Citation
The St. Augustine directory

Material Information

Title:
The St. Augustine directory containing a general directory of the citizens, the churches, schools, societies, streets, and a business directory ..
Cover title:
St. Augustine directory and guide
Place of Publication:
St. Augustine, Fla
Publisher:
Chapin & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
41, [52] p. : ill., 1 folded map ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
History -- Saint Augustine (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Guidebooks -- Saint Augustine (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Directories -- Saint Augustine (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Includes a condensed history of St. Augustine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
UF Special Collections, Florida History
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
029698838 ( ALEPH )
11356499 ( OCLC )
Classification:
F319.S2 S14 1880z ( lcc )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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T.UGUSTINE kRCOY,
-CONT AITNING A
NERALIRECTORY OF THE. CITIZENS, THE CHURCHES
SCHOOLS, SOCIETIES, STREETS,
AND A
R SIN ESS DIRECTOR Y.
TO WHICH IS ADDED
A COND E, SEDAN HISTO-RY OF ST. -AUGUSTINE
GIVING AGITJC: DESCRIPTION. OF THE PLACES OF INTEREST
IN AND ABOUT-.THE ANCIENT CITY, CONTAINING
fifty. t nabingo,. a, Map of 0t..ugu#ti~ne,.
ADMtJCH MATTER OF INTEREST TO THE TOURIST.
CHAPIN &CO., -PC HLIS HEIRS,T
ST., AUGU STINE.FA




WIN!
RES1DENCE OF DR~. C. P. CARVR
The oldest House, in the oldest City in the Unie tts




Ly Lane, extens from E S ret oS .G o teet
d, extends frm the Bay toShl Road.'
ekxtenids from, F t Mario t the Ba rracks.
,extends frcm Bay, Streeto Hospital.,
fidge, extends fro Bay Stret to St. Sebastian River.
Brononextends, fro King Streeto St.SeatnRi
jilland, extends fro Fort Marln toHospital Cree-k.
lCharotte, extends n ot \ ont Mai Sac e e
C,,lin'th e.teids, fr< heBay to Shell Road. I" ,Cun a, extends fro~ ,el Bay to Tlomato Street. Fo rt extrd fro Carlotte S t oS.Gorge Street. Green,, extends fro Ilay 'Streeto St.--George. Street. ''Gro've' Averaue, extens fromn Shel Road, to St. Sebastian Rivr
H pital, extends. f igS tt Bridge Street.
-lypi, extrids froBay S't to TolomatoSte. Kitigextelnd fro ay Street t ew St. Augustine. Locust, extend's" fr he-Bay toTSell Road,.
Ma in xtead -f r oK ing Streit to Maria Sanchez Cree., Mu befy 0xtndsfr 1;he Bayt Shell Road'. Sytile, etnfr thelRo to the Bay.
OTange, extends frof Fort Maro to-St. Se6bastian River
Pe,, exten.fo Street tShell Road.
tShenandoah, extend from the Byto Shell Road. parishh, extends fo O range Sret to Treasu ry Stret
t.Francis, extend'' fr>m the Barrcks to Maria, -Sanchezi Cree St. Geoge etends rm te. CitGates to St. ,Francis Ie St. Louis Ave' ue ndse frhrell Road to the, River St. Selstian Avenue-:extends fro Shiel~l Road to the Rivert 10 late,6xfends nm Orang eSreet to St.. Frar is Street.
amteLape, extens from St.'eortge Street to Tolomto.t
kr's, extns :BySi o Tolomnato.




PUBLIC LIBRARY
FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, RtAlING ROOM,and HISToRIAludSTJI,
CITATION OF ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA. Officers for the yar Press Phillip Ammidown, New York. Vice-Pres., Geoig St. Augustine.' Sec. and Treas., John L. Wilson, Mas
setts. Ass't Sec. and Treas., Dr. Andrew Anderson,
gustine. An Executive Committee includes the named officers, with the addition of the following mem1 the Association: A. J. Alexander, Kentucky; MissR
St. Augustine; M. M. Hurd, New York; W. H. Pell
York; H..P. Ammidown, New York. librarian, Miss .Sherman, St. Augustine.
YACHT CLUB.
ST. AUGUSTINE YACHT CLUB. Commodore, Capt. H. V. L
Vice-Com., E. V. Clark. Sec., R. F. Armstrong.
MILITARY.
ST. FRANCIS BARRACKS. 2d Arillery, Commanding, Col.
Ayres. Adjutant, 2d Artillery, Lieut. Eli D. Hoyle. termaster, 2d Artillery, Lieut. Sebree Smith. Surgeon, J. R. Gibson, Surg. U. S. A. TRoops.- Battery G, tillery- Capt., Geo. Mitchell. Lieuts., C. E. Kilbourne Curtis, C. DeW. Wilcox. -Battery 1, 2d Artillery-H. G. Litchfield. Lieuts., Nat. Wolfe E. 1. Weaver, Conklin. Parades Wednesdays and Fridays. Concerts
afternoon (Saturdays and Sundays excepted). ST.AUGT
GUAPDS. Capt., WM. Moody; ist lieut., W. A. McWill 2d Lieut., S. L. Beasley; ist Sergt., J. W. Spitler; 2d .
E. T. Hyde; ist Cor., Corbett 2d Cor
Masters.
FORT MARION. Open from 8 A. M. to 4 P. M. Ord.
Brown. IT. S. Army, in charge.




ST. A UGUSTINE.. DIRECTORY.
'TRANSPORTATION COMPANIES. ,
JrlsONVILLE ST. AUGUSTINE & HALIFAX RIVER R. R. Gen'! idima ger, W.L. Cr afford. Agent, M. Williams.
S"T 'JOHNS RALWAY. President, -R. H. McLaughlin. Sut. W. P. Jarvs Gen 'I Pass. and Freigkt Ag't, F.0 W. Clark. Agnt, H'. ILane.
FLORIDA C John. Wesct. Alanager and Chief Engineer, R. E. O' Brien.
Sec.and t H. Gaillard. Supt., -Pitt Cooke. Supt. Drea'ges,
F.B.' Colto
FIRE DEPARTMENT.
ChiefiW.- Milfod bIgraham,. A4ss't Chief, Chas.'H. Dewell.
COMPANIES.
ANCI ENT. C IT 00KI AND LADDER, No. i. Foreman,, John H.,
Dolwd. s'l 'Foreman, L. H. White.,- Sec., Geo. A. Alba.
S". AUGs STEAM, FIRE ENGINE CO., NO. i. Fofreman,
-James Morrs.. Ass-'t, Foreman, Stephen- Benjamin., Sec., E,
j.- Houston
SAN 1\ARCO >SE F Co.: Foremn Wm. Clai-born. Sec.,EPaio
A^ RSSED: VALUATION, CIT Y.
... 0.. ....... a4 6.. .. .. .. .. .. 630,2 15
0. ..3..8. .. . .. . . . 549i300
.X ... . . . . .. .. .. 592,105
eaisfetint"oethnoes~t fiera le




CHURCHES.
ST. AUGUSTINE M. E. CHURCH. King street Paistor,
McLean. Trustees, J. K. Rainey, Geo. L. Atkins, C1 Atkins, John T. Edwards, W. T. Broadwell I. R. KnI
J. G. Libby.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. St. George street. Pastor,
Wilson. Trustees, Dr. A. Anderson, Phillip Amidown
Gordon, L. H. Tyler, J. W. Allen, Heth Canfield. John E. Peck, DeWitt Webb, J. W. Allen, J. D. Sharp, : Reynolds.
ST. AUGUSTINE ROMAN CATHOLIC CATHEDRAL. Bid Florida, Right Rev. John Moore. Vicar-General, Rev. Claveraul. Rector of the Parisk, Rev. Patrick J. Lync
TRINITY EPISCOPAL. Rector, Rev. E. L. Drown. Recto ritus, Rev. E. Roote. Wardens, Geo. Burt, E. M. Vestrymen, W. S. M. Pinkham, John T. Carr, Geo. W.
A. C. Spear.
COLORED.
A. M. E. CHURCH. Washington street. Pastor, Rev.
Thompson. Trustees, A. McKeever W.. McGuir
McGuire, Henry Harrison.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH. Pastor, Rev. D S. Scott. 10
10ses Wise, Daniel Green, Maj. Arg tt, Henry
John Robinson.,
ST. MARY'S BAPTIST CHURCH. Pastor, Rev. Ivory aesm
Trustees, Adam Floyd, J. Stewart, Wm. Moran.
M.i E. CHURCH. St. George street. PFastor, J.G. Fowar
Trustees F. E. Witsell H. M. Emmerly, Lewis Whaley
Tordan. Sam'1 Crosby.
...u s= /,= -,== ,= iiiiiii= i .. ...... ... : ..... ....
........:S




ST AUGUSTTNE' DTRECTORY.
SOCIETIES.8
-,,IN T CIT LOE. F. & A. -M., No. 6.- W. M., H. M.l
$"n'ow. W, F osoe Perry. ScWm. Moody. Trea s., W Milo 'Igrah.am W., W. R.. Harris. EA INOLE 0,)E.9_ 4, IA. .U .M W.' W. Milford Ingraham.. Af. M., J. W. Allen. Fin., W., H. Atkins. Rec.,
John T., Car. Frman, L.' H. White. -Recorder, A. J. Corbett.
T. UGUSTIN CATHOLIC -EN EVOLENT SOCIETY.- President, A. E. Loez Viesident, John H. Dow d. Sec., JonP Bridier. Tres., icholas Rogero. W.C. TEMPELNCE UNION. Pres. 'Mrs.. Dr. DeWitt Webb._ Treas., M r. L Alxander. Vice-Pres., Mrs.' C. C. McLean,
Mr. r Iip -hsMar Reynolds. Sec., Mrs. C: E. Mackey..,
S.AUGUSTIi LODGE I. o. G. T. W C. T, E. T. Hyde.
W T. is MfMry 'Beasley W.S, :.H. Greatorex.
W ALV Allen. W. C., J. W. Woltz., W. RSMs Bruce. : ab.W G., L. Taunton. W. O..,
G.,' M. T. Msters.'
COLORED.
. O P. S van LODENo.P. C. 11 D.D..-M.
PJapy. C F. Papy K. of R. S., Jafobjo:rdan NIGHT TE 9PARS .CDM.Ppy Prelate H. :M. Emric 8Kinney.
"TE AM- T. HREB LODGE Flo & A. M.'
95. E-.Se. Sam' 1 Crosby.,
RA IN 01% Pres, Wm atiL ScS
el, :Chass BaM.




ST. AUGUSTINE INSTITUTE OF NATURAL SCIENCE. Fresde'4, Rev. Milton Waldo, D.D. iePresident, DeWitt MeM. D. Sec. and Treas., Miss Mary R. Reynolds. Gunaa
-Librarian, Chas. W. Johnson. Regular meetings are he the first and third Tuesdays of each month at 7.30 o's P. 1., at the rooms of the Society, cornerSt. Georgan. St. Hypolita Streets.
SCHOOLS.
County Superintendent, PETER ARNAU.
School Commissioners:
A. LOPEZ, JOHN ALLEN. L. A. C
M. S. USINA. W. S. M. PINMAM.
No. i. HIGH SCUOpL, Hospital Street; 145 Pupils. PH Walter E. Knibloe. Teachers, Miss Mary Brown, Miss tensia Rogero, Miss Grace Eilliot.
Trustee, DR. J. K. RAINEY.
NO. 2. (Colored,) Spanish Street; 1x 5 pupils. inecpal,M
Emma R. Caughey. Teachers, Miss Helen Barton,
Mary E. Howard.
Trustees: DR. DEWITT WEBB, BENJAMIN RILEY.
No. 12. SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH, St. George Street; x80 p
Teachers, Sister Gertrude Capo, Sister Agnes Herna
Sister M. Fitz-Simmons.
Trustees: J. D. LoPrz, DR. R. B.. GARNETT, B. GENOw ST. AUGUSTINE 'ACADEMY FOR YOUNG LADIES. p
Miss L. S. Miuda.-(See adv.)
ST. AUGUSTINE SCHOOL' FOR Boys. PrinK7al, Edwa S
Drown.-(See adv.)
ST. JOSEPH ACADEMY FOR YOUNG, "LADIES. PriCta,
Mother Lazerus.-(See adv.)
AI




. ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 9
kmINDUSTRIAL SCuOOL. President, John L. Wilson.,
oerrtary, Andrew Anderson, M.D. Treasurer, Fred. Ballard.
, I 3wrsks: C., F. Hamblen' and above-named officers. Zadid Executive Board :
'-Prsilent, Miss Sarah A. Mather. Secretary, Mrs. DeWitt Webb. Vice-Presidents, Mrs. John L. Wilson, Mrs. Col. Traa .cey, Mrs. C. F.: Hamblen, with ten, managers, selected from
the different church organizations.
PUBLIC' OFFICIALS.
MUNICIPAL OFFICERS. Mayor,, John G. ,Long. Aldermen, B.
F. Oliveros, C. C. Beasley,, Roscoe Perry, Jacob Jordan, A., B. Phillips, E. F. Joyce, 'Geo. W. Atwood, John T. Edwards, D. M. Papy. Clerk, William H. Atkins. Marshal, John Papi-no. "Collector,' Edwiard J. Houston. Assessor,-A.,
A. Papy. Treasurer, James W. Allen.
COUNTY OFFICERS.:, County judge, M. R. Cooper. CountyCler-k, B. F. Oliveros. County Sheriff R. Hernandez. CountyCollector, D." L. Dunham. County Treasurer, C. Pomar.County Assessor, R. Ximanies. Sut.Shos PterAnu
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, M. S.. Usina, A. B. Phillips,, H. H.Floyd, Benj. Masters, Perry. McCullar.
BOARD OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. M. S. Usina, A. E. Lopez,. L. A.. C61ee, W. S. M. Pinkham, Johbn Allen.,, Secretary,
Peter Arnon.
EDERAL OiFICERS. Postmaster, W. W. Dewhurst. Collector 4"of Customs, -F. E. Witsell. Def ty_ Collector of Customs, Geo.
A.Alba. U. S. Commissioner, B. F. Oliveros.
Vu BoARD or HEALTHA, Drs. J.. K. Rainey, L. Alexander,
UllC, Slog*gett, B. Genovor, Wm. Hernandez. President, Dr.
Rany.Seea
C.L oln




ST. AUGIUSTINE PRESS, weeklyf, $2o a yerTonP hte,
Pblishier, Spanish street.
S.JOHNS WEEKLY, G. W. Dickinson, PublisheKn tet wekly, $2.oo a year.




ST. AUGUSTINE DIECTORY.
'Abbott Miss Luc house Perry ave. and Shenandoah St. Alba, E. M. M.D. drggist, Plaza stre'eit, house King. Alba George A. duty collector, Custom House, house
Kino- street.
Alba W. E. King ntret. Allen Daniel, carpeter, house Charlotte street. Allen Edward C. plt,'house Charlotte street. Allen J. W. book-keper (C. F. Hamblen), house Bravo. Alexander A. J., co.St. Georg ad Bridge st. Alexander H. L. "Iinery, St. George st., house Charlotte Alexander L.., City Drug.Store, St. George street,', house Perry aveue.
-Anm'idohi Philip, hose St. George, street, near King. Anderson Andrew M.D.,,-house King st., near Bronson., Anderson E. L. la. er,: Lincolniville. ?Andreu John, Jr. hose North city. Andreu Antonio, s.laborer, house North city. A~id Atitonhia -r aborer, house North city. ,Andren Edward, -lbrr, house North city.:
arer. dwa =orer-, hpuse North city.
Gret Aanul -areter, house Ch,'arlotte street.
Adte firanci A aoer, house North city., Adii t iiiiise Cana stet.
Frands F 4or, house Tolomato st., near Cun a.
- 9wor, -houso, Charlotte street.i'




Andreu William, Iaborer, house North city. Andreu William J. nason house North city. Andrews W. J. clerk (C. T. Hamblin); St. George Anheuser Julius, (Will, Anheuser & Cp. Charlotte
near St. Francis.
Armstrong R. F. real estate, St. George street, 1
Hasseltine House.
Arnau Paul, ex-rnayor, house St. George. street, near Arnau Peter, superintendent schools, house Spanish
near Cuna.
Arndt Otto, laborer, house North city. ARTESIAN WELL DRILLING Co., Orange store Ashmead William A. Florida House, St. George store Aspinwall Rev. Jno. A. house corner Bay street and
lery lane.
ATKINS ALFRED C. Florida House, St, George: Atkins Charles A. Florida House, St. Georgesstreet. Atkins Charles L. Florida House St. George street. ATKINS GEORGE L. & SONS, Florida House. ATKINS WILLIAM'H. City Clerk, house Orange ATWOOD GEORGE W. livery stable near San
Hotel, house Bridge street.
Bailey Edward, house Orange street. Ball Mrs. H. house Tolomato street. Ballard F. J. ticket agent and jewelry, St. George BANK OF ST. AUGUSTINE, St. George street. Barnes E. L. clerk, (Sabin, Moulton & Co.), boards
house.
BATES, W. T. confectioner, Treasury street. Battle S. W., M.D. (U. S. Navy), office San Marco
Store, St. George street.
Basket W. T. (Hopkins & Bausket) real estate, R
building.
Baya Elotario, laborer, louse North city. Bayer Frank, laborer, house North city. Beasley C. C. house Sanford street. Benet Acilimo. laborer, house North city.'.




ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY.I
et Franci, fisherman, -house Charlotte st., near Fort. Sent Joseh fisherman, house Charlotte street. enet J. R. gocer, corner St. George and Cuna streets, housedo
Benet Ne >ci, laborer, house North city. Benet S. F. lborer, house North city. BENHAYO! & GONZALEZ, Charlotte street. Benhayon J. ., cigars, etc., Charlotte street. Berry Alfrd, painter, house Spanish'st., cor. H ypolita. Beven A. H Tower & Co.) King street. Beverly Jame Porter, house Charlotte street. Biddlecom Edward, boats house Marine' street, near St.
Francis
BLAKE A. M. Cleveland House, St. George street. BLAKE L. leveland House, St. George street. Bloomfield Ms. newsdealer, St. George street, house do. Boutwell W. O.clerk, (Will Anheuser & Co.), boards at
Seasih ouse.
Boynton Willam H. boarding-house St. George street. Bradford jam:s'A. Laborer, house Bradford avenue. Bradford Joseh A. sawyer, house Sanford street. BRAINAR JOSEPH, Villula," King street'. Bravo Donao grdener, house St. George street. B3ri 'dier E. T. arpenter, house King street. Bridier Joh M. carpenter, house Tolomato street. Britt John, grdener, house Tolomato street. Bronson Robert, house St. George street, cor. Bridge. BRUCE & OYT, -contractors and builders, St. Louis
avenue
Bruce E. Abuilder, house Sebastian avenue.: BRUCE F. surveyor and civil engineer, house St.
Bruce FrdJ
Bruce T W.(ruce & Hoyt), house St. Louis avenue% ,Jl ryan A. J.hu North city. Bad A. 0.liey, Telemato street. auckhale E.Ocean View. BUNTIC GEOR GE T. furniture, Charlotte street,




Burgess JHn. (B clre k, o) r ( it,.: E ~or t
Cur Grereh, house St. George tet
fpdi street.
panva Alexander~, carpenter, houeSaihsrtp. Cnva Jamxes, bar-tender, house Spnsste,
Caoa John L. masoni, house St. Georesrecr ~.S
Francis.
Canova J. R. laborer, house Spans tet Canova Lucieni, saloon Charlotte St.,hos yptaS. Camellia E. L. cigars, house Chrotte tet Cape11i4 Lawrence, labor, house Notciy Cap llia Seyernnio, tailor, house Notciy Capo Antonio, laborer, house Chlotte stee. Capo E. laborer, house Charlotte street CAPO E. G. jeweler, St. George stret Capo John jr. laborer, house North city Capo John H. butchr, house North cty Capo Joseph, laborer, house Charlotte ste. Capp Lewis, gardener, house North city GCipo Paul, laborer, house AnastaiaIsad
0AP PHILIP, bath houqseBaste.
Cao Philip jr. mnason, house Nrth ciy CaoVernancio, plot houseChrot re. Cap Vjctorina, m~ason, hous ot iy
Cap Wlmr. laoer, hueLcsaeu'




--U STINE DIRECTORY.I
erlin W. Shose Bay street.
iD. W. hoe King street
Geo. H., relestate, Office cor. Charlotte and Fort,
streets.
CHAPIN & CO. wholesale and retail curiosities, Museum
building.
'chison Rufus, -Sanfod street. ''Clayton J. R. hous Sanford street. CLEVELAND HOSE, cor. St. George and Cuna sts. Cole J. B. builder, Bonson street, house Bravo street. Colee J. B. livery, hose Sanford street. Colee J. L. surveyr house Spanish street. Colee J. R. salesman (with W. Lyon & Co.), house Spanish street.,
Colee L. A. livery Tolomato street. Colee William, wheewright,, Hypolita street. Collins C. F. w atchaker and jeweller, St. George street..
ColinsC. I. attorney, Court House.
Compton & Veder Charlotte st., druggists and notions. CONNER O.,T. futs and refreshments, St. George st.
house same.
COOK & LIBBEY wood-turners, etc., factory Bravo st., Cook john L. carpeter, house New Augustine. Cook J. L. (Cook & ibbey) house Bravo street. Cook Robert, carpeer,. house New Augustine. Cook S. L. builder house New Augustine. Cooke Charles H Forida Stone Co., North city. COOKE HENRY A. Florida Stone Co., North city. Cooper C. M. attorny-general, house Charlotte street'. Cooper, E. M. hous Orange street,. Cooper Fred, hous Urange street. Cooper M. R. iat cny, and! county judge, Court House,
house New Agstine.
Corbett A. J. attore, Custom House. Corbett T. *F. steambots,, HypI olita street. Cowdon J eacher house Bridge street.,
C~x W,, A. phoogaher, St. George- street, houseSt
G6restet




'CRADDOCK MR. J. E., Craddock House, Bri Craven F. W. St Augustine Gas Co. house Marite Crawford George, laborer house North city. Crichlow S. telegraph operator, Cuna street CUNNINGIAM' JOHN, Rainey Building, St.'Geo
Dale Thomas, painter, house North city. Dale William, Dale's Rosery, Shell road. Darling J. J. merchant, Charlotte street, house Cha:
cor. Treasury street.
Davis Geo. T. painter, house St. George street. Davis Mrs. H. B., dry goods, (Davis & Jenkes), '
lotte street.
Davis James 0. painter, St. George street. Davis Thomas M., barber, Charlotte street. De MEDICIS EDMUND P. produce, Charotte s
house New Augustine.
I)E MEDICIS EMANUEL E. merchant, Charlot
cor. Cuna.
De Medicis Emanuel J. house St. George street. De Medicis Frank .A., saloon, Charlotte street. Desselberger William, meats and restaurant, Cha
street.
Dewell C. H. East Florida Bottling Co., house Putn Dewell J. H. produce, Charlotte street. Dewhurst W. W. postmaster and attorney-at-law;
Marine street.
Dickinson G. W. St. Johns Weekly, house.King store Dil-lingham Elwood, sawyer, house Bridge street. Dorr H. A. clerk, (Sabin, Moulton & Co.), house Bay Dow G. N. laborer, house North city. Dowd John, tinsmith, Hypolita street.
-Dowd Peter, clerk, (E. E. De IMedicis), St. George s Doyle Jarnes, carpenter, house St. George street. Doyle Jerry, gardener, house North city. Drown Edward S., principal St..Augustine School, A
Mansion, near Hotel San Marco.
Drown Rev. E. T. rector Episcopal Church, house
street.




ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 17I
W. S. artist, studio, post-office building, boards
Xitng street.
dale L. saloon Charlotte street, house North city.
ryeale V. manager St. Augustine saw-mill: oards North
city.
kinas Henry, house Bridge street. 1)ummitt Miss Anna, St. George and St. Francis streets. #Dunham David L. county collector, Court House, house Spanish .street.
Dunham F, T. F. house Charlotte street., Dunham Charles, M.D.. Charlotte street.
-Eastman George L. house Orange street. L,'Edga-r Daniel, house Bay street. Edgar Leroy, house Bay street. Edge Albert J. laborer, house North city. EDWARDS HOUSE, Charlotte street. FEDWARDS JOHN T. Edwards House, Charlotte street. EICHBAUM W. P. supt. St. Augustine Gas Co., Marine street.
Elliott Joseph, 'ice-cream, cor. Treasury and St. George St. Emerson George,. builder, house Clinch street.. Enslow J. A.- j r. tr'avellingo salesman, house cor. St. George and St. Francis streets.
Etrreger George, bar-tende'r, Bay street. Et stes, Brown & Co. Gordon -Block. Evans J. D. house Orange street.
Al1ana Fernanda, butcher, house North city. Falan'a Thomas, -butcher, house North city. fields A, J. c'arpenter. AFilkins M. carpenter, house, Ballard avenue. r ~nk J. J. carpenter, house Spanish 'street.
Albert,,porter with G.,T. Bunting, bouse Tolomato
street'.,
- kDA, HOUSE, St George street,
yd B. laborer, house. North- city.
her HUam F. boats, Bay, street.




Foster Charles G. carpenter, Marine street. Foster Mrs. E. boardinghouse, St. Geo rge atte, Foster Frank, laborer, house North city. Foster Mrs. G. house King street. Fowler F. M. painter Charlotte street. Frazer Mrs. H. Ingleside House, St. Francis st Eurman S. S. driver, house Balard avenue.
Gaillard C. R. (Canal Co.), Bay street. Gaillard E. M. (Collins & Gaillard), Raine bui Gaillard Henry (Canal Co.), Bay street Gard C. E. (W. Lyon & Co.), 'house Charlotte stee. Gardner Charles P. produce, Charlotte street. Gardner Joseph E. produce,.Charlotte street. Gardner Stephen J. produce, Charlotte street. Garnett R. B. house Shell road aid St. Louis a GAUZENS F. sewing machines and notions
street, house Orange street.
Geer A. H. engineer, house North city. GEMMINGEN, VON G. civil engineer, Maris GENOVAR B. groceries and wines, CharlottS
Marine street.
Geiovar F. B. Orange Grove, Cassacola. Genovar N. F. planter, house North city. Genovar William, clerk with B. Genoyar, hou
street.
GIBBS GEORGE W. (St. Augustine Nation
George street), house Perry.avenue. Gilbert M~rs. A. house King street. Gomez G. R. boats, Bay street.
Gonyer Joseph, drayman, house Washington stre. Gonzalez Frank, Charlotte street. GOODRICH E, M. dentist, office St. 'Georg<,hueS'
George street.
0.. ... .
Gordon J. T. house Marine street. Gordon R. H. house King street. Graves C. A. painter, house SDanish street.,




. a,"' T UGUA DIRECTORY. I
. H. auctioneer, a zf:St. George street.
G,--,eorge S. Greeno Hous, Marine street.
any C. clerk, (HTAdtbf & Co.),' house North city.
aWilliam', boats,, Charlote street.
Charles, painter, house St. George street.
W. H. baker, house Chrlotte street.
blen C. F. merchant, Kin street, house do.
W. A. light-keeper, Ant cia Island.TARM-ON A., W., Savannahluab Stable, Span,'ish street.
erri W.R. builder,, house Balard avenue. 14rison Geo. painter, house North, city.
S ,SELTIN.F MISS R. E. Hsseltine House, St. George
street.
'ayes Geo. W. laborer, house North city. ende M. J.artist, house Shel road. "4ENDERSON J.: W. attornyat-law, County Building,
boards Edwards House.
endesonW. T. carpenter, hose North city.
"ernandez Alonzo, carpenter house Cuna street.
_estiandez Deigo J.carpenter house- Bronson street. Z:ernandez Eugen~ae, laborer, hose Tolomato street. "ernandez Hubert, carver, I u~e St. George street.. iornande~z Joseph, clerk, haus Charlotte street. emnandez'Joseph, shoemaker Charlotte street. mandez Joseph ir, crverl S.:George street.
rnandez Mr's. J.V. M1erha,&z House, Charlotte street.,: ,Uernantdez, Ra'mon, sheriff, hou:e Tolomato street.
ggis m. carpenter, St., Gerge and Orange street.
IdrthJ.A. book-keeper, fo G. T. Bunting, house North
city.
NCH & 'SON, painters.'n trainers, Treasury street
house, Mulberry street.,
mS, (Hitch & Son) Traury street,
in E.(inch &SnTreasury--street.




Hopkins C. F. j r. (Hopkins Baudsket), real estateR
building. 7
House William.E. engineer, house Putnam street Howard T. H. (Howard Bros.), St. George street. HOWARD, T. H. paints and oils, St.. George str Howatt George (Geo. Myers & Co.), Tolomato stre HOWES 0. King street (Rink San Marco). house
doah street.
Hoyt A. J. builder (Bruce & Hoyt), house St. Loui Hulett Philander, house Orange street.. Hyde E. T. clerk (C. F. Hamblen), house Charlott<
Inkraham W. Milford, paints and oils, Qharlotte
house Cuna street.
Irwin John A. livery, Bridge street. Irwin John J. laborer, house Bridge street.. Irwin R. L. livery, Hospital street. Iwanowskie, Alex, boats, Marine street.
Jenks M. J. (Davis & Jenks), Charlotte street. Johnson C. E. salesman (W. Lyon & Co.), house
street.JOHNSON L. E. artist, Craddock House. Joseph B. merchant tailor, (Joseph & Myerson), St.
street.
Joseph & Myerson, clothiers, St. George street. JOYCE, E. F. Artesian Well Co., St. George,
Orange street.
Joyce. Henry, driller, Orange street.
Kane Stafford, fisherman, house Marine street Keith Mrs. W. H. house Lincolnvile. Kingsland H. P. house Shell road. Kirkpatrick T. W. Orange street. Knibloe W. E. teacher, house Orange street. Knowlton D. R. St. Augustine Mill, house Shell rt
Grove avenue.
K R(MT T.J (clerk, Mano lia Hot el),, house St. GetreIS'




ST. AUGUSTINE. DIRE CTORY. 21I
(r.J. J. hair dealer,: St. George street, house do. V2* wwoske Frank, watchman, house Cedar street.
ane H. B. agent St.Johns Railway, house New Augustine.
a ler Michael, gardener, house Charlotte street, 1,awler William, bar-tender, house Charlotte street. Lawrence L. P. ,drug clerk, boards. Cleveland House. Lee W. R. carpenter, house King street.
-Leodardy Celestial, wood, house Marine street. Leonardy Fernando, carpenter, house Marine street. Leonardy John, laborer, house Marine street. Leo-nardy. Joseph i st, carpenter, house Marine street.
-Leonardy Joseph 2d, mason, house Marine street. 'Leonardy Lewis, carpenter, house Marine street. Leonardy Mathias, laborer, house Marine street. Leurand E. C. porter, house Plaza place. Lewin A.! H. laborer, hos ot iy. Lewis 'Henry, porter, hou'.se Charlotte'street. Libby J. E. (Cook & Libby), St. Augustine Saw-mill, house Sanford street.
Llnbias, A. M.. watchman, house Charlotte, street. sLlambias D. J. printer, house Charlotte street... Llambias Jerome,- clerk, house Charlotte street-. Ll amblais Joseph F. wood dealer, Bridge street Long John" G. (mayor}, attorney-at-law, house Shell road. Lopez A. E. gunsmith, "Cuna street. Lopez A. M. clerk, house- Cuna street. Lopez Andrew, carpenter, house St. George street. Nl',Lopez Antonio, laborer, house King'street.
*",Lopez Emanuel, hunter, house Tolomato street., Lopez Ignatio, laborer, house Charlotte street.
opez James L., hunter house Cuna street.
pez Jerome, wood, house Cuna street.
.oesJ. D. rtig clerk (with Dr. E. M. Alba), osloo
Mto Oreet,
av c. punter hose Spansh stree




Lopez twanmie, clerk, Carlotte street. Lorrillard Geo. L., house St:. George street. Louis C. E. B. laborer, hoitse S-anford street. Louis Henry, laborer, house Sanford street.. Lusby J. H. clerk (C. F. Harnblen &- Co.,), house.-ange',,"', Lynch Rev. P. J. house Plaza place. LYON W. & CO. King street, cor. St. George.
MACKEY C. E. newsdealer and curiosities,S
street, house do.
MACKEY & CO..curiosities, St. George street Mac.Millan Andrevi F. house St. George street. MacWilliams W. A. attorney, Court house. MAGNOLIA HOTEL, St. George street.
Mance John N. steward Magnolia Hotel, house Ballar'd'9aii Mance & Mitchell, contractors. MANCE & COLE, builders, Bronson street. Mance, S. B. builder, house Ballard avenue. Manucy Charles, printer, house Spanish street. Manucy Mark, carpenter (with G. T. Bimting),
George street.
Markle William H. builder, house Tolomato str House.
Masters Gasper, carpenter, house St. George str
Orange.
Masters Gasper S. driver, house St. George' -stre,-dre
Orange.
Masters John, laborer, house North city. Masters John S. house Charlott ste. MASTERS MARION T. livery, Orange street,.oue o Masters Peter. laborer. house Charlotte street.
= 1 = i~ i i
eiiiii iiiii~!ii iii i =iii= =~i= iii'iiii = ii[ i = "i = "




