes Range, containing about Seventy Acres, and his Heirs forever. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my Wife Mary Jenkins, Two Negroes, one Negro man called Ben and a negro woman called Nell. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son Henry Jenkins, Two Negroes one called George and a negro girl called Peg. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son Michael Jenkins, One negroe girl called Judith and a negro girl called Sarah. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son Ignatius Jenkins a negro boy called Robert and a negro girl Hannah. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son William Jenkins one Negro girl called Susannah and a negro boy called Peter. ITEM: I give and Bequeath unto my son Thomas Courtney Jenkins, one negro boy called Mark and One Thousand Pounds of Tobacco. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Jane Jenkins one negro woman called Bee and a negro girl called Bridget. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my grand Daughter Mary Anne Hagar one Cow and Calf. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Mary Hagar one negro girl called Tabitha. ITEM: I give and bequeath to my son Joseph Jenkins, five shillings and no more of my Estate. ITEM: I give and bequeath unto my son Ignatius Jenkins one more negro woman called Cate. My will is that my son Ignatius Jenkins shall remain with his mother until he is of the Age of Twenty years and his Estate to remain in his said mothers hands until he is the Age of Twenty as aforesaid. My will is that Michael Jenkins live with his mother until he is the Age of 20. My will is that the remaining part of my Estate shall be equally divided between my wife Mary Jenkins and the following children: William Jenkins, Henry Jenkins, Michael Jenkins, Ignatius Jenkins and Jane Jenkins and Mary Hagar and I constitute and appoint my son Henry Jenkins my sole Executor of this my Last Will and Testament. IN WITNESS whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and affixed my seal This Twenty fourth Day of February 1755. WILLIAM JENKINS (Seal) [72

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shall have ye next that arrives at ye age afsd. Also my desire is that ye two negros bequeathed to my son William Jenkins shall be for ye use of my loving wife Jean Jenkins for ye time of her widow hood, or until she shall come of age. LASTLY I constitute, make and ordain my loving wife Jean Jenkins and my son William Jen kins my whole and sole Executors of this my Last Will and Testa ment and I revoke and disallow and disannull all and every other former Testaments by me in any wise before made, Ratifying and Confirming this and no other to be my last Will and Testament. IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto sett my hand and seale ye day and year first above written. THOMAS JENKINS Signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of John Thomas, John Evans, and Mary Evans. PROVED August 5th 1761. WILL OF SUSANNAH JENKINS of Charles County. In the Name of God Amen, I Susannah Jenkins, of Charles County being weake of body but of perfect mind and memory, thanks be to God, being willing to settle my affairs in time, Doe make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following. IMPRIMIS: I give and bequeath my soul to Almighty God trusting to be saved through the bitter death and passion of my Blessed Savior Jesus Christ. My body I commit to the Earth in such Christian and Discreatelike manner as my Execu tors hereafter named shall think meet and expedient. And as to what worldly goods God hath been pleased to bless me with, I give and bequeath as followth. ITEM: I give and bequeath to my loving son George Jenkins my negro woman named Sarah whom he has now in possession in discharge of his claim to his Grandfather and his Deceased brothers Estate. I also give and bequeath to my said son George Jenkins, my negro girls Lucy and Terry and one negro boy called Charles and a negro girl called Fyda and my negro man called Harry to him and his heirs forever. ITEM: I give and bequeath to my loving son William Jenkins my negro woman named Nell, she and her increase for ever as also my negro boy called Jerry, to his and his heirs forever. ITEM: I give and bequeath to Elizabeth Jenkins, wife of the said William Jenkins, my saddle and bridle. I give and bequeath to my loving daughter Henrietta Semmes my six silver teaspoons. I do give and bequeath [80