ST._ AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. .23
RS .PETER C. Mason, house Charlotte street.
Sylvester,, blacksmith, Hypolita street, house
,,North city.
rs William I. masonhouse Orange street.
Ride Edward, plumber, house San Marco.
alFrank, prin ter, St. -George street.
'cCLELLAND J.A. St. Albans House, St. George street. ..McClelland, S. St. Albans house, St. George street.
Mc~obbErnest, carpenter, house Spanish street: McEuen David, carpenter,. St. Johns House. McGave James, laborer, house Charlotte street. McGuire David, carpenter, house. North city. ,McGuire Edward, carpenter, house Shell road. .-,.McGuire, J. A.. builder, house Shell road.
McLean Rev. C. C. pastor M., E. Church, house Bronson
street.
McNeil John R.- clerk (C. F. Hamblen), Charlotte street. M,!,eltcher William-, driver, house Bronson street. Mickler Daniel, laborer, -house Marine street. Mickler Ernest F.. boards. Marine street. ;4Mickler James J. wood,: Charlotte street.* MUickler: Paul: A. hunter,, house Charlotte street.
A-..Mickler William, civil engineer, house Charlotte street. M-,,-iller Miss E. E. Hasseltine. House, St. George street. fisson E. jeweller, and curiosity dealer, St. George
-street, house do.
Mitchell M. carpenter, house St. George street. Mchell -W. H. (Manc'e & Mitchell) St. George 'street.,
Mon$on Anthony., boats, Charlotte street.
onson Anthony, (Monson & Campbell), boots and shoes,
Charlotte street.
O9NSON & CAM PBE LL, .boots and shoes, Charlotte
Spy ,,FRITCHIFF, livery, Orange street, house
gi ae*- arot tet




Moody William, elerk (C. F. Hamblen & Co.), Cha', lt,,",, MOUREY WM., paper hangings, -glass, etc., cor.-Sat-'
and Cinwa streets.
VMourgon L. E. dyer, house Charlotte street. MUNDAY MISS L. S. ladies' academy, CedarM Museum The, opposite Fort Marion near. city gat Myers George(GIeo. Myers & Co.), ouseBronso Myers George & Co. grocers, King street. Myerson Alfred (Joseph & Myerson), house Char Myrick S. steward St. Augustine Hotel.
Nelligan H. H. St. George House. NELSON JOSEPH F. painter, house harlotte
Nelson Mrs. Dora, house Charlotte street. Nelson Thomas H. clerk with B. Genovar, boarc
lotte street.
Nesbitt R. W.-road master J. St. A. & H. R. R. Noda A. J. house Hypolita street.
Ocean View House, Bay street. OLIVEROS BARTOLA, house St. George str
city gates.
OLIVER.OS B. F. county clerk, notary publicand
sioner of deeds for New York, County building
St. George street.
Oliveros Ernest, clerk (C. F. Hamblen house Sp Opdike M W. carpenter, Marine street. Opera House, St. George street.
i
Pacetti Albert, mason, house North cit Pacetti Bartola E. pilot, house North city Pacetti D. F. saloon Charlotte st., house Cunastre Pacetti S. J. carpenter, Tolomato street, house No Pacetti Thomas A. agent, Cuna street. Pacetty A. N. sodla-water, Charlotte street. Pacetty B. A. mason, house North city. Pacetty B. T.mason, house North city.




$T. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 25
Felix, bake, Charl
dtty Gabriel, viwSt. George street, house St. Georg
S sreet.
Fcetty Joseph.R. baker, Charlotte street.,
Philicer Antonio, laborer, house North city.
Palramer E. L. house North city.
C-.PALMER W. W., prop't Magnolia Hotel, house Ravenswood.
PAPYGASPR NSt. Albans House, house Shell road.
PAPY T. M., St. Albans dining rooms, S.George street.
PAPY O.-F. livery stable, house- Shell road.I
Paris H. -B. clerk, Bridge street.
-Paris Robert, "dry goods- Gordon block, house Bridge street.
PARKER. E. C. Rolleston House,
Peck John E. MD. cor. St. George and Treasury streets.,
Peebles R. P. conductor J. St. A. & H. R. R.
Pellicer Andrew j. sen. carpenter, house Hypolita street.
PELLICER -ANDREW J. jr., tinner- and plumber, Charlotte s treet, house- Bridge street.
Pendleton John,, house Hospital street.,
same.
PENNINGTON, -H. J., Philadelphia House, Tolomato'
-street.
Pe rpal Chas. F.. clerk, house St. -George street.
Perpall Chas. W. laborer, house St. George street.
Perpall Francis E. saloon Bay street,, house Cuna street.
Perpall William G. bartender, house St. George street.
Perry Roscee groceries and provisions Ceilland street.
Phares J. B. Sulzner & Phares, North -city.
Phelps Robert B. carpenter, house North city.
.Phillips A,. B. dentist, Bay "street.
'Phillips Johni Lott, house St. George street.
Pinkham W.S. M. Ocean View,, Bay street.'
Pollock: C. G.,: Florida House, St: George street.
Pomar A.'D. citrpenter,: Spanish Street.
Pomr Brtoalaborer, house Spanish' stet.
Po.mar (Christnnher, whe elwela-ht 'N w St Ananistine.
YoaC .lbrr hus ot iy.




xiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiisi
R6 S.-UUTN lRCTORVfH.S
Pom r Jos p i ce-c e m St G e rg ......h.' usi Siiiiiiiii "iiiiii~ii
Pomar, William, laborer, house Spanish. street Ponce Alonzo, laborer, house Spanish street Ponce James A. hiter, hoise Spanish street
Ponce James B. carpeterFort street.. PONCE M. J. millinery, cor. Fort and Charlott
Ponce William G. agent, St George street. Poor Daniel A. house Bravo street.
PROCTOR JOHN, St. Sebastian Mills. Pullis Washington, house Brid street
QUEST & MITCHELL, boots and shoes,
eli iiiiiiiiiii iiiii i e jeii 1 ei, ii
street.
Quigley J B. grocer, North city. Quigley J. O. carpenter, .North .city. Quigley J. W. carpenter, North city.
Rainey J. K., M. D. Rainey's building, St. Georgesrt' Ranty Felix, carpenter, Shell road. Ranty Joseph, light-keeper, Anastacia Island. Reed Morton, Sanford street.- .. .....
REHNBERG GUSTAV, jeweller, St. George.sre
house same.
REHNBERG PAUL, j ewell er, Treas ury st., housste Relf J. S. Ice Co. Bridge street. Relf Miss L. E. (cashier, W. Lyon & 0o.), boards.Big
street.
'Reyes Raymond, Marine street. REYES WILLIAM J St. Augustinesaw-millBig.
street, house Charlotte street. Reynolds Burnett S. Cedar street. Reynolds Mrs. C. O. (Rose Garden), Cedar street. Rice Samuel, carpenter, house North city. Ridell John, painter, St. George street.Rogero A. D. Charlotte street.. Rogero Nicholas, cigars, St. George street,, cor. Iipioiiiiii Rogero Raymond, printer, St. George street, cor. H- Iiiii!.
.... ,@, o.............. ..............,., ,,I~ ii =i~i i i~ iiiiii > 8
riOiiiiiioiiiiii ~i ii




n~ryM. Oio venue: and Shell road.
STON HOUE., St. :George street.
Wilim, wthmaker, S.George street.,
te,,Rv. Ehouse -Bidge street.
Broha hcn street.
i~f iih iii ii
Willia H. clek (Sabin, Moulton & Co.), house
Spaish sret.
Ras Richad manner Cub Stables, house. Spanish
Sabae R.1-P. bots an shoes, Treasury, corner Tolomato,
t -incin D. (Sbin, Multon &Co.), -St. George street. iA M(CiiCOidyoods, 'Rainey building..
1alterJ D. Bhouse Orange-street.
-ad Emo1atman, house Marine street.
nd Fran V. houe Marine street.
ncb Joseph boat 'n, house Marine street. Sanche Josep S." 1ots Marine street. SANCHEZ .paier, boards Hypolita street.
Snchez Ve i'co,, Spnish, consul, -corner Hospital and
KI Tstret
upt'a~ce V. (Sachez' Son), King, corner Hypolita St. 'ndhe Will mJ. (Sn chez & Son), King, corner Hypo1ia street.
SN MARCO HOTEL.- Shell road.
Sage V. I. huse Raenswood.
ru euChare F. curisities, under-,St. Augustine Hotel.011 HoseSt., George street. ".1,SEAEY .D.manaer Hotel San Marco.
"S-id' 2ewck W I inet -maker (with G. T., Buting),
boads t-WH oynton's
t~at-la cerk, Sanish street.
'C'esi m .Tlrato street.
_6 r (DrpE. M." Alba), house, Toloedu lr
ii~iim4_4 0,i viiiiiiiiiiiii
*,,lr,(3,Geoazpnih8rmt:,




SHARP E. P. fruit and confectionery, St. Ge Sherman Willinam Art. Well, St. Francis st Shine Willia. F., M.D. Bridge street. Short Howard, Florida House, St. George-stree SISTERS ST. JOSEPH'S CONVENT, St. Ijfr Silcox & Carpenter, Spanish street. Skills J. T. St., Augustine Hotel. Sloggett Dr. H. C. (E. F.. L. & L. C o.), King street. Smith Franklin, Villa Zoradia, King street. Smith F. F., M.D. Custom House, boards Magnolia Smith H. B. boards St. George House.
inow H. M Tr.. e .o. Cha .t .
Smith James, clerk, Shell road. Smith John, baker, St. .George street, house sa Smith J. Hayden, curiosities, Hypolita street Smith J. Milton, clerk, ane r ,Charlotte s Smith o0. B. (W. Lyon & Co.), house Shell road. Snow H. M. Transfer Co. Charlotte street. Sommey P. A. clerk (Paris &'Co.), ,house Shenadh
street.
Spear M A. C. St. George street. Speissegger T. W. & Sons, drugs, Bay street, hoei
Orange and Tolomato streets.
SPENCER J. A. dry goods and groceries, Bridge Spencer Rev. M. agent, Orange street. Stafford O. N. Shell road.
STEA1 ii I i E
Stanbury Mrs. S. C. St. George street. ST. AUGUSTINE HOTEL,.Plaza street. ST. AUGUSTINE GAS CO. W. P.. Eichbaumt, sut. St. Augustine Water Works, E. F. Joyce, superintendnt St. Johns Railway Depot, New Augustinte. Stevens L. H. painter, North city.' Stevens Sydney G. St. George street. Steward J. N. dry goods, Charlotte street. STEWART CHARLES, building mover, house Spns
street.
Stickney Mrs. J. B. Shell road. SULZNER & PHARES, music store, Treasury 'ste,




ST'. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 29
Fredeik(uzer & Phares ), house Shell road.,
L.A. carpenter, house South Agstie
e ney Morgan, saddler, St. Gog tet
H an Miss Katie A.Ocean View Hotel.
7T4untin -W. -S. grocer, cor. St. George and Orange streets. T'aylor H. clerk (Sabin, Moulton &Co.), house Bridges.
near St. George street.
Tayloi:Rs, H. Seaside House, Bridge street., Thomas -Mrs. J'. C. millinery, Treasury street. Thomas J.C. house Treasury street. Tower:G., M. (G. M_. Tiow er &Co.) King street, house Putnam street.*
Tracey "Albert, Major, U. S. A. house cor. St. George and
'.Hypolita, streets'.
TRAVER. JAMES W. hardware, St. George street. 'Trea W. J(. (with- C. F. Hamblen), King street. .Triay, J. A. mason, house North city. Triay Phillip R. mason, house North- city. Tyler'Charles, Tyler House, corner King and St. George
streets.
Tyler L. H. Tyler House, corner King and S-t,. George
streets.
*Ucko~s John, barber,-,St. George street. Updike Fred W. carpenter, Marine street. Updike- George F. restaurants,, Charlotte street. Updike George M. restaurant Bay, street. Upton. B. -:F. photographer,- Hypolita street. Usina Albert, shoemaker,. house. North city. Usina Frank A. carpenter, St. George street. thina Joseph, printer, Cuna street. U.,Jsin'a M. S. shoemaker,: Shell. road.
Taitui Phiip ca)enter, Marin'e street.
,",AIlL E, E. St. Augustine Hotel.




Va Dorn4 The, ingD s in t. ret VanGemmind C. cartr hoeNot i Vaueht J. F-carpeter. N
1 der Charles J. (W. FLona),hueBrde t house o. I ~ba
altonl Gheog WKing teet
Yoelso Mohnm Letor. R.Abot.nin ot iy WstenUet. eegaIao
WHIe carbotsr, Nrth esit
-Whiter R.acerk Carte Flrdtos.
-WalteridbiGeog Flerid osSt.eresr Watsn Jmhs, grilor, S. Gegste. W14iley William, ba erc Chrltt stet WhicottJohnF.Ptrne a sret WHIeE L. P. botis esStGeretet. White 1 R.cek hrote tret
Whitney Ton Pro iRavnwod .- hine P. S t. Auusin ei-s) p ns treb ars ..
Magnlia otel




17" AUCWSTINE DIRECTORY.
31
G. Shell road
f 10 bn L. St. George stre eA,
"'Rev. S- T. pastor Presbyterian Church, parsonage
George street,,
U6:M. Orange $,treet.,
ge 'L. W. blacks.mitb...
th 'M',Henry, carpeDfer Bravo. street.
0LTZ-C BRO,'budde rs,'Rh
aven ue.
ltz' eS, -H-,, (C... WoItz .,& Bro,, ca-rpenter,- house
Rhodes avc%,ue
Woltz J, -W,,.. Ul
woltz &--Bro..), b ilder,, h 'Ouse- Bridge St. Woltz Robert ;(C Molt & Bro") builder' house Bravo
Woodall. SarntieI,.(A An,. Hou e), 0 street.
,Wworden W G., E ib C"tric GaS: 7CO'.
w,_Orth Misis t.
ni's -st t'
ith'a e Antonio, saloon, S ani sh, ree
es Rafael ass r c
iel s6-t S, ish, st'e
YAIkKEL....._-m ''t eet
Ai I On-, S-t.,,, G' rge s.r
Youhg k n.. ..,Georgre stre-6t.'-




SI
MRS
4
'T'T
T he' Lorillard VillA, St. Augustifte




'ST., A GUSTING DIRECTORY,
COLORED.
ey, laborer ,,
Ada'lms Ton edarstreet.
T
A4ams, GQQTge, tailor,' Bridgi2 street.
neyjr' I b orer Linc Inv*11e., Acla m" s To a 0 1
"A d sjitme 1ab' ret n 'oln v'll e.
m S'y 0 Li c 11.
44 1 1- ,A-, rettL. hackniaft.
Major hae ,ah,,., ,,Washingtofi street-,
''tr ag WilliamL N,
coo orth -city.
Aftii' john,,.ba b6r, house L'ifteolnvill'
4,,,- m ts lvo'ry, Rev'i Wtshington street.
e,'Chailes, IerkC...F.",Hamble.fi, Lincolriville.
n S t,,6ven laborer treet.
'emijlami /ashingto'n, s
enjami, Philli'' lab.ore Spanisbstreptevja in William','boAfoia ih I vitl
'B ujamin, Mward, b'oatmaL
paniss-tteet.
Blan eb rd C laborer, I St., 'Georae streef
. ,eUry;ftnt Aienouder clerk, W. on,& Co., Lin'61nville.
f y
Ch4rl ,Qr Li 'Odlnv e
SajW Marine, gAre t
Ad' kir,,er Lin& I
*11 a,
Au in 0 elUncolnville.
Or gp s t 'e',
C borer,' Ia hell, road
a t6 al -, -1 A-b b f e, r, Lin*c6lywille.
0 r1rr
tP, rel Lincojnville.
!NP44Iabover, 1 iuco'M6flte.
horer An'' Inville y A C,
1- A
y,
e! 'AV;




B4 ST'eAUGUSTINE DIRECTORY
Burn Abram,~ laborer Lincolqinle
Bagley Frank, laborer, Lincolnvile Brown Daniel-, laborer, Lincolnvi1l1e. Brint Richard, laborer, Lincolnvile' Blanchard Jos. F. S. house St. George tet JBloxham Robert,, house Lincolninl Brwn Judge, house Lincohnille. Brs Johin L. house Liniolnvle
Burs Charles, laborer, Linclnile. Burin s Robert, laborer, Lin c~ln vile.
Clark Benjamin, mattress-makr Charltt 1tet Crosby Samuel, painter, 0ra'ng street. Crosby Sheppard, laborerLnolvle Cassnmay James, hackmn Linclille Cassmay Moses, draynfian, S~panihrtret Clavan Charles, livery, Shennoslob street Clavan William, livery, Slhennodohste. Clavan Calvin, drayman, Tolo mato stret Ceesor' James, laborer, Lincolnville. Catlin Charles C. laborer, Libohwilde. Chambers Robert, laborer, Aiclvile Collin~s Cha~rles W. waiter tin'c6hvle Cirosby Richard, waiter, ic!lvle Coleman Isaac, laborer, Linclvile Colsomp Simon, laborer, Northct. Crosby Phillip, laborer, Linclvl Coniors Robert laboe iclvl.
Clark Gorge hos2iconvle qJ1wy . atrClvlndHue




iels Everet drer, Lincohwville.
mi rtt Wi 'boamn, Lincolnville. 'Da *ieIs John borere, Li colnville.
Deree Thoms Alaborer Lincolnville.
lvenport Pete,'laborer, Lincolnville.
Dennison Marin, laborer, Lincolpville. D)a vis Gasper lborer,- Lincolnville.
]Edwards -Geore oysters, Washington street. Emmerly Henr M. carpenter, Artillery Lanae. Edwards Warrx, laborer, Lincolnville. Eugiene Eddie laborer, Lincolnville. 'Evan~s Thom.s house Lincolnville.
-Foward 'Michl, laborer, Lincolnville. Flmmi ng Heny-F. drayman, Washington street. F,'innhish, May, laorer, Lincolnville. Farmer John, borerr, Lincolnville. 'Felder Rev. J-Lincolnville.
Floyd Adam, yrayan, Lincolnville. Fields'Ad-am I orer, house Spanish -Alley..
Flagg James barber, Charlotte Street.
,Gibbs Lymas, very, Washington street.
*'Granger, Frank drayrnan, Bay stret GeQray Pablo, laborer, Linicolnville. Growls James -rayman, St. Francis street. Glenn Tone aier StL George street.
Green Daniel lborer,- Lincolnville. GrantBenjamn. laborer .Liricolnville.
risson Dennis laborer,. Linfcolnville.
hthrs ill'a, Jaborer, Lin"colnville.
over Henry bo'trnan, Marinie street.
enWilliam boatmanW, inlaville.
aint, Geo rg laorLincolnvillee.
EkRnkhr, Mi:ahewer, trolnville




Harrison Jhnr, labrr ic~vle icksto Richard, wcler,Chrotsre. Hamnd da, aiter, LJinco1nile
gHsmmon, hEmanwe, Linnvle
ganieh EHardy, hackman, L'inclvle
.glish Lewis H. hack~man Linon'le Iglish Julius, laborer, htous Liclvi.4
JoQhnson Frank, gardener, Linconln e Jenkins Henry, laborer, iclvle Jenkins Abraha~m, laborer, Lnonvle Johnson William, laborerLnonvle Johnston H. S. laborer, Orne tee. ackson Jonas, laborer, Linc&lvle ohnson Moses, laborer, Linqolile. Jackson Nathaniel, laborer, Line lnvle Jones H. J. laborer, LiuncbhwilIe l
Jackson Davis, laborer, Lincolh 'ile. Jackson David E. laborer, Lincolnv&1Je. Jordan Jacob, teacher, Lin69lnvle Jackson Samuel, laborer, Linco1nile J ackson Warren,. produce, Charot o tret Jackson Miles, laborer, Linclvle Johnson Jerome, laborer, iclnVle Jones James, laborerLnon'le Jones Isaac, laborer, Jiconile Jones Harry, laborerLnonil. QJones Robert, lboeLnclvl. Jordan Samuel, aoeLnonil.' Jhnson Robertlbrr iclvle
JaksoLeihos iclvl.
JenkisPins os iclvle




AUGUSTINE ]DIRECTORY. 37T7
laborer Lincoln.ville.
'Joseph B. labo r., Lin:'oln
re C villee
James, house Ll'ncolnville.
ki s Julius, in laborer, Lincolnville.
wrench
v ph te incolnville.
Jose wai r, L'
tt awrence J. M. head-waiter; Spanish street. ,.","Lee Butler, m6asom: Lincoinville. Linington John, laborer, LincoInville.
Leonardy'Johnf'hackman, Lincolfiville.
London.Jam.es, laborer, Linco'lnville.
Lawrence Andrew., hackman, Lincolnville.
Longwood Andrew,, peddler, Lincolnville.
_ 3long John AAaborer, Lincodn-ville.
*Xartin..-Lewis,' drayman, Lincolnville ''McKinney Richard' waiter, -Lincolnville-,
M ungin Jack, drayman, Lincolnville.
Martin Alexander, mason, Spanish, street.
Martin Mariano, mas-on, Orange street.
Maran', William-, driver,- Lincolnville.
Martin, Be.n, maso .,Orange street.
.,_,#, :Marti n-S.tephen, mason, Orange street.
-'Mc Ke ever- Abraham,, I laborer, L.incolnville. MPrrilIjames H. gardener, Lincolnville.
'Moris James, mas on, Bronson'street.
Moore 1. saac,. Porter, Lincolnville.
McKinne y Ric'hafd, Jr.,; waiter, Lincoltiville.
-Macon Wilfred, waiter Lincolnville.
cMillen James S.,carpenter North city.
Frank E. hack/man,., Lincolnville.
cMillan A. R"camenter North city.
17
0,rgan Samuel laborer Lincolnville.'
X&n, e, jami s T., laborer, LiticolnvHle.
orer, L n1 colnville.
uxt Alexander, labore, Liacol
je I Ale4, carpente r, Lincolnrille.
1-1 barber', Charlo tte st -house Cedar':'..
01




Martin Lewis, Jr., draymar, Liolvil. Morand N., M. laborer, Lincolnvill McMillan Nelson, carpenter, Lincolnville. Moore James, boatman, Lincolnville. Myers, William, laborer, Lincolnville. McDuffie Washington, drayman, Bay shore. Morgan Solomon, laborer, Bay shore. Mason, Robert, shoemaker, Hospital street shop. McKnight Elija, laborer, LincoInville. Mack Sam, laborer, Lincolnville. Moore Jasper, laborer, Lincolnville. Mabry Charles, laborer, Lincolnville. Myers Moses, laborer, Lincolnville. McCormack Joe, laborer, Lincolnville. Martin John, laborer, Lincolnville. Munford Sutton, gardener, Tolomato street. McCoy James, house Lincolnville.
Nattiel William, Lincolnville. Nattiel Richard, Lincolnville. Nattiel William 3d, Lincolnville. Nattiel Frank, Lincolnville. Newman James H. Washington street. Nelson Richard R. Lincolnville. Nesbey Jacob, Lincolnville. Nelson A. B. house Lincolnville.
Osborne Emanuel, Marine street. Osborne William, Marine street.
Papy Antonio, waiter, North city. Papy D. M. groceries, Washington street. Papy A. F. barber, Washington street. Papy John, laborer, Lincolnville. Papino John, city marshal, mason, Lifcolnville. Papino Emanuel, waiter, Lincolnville. Pierson James, livery, Lincolnville. Pierson Mac, laborer, Lincolnville
kF




.......ST.AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Q
.. iiiiaiiilaborer, Lincolnville.
. obsGus. labor-er, Lincolnville.
B% salaamm,. laborer, Lincolnville.'
eJoseph, la borer,,Lnonvle
amUmer Joseph, drayman, house Charlotte street'Reddick Pierce, cook, Charlotte street.
ReuL Charles, laborer, Lincolnville.
Rileyr H'enry, laborer, Lincolnville.
.Riley benjamin, Shell road.
Robinson John, laborer, ]Lincolnville.
Jtochell1- Henry, laborer,- Lincolnville.
Roach, John, laborer, Lincolnville.
* icadsn hmalaborer, Lincolnville.
Robinson Samuel, laborer, Linclnile.
Ros~s.James, laborer, Lincolnville.
Robinson Benjamin, laborer, Lincolnville.
Robinson Robert, house Lincolnville.
Redmond John, house Lincolnville.0
Robinson B. house Lincolnville.
..,,Step'hens Domingo, laborer, Lincolnville. $Sessions Daniel, gardener, Lincolnville. Stewart Jake, laborer, Lincolnville.
Savell-e Bartola, -painter,, Lincolnville.
Sanks Adam, laborer, Lincolnville.
Savelle Frank, porter, Lincolnville.
Savellep James, laorr Linco.lnville.
Sanders Sampson, laborer, Lincolnville.
Sanders: August, hackman, Lincolnville.
Simmons William S. laborer, Lincolnville.'
S'mall John, laborer, Lincolnville.,
N :Sharpe George H. clerk, Lincolnville. ,.$anders James;hcmn Lintolnville.
Se at.Jamies, laborer, Lin::colnville. 'Sct Rev' ':). "S. Lincolnville. 3~ith 1bnhrt, Iaborer,,T.inconnvill0 1b
4"
?i i t mslaoe'Licl,'ie.




Savelly ML S. laborer, Lincolnville. Stiner William, wood, Shell road. Saunders James Lee, laborer, Lincolnville. Sylvester John, house Lincolnville.
Thomas James B. -merchant, Washington street. Tillman, Tiby, mason, Lincolnville. Thomas Frank, laborer, LincoIville. Thomas William, laborer, Lincolnville. Turner David, laborer, Lincolntrille. Tatum Hamilton, laborer, Lincolnville. Thompson Rev. Thomas, Lincolnville. Trottman Joseph, driver, Lincohiville. Tomberlin Stephen, laborer, Lincolnville.
Valley Michael, laborer, Lincolrville, Valley Joseph, laborer, Lincolnville. Van Dyke Wm. A. carpenter, house Lincolnvill
Welters' restaurant, Charlotte street, corner Tr Welters John A. painter, Lincolnville. Welters Michael, painter, Lincolnville. Williams William, painter, Lincolnville. Walton Joseph, drayman, Lincolnville. Williams John, waiter, Lincolnville. Welters David, painter, Lincolnville. Waiters, William, butcher, Lincolnville. Whertas Toney, painter, Bridge street, Wilson Jacob, gardener, St. George street. Windley Morris, driver, Lincolnville. Welters Robert W. restaurant, Charlotte street. Witsell F. E. collector customs, Spanish street. Williams Thomas, laborer, Lincolnville. Williams Simon, laborer, Lincolnville. Wintley Henry, laborer, Lincolnville. Whertas Robert, painter, Lincolnville. Wilson B. Sandv. laborer. Marine street.




ST.' AUGUSTINE 'DIRECTORY. 4
r,7 la borer, LincolInvle
te Lewis, waiter, Lincolniville.,
& ~' Mielborer, Lincolnville.
msAlfred A. waiter, Lincolnville.
by John, laborer, Lincolnville.
fV1liams Thomas, Jr. hack-man, Lincolnville.
a~singonFred, hackman, North- city. Wing F. R. S. waiter, Lincolnville. Williams David, waiter, Lincolnville. .Wi'se Moses, laborer, Lincolnville. Wilson Dan, laborer, Linciolnville. White Charles, bill-poster, house Lincolnville. 'Wallace Robert, house Lincolnville. Warren Jeff. waiter, house Lincolnville.
Youig_ Charles,,.hackman, Hospital street. Young F.'D. S. waiter, Hospital, street.
4,*a




Wholesale and Reail Dealer in
WOODEN WARE, TIN WARE,
Edge Tools, Garden Tools, Table and Podket Cu
and House FuraisiM9 Goods..
- ALSO
fRON PIPE AND PLUallEm
LAM PS,
F/RE /RON SETS, Etc., Etc.
Estimates given for Furnishing Hotels a
Large Boarding Houses.
CONTRACTORS' AND CARPENTERS' SUPPLIES AT LOWEST RE
St. George St., abo-ve una,
ST. AUGUSTINE., FLORIDA.




ii
7 9.,%ET; HAR ST-. ;GEORGE ST WPIAUL .E H NBE RG,
Manufacturer of
atrSea- Bean;, ad Shell Jewelly,
MOUNTED IN SOLID GOLD AND SIL..VER.
Or ders by Mail rop tly Attended too.
*SPECIAL PRI CES TO DEALERS.
Ivand Iantn a 1mia srene gy
A SPECIALTY.
LARGE STOCK OF SHELLS ALWAYS ON HAND.
Address
rPAUL REHNBERG, BOX 24,
ST. UGUTIN., LORDA'




ST. GEORGE ST.
Opposite Opera House, one block from Plaza and otOfie
This house has sunny rooms, wth eadsadi
newly furnished throughout. a
commo date Sixty guets
TERMS,, 8Q.00 to $3.0&OOA .....
S. MCCLELAN' rpit.
S-F GEORGE ST,- OPP. OPERAHUE FIRST CLASS TABLE., 0- 0
0- BOAR13BY~ TH DA RW-EV
Wedding Parties, Dinners andSpessulida
4Z 1v-14A :
FomrPoreo fFoiaHue




ENE= V
4 1
2 X-RAIL IL-K JLAJLA, a JLJLJLALJLJLJLJLJL p
YTO
OH'NSO-N
P ,O.R '"E'AIIT
AND
RTIST AjqD CAPE
A E's-L-Lil-K
IAO OR
, 4K
"Irl




Florida P a eLkc-i i
EDWARD P'.SAP
-Indian~ ivrep Ortnges of thJelQ'z-,
itg in, any, quantity, Paced an
Shipped to ayjd-es
MAILI -eRD
sleGEOvGE ScZTy
(OPST LRD OS"
St A4lrd'.




, Ttl
- G C A .PO.
Ma manufacturer of .
I*,g a t, 0 ir and 13 oar'
Tu zh
JEWEL yl
-ch es,
Cloc eTyelp, -.Re.Da ed.
AR, IJ\I SI*, .. URIOSITIIIES* Wis
TI)
U-L
Opposite,- theL, Lorri 11 rd H
a V I a.,
AU G U Sr I N'
L




-Tiswel nowop a se-uaso. TU0'
1oatio-n is, within
I~~ WF P1P
TERM $2.00 PER:, DAY-,
Spe cial1' Rates by the Weeok ,Mit Mc
Season.
Mrs J. E. Gr




MEJN S T AUCUSTINE M I.10: 71IA
277 2Ps
TOLA TOIf T
8 5 31
; 73,e74 4-9 26 41 4/ 7/ ~ ~ ~ 'ir '-72 22 8M 4
S W3 L2 ANA A2IA 64







t. Auge, FlIori~d
The Nane. The city ef St. Augustine (Ciudad de San Augustin) received its name from' its founder, Pedro IMenendez de Aviles, who took possession-of the place in the iname of Philip II,_ 'in g of Spin, on the 86h day of' SepmberL Ais he had arrived on the
cot the 28th ''f the preceding. month, the day dedicated to St. Augustine,- he was fed.to name the city 1in honor of thnat celebrated Latin Father. The Indians whom he found there -called the place Selooe, or Seloy, from th-e riubmerous dolphins (porpoises) seen albu g the shore; the Spaniards had
.already named the harbor, which has
:ne entrance at the norh aid als at
.eight feet deep at low tide, "The
River' of Dol- pihmns."
Sitaton This city, celeTbatted for its! an tiquity, romantic
history the peu liarity of its build1n0"s the salubrity of its climate, and
e geniality of its people, is built on th 'uher part of a peninsula,
Av mles from the sa, between the
Vatan zas and the St.-Se bast ia n rq~vers,' and is a The Old Ci1ty Gates, port, of entry, and
the Icapital of St. John's County,, Florida. Its latitude is 290, 48' n'northl its lonvgitude 810.u west. And it is about 3o miles south