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Jeremiah, William, Ignatius, Ann Atwood, Mary Jenkins, Eliza beth Jenkins, Joseph, Benedict and John Jenkins. Wife, Elizabeth Jenkins. To his son Jeremiah Jenkins he leaves 140 acres of land near “Hominy Creek,” to son William 150 acres of land. Witnesses to will: James Hopewell, Vincent Thorton and Mathew Dunent. MARY JENKINS of St. Marys County. Will dated Novem ber nth, 1807, a d proved December 8th, 1807. To Elizabeth Fen wick and her children she leaves 50 pounds current money; to Rev. Sylvester Boarman 10 pounds “to offer up prayers to Almighty God for my soul when departed;” to James Fenwick of Pomonky, “ali the shares of Columbia Bank Stock which of right belong to me, but stand in the name of my nephew Athanasius Fenwick.” She mentions her brother John Fenwick and her nephew Thomas Fen wick, also her nephew Ignatius Clarke “now residing in Kentucky ” and her niece Elizabeth Smith. She also stipulates in her will that all her slaves shall be liberated at her death. Makes bequests to Wilfred Manning and Ann, his wife. Witnesses: Dorothea Fenwick, Catherine Greenwell & Monica Greenwell. JOSEPH JENKINS of St. Marys County. Will dated Janu ary 18th, 1796, and proved February 9th, 1796. He leaves all his lands in St. Marys County to his mother Mary Jenkins, also all his personal effects, &c. Witnesses: Jos. Sanner, Wm. Hammett and Henry Taylor. AUGUSTINE JENKINS of St. Marys County. Will dated December 5th, 1798, and proved May 14th, 1800. Devises all his property whatsoever to his friends James Walton and Robert Molyneux, both of St. Marys County. Witnesses: Leonard Neale, Chas. Sewall, & Fr. Neale. WILLIAM JENKINS of St. Marys County. Will dated September 2d, 1792; proved January 8th, 1795. He leaves his entire Estate to his wife Elizabeth Jenkins, and to a prospective child. Witnesses: Ignatius Rhoads, Benedict Rhoads and Cartwt. Hammett.

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Uenkiits Mfcemorial (Laurel) Baltimore, Md. dE subject matter of the stained glass was designed and executed in England, literally in the school of Pugin, by the pupils and de scendants of that great master in the Revival of Christian Architecture. And it is distin guished by a depth, softness and richness of color which can only be produced by the finest qualities of antique glass reproduced in fac simile from a careful and exact study of the Mediaeval examples existing still in some of the windows of Can terbury and York minsters, and in invaluable fragments to be found at too infrequent intervals throughout that beautiful country which was once the “Isle of Saints,” and whose religious shrines have been, and are still, the wonder and admiration of the world. Its methods of painting, burning, leading, and entire construction are a faithful exposition of those true and sound principles in all details which flourished in Mediaeval Art, largely under the inspiring influence of the Faith, and which it was Pugin’s enthusiastic delight to awaken to a new life after a trance of over three centuries. The great windows of the Sanctuary are naturally the first to claim attention, and the three centre ones contain a composition of great beauty. Enthroned between groups of adoring angels the Mother of God is seated bearing on her knee the Divine Child who came to give Himself to us in the Blessed Sacrament of Corpus Christi. Our Lady’s robe is of sapphire blue diapered with fleurde-lis of gold, and around her head is the glorious crown of twelve stars described by St. John. The throne is of gold and over it two angels hold a shielding mantle of richly diapered gold. Above the 93 ]