Tallahassee. It is separated from the sea by Anastasi Island Matanzas Riiver, forming a safe harbor about onealf mile in with some 20 feet depth of water. A triangilation of the hadi made by the U.- S. Coast Survey in 1859, whc1 of the rise of the tide 4.2 feet. The site of the city is level and ele only about 12 feet above the water. It is in the form of a parallel and extends along the harbor about one mile, having the old Fort 1 on the north, and the U. S. Barracks on the south. Its width is ''three-quares
of -a mike-T
tForange
date and toh l
groves, o so
a round h
to it 'a o e.............
rural aset
The entnT g a t,
and are s tpto it' thr
c .e...n o.hlansn..n the bloo an A
brigyhtverd-e
of these f t u
tropical e s ta o
is very c
S t. Francis Street, ing.
The Streets. After the manner of the old country, and sake of shade, the streets were laid out very narrow. They width from seven toeighteen or twenty feet, and thus remind oneo streets of Venice. They generally intersect each other at right an'l and are said to have been paved in ancient times with "coquina, a o-,. cretion of shells and sand quarried on Anastasia Islaind. Commni at the harbor, the first street running north and south is Bay Ste. which is the widest in the city and overlooks the water.- Then runnng parallel and west of it, is Charlotte Street, then severally and in the sm direction, St. George, Tolomato and Hospital -Streets. Beginninga Fort Marion on the north, the streets extending east and west aref'n after the other, Orange, Cunia, St. Hypolita, Treasury-the narrdet of all-King, Bridge and St. Francis Streets. In addition to tee thoroughfares the city has several lanes and promenades. Thedrv




t through. .King Street, with its orange trees and magnoa' Paa, is one of the finest in the city. St. George Street has
t cowpicuous buildings,, and Bay, Street affords fine views of the
hatthe fort, and the light-house on Anastasia -Island.
is ccont f te ity, 1769, Dr. William Stork says: "The
are regularly laid out and intersect each other at right angles. They are built narrow to afford shade. The town is about half a mile helength, regularly fortified with bastions, half bastions, .and a ditch. Besides the works it has another sort of fortification, very singular, but 'well adapted against the Indians, an_ enemy the '
Spaniards had, most to fear.i It consists of several rows of Palmetto trees, planted veryL close along the ditch, u'p Lto 'the parapet. Their, ,Pointed leaves are so many ck eveaeux-de-frize, which make it entirey impenetrable. The two southern bastions are built -of 'stone."l W. C. Brvant said of the streets in- 184 : "Ibave, called the streets. narrow. In"'few'places-are they wide "nowrb to allow two, car-; rinages to pass abreast. I'& was told that they were not originally intended for -carriagre, and- that in, the time The Palmetto Tree.
when the town belonged to Spain, many of them were floored with-an artificial stone composed of shells, and mortar, -which in this climate tahds and keeps the hardness of rock; and that no other vehicle than a hnd-baro ws allowed to pass over them. In some places- you see rem ant ofti nin avement, but for the -most part it has been
galbnd into dust unde r th vWheels of the carts and carriages introduced




dence of Mr. H. P. Kingsland, the Catholic Cemetey,.and
Grove, noted for thel grand avenues of live oaks, which are
draped with Spanish moss. Other pleasant drives are to Pone Spring, the Bridge of Sighs and Centur Oak, the Genev; Grove, Dr. Vedder's, Hildreth's and Williams plantations.
Anastasia island. This narrow strip of land extends coast about eighteen miles, and forms a natural breakwater fo from which it is separated by Matanzas River. Its average about half a mile. The inl
City are at the north
southern points ofthe a main channel be- ing at th
Near this entrance sad tn ds
Lic ht-house, one =-of the,-ols
structures of the kind on
lantic coast. It rises to.1
of 164 feet, and was buit
at-a cost of more _thanThe cost of the lantern
sends its light out many les
the sea was some $16,00.W
a good engraving ti i-oltl
Pharos here. It will well
visitor to ascend thesteps
the magnificent -v ie w p
both from the ocean a
Not far from this lofty anc
tia twe, aybe. The Light-house, Anastasia Island. se the un,6i tial. tower, may be T seen euse
the old Spanish light-house, erected towards the close ofthe tury, and which was, on the 20th of June, 1880,,carried aw violence of a storm. A cannon was at one time placed on notice of an approaching vessel.
Coquina Quarries. The shellstone, or Coquina quarried material for nsonry has been for ages taken aren't far dist the liht-house. This coquina is formed by the action of sea shells and sand. The concretion, though not very hard, is drbe and is to some extent still used for building purposes.




:hi brAt the suhr emlu of tims he Spnirsln rp ale
;M itmais oe hotld Maanzists, ote acouetnt o yar 8ud loffaRn thes shrepIa s be reachednut mieh sot
-tegh Sprng.d "t eher is, as a teri, sthree eigh et o
Jth
hotlestns Block oiitr
Mtnat as bonnot fat ovri, but iscdrivnt asideoo
|y
fisbig fr the currte. Ahre tnhy veseafched flaoheet ofoJea
edom St uuneMtna.n16,an eea ude
LZ Boi nly massacred "notr ias enchme, bthe as le Luthehe
as~~~~~~~~~ca~ Adlatao Perfeadzd vls e.O isite~~~~~~~~Mtazs aotMrobth.a i hs swl si
d snguar apeaanc. Teyaremotlycostrig o
frs wtr
..
bolnr
j fromabash]
kN|
a nr
fetblw
I
fitif
dep uh
iste oc
|1
r Rolestn'sB16c. of t i




the street, with amjple balconies'phajeting fro the second stor iA
approach so near'to the balconies opposite that conversatiM i be. carried on across the street. The roofs in former tie) and, as in Naples, covered with flowers. The outward as evS old two-storied Spanish buildings is not particularly invite courts and gardens in the rear of many of them, are teeming rarest plants flowers and fruits of this delicious climate. The within. In contrast with these antiquated coquina buildings, projecting balconies ,and windows, many modern houses 1 b
erected by gentlemen from the North, which decidedly im appearance of the city, Among the tasteful buildings on
-Ila
Sunnyside. the Residence of Capt, T. F. lous
Street, may be noticed the handsome housepf Mr. A. JAlex Kentucky, and the fine grounds and residence of the late Hohr down, of New York. On the same street, north of the Pla the well-constructed mansion of the Rt. Rev. Bishop Moi street is also beautified by the pleasant residence of Mr. R. D. of New York; the beautiful estate -of Vr. J. L. Wilson, of Frst Mass.; the winter home of Col. Tyler, whose garden about it
plants, and is also noted for its nobledateitee; theele and stylish buildings, with the windmill, of Mr. Georg New York; and the tastefully arranged garden of Mr. J. P. F the same city. The residence of Capt. T. F. House,kno b
pretty name of "Sunnvside is with its handsome decor
.................. li Iiiiiliiliiiiiiiiiiiiiii~ iiiiiiiii iiiii i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiililiiiiiliiii i iiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiii iii ii i !illiii i i ii~iiii!i i 4%ii




to the city.- Mrs. Ball's house, the approach to which
h a splendid orange grove, on Tolomato Street, is in some resitek odel; and the home of Mr. -Gilbert, as well as that' of Dr. A.
LaerOn, whose orange grove is one of the attractions of the city, Xare' an, air of taste'and comfort. The house of Mr. D. Edgar, of New stands at the corner of Treasury Street, opposite to the. Bay, and that of M.Aspinwall, of the same city, a little south of the Plaza ; both .,are well constructed and commodious. The house of H. P. Kingsland,,
-wt isexesiegruds just without the City Gates. The
parsonage' of the Presbyterian Church is an old and unique coquina
Boating on the River.
nstructure, on St. George Street.; its extensive grounds are wel stocked
-with semi-tropical fruits. John Geiard Williams de Brahin, citing of
-St. Augustine more than a century ago, says 'All, the houses 'are built of masony their entrances ate shaded by piazzas', supported by Tuscan pil pil ilses gis h South sun. The houses have to the east, windows projecing 16 or 18 inches into. the street, very wide and, prog),rtionally high., On the west side their windows are commonly very sMAIl and no opening of any kind to the north, on which side they 1ive double walls siy or eis feet asumnler, forming eakn fvley
,*Whasesfr elr n atie.N os a n




with coals., left them in their kitchens in the afternoon, and set?
-sunset in their .bed-rooris, to defend them ag-ainst those winiters required such care."
Water BSipply. The various wells (some Artesian). andcsten,' furnish water in abundance. In some instances the windmill is raising water, and its revolutions serve to enhance the pictures< of the. city.
Population. -This h-as varied from time to time with the cl fortunes of the city. Menendez started from Spain in 1565 with
V 11
The Presbyterlan Parsonage.
men, but many were lost on the way. Through disafcins deserted Menendez during his governent of the coloyb Francis Drake made his attack on the tow3 ini 56, h~ars 4sisted of j 50 men. The population then, accodn oBrit creasig rapidly, and there were two" l ofhouse-holders in 1648 was upwards of 300,adteihlep 1ight have been about 1,500. In 740 theti of which about 740 were soldiers~. Dr. WlimSoksy h
evacuation of the town, 1763, the popul ber 2,500 belonged to tse garrison. n e
m,000. In w860, l,914, and in 870, i,717. Mrsairbanks : i881), "that the pop oulation sneve excdd 3,000 whichnis-, about its present nur of inhabtan" hsess of dest of he old Spanish fa i ies un3and the. Mnras moi
inah hv benaou iIn140th otl opltin a i2i1j
of hih bot 70 er slders D. iliamStrksas h h
aboutiiits present number ofi inhabitants." Thesei iconsist i =of descendants',-i of th ol Sanish fam iiies an the Miocas manyii pesos who' bave,,i... i l




sky to regain terhealth, ortnjoy the salubrity of the.
tesand Africas
?, ",,eal. The undelyinig rock is calcareous, which occasionally
t the srce Th befmation is overlaid by sa nd inter
Adth decomposed shll and clay, favorable to the growth of pine, e k, magnolia and orane. Its porosity is also conducive to thed74po Iof the soil, a lid thist the preservation of health. '
'h~e Climate. ,Thouig somewhatt humid, the air of St. Augustine, lipre ndsalubrios It is tepered and softened by alternate breezes. ,from the Atlantic and the Gul of Mexico. Flowers are in blossom aL
MisHasseltine s.
the year round. The extreme of heat and cold are less than in the cities farther north, and tle nimosphere is so e xhilarating, and yet so.
_mild w'ithal, that just to brcah it is a benediction. After living in this. eity- 20 years, Mr.D. Lope says: "I have never known of a singlecase, of malaria fever to have originated in this city or its near proximnity." The healthfulness. ofS. Auigustine was noticed by De Brahm in-tle time of its occupancy ythe British. "Among( the, 3,000 -who,
related St..Augustine, he sas, "the authoris credibly informed were Isiy Spaniairds near an~d',abv the age of 100o years. Speaking of the s ubity of the climate of th city, W.-C. Bryant said, in 1'843 : 'h
ings are satmetimes altle sultry, but after two or three hours a.




inboo m T he niits a re ra efully cii ....................... .
son who have lived here many yeartatheaevryfwngiis
summer when you cn sleep without ab
acquaintances I have made here I remebray h'hainCm
here for the benefit of heath, are detindfriebtham
of the climate. This delightful, and at, the climate, is attracting many invalids froi all qa
i A g Sw m i the ......
iili when te c they in. m intne ra In' a letter
whdihe th e comherer thn'eyih impn r inormnfcueedldu
-thpdoug wehe eie in the oenairadorhat mrvd4f
But, some will ask, do you pretedtasumrithSoh k 6O




thnat the North ? This, is what we believe'. ***This %nconisfor thelo6ss of many good things we enjoyed at the
butwe alsohv fri inmost luxuriant abundance ; we -find ;ere wvhoare generous and kind, and after careful consideration deie ormin for life, if it be the will of Providence, among eJ rngs fis, gaas., plums, strawberries, peaches, and other
", pleasant things, too numerous to mention." In- summer the thermomiThe Pine Forest,
eter conmronly stands In the shade' between 8Roo and 900. Ift rarely fr eezes in winter, ad'nd so rare. is snow that the Spaniards called it, when
Aidd,appear, "white rain." There isnt eras aige wol
year-through, a finer or more healthful cliEmate-in the world, and the low d&ath rate tgthe'r With the g~rea~t influx for years Past of strangers in ,Search of hltwudsetovrfthstamnt. The rainy season




are followed by immediate sunshine. The land and, sea bruees. always uniform at St. Augustine, the dews are heavy, and the n always cool and healthful. The temperature rises higher in e State in the Union than it does in Florida, and no other State
The Spanish Bayonet Tre-e.
in the salubrity of its climate, A considerate writer assigns th ing reasons for its healthfulness ".-The calcareous and an quality of the soil, which neutralizesand absorbs the malaria. pine forests, filling the air with healthful aroma 3.-The abun surrounding, always a purifier of the air. 4.-The coolness of ner breeze, and dryness and clearness of the winter air; and s to all is the mild and friendly influence of her warmer climate.
the atmosphere at St. Augustine is humid, it has an elastic ad
purity which at once invigorates an invalid from the North, an it an exquisite pleasure iust to breathe. -Hence. of all place nta




isisthe very best for him for the regaining of his health., and "y of living when health is regained. It, is the NMontpelier.
oP '4Trees.- The prnia orest trees in and around the city
a yllow Pne (Pinus 'Australis), and the bald cypress (fag*ess
xgg~r), both of which attain to a remarkable height, and are of great, eco mi value,., beigue for boards,, shingles, irail 'ay ties,
eand for many -other purposes. Intermingled with these trees is the Live Oak (uercus Virens), highly valued both for ship-buildkin d for fuel. The -Magnolia rises to, the height of 80 or 90 feet, and wkhe
the oak. may ,be called the King;,,this maybecldthQenofle
Forest. The
Pametto or
Spanish Bayot,4net, with its
sharp, pointJed leaves-, is
common, and Is sofetimesised in buildm.It sends:
A out, like ,"the,
fretfiil porcu i
PI Irg, i ts ,
harp points o ns
OnI every side,
anid forms, An Avenbue in lYrs. Balls Orange Grove.
when growing in line, an impenetrable palisade.
Vegetables Garclens.-The soil and climate are finely adapted to
thegroth and ripening of culinary vegetables, adnweed efn
better or cheaper melons, squashes, tomatoes, okra, sweet corn', .potatoes,,yams, artichokes, peas, beans, cauliflowers, and other vegetables Ifor the supply of the-table, than in, St. Augustine. These productions catme early and remain'late., and are raised without much 'labor. In
s snny clime 'they have nothing to do., but grow, and they are, as
f wh6otaste can tell, of superior quality.- Green peas.adohe.ee 6, ';bles are on the table early in February.,.
Ord~nge, Cqv -These are the pride(o the city. The Orange
Afe citrms aurantium) L with its shining -leaf, white blossom and




commJ~ands a high price in4te)arkthuhteoau rei'fl"
lag, it is ltong-lived and very rdcie n h we o 90
orange grove miay> be considered wl-o-oithwrl.Te ~grove of D~r. A. Anderson, on Kig Sre, conan bu 56fut bearing, trees, and that o~f Mrs. B3all, nearbyismcadrefoth"' ~tasteful disposition of th~e gfroupnds, as well as frte it ofsmghovs yieecniealrvnue tot thPpole vst~
I~~abndace tThe houses and hue, m they reard of thes town are intergroveser thus gree frui andr
tbeatif thein apphenc ofgrc thihs
inerstng littl town."ia An
Plcqantne fMr ryn