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from their sins, to go forth with light hearts filled with cheerful ness; contemplate the number of sorrowful souls that will come here and find satisfaction and joy and peace at the foot of the cross; and then, and not until then, can you form an adequate idea of the bless ings of this church upon society and religion. You may have observed, my dear friends, that this beautiful temple will stand forth as the vestibule, as it were, to the gorgeous and magnificent park that lies beyond. Thousands and tens of thousands, as you know, of weary persons annually visit this park to escape the noise and the heat and the turmoil and the dust of the city, to inhale the fresh breeze and to enjoy the cool and delicious shade afforded them beneath the trees. In like manner, thousands and tens of thousands will repair to this church to escape the noise and heat and dust and cares and troubles and anxieties of this world to enjoy peace, and tranquillity and repose within these walls. They will come and place themselves under the shadow of the mystical vine that will be planted in the sanctuary, and they will come for rest from the heat and turmoil of their own passions to seek coolness and refreshment, and that they may be nourished upon the perennial fruit that will grow upon this mystical tree. Now, my friends, if you ask me the name of this church, I will tell you. It is to be called the “Corpus Christi Jenkins Memorial Church.” It is to be called by the beautiful name of “Corpus Christi”—the body of Christ—because it is consecrated to our blessed Lord in the adorable sacrament of the Altar. And, indeed, it may seem strange that at this day although there are about seven thousand churches in the United States, as far as I am aware this is the only church that bears the beautiful name, the appropriate name of “Corpus Christi.” There is in England one of the colleges attached to the famous University of Cambridge which is called the College of Corpus Christi. It was founded by a pious guild in the thirteenth century. Three centuries later a revolution swept over England, which destroyed the faith, uprooted the altars, abolished the priesthood and the sacrifice of the Mass and removed the blessed Sacrament, but yet, my friends, the name of Corpus Christi remains to this day attached to that college to serve at the same time as a rebuke to the innovators, and as a lasting memorial of the early faith of the people of England, This Church, as I have told you, will also be called the Jenkins Memorial Church, in honor of the venerable man whose name is inscribed upon this stone. It is erected in memory of an honored and distinguished citizen of Baltimore, whose clear mind and solid [ 100

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judgment, whose sterling integrity made him honored and dear to the people of Baltimore, and who went down to his grave without a stain upon his commercial character. It is erected in honor also of a loving husband and a kind and devoted father, whose provident care and affection for his children have enshrined his name in the hearts of his children and of his grandchildren, who rise up to-day in the affection of their hearts and “call him blessed,” and with loving hands and hearts they erect to his memory this beautiful temple as a pledge of their love and united affection. The church is erected also in memory of a pious Christian man who edified the church of God while living, by his good example, and helped the church by his generous charity and contributions. For a period of sixty years, from the dedication of the Cathedral in 1821 to his death in 1881, he continued to be a pious, faithful and regular attendant at the Cathedral of Baltimore, and his venerable form Sunday after Sunday was always conspicuous in his pew. Let us hope and pray to-day, my dear friends, that as we this morning bore in our hands the palm that was blessed in honor of our Divine Saviour’s entrance into the earthly Jerusalem, may he, our friend, have also borne in the heavenly Jerusalem the palm of victory, and while we are assembled here this afternoon in laying the cornerstone in this new material temple to Almighty God, let us hope that he is dwelling above in that temple not made with hands, enjoying the society of God’s angels and saints and with them singing His praises. Benediction and honor and glory and thanks giving to our God forever and forever. Amen! Sermon Delivered by the Most Rev. P. J. Ryan, Archbishop of Philadelphia, on January ist, 1891. “I have loved, O Lord, the beauty of Thy house, and the place where Thy glory dwelleth ” —Psalm 25 t h, verse 8. Most Reverend Cardinal, Rt. Rev. Bishops, Venerable Brethren of the Clergy and Dear Brethren of the Laity: The dedication of a new temple to the Almighty is, in our day and country, of such frequent occurrence that the thoughts and sen timents suggested by the event have become familiar to all. There is only danger that the frequency of the event and our familiarity with the expression of these thoughts and sentiments may lessen the deep reverence with which we should take part in such celebrations. 101 ]

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Mr. Welsh died in 1784, and the estate came into the possession of William Jenkins of Long Green. The hospitality inaugurated by Mr. Welsh was continued by Mr. Jenkins even on a grander scale, Mr. Jenkins having become wealthy and had erected a very extensive tannery on the New York Road near his residence. After wards, Mr. Jenkins built a new and more extensive dwelling North west of the Huntington Mansion, and known as Oak Hill, living there until his death in 1842. The Huntington Mansion was widely known for its Catholic ecclesiastical entertainments. All prominent clergy were constantly guests of the Jenkins’. Carroll, Neale, Marscheal, Fenwick and others would walk out on an afternoon and spend the evening with the family. The French Priests, the founders of St. Mary’s Semi nary and College, were often the guests of the Jenkins’. When the older William Jenkins, “Oak Hill,” moved in 1808, his cousin William V. Jenkins, moved from the City and conducted the tannery, the Mansion did not lose its name of generous hospi tality. When the Irish Priests and peasants, driven from their homes in Ireland by the Rebellion, sought safety in this Country and landed in Baltimore, they were directed when without a home, “to go straight out to the Jenkins’ Mansion on the Old York Road.” Once there, they were sure to receive aid and comfort. The night before the bombardment of Fort McHenry, when the people in the Southern part of the Town were in a state of terror, those of “Frenchtown” being well-to-do, found refuge and protection in the Jenkins family. At night, twenty families number ing over a hundred were hospitably cared for until other refuge was given them. This estate with its picturesque surroundings passed from Wil liam V. Jenkins in 1831, to Mr. Mark W. Jenkins, son of William Jenkins of Oak Hill. Mr. Mark W. Jenkins resided on this Estate for many years and conducted the tannery with success, until from infirmity he was compelled to retire to his farm at Long Green. During the Civil War, the old mansion was used as a Govern ment Hospital. In 1866, the estate was sold to a Mr. Gruppy, who held it but a short time, selling it to William Kennedy, as an invest ment. The tannery was never operated after. Huntington of one hundred acres, now became, from City improvements, an old man sion with less than two acres. Now it will puzzle one to point out the spot of this old hospitable mansion.

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I then related to Captain Semmes the whole circumstances con nected with the shooting of the three men of the Patrol Boat, exon erating the two negroes with me, as knowing nothing whatever about the murderous affair. I told him that the guilty parties were ref ugee negroes, irresponsible, and a desperate lot of outlaws—run away slaves, living in the Everglades with the most dangerous portion of the Seminoles, but excell them in murderous deeds, and they are now trying to get away to some other field of operation in order to escape death, as in either case, from their former owners, or the savage Seminoles, death was assuredly certain. I noticed that Captain Semmes listened very attentively to my statement, and sending for the Officer on duty, said: “Have the two negro prisoners released at once, get them ready for going ashore, give them such rations as you think sufficient for their sustenance if they have far to go.” After the Officer left the cabin, Captain Semmes said: “Cousin, take a seat, I will return in a moment,” on his returning he handed me one hundred dollars, as he said to pay my way home. This offer I positively declined, but with many thanks, stating that it might lead to much trouble in case it should become known. I assured him that I did not need any funds. In one hour after the negroes were put ashore in the govern ment boat, and both made their way to Bayport, where they were formerly employed. Soon after I bid adieu to all aboard and made sail in my own boat for my home on the Homosassa. Captain Alexander A. Semmes, son of Raphael Semmes, mer chant of Washington, entered the Navy as Midshipman in 1841, remaining in the Navy many years; Raphael Semmes, of Confed erate fame, was his cousin. His mother was the daughter of Cap tain Thomas Jenkins of Charles County, Maryland. Captain Semmes resigned his Lieutenancy in the Navy and subsequently became a Priest in the Catholic Church. &f from tt>e JFlorlda“Star” “Long before daylight on New Year’s day, 1889, the inhab itants of Citrus County and all Crystal River to its mouth, were astir, and despite the threatening weather there could be seen crowds of people from every direction of the County; some on horseback, some in carriages and some on foot, as well as in boats, landing at the beautiful residence of Mr. Jenkins, the occasion being an ovation ml

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About, and for ten years, great progress favored the settlers, and many additional grants of land were given to all who complied with the required qualification. It was in 1654, for the second time, a radical change occurred, when the Colony was administered by a commission appointed by Clayborne—it was then that all records of the Province that could be found in Catholic possession were seized and taken to a private house owned and occupied by one Richard Preston, an officer of Clayborne, residing on the South bank of the Patuxant. It is con ceded that Preston destroyed many family documents that would have furnished much information of interest to the present genera tion whose ancestors were of the original immigrants who came to Maryland in company with Father White. After six years—long and dreary—the ascendancy of the Puri tans was overthrown and the Proprietary Government was rein stated. In 1660, many persecuted “Friends,” from Virginia, com menced to arrive, and make homes in the Colony, principally in the upper County, North of Baltimore. No sooner had these good people set foot upon the Colony, than they began to protest to the Governor, William Stone, against the “illiberal persecution of those of the Catholic Faith,” and so persistent and perseveringly, that many of other beliefs joined in the appeal. The Committee that called upon the Governor was as follows: Thomas Maydwell, Francis Posey, William Hungerford, William Simpson, John Gage, William Smoot, “They brought with them stout hearts, in which were cher ished fundamental principals of liberty, learnt in a land where, before, Magna Charter had been extorted by the sturdy barons from King John.” It has been said, and I know it is true, that, so far as relates to their patriotism, there was no one family name that contributed more members to the honor of our flag in war, commencing with the year of 1775, all the way down to the last, 1861. It was from f 10 Auther Turner, John Perine, George Beckwith, George Sawer, Richard Browne.