Wundoubtedlyo padtohecla iono this deliiou fruit..
d. '15 011uits. In addition tote'rne, the soil of St. Augustine prdday e.-s*strawberries of superior size and flavor, plums and peaches, di ths4at*quality, fgrapes, pomegranates, guavas, bananas, dates, pine a es, citrons, olives,_1 limies, lemons, arnd other semi-tropical and delicious edibles'. The Banana (Muisa SagientwA), oef whose blossomwe present a ,,cut, has leaves ,about six- feet long, and is profuse in. fidiers as ih fruitage, The .Date Palm Tree has; a straight, scaly trunk,.. which id crowned with a uft. of log'pendent lte tlnu.aves, at the summit. Th.fruit, whe fehhas a very agreeable taste and perfore. A writer thus describes this tree: "Its branches attract notice from their siigt1ar beauty and constant rustling, like, aspen leaves,, as well as, from the pecuTityVof the under branches, which resembl and serve the purpose of ladders, by
-Which to ascen d the tree. The fruit in' form resembles 'the largest acorn, and'is covered
With a hin, .transparent, yellowihm
brane, .containing a soft -saccharine pulp, of a somewhat vinous flavor, in which, is enclosed an oblong, -hard kernel. When ripe
iafords an agreeable nourishmn.
'Ther' Floral Kingdom. -Florida is the I1snd of flowers. "It is," 11a writer truly says, "'an ever-green land,' iri which wild flowers. never cease to unfold their petals.", This arises from the, warmth and moisture of its .delightful climate. The fields and forests, around St., Augustine abound in wild flowers, remarkableifor, the variety and the 149 teDeTre briliancy of their, colors. .The flower of the 1\ag~nolia (Grandifolia),is eenhere. in its perfection. Its large white corolla contrasts, beauti- illy with the deep, green g lossy leaves of the tree, and. fills the air with, fdgr ance, sometimes to the distance of a mile. The forests are filed wtvith clqambering vinea the.- lemat'is dodder and yellow jessamine,,
whs rih yelwflowers: som etimes cause the traveller to'smhile, he-. h4 urA ant, whav -The 'Spnish Moss,/ Tillands ia [Zmxenides L, drooping




f F
The Banana Tree,




of th.fowers' that bloobm around them. 'The flower of
Oh Baonet (Yucca gloriosa), is -very -beautiful. I t can be
ereton only on its native soil..
Tarens.--These form -one of the attractions of St.
Tepeople are very fond of flowers, and as they blossom
prof an erfcin almost every family cultivates them to
tete r exet heeeigbree ze is redolent with the perfteof a theusad different kinds, of flowers. The city has always been. celebrajted -for thebeauty and 'profusion of its roe, red and white,' and .nothing cnbe more lovely than -some of th ose gardens, such, for instance, at of Mrs. ReynolCds, on Bronon Street. The,/ rose tree of M.Oliveros', near the City Grates, -h~ ttained the height of ffteen feet, an when in blossom 4 attracts genera attention. Mr. -H. IJL Williains ha.extenasive groundsand nurseries known- as Paradise, Grove .and oeGardens, on the SheI Road, an-is always ready. to elco60Me visitr to his delightful
ads. An 'Ol coqu ina building, V0yveed with string vines and brill Powers, isaways, picturesque,
uc 4A~h,"a viin of beauty is to be etwith' ony in this ancient
Spnshct Mvany of the olId
'h',onas -pssessing in .fronts,
' The Banana Blossom. beatifu foer gardens covered
honeysu roses, jessamines, e actus, and, other favorites of -the
kfingrm Ohe rear. Manyof these flowers are in full bloom
osex met-domte riid, hills of the north,
4 s Ge0ngtitajbibn,-=This fine public square openBdv ,inthe central part of the city, where people, "ot do
wo na. litialde condition, being for-a long time, a~s the"
, hrbsert, of cattle, until improved. by the late s, e 04*d. It is shaded by the Pieo




Trinit Episcop1 Chrh thet St uutn8oean te.no~
structures. 4A monument, in the foo~noeik bu w-,4 higah, stands near the centre of the Plz.I a rctdi ,ujnder the direction of Don Geronirno Alvarez, Alcle tocme oa thieSpanish Constitution, and bears the following incitono1 a ble tablet:PL4AZA DE LA CONSTITUCIQI.
PROMULGA EN ESTA CIUDAD DE SAN AUGUSTIN DER LA LRD,
ORI1ENTAL EN 17 DE QTOBRE, DE 181%4
SIENDO GOBERLNADOR EL BRIGADIER~ DON SEBAkSTIAN KIDLMI-z
CABALLERO PARA STERNA RMI(RIA,
EL AYVNTAMIENTQ CONSTITUC)?ONAL ERIGIO ESTE OBEIC DIRIGIDO POll
DON FERNANDO DE LA MAZA ARlREDNDQ,,
EL JOVEN REGIDOR DECANO,
DON FRANCISCO ROI3IRA, PROCURADO SIDIO AJNO DE 1813.
2- R
The Old Market.
It may be thus translated: Plaza of the Consiuin rcamd,in this city 'of St. Augustine, East Floia:okhV7t fOt_'r
,1812, Brig-adier Don Sebastian KlndalemKi-to h re fSn Dieg~o, being then Governor. For eiternal rmmrne h o~i
tional City Council erected this obelisk~,unethsprvioofD .
Fernando de la Maza Arredondo the yougmncplofcrods member of the Corporatin, and DoFrnicR- raAtreyad Recorder." On the downfall of the SpaihLbrlCntttoodr, were given that this monument sholbedmisdadteppe removed the marble slabs containing h ncito.Bta h bls




remai, the tablets were in 18 18 restored to their places.
_+eough fra Catholic city, as St. Augustine was when this
qjo~ 'ntwasenated, the Masonic emiblems of'the square and comncut n th tablet immediately under the date. In his history of the
Mr ,,bewrat thus accounts for it: Soon after the close of the War
-4 ein,, the yong bloods' amused themselves by endeavoring A0 eatea alarm in the mind of the United Stated-4 Commandant, and byexectn a series of cabalistic marks at different localities throughout 'tetow n c cnvey the impression that a secret. society was in existence n1 abou to dev'ome act contrary .to the peace and dignity of the .ited'Saes. Besides other 'marks anid noie otduo rivate
St. George Street, Showing. the- Bishop's. Mansion.
adpubi buildings -about the town, this square and compass was one niht, cu upon. the Spanish monument, where it will remain as lona as tetable exists, an anomaly without this' explanation." The ^Cderate Monument, selected by the Ladies' Memorial Societ ini88oi memory- of the St.'Augustin'e soldiers lost in the late war, sads oppsite the Spanish monument, and in addition otenmso sol 7,sbears the following- ilirs 'nscriptions: "Our. dead. Erected
b he Ldes' Memorial Ass ociationb", of St. AgstfinIQ, Flori a, A. D.
Meoum Or lved: one ho' gav e their, lives in, the
e he .Coniedeite States.",: These'inscr.iptions. are on'the east IAOd Wst~sdi4 of the monument. Oxy the, soth -side, are the lines : Thy-d, d ar from the home, that gavle O~fo6 birth;an on t'he side




the river and rest netv"
Of thetrees." Thesetw nnare unique in style and rv pc
iterest -to this fine -l Another object that attrat
--tention of~the visitor isa auiusod
bruised and battered builigss
- tained by huge square pl~~s;, n
surmounted by a cupola a el
x land bearing the name o he
ii
VMarket. I t stands on h lz east of the last-namedmouet sand is of a style of arhtcie, which the books 1 ave notladow.
ol J
By2 whom or when, or forwap
pose it was built, will prbbyb( never known. There is anAtsa well in the central part oftePaa affording a supply oif minea ae whose virtues have exelln: e
dial qualities.
bDThe Bea Wall.-Tistutr is built of coquina and capdwih,
granite, and .extends fo ot
Marion along- the Bay, nfoto the city, fdr about one mieat a, built by the United State oe:R
on ment, 1837-3 at a
about one hundred thousand olas The design of it is' to poeth city from the encroachmetr f' 1 10, ~~sea. It rises about tenretabll
low water mark, and the oigI just wide enough for two prost walk abreast. It hence om
favorite promenade for k~e-LJ
gloaming. The listeninoesas bv
adand whispering waves belw ln
iVi




tentder sentimet ha-vL; bee expressed, what love-troths .th ......is long line ofck that -sparates the City from the, deep.
v an-. old. sea nal extending from the Fort to a point op%h Plaza,.are still vile. it na bgi ir 690 by Governor I:1*'g.'de OQuiroza y dosada.
Frt Marion.-Ancietl San Jua de Pinos, and San Marco, this MOebrated structure, stands at te north "astern extremity, covers about bur acresof ground, and commads the cty, the, harbor, and its entrance from the seka. It, is built of 'lull fil cpoquina'and its walls are 21 feet -in height and 12 feet in. thickness,.- It has four bastions and is constructed in accordance with the plans of 1e famous French engneer Mar achal. de eVauban. Inal r'sects it is ,a military castle, i 11 11 and so in former times wa designated., It has,27 case..:. miaites 35 feet long an da -it8 feet wide, and its compleme is, ioo -guns and i,000 men, though, it has room forma ]More.' It is surrounded bya mnoat, and its main entrance jii
was'by a. draw-bridge but ft tis -- a movable bridge has been substituted. A block of stowe over-the ;door exhibit m1 alto rehievo thel Spanis--hcoat of. arms wi-th a' globe and /The Gateay and -Coat vf Arms) Fort Marilon,. aid cross abve, and -a e -cros nd lamb below, together with thi s miscription:REYNANDO EN ESPANA ET' S:ER r DON FERNANDO
EftOY ENDO GOV Y CPn DE ES aCdS a AUG n
"A RA 9Pa, EL, MARESCAL DE
ARFPVO Dji ALONZO FRN~d IEREDA ASI CONCLUIO
"S e e- eAASidt L ELs t AN D1 nwIINnri TA:5, ORAS
===~NI61 Diiiiii PEDROiiiiiDE BRiiiiiiiiiiYiiGARAY.ii




*1N
$p~an, a~4 4i ?L~i~k1
Goverrw~ an~ Capt~in-Gen~era1 Qf and its pro~i~nce. This fort wa's finis i t
ere directed by the Captain-LEngineer ~
On his arrival~ at St. Augustine in ~
wooden fort, probably on or near the site of Fort posed to have named it "San Juan de Pinos)' Si~ i~~86, found the fort deserted. It ~ built of wo~d, ~and had fourteen ~brass cannon. In i66~ th~ f
A
inen.~ The present fort was probably comm
- -~---- ___>4!?)!
ii
~
I i~illfjjiij '~
1. JhIJ~ ~ I
The Intei4or ~f>F
period the foundations of the old sea w then. called San Marco, had 50 guns, cas which were the names of St. Peter, St With the exception of the marks of serves as a pleasant promenade~ t1a~ f e completed in 1756. Tb~e name S Marion on the cession 01 FiQrida,~ i Spanish guns, one of ich beays e ~possessioix The labor oJ const c fortress, was in part perfo d jy from Mexk~Q. Itw~sor~aIongti
4




RI so h rica. It certainly has never been captured. Dr. William 4rk air In 1769, that "it might justly be deemed the prettiest fort in dihecking's dominions.." A writer said of it int 18l\7: "The garr-ison: ist corposed, of a detachment from the. Royal Regiment of Cuba.,with some htaqk troop ps, who together f orm respectable force. ***This mAine substance (coquina of which the fort is constructed), is superior to-stone., not being liable to splinter from the effects of hombar'dment; it receives and imbeds the shot, which adds rather than detracts from its strength and security.". "We saw where it had been struck with cannon balls," wrote W. C. Bryant, the poet, in 1843, "which instead of splitting the rack, becameimbedded and clogged among the loosened fagntents of shell." The marks of cannon shot of Gen. Oglethorer are still visible. The- parade ground at the foirt is about ioo feet square, and ofne of the casentates has an altar and two niches ,which are supposed to have contained vessels of haly water-.. This bomib proof was evidently once used as a chapel.' There is a platform in anotherr 'casemate raised about five feet, 0on which, it is said, the judge tk his seat when a ctdurtmartial happened, to be held The-Dungeon in fort Marione for the Itrial of some ,delinquent.'. A gloomy dungeon, twenty teet long and six feet wide, under the northeast bastion received those sentenced by the stern tribunal. Many stories are told of dreadful tragedies which the dark 'walls of the subterranean vaults of -this: old ti me-worn fort have witnessed. One of: the m is that on the falling in of the terre-plein of a casemate, about fifty years ago., and the clearingr up of the ruins a dismal dungeon wa's revealed, which aontain d- two iron cages, somewhat inthe shane of a' coffn'; an




Cat." In the first Senole war he was taken captive and et,, southwest casenmate of the fort, which has a platform five -feet hcl over it an embrasure, about two feet high and only nine ind Through this narrow aperture the wily Indian pressed his, bod ated by abstinence, let himself down into the mat, then dry, e the guards and rejoined his people. He was afterwards recapt and was used by Gen. James Worth for the surrender of his tribe, was ordered by the General to deliver by messengers, twenty twigs for each day, to his people; the last twig was to be broken, showing that unless they reported themselves at the Generals headqu within twenty days, they were to be exterminated. Three dayst the expiration of the allotted time they were all in Gen. Worth s
I
The United States Barracks.
i iliiiiiiiiili~iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii~ii iiiiiiiiiiil liii un jiiiiiiiiil$iiiiii~i lljjIIJ[Iii li ,iiII i iiiIII~II 111 I II W ii
Iii liiiiiiii'iiiiiiijiiiiiii liiIll hi= 11111111~i~iiiiiiiiiiiil liiiI tiiiii~IIiii iI II I IiHII II iii!! ii iiiiiiiiWIiiiiiii~i IIiiI 11111ii11111~i = l~ll
and prepared for their departure to the west. From May, 875, to 1878, some wild Indians of the Cheyeine, and otherwestern tribes held as prisoners in the fort, and while here some of them were t to read and write. The older ones, among whdm was the roted cine Water," were sent to Fort Sill, Indian Territory, and the yo ones to Hampton Normal Institute, at Hampton, Virginia.
St. Francis Convent, now the U. S. Barracks.walls of this famous building are perhaps the most ancient of any country. It stands at the southern extremity of the city, and is at ent used as barracks for the U. S troops. Prior to the assault Francis Drake on the city, in I586, the Franciscans had estab here a convent, hence -the walls of this structure may be now




Wt es old. But great changes have been made in the appearance, of
the6 bultdding by our government. In olden times it was surmounted by a di~cular tower which overlooked the city, bajr anid island. De Brahm,.
wrting at the time the city was occupied by the English, says: "The
convetc =hurch'and convent is in the body of the barracks, i. e.the barracks were built. around them." An English writer in 18 17 says,: "At, the southern extremity of the town stands a large? building, formerly a monastery of Carthusian friars, but now occupied as a barrack for the troops" of the garrison." He also adds that a- Franciscan friar was thechaplain to the garrison. The building, as will be seen from the engra ving,. is symmetrical in form, with a long balcony and pillars in front.
TThe itrs (fate .pillars of coquina., surmounted .with IMoorish
capitals,"and. bearing the
marks of great .anrtiquity,
stand at the head of, St.
George Street west of'
Fort Marion. A dry ditchand the ruins of anacient
tance from both of these
quaint pillars, and some
supoe that they once de-fended in its whole -extent
7" the land side of. the city.
Buat this is mere conjeeture. When or by whom
A Side View of the City G ates, these curious pillars and
these old walls. were erected we have no means of ascetaininig; thoughp robablty the work was done at the time of the building of the, first sea,
wal wihextended from the fort as far as the public square., The
ditch, still visible, extended from the fort to St. Sebastian River, where it terminated with'a bastion. The defence' along the- ditch consisted, it.
is probable,9 of a sto*ckade built -of logs,- but no -trace of it remains. The Pillars of the city gate remind one 'of the entrance to some of the south
em2: ciiso piadwr oblsspandadrie yegnes
iro htcutyTe etil.rn aogtecroiisoti&




imposing aid unique appearance, furnishample scope fior i spec of the antiquary, inasmuch as Non stat umbra.
The Catholic Cathedral.-This unique and antiqt
,constructed of coquina, at a cost of $16,650, in 1793, sn Side of the Plaza, and attracts the attention of every visitor dows of the church are high and narrow; the belfry is of style and contains a chime of four bells, placed in four se three of which form a horizontal line across the tower, and
-above. These, together with the clock below, are so ar
The Catholic Cathedral.
form a perfect cross. One of these bells, supposed to be t this country, bears the following inscription: Sancte os
-nobis. D. 1689. [Anglice-Holy Joseph, pray for us 1689.] This bell is supposed to have belonged to an ea The bell in the upper niche was the gift of Don Geronim A Alcalde, to the church. The entrance to the church is by bule, on the left of which is a crucifix, from the chapel of d Leche. What countless genuflexions have been made befoei!'l loroan, huilt hv Georoe Stevens, of Cambridgoe, Mass., abot4yer