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In the preparation of this record, the name of each individual is given, either as the head of a family, or where the name first occurs. The frequent inter-marriages, in each family, has made a continuous rotation necessary, besides, it will be seen, there is such a continuity of Christian names, from generation to generation. In Thomas Jenkins’ Will, he names, first, his son Edward, then William, then George, not in the order of their birth:—Edward was born 1671, George 1675, William about 1673, but it had been found that William was the eldest son. In the year of 1691, the following relations of Ap. Thomas Jenkins came to Saint Mary’s, from Wales: — Benedict Jenkins, who settled on the Patuxant River; Rowland Jenkins, who settled at Saint Inigoes, Saint Mary’s County; Jason Jenkins, unmarried, and lived with his brother, Benedict, where was erected the first storehouse in that settlement, and in 1813, it was destroyed by the British. “March 31, 1671, Charles Calvert, Esq., of the Province of Maryland, to Baker Brooke, Esq., of the County:” “Whereas the said Jerome Whyte, Esq., hath sometime left this Province of Maryland, and is at present in the Kingdom of England, by which absence of said Surveyor General from this Province, his Lordship’s business of divers of the inhabitants have much retarded. I do hereby impower upon the said Baker Brooke to be his Lordship’s Surveyor General of said Province.” From this it can be seen the great neglect, not only of record ing events of interest in the New Colony the first few years, but negligence and the continual strife seemed to go hand in hand to annoy and prevent a clear and reliable record of the early days of Saint Mary’s. William Jenkins, son of Thomas the original, was born 1673, and married 1718. He moved to Charles County in 1706, died 1755. From records at hand, he evidently was a large property owner and the owner of a large number of slaves. In his Will, recorded, he left all to his wife, Mary Courtney, and after, to his eight children namely: Henry, William, Thomas, Jane, Ignatius, Michael, Mary and Joseph. He gave to his wife, for her “sole use and benefit,” a tract of land called: “Tuesday’s Work,” and in like manner, gave to his son Henry, a tract of land, called “Salem.” Henry was appointed Executor for the four younger children. This Will bears the date of November 1, 1757. Thomas (Court ney) remained unmarried, and died in 1758. He bequeathed his property, owned by him, in Baltimore County, to his brother 21 ]

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THOMAS COURTNEY JENKINS

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Supplement T may prove interesting to know that in the City of Baltimore, in 1799, there were but three of the Jenkins family located there, Edward Jen kins, Thomas C. Jenkins and William Jenkins, sons of Michael and Charity, and old and young, there were but fifteen souls in all. In 1800, Walter Jenkins settled in the City. In 1802, Samuel Jenkins, a sea Captain, settled with his family. From 1802 until 1809, there was no addition, but in 1810, Michael Jenkins, David Jenkins, Thomas Jenkins, William V. Jenkins, located and commenced business. In 1812, there were but two families residing in the City, all of the others of the Jenkins moved into the suburbs, but conducted business in the City. In 1814, Felix Jenkins located on South Street, No. 6. James Jason Jenkins, located on Aliceanna Street; he was a Pilot, from Saint MaryÂ’s County. In 1819, Captain Benedict Jenkins, from Charles County, located at No. 6 Market Street; he was a sea captain. James and Jason Jenkins, Cabinet makers, established business on Calvert Street, warehouse, No. 6. Frederick Jenkins, grocer, located on Water Street, No. 23. Thomas L. Jenkins, Pilot, located on Bond Street. All these were from St. MaryÂ’s and Charles Coun ties, and relatives. From 1819 to 1823, there were no additional arrivals of the Jenkins families in Baltimore City. William S. Jenkins and Henry Jenkins formed a co-partnership in the hat trade, on the corner of Baltimore and Calvert Streets, 1823. From this year until 1827, 43]

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being the leader of the anti-bank party had to be made a sacrifice. The combination commenced their work of sending challenges to him, one after another, he took no notice of them, but he had made up his mind and said: ‘I do not intend to fight dung-hill chickens, but when the game cock sends me his card, I will attend to him.’ Every one knew who that man was—no less than Colonel A. Alston. There was no dodging then. The challenge was made and accepted, and at Miccoseekee lake the duel came off. Colonel Alston was of that notable family of South Carolina. Greek met Greek. General Leigh Reed, on that occasion, was attended by Captain Guion, of the U. S. Army; Colonel Joseph Branch, now of Nashville; L. Branch, who became a Confederate General, and Nat Walker. Colonel A. Alston had as his seconds: Captain Gillard, Hugh Fisher and Doctor Randolph. That duel was one of the most notable that ever occurred in the State. Both parties had their friends, and the whole State was more or less interested. Colonel Alston had the choice of weapons used, and he chose a heavy rifle, one-half ounce balls, distance twelve yards. Earth mounds were raised and each took his stand as all preliminaries were made. Reed examined his mound and stripped himself of all his clothing except his pants. His coolness surprised every one on the ground. At the word ready, one, two, three, fire! Alston being quick and active, fired first and missed his man. Reed cool and like a stone wall, fired in time. The fatal bullet struck the heart of Alston. All was over. The parties returned from the field to their homes. No words were spoken. “But did it end there? General Leigh Reed, being the leader of the democratic party, was elected to the legislative council. His friends, particularly Nat Walker, elected him Speaker of the House. That made things more bitter. Bitter was the feeling of each party. While attending to his duties for his County, at the Capital, one night, while he was coming from the dining room, after supper, he met a crowd of men, and some one made an attempt to assassinate him, and with a large knife ripped his abdomen open. Horrible was the sight; a cry for vengeance was equal to the Seminole war whoop. “General Reed got over this awful wound and soon he was him self again. His heroic action in the Indian war was known to all, and particularly the deliverance of Captain Holloman and his brave men, who had been left on the Withlacoochee river in a block-house, surrounded by Indians, over six weeks, was a daring and heroic act, and the whole State looked upon him as the Saviour of these men. He was, also, at that time, U. S. Marshal for the State. I was one of his 61 ]

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EDMUND COURTNEY JENKINS of St. Marys County. Will dated April 30th, 1796; proved July 24th, 1798. To his brother Ignatius Jenkins he gives 100 pounds; to his wife Elizabeth Jenkins, the use of two tracts of land called “Truth and Trust” and “St. Thomas,” during her lifetime; to Mr. John Boarman, 5 pounds. Appoints his wife Elizabeth Jenkins his executrix. Witnesses: Peter Peake, Sarah Peake and Francis Hopewell. Mtarriage Cicenses Elizabeth Jenkins and Cornelius Manning September 22d, 1800. John J. Jenkins and Mary Ann Plowden, February 20th, 1808. Maria Jenkins and Aaron Patridge, March 23th, 1812. Six (Generations of Jenkins Thomas and Ann. Married 1670. William and Mary C. Married 1718. Michael and C. A. Wheeler. Married 1761. William and Willcox. Married 1807. Thomas and C. X. Carrell. Married 1830. Michael and Isabelle. Married 1866. Seven (Generations of ^Jenkins Thomas and Ann. Married 1670. George and Susannah. Married 1695. William and Elizabeth. Married 1725. John J. and M. Ann Plowden. Married 1760. George and Lawson. Married 1800. Austin J. and Margaret. Married 1840. Michael and Isabelle. Married 1866. [ 90