Pps, 'an<, cs osfdol fau idt ha It is 15 fet
T ide, and6 1 fee dep. Th--re is a paintit af
nble merit on..te wal hh is sup 'osed to represehi th
{.te Saniardsei. Flida. It, bears the following interesting re First, 'mas in LuutnFlorida, Sep. .8, 1,65, a
ding f the Spaniads uner Pedro Menendez. Wt eiin
tour.,sh,,ores ,civ*i 'a n, at, sciences, and inuty"Asilver
9,.kpt onsanty b ig, gs near the altar of the church. The14, Od Catholic church sto Trinity Epis~copl Churc.-This building stands on the south ide of 'the Plaa opoCtatholic Cathedral. It wsbgn 1827 and finished ini
1833, when it vwas,
consecrate d by Bishop Boven of South
Carolina.
The Presbyterian Church.'
This is a plain structure of coquina, built
about '53 years ago,
and stands on St..
George ,Street. It has.
a good, substantial
--parsonage, of which
--we present a view.: The chapel is in the.
St.Jos o rear of the Post Offi ce.
The 1Vethodist, ( ael This buildingr was erected about11846,
a I isocc pie by col eoThe' M ethodists a e nw building
convenienita house of v ip oKing. Street.
TheMiitetd B P1 whch is situated a little south o
e~~~~ UntenSaesBar e ns three coquina. pyrads covee
iN kn'tuhSicco, seftup, 'n or Maor Francis 'L. Dade and his 0 ," >1iors, wi wpr ma d ehe 8 83 hile on theirwa
pit eG atGneral Dunca L., Cich, on the a Rives an tok pAc rearFr Kingk. The
:assfaonting X 0. A.p hohmw heokwo were mountedL




of his men at the first -fire. The rest-retur t n
=iri n= ei, d,, tiii i hi. e ..... nd.
good effect a six-pounder cannon until the artillery men we After about one hour's hard fighting, the Indians withdrew fr allowing our men time _____....._ r
Monuments to Major Dade and his Soldiers,
removed to this quiet military burying-ground, where they sleep I fully beneath the flag of the nation.
St Joseph's Convent.-This is a substantial three-storybu with a handsome portico, on St. George Street, south of the p square. It is constructed of coquina, and occupied by the Sistiis oii Joseph, whose fine specimens of needle-work are much admired. ors are cordially received at the Convent. We give a good illust: of the building.
The Oldest House.-It is no easy matter to determine wh is. Some say that the old wall on St. Francis street, over which in the notable date palm tree (of which we give a picture), is believe t be the most ancient structure in the city. "We have heard it rem




, our old Spanish Dons, seventy-eight years ao," sasMVr.
-kel,"that he, remembers both wall and tree stood there when twg chid."Brinton, 1869, considered the house on the corner of ,Stet and Green Lane, once the residence of the English Attorneyeal the oldest 'habitation. Mr. Fairbanks agrees with hinm.. It soce a hndsome house, but much of its wood has been cut up for
afing-canes. W e present a view of 'the dolidz'hquina corridor of an old 4'Spanish domnicil on Hospital Street, now used for storage. The wall$ of the U. S. -Barracks 'are very ancient, and the old sea wall, traceso~f which- remain, carry us back in imagination to the times of Charles the Second,,.
The. Governor's House.-This: old building ohnthe Plaza, at the corner of St. George and King street s, and. now used for the_:Post
The Corridor-of an Ancient House.
lOffice and business- offices, was formerly one of much pretension, and is associated with many noted persons and events of the ancient. times.., DBlr. Stork thu speaks Of it in I1769 : "The apartments are spaciousan suited to the clmtwihhg indows, a balcony in front, -and galleries on both sides. To the back part of :the house is joined a tower, led in,Anerica a look-out, from whic teeianxesive prospect
1iWi iii is i St.iAiguiiiiiiii
I6, as well as inland." _A writer vis tingS i7 speaks of this hos4s"nasaeo ilapidation and decay fro
,'o, a"1d in attetion- I t was formerly surrunded' byahay oun
iiiar on iofiwhiihisistanding. Thi
4Aivh ati the conrsp




haoe used te ald"Th lae" bt ih ts-a ,I inmoateis uniqu 300pen,ds ha~es preanito -+ apopearage o 200fee on stuthe builta fo business aHotemans ofthe se epian ornae an fnhnrt hect,: "h aire ist popuritor.dou r "h S.Agutn
ea- Mandli "hoeFlria Houser The St.Agsiehsco
,,personshasnd iasachtygeofa2e0$4-00 persdahIt
of th city bay Anasasi Islnd an hican ti igtdit
fa g illA
DWI
St. Augustine Hotel.
accommodations are first-class, andget r rmpl evdb t
genial proprietor, W. W. Palmner, Esq. The Florida House, George L. Atkinas & Sonporeosioe from Janiuary ittill April 15, and acomdts25prn.I'Te% building is four stories high, and- is su~rroune yhn-oelwsn piazzas, and furnished with a steam- elvtradecribls.So of the rooms are elegantlyfunse.Tecagis$0prdy The tables of these poplar h1ousesaepetflysple ihae and fish and tropical fruits, and te4istrawylevsheel ni" ThteA rooms anid broad ia zza wihrge4ndwt$h op fetrn them agin. These fin hoesrs nsrkn otatwt h~lcouia buildingsoftectadtatewihtemnelgtprve dwlig eet osrceipr oi oenar nadto




atioLnguma ile hadH 1t fro $1.50 tU UAc 11 r da* VV 11
Thy e FurdsHue
y ~ ~ ~ ~~~ Satrda eveing "TeSthohe
_ td~wi-h as acopert Esq., and pulihred evr2 Fi dez Hoston, Chao andePhiadelphiatpaes 0adchre
$2.00 to d3a. halfrfrom.The dae Gofg S publcato. o arn t, -apaity6a-Bys the e Tr Eware comnicaio isoma n m0; MiRe:E. ~ase"Iieshiong -Thisr citfrnies, finepaci r..A tFse' er Yachtsl and fihnotsadtcl
and~~~~ W. Wot nsohd experee seaen ad re lwa onSt bFraacic ofdrurasca-fsthak paper, "Te St AOystie Pras? cls, anitd bJoherP shl-f ,s




i v
sail-boats scudding away to this or that delightful spot.- A) ra h storm the sea-bean, shells, and other marine curiosities, in up along the beaches. A sail by moonlight over the b with a genial company and music, is very enjoyable. Lik Augustine is a city of the sea, and its moonlight scenes up areas lovely as those by the ducal palace or the famed Ria
The Yacht Club House.-This building, of whi picture, is situated opposite the Plaza on the Bay, of which
The Yacht Club House,
a pleasant view. The Yacht Club has its gali days in M one night illuminates not only the building, but every yaci which then presents a scene as brilliant as a poet's, fancy
Hunting.-The sportsman finds.. a great variety as we abundance of game in the vicinity of the city. Small anir as the robin, rice bird, cedar bird, red bird, oriole, etc., ar in great numbers during the winter season, Wild pigeon and several species of ducks are numerous, and sea-fowl wa shot, bagged and eaten. Ano the curious birds the hu in this region are greedy spoon-bill, the indolent pel tall flamingo. Rabbits, black squirrels and opossums, with pouches for their young, are common. Deer, may be found i h oet at no very great distance from the city. A good sportsra oe o




from a.mring's hut without game to keep and game to i s oftieiocking bird delights him while at
b-eatth orange tree.
og of ivig:.-While the- prices of board at the hotels does not
wmh frmthat of other Southern Atlantic cities, the ekpenmse of
hou e-eepigs quite moderate., Rents are low,, fuel is cheap', and not
mu hi neded. Service is easily obtained, and the cost of winter
ii
A Characteristic Scene.
ndepc of vegetables, such as yams, melons, tomato-es, beans,
sweet corn, okr, anid the like, together, with such fruits, as peaches, 'plums, grap8 dates,, bananas, pom egranates figs and oranges', which
e,,:ery chea indeed, the cost of. supplying the table is much less than Ath orth As in other cities, it is better here to procure a home of eveow if the stay is brief, than to incir the. expense ,of living
ichotel or barding house.
ate prve I=enns-Owing, to the healthfulness of'the place,
beine fr am all malaria) 'the profusion, of semi-tropical fruits,th
LC T




slubrftyof thear h pnn-o h t.Jh' alodtefti
ffishin and bathing, th e
the influx of prominent Northerrs haflt enveygetE1 gant cottages have been -erected in the city yn t uub omd u hotels have been opened, oraiige groves plantedoadn xedd new buildings projected. A new order of thing~shabenitoud," an~d the city now begins to assume a modern aspexct.Tesceyi the winter season especially, is ful of life and gay a
A Picturesque Cbn
refined as any in the country. From th lme ftrecnuiste city is awakening, and its prosper for th uueaems heig
The city is now accessile from all pointadwlldutes oncm to be one of the liveliest, as it is no~w one o h rtis, n elhet spots in Florida.
Hlistorical-Ponce de Leon.S.Agsiehstehnro being the first city in America sette byE.oen.Th aeo t
settement i~s pror to tat of JaetwV.byfr-heeersan




uth, Mass.,.by fifty-five years. Searching for the 'Fountain, of
. Athiy whose~virtues were credulously believed to renew the vigor of
.th d Juan Ponce de Leon landed on the coast a little tothnoh
thiiiiiii = i ge th north
Q f,1St, Augustine in the spring Of 1512, and as it happened to -be on .P6a Sunday (Pasqua Florida), -he named the country Florida. Revisitin h peninsul a again in 1521, ewsmral ouddi ots
with the aborigines.
Te Huguenots and. MVenendez.-Under the direction o07f the
celebrated Admiiral jasper Coligny, jean Ribault, (1520-J565) with two vessels and a colony of Huguenots, arrived on the coast near St. Augustine in 1,652, landed near the mouth of St." John's. River, and then proceeding northwards, built Fort Charles for 91, 1 the, protection' of his colony at 'Port
Royal, left twenty-five men as a ga'rrison, aiid returned to France. Reduced almost !to starvation,' this colony constructed a -rude bark 'and set sail for Europe.- After great suffering- at sea they were. discovered by an English, ship and- taken into port. In -the prosecution of his design, Coligny sent Retn Goulaine de Laudonni6re, with three:vssls to America. He arrived at St. Aug ustine 'in the spring of 1564, and thence proceeded to St-. John's River, which he named ".La Rivibre de Mai, wheree "about two leagues from 'the entrance he, erected Fort Caroline. The Colonists here weeson reduced to
great misery, and were devising means
to return toFrance,,when Jean Ribault, Lock to the Door of Fort Marion,
Who left Dieppe May 2,565, arrived with a fleet of seven vessels and abun'dant supplies. In the mean 'time Philip II, King iof Spain,
depatched Pedro "Menendez', de Aviles, (1519-15 74) to Florida, with, leen vessels and 2600 men, and wit orest'eed and gibbet all
'Protestants ip those regions. A bout one-half of this fleet,, the rest havag nffred wreck, arrived, in the harbor of St. Augusiehncle
heRiver of Dolphins," on the 7th day of September, 1565, and the. iiit




1
next day Menendez, with much pciop and ceremony, took oesS1 1
ii
the Indian village of "Selooe," which stood upon the site news by this city. Eighty cannon were landed from the ships and en ments for defence erected. The following account of the disemb is given by Francisco Lopez de Mendoza, chaplain of the fleet Saturday, the 8th day of September, the day of the nativity of Or the General disembarked, with banners displayed, trumpets an martial music resounding, and amid salvos of artillery. Carrying proceeded at the head, chanting the hymn Te Deum Laudams General marched straight up to the cross, together with all th accompanied him, and kneeling they all kissed the cross. nu mber of Indians 1 ok d upon
ceremonies and imi- tated what t
done. Thereupon the General took
sion of the country in the name <
Majesty. All the offi- cers then took
of allegiance to him as their General a
lantado (Governor) of the whole c
After driving the French fleet f
coast, Menendez (Sept. march
the wilderness to Fort Caroline, at w
arrived early on Friday morning, Sept.
by a sudden assault gamed posses
the place and massa- cared, with thee
of the women and children, most
people. Hanging seve- 5 a fteh lcd
over their heads the nscipti
Frenchmen, but as Look-Out at Fort Marion, Lutherans.
Laudoniebre and several others made their escape to a s river. The whole number of persons in the fort was 240 C the name of the fort to San Matheo, and leaving in it a garrisoi soldiers, Menendez soon returned to St. Augustine, when an performed in commemoration of his victory. In the meantime in an expedition for an attack on St. Augustine, had his four wrecked in a storm and cast upon the shore south of Matanza leader and his followers, with incredible hardship, made their wa the coast to the Matanzas River, where about 350, including himself, surrendered themselves to the tender mercies (?) of Me Crossing over the river in a skiff they were nearly all massacred




by ten, with'thei hands tied behind them. This- is one of
tsics cenes in history, and brand te nme of the minion i
td ing of Spain wihinfamy. Well may the inlet here be Y~eBloody River o Matanzas," Well has Mr. George. R.
ks said inl his excellent Histor~y and Antiquitizes of St. Augus"At some points on e thickly, wooded shores of the Island of
wastsia, or beneath the shitig mounds'of sand which mark its shores injay still lie the bones, of sori 2o the 350 who, pared from destruction by the tempest,..and'escpn prlofte sea and of the savage, fell, victim o the vindictive rano and blind rage of one than whom- history
p rcalsnon mrecrulor humane. But while their bones" thus scattered o n earth and, sea,
unhonored and unbiuried,
were lost to-,human sig-ht,
K, the tale of their destruction
and. sad fate,. scattered in
like manner over the whole
world, has, raised to their
+A'i
memory through sympathy
with their sa~d fate, a memo''
rial which will endure as'
long as the ae of history." Incensed at the
. . .. .. . .. .atrocities-of M enendez, the
Chevalier Domenique de
Gourgues (13-1593) with
. . . . . . . som e other H ug.uenots.,
Blocssom of the Iagla, qipdasall fleet and arrived at St. Joh n's Rive wth about '250 men in April, 1568. The fbrtifiaon at thot the rive r and Fort Caroline were soon,
taken and the garrisonas put tthe sword. Over those hurig he -placed
hinscriptioni "Not 'as to Sim'iards, ,nor as' to outcasts; but- as to
-t 4ttors, thieves and 'murc1de Under their chief Satottriara, the
dasaround St. Augusthinecmmitted mnany depredations, and during vern ip o killed more ihan a hundred of its inhabni 40*4taf Drake T clbated'' Sir Francis Drake (1537A Kadd:Enatack Un the tow in & 16,oe-.half of whichhevrnd
Thswsd,,ei osqeceo h iln f'n i




St. John's River. Drake fo
was then built entirely of wood, a in iwe le a a treasure chest, containing /2,000 sterli.
Franciscans.-In 1592 twelve- Francisc
labor among the people, one of whom, Francis Abridgement of Christian Doctrine" in the Yeniasee 1a a-. Fte Corpa had -an Indian mission house at Talonitoi he ot-esat of the city. He was afterwards murdere wile at payrbyoef.,i: converts whom he had publicly rebu~ked FahrMne, -s~da church was on Cano de la Le(-he, shared alsoph aetai ae h
Indians of the south, as well as of th~e notwregnrll 'r
friendly to the French than to the Spanish or-teEgih
The Indians.-A war broke 'Ou in 1638 ewe h pnad
and the Apalachian Indians, and soon terinatditedfato h
aborigines, who were then compel for morethnsxyeasolbr
; @5
on the fortifications of the city. The Yeaes hsecfvlae wa
Macarisqui, near the city, and one of wose cif h oenrhd executed, in 1686 made an attack on the peopedrvthmiote fort, and gave those they found outside of it no qatr The c ... tinued long the inveterate enemies of the Spanirds Inteya16 Don Juan de Aila introduced the first African slaveinotecly.
Gov. Moore's Attack.-On the breaking out of thewabeen England and the two kingrdoms, France ad Spain,'i 72,Jms Moore, Governor of South Carolina, planned~ an injudicosepdtn both by land and sea, against St. Aug-ustine. H edtetw o
three months, the inhabitants having betaken themevst h ate He was frightened away, after burning th towbyteaprncof two small ships in the offing-, which he took tobetofrialSpn ish men-of-war. To meet the expense -of thi ols xeiin h
first paper money [bills of credit] was issue inSuhCaoia Assault of Oglethorpe. -General JamsEwr geh .e
[1698-1785] Governor of Georgia, besedthciyntesumro 1740. The fort had been put into grood condto n a arsno more than 700 soldiers, with ~fifty pieces ofatleyOltop0rce one battery on Anastasia Island, caledPz termisowhcae still visible, and oth.ers~ not far distanfo hc efrduo hSFairbanks, p. 68.