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In the ceremony of to-day, however, there are points of peculiar interest. This is not what is popularly known as the dedication of a church. It is the very ancient, and very elaborate ceremony of the Church, the solemn consecration to God of an edifice which shall be irrevocably His and can never be used for any other purpose. Your Cardinal Archbishop has been occupied for several hours this morning in this great function. In order that such a building should be thus consecrated it must be free from debt, or at least so secured that it can never be alienated. A second consideration of peculiar interest is that this church is erected by a most devoted Catholic family as a memorial of their equally devoted Catholic parents. It has been sometimes asserted that the age for grand Cathedrals and splendid memorial churches has passed away, that the erection of the great Cathedrals, supposed deep faith and generosity in the great masses of the people, and the memorial churches, supposed what is still more difficult to find in our age, great faith and generosity amongst very rich people. But in the magnificent Cathedrals already erected here by the body of the faithful, aided by their rich brethren, and in such a splendid edifice as this, we behold the triumph in the new world of the faith of the old. The “ages of faith” have not passed away and never can, until the consummation of all ages. But this is not a mere monument to the dead that has no higher mission. Here shall prayers and sacrifices be offered for them for all time, and their memories shall remain hallowed by the religious associations of the place. And this edifice is furthermore, as a parish church, a great thanksgiving offering to the living God for all the benefits He has bestowed on the parents and children of this family, especially for the gift of faith, which inspired this oblation. Another consideration renders this occasion one of more than ordinary interest. I mean the time selected for the consecration and the title “Corpus Christi” selected for the church. At this season eighteen hundred and ninety years ago, the body of Christ was first adored in the first miniature Christian Church in Bethle hem. There the tabernacle was the manger and the ministers were Mary and Joseph, and the congregation represented, as in embryo, the future church of the Catholic world. The poor and docile were represented by the shepherds, and the rich and wise by the Magi of the East. Rich and poor, Jew and Gentile, bowed before the taber nacle of the crib. After eighteen hundred and ninety years, we behold another tabernacle in which the same body of Christ shall [ 102

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LLEWELLYN

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We had been quite successful in shipping the cotton bales to buyers who had already run the blockade with many thousands of bales, I know not where, but this I do know, of little profit to myself. When I imagined that everything with me was in the most suc cessful operation, I took my sailboat, and two of my men with me, to visit a near encampment of troops down the coast a few miles. I had not proceeded far when I was run down by a fast Government Patrol Steamer, and made a prisoner, including the two negroes I had with me. When taken aboard I was unceremoniously ordered to be put in the lower forward deck, and a guard placed over me; the two negroes were sent aft to the Officer of the Watch, and were at once severely put to an exhaustive examination. The Officer, seemingly not satisfied with the explanation given him, then threatened the negroes, saying: “You will be strung up if you don’t tell me cor rectly, I know you had something to do with the killing of our three men, who had been cowardly decoyed to the landing by some white men, who had their faces blackened with some substance or other, and coaxed them ashore, as they said, to obtain them liberty from Government service.” It was not long after this unwarranted effort of the young Offi cer to make so serious a charge against me, before I was informed of it by one of the frightened negroes whom I formerly owned, and had confidence in his sincerity. I at once insisted and demanded strenuously to see the Captain, the Commander of the boat, whom I had just heard was a regular naval officer, believing that they are, or ought to be, gentlemen. In my persistence to see him, I found that he was a Lieut. Commander, and had under his control the entire West coast of Florida. After much persuasion, and some indignation at the conduct of the deck officer, I was permitted to go aft, and see the Captain, who was then busy in writing his monthly report in his room, in the after cabin. On looking up and at me, he said: “What is it you want, sir?” I replied: “Is not your name Semmes?” He said: “Well, yes, what is that to you?” My answer was: “Well, sir, you are my cousin; your mother is my Aunt Matilda.” Semmes laid down his pen, and with a smile somewhat equivo cal replied: “What do you know about Aunt Matilda?” My answer to that was: “My object is, sir, to let you know who I am in order that you may listen to me the better, notwithstanding I am a rebel prisoner. I simply wish, sir, to make a statement to you so you may act justly, as I am confident you will.” [ no