--Th0e siege cotinued thirty-eight days; -but while the
tydrve colefi their dellings into the fort, it made butitA'ptressicn on that sldrampart, for its Walls received the shot b4eattaery of d, as na still be seen by the marks remaining. On tb,,2 th ef June aortie wa made from the castle against Fort Moosa, ab4 ttwo hahes nrth of tecity, when a company of Hiahlanders, der, CaptainMcI ntosh displayed great gallantry, but were taken
pioners. Findn his gun adequate to the reduction of San Marco,
Mrs. Stow' Orange G rove at Mandarin,
ten under the comand of Gvernor Manuel Monteano, Gerieral Ogle-torpe withdrew hs forces Two years later- he made another, unsucaesful demonstr>in against the Tort. Cession of the City the' English.-In 176Flrdwa
,ced to Englad= exchange for Havana,. when many of the Spanish. rsidenits., of St Agustine et the city. In his -woik published at this ni'e,Mr. Robet seaks ofte city as"unning along the shore a h L,,a(t lof a pleasant hill, adored with trees. -Its form is oblong, divided
four regular stets "crossn each other at right angles; .down by .he sea sde, abou thre eifths of a mile south of the, townsadt iiii0;




the ucanoateryo t uutn.Tebs ul town iision dl nars to pai nle whc 'ii Gon's. Anrew Jaisons buitsing of soft stone, fortified with
tbasos avi g aecbd ramprbwnyfe ihwt aae i
cannofO thenotansotwtottewlso hct rete0
Indian towns."T ish opie
yeasani maeianiimroemnt.iTeycostrctdiarg brrck i i sotenpr fteciyiulhtwr ale h igsRas
onei leain iiii Ne imra n h te oJcsnil;bigdte St.iii~iiiiiiii~ Sebastiiiiiiiiii Riiiiiiiiiv r andiiiiiiiiiiiio the heigiiiiiiiiiht- ous
oni Ansai Island. iiii T heiiiiii= i nori==iiiiiiiii iiins.ii- iD u riiii ===; iniiii tihii= isiiii perio aii rem an of the colon of inorcans, who::::::::: ::::: haiiiiielyueii r NcoasT rbul etld
intenrhr ato h iy n n18 bu it oe ot
Caoiinaogwo pertenmso dadRteg n
Arhu -iddlI wrsetheasisoeso a.O h eeto
of the news of t I Ihe DelaraionofInepneneth ptios ame A damsiiiii===iiiliiii~~=iii!iii andi Joh H an oc were burned iniii~iiii=i~i!~ii effi g oniiiili=Iiiili tiiiiie Plaziiiia.iiiiiii~ii~iilIII~i
R e c e s io to S p a in On tiie ireiiiiiiiciiiiiiiiitiiiioni o fiiiii iiSiiiti.i A u us in iiiiiiiiiiiiibiiyiiiiiii iiiiii,
iieiSpaniards in 174iotO h nls fmle eatd n h
.......... wa manned.......... byS ans ro p n de o m n fG v ro
inet Mauld epdz
Chnei lg.I 8 lrd eae ytepyeto
five........ milo dolr to San ertr f h ntdS ts n Gen.... AnrwJcsnis is oenr Th eioe.Avsto hs nin otect n11,i
th s v v d y d s rb d 1 A o t t i t f t e h u t n a r o s o ,
Se is wihtersuwhdarvdfrteproeo eln h
prdc ofte hs ,nitn fbaotr ieadohrsis
bersgesadohrtifngatce.Tisvgereoelrd
of the ascedantiaeithe motiformiable boder enemesiof te Unite Stts Afe trfikn fo hi omdtete eese
avaiou pat ftetwasmldi ml rus etduo
tiranhsIiemnes asn rudterbtlso pd~l




l se tbakhair, over which they had spread a quantity of
be0.adr7,Si4ae. In, their ears and the cartilages of the nose: were inserted K" ixng~s of sihier ah'd brass, with pendants of various shapes; their feat ures
wee, "trodlinent and harsh, and their eyes had a wild and ferocious exprospin.. A- torn blanket, or an ill-fashioned, dirty, linen, jacket, is, th6 ge-neral cost-eume of these Indians; a triangular piece of cloth passes.
aridteon.Thioiary in their apparel by rnerely wear
short 'p;tticoats, the original color of which was not distinguishabJe, from the various incrustations of dirt. Some of the young squaws were tolerably agreeable, and if well washed and dressed would not have been uninteresting; but the elder squaws wore an air of misery and debasement."
i'
Fort Marion, Showing the Water Battery and Hot Shot Furnace$
Curiosity Stores.-There are several in St. Augustine, where the
natural productions of Florida can be obtained, but the most popular store is the mammoth establishment known as the Fort Marion Store, in the Museum Building, opposite Fort Marion, where everything in the curiosity line can b~e obtained. Having collectors in the southern portion of 'the State -and in the Bahama Islands, the proprietor is able to, offer the most valuable' tropical curiosities at reasonable prices. The -fort Marion Store is a favorite resting place for ladies, while takingtheir morning -walk._ Easy ch ais are provided, and -on chilly mornings(fr there are chilly mornings in Florida) a fire will be found burning,
and the many novelties nresenteel to view mIk tiaveynoua
l esot




Thse Rnainey B uinu,*Buntrag's Buuaing, the OceanVmethe Beach Cottage, the Cleaireland House, and the reie F Goodrich, the Dentist, are well described in our engravings. The Vuseum, opposite Fort Varion, near the City Gates of the principal attractions of the ancient city, and is worthy of pa mention. The reader will obtain a good idea of the value of election from the following communications from prominent cit St. Augustine. Hon. John G. Long, Mayor of St. Augustin
*m
TWe Rair-y il Wenregar
NS
Augustine Muof Se
tVh s mn o st v al a
tractions of thofodSanh,,'
Weeks might'b rf
itabl spent in Jdge
NY
e xa mina t itq n. and
study of the etn
sive collections'fre
and valuable fso
rical relics,' cofie
not only to th1 i-..
ocovery and ean see
tletrnt of t assi
The Rainey Building. tobut of national
scope and interest.,,,
The Trofical Paradise of Jacksonville says:' At the Museumtee is an almost endless collection of historic relics connected wit he.-a history of St. Augustine, and visitors should not fail to viewed it. Visitors are enthusiastic, and no one should fail to examine terr collection of old Spanish rel'ies ,as well as the relics of slavery h wonderful whale exhibit, and multitudes of strange curios to b eh_.. no where else.
Hon. M. R. Cooper, Judge of Probate, thus describes his vstt,
-the Museum in an article in the St. fon weky: u
SO pleasant, and: the subject proved so interesting, that we gv more than a passing notice.




T
The C.160pland House,
il's
'it 11111milliptul 111
Residence and Office of Dr,' Goodrich.




The oldlca re loida sc as~ ln-l ukt fudin,
liern oge For gMain te old bateae fonetMuti, e i
moni ong kin exaat notheotou ofb nh ot;teol mlmei and colors.n
The collection of old books, atogahperan edk:aeo
inetimable value, and will be eagerly eained by the-aniquarian
curiosities wihaewrh
of note. One room con-Ni tans a life-size solie r in
orfn Japan;mr arom 00o Priest fromi Indi.a, ijfesize, and numerous figures, idols, and curious things-from Japan, China and 111-y1-1-1-11m,
India. From the Holy Land is a lamp 3,000 yearsm old ; carved rocks from the 4 garden of Gethseimene, besides other relics fromThOcaViwHue th~at sacred spot which will interestanad"eryo.Thptey made by the Indians, their w~ar shields, o-ros-soeipeet remains from the mounds, teethand silenckasbnetcohig and various other things madebytewudao,,eofsfien attraction to induc~e a visit to the Muem
But to us the most inteesting fetur ftewoeexii sejw of a large sperm whae otiigms fteteh hs asae.
of immense proportos aiubetaefrmawaehchild ,
one hundred and fty brelspO ol
There is a whal~e shi with l fteeupg n mlmnsue




_ie ote thc oric-,th a-rcu wi s ofsharpprecs ted lace
The Beachnt Cotae
re for herle is an oldr pano whic weehikn
b~~o*,tom itslda hae apperne anrds tyleofdmanactreete
Threisasoa antiquatedlloom, usedai
wihtnde bouse bor thedicvrofm
al Herat solie will be inerested inos there ollec iminnefemae'av actually sih e estn eric tgther withg mligtr ;jmbrekin thof Sother mganufacure, lookeeeinglyen fan The roomd fvoed to hosera wo'waor the gr. td y
dout'ju frm the vaeastoc of sthieit oft mofares h




i i
created~ so much imaginary trulintemdsocran e":T
shell and coral collection is wondefl vrahnrd4osn~pe nmens, and are worthy of an extended desciion u ursaei.o'i& at present. The tooth of the Mastodo, adth'mnspces petrifactions, fossils, mineras ad precious stnsarof-etitrs." Every visitor should se 's spleni instructive relics; the schl cidenwudganavstda f4non atiqn by studying these specimens.WecnrtleS. u-usie_,"; upon the acquisition of thi exhibit t t te trcin. JOHN P.' WRh'T7NEY, EsQ., eio.fthe S.Agsi, rs.Sy
"We hear the most enthusiasic. ~praises of the St. Aug- stine Museum, and visitors wvill no fail to examine the collecino Spanish relics. The mysterious bones found in excavatiog nort of the F~ort, are, as near as can be ascertained, the very bone that were found in the iron cagye which were buried north of the ~ Fort. It was John Capo, the I old harbor pilot, who removed the rocks and found the cage inthe inner dung-eon. This is, without doubt, the finest collection of curiosities WA ever seen in the Southj. We were particularly interested in M.BnigsSoe
the collection of rare and precious stns opiic oaetruie moonstornes, opals, gold an~d silver rpalcruceau-mrn emeralds, malachite. topaz, crsas n>mn te ae es nte
collection of whaling implemns esdstemamt hlesjw.
the teeth, rough and cavdisaremaeowhl'ioyan ind
,by rivets made of oldSpnsdolr. mThe collection of inetsispriuallrg.TeCndrt. relics attrct iret attention, as also triifl y. hes ancient halberd, 'supposed to. be oeta 0 erlasodo
! N e




Full Text

PAGE 5

THE It. Augustine iiRECTORY, CONTAINING A GENERA!. DIRECTORY OF THE CITIZENS, THE CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, SOCIETIES, STREETS, AND A BUSINESS DIRECTORY. TO WHICH IS ADDED A CONDENSED HISTORY OF ST. AUGUSTINE, GIVING A GRAPHIC DESCRIPTION OF THE PLACES OF INTEREST IN AND ABOUT THE ANCIENT CITY, CONTAINING 5riftp €n0ratiing^sf, a Sl@ap of ^lugujStiue, AND MUCH MATTER OF INTEREST TO THE TOURIST. CHAPIN & CO., PUIUHSHERS, Museum Building, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA.

PAGE 6

RESIDENCE OF Dr. C. P. CARVER. The oldest House^ in the oldest City in the United States.

PAGE 7

THE STREETS OF ST. AUGUSTINE. Artillery Lane, extends from Bay Street to St. George Street. Ballard, extends from the Bay to Shell Road. Bay, extends from Fort Marion to the Barracks. Bravo, extends from Bay Street to Hospital. Bridge, extends from Bay Street to St. Sebastian River. Bronson, extends from King Street to St. Sebastian River. Ceilland, extends from Fort Marion to Hospital Creek. Charlotte, extends from Fort Marion to Maria Sanchez Creek. Clinch, extends from the Bay to Shell Road. Cuna, extends from the Bay to Tolomato Street. Fort, extends from Charlotte Street to St. George Street. Green, extends from Bay Street to St. George Street. Grove Avenue, extends from Shell Road to St. Sebastian River. Hospital, extends from King Street to Bridge Street. Hypolita, extends from Bay Street to Tolomato Street. King, extends from Bay Street to New St. Augustine. Locust, extends from the Bay to Shell Road. Marine, extends from King Street to Maria Sanchez Creek. Mulberry, extends from the Bay to Shell Road. Myrtle, extends from Shell Road to the Bay. Orange, extends from Fort Marion to St. Sebastian River. Pine, extends from Bay Street to Shell Road. Shenandoah, extends from the Bay to Shell Road. Spanish, extends from Orange Street to Treasury Street. St. Francis, extends from the Barracks to Maria Sanchez Creek. St. George, extends from the City Gates to St. Francis Street. St. Louis Avenue, extends from Shell Road to the River. St. Sebastian Avenue, extends from Shell Road to the River. Tolomato, extends from Orange Street to St. Francis Street. Tolomato Lane, extends from St. George Street to Tolomato. Treasury, extends from Bay Street to Tolomato.

PAGE 8

4 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. PUBLIC LIBRARY. Free Public Library, Reading Room, and Historical Asso ciation OF St. Augustine, Fla. Officers for the year 1885. Phillip Ammidown, New York. Vice-Fres.^ George Burt, St. Augustine, Sec. and Treas., John L. Wilson, Massachu setts. Assd Sec. and Treas.., Dr. Andrew Anderson, St. Au gustine. An Executive Committee includes the above named officers, with the addition of the following members of the Association : A. J. Alexander, Kentucky ; Miss R. Perit, St. Augustine; M. M. Hurd, New York; W. H. Pell, New York; H. P. Ammidown, New York. Librarian.^ Miss Mary Sherman, St. Augustine. YACHT CLUB. St. Augustine Yacht Club. Commodore.^ Capt. H. V. LeRoy. Vice-Co 9 n., E. V. Clark. Sec.., R. F. Armstrong. MILITARY. St. Francis Barracks. 2d Artillery, Commanding, Col. R. B. Ayres. Adjutant, 2d Artillery, Lieut. Eli D. Hoyle. Quar-termaster, 2d Artillery, Lieut. Sebree Smith. Surgeon, Major J. R. Gibson, Surg. U. S. A. Troops. — Battery G, 2d Ar tillery — Capt., Geo. Mitchell. Lieuts., C. E. Kilbourne, E. S. Curtis, C. DeW. Wilcox. Battery Z, 2d Artillery — C apt., H. G. Litchfield. Lieuts., Nat. W^olfe, E. M. Weaver, H. B. Conklin. Parades Wednesdays and Fridays. Concerts every afternoon (Saturdays and Sundays excepted). St. Augustine Guards. Capt., Wm. Moody; \st Lieut., W. A. McWilliams ; 2d Lieut., S. L. Beasley ; \st Sergt., J. W. Spitler ; 2d Sergt., E. T. Hyde; 1st Corp., A. J. Corbett; 2d Corp., Eugene Masters. Fort Marion. Open from 8 a. m. to 4 p. m. Ord. Sergt. Brown, U. S. Army, in charge.

PAGE 9

ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 5 TRANSPORTATION COMPANIES. Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Halifax River R. R. GerCl Manager^ W. L. Crawford. Agents M. Williams. St. Johns Railway. President^ R. H. McLaughlin. Supt.^ W. P. Jarvis. Gen'l Pass, and Freight AgP, F. W. Clark. Agent, H. B. Lane. Florida Coast Line Canal Transportation Co. President, John Wescott. Manager and Chief Engineer, R. E. OÂ’Brien. Sec. and Treas., H. Gaillard. Supt., Pitt Cooke. Supt. Dredges, F. B. Colton. FIRE DEPARTMENT. Chief, W. Milford Ingraham. Ass't Chief, Chas. H. Dewell. companies. Ancient City Hook and Ladder, No. i. Fore 7 ?ian, John H. Dowd. Ass't Foreman, L. H. White. Sec., Geo. A. Alba. St. Augustine Steam Fire Engine Co., No. i. Forefnan, James Morris. Ass^t Foreman, Stephen Benjamin. Sec., E, J. Houston. San Marco Hose Co. Foreman, Wm. Claiborn. Sec., E. Papino, ASSESSED VALUATION, CITY. 1870.$505,100 187s. 630,215 1880. 549>3oo 1884. S 9 2 > i o 5 The assessment is not more than one-sixth of the real value.

PAGE 10

6 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. CHURCHES. St. Augustine M. E. Church. King street. Pastor^ C. C. McLean. Trustees^ J. K. Rainey, Geo. L. Atkins, Chas. H. Atkins, John T. Edwards, W. T. Broadwell, D. R. Knowlton, J. G. Libby. Presbyterian Church. St. George street. Pastor^ S. T. Wilson. Trustees^ Dr. A. Anderson, Phillip Ammidown, J. Tom Gordon, L. H. Tyler, J. W. Allen, Heth Canfield. Elders John E. Peck, DeWitt Webb, J. W. Allen, J. D. Sharp, Burnett Reynolds. St. Augustine Roman Catholic Cathedral. Bishop of Florida^ Right Rev. John Moore. Vicar-Getteral^ Rev. Father Claveraul. Rector of the Parish^ Rev. Patrick J. Lynch. Trinity Episcopal. Rector, Rev. E, L. Drown. Rector Eme ritus, Rev. E. Roote. Wardens, Geo. Burt, E. M. Alba. Vestrymen, W. S. M. Pinkham, John T. Carr, Geo. W. Gibbs, A. C. Spear. COLORED. A. M. E. Church. Washington street. Pastor, Rev. T. T. Thompson. Trustees, A. McKeever, W. McGuire, M. McGuire, Henry Harrison. First Baptist Church. Pastor, Rev. D. S. Scott. Trustees, Moses Wise, Daniel Green, Maj. Argrett, Henry Wintley, John Robinson. St. MaryÂ’s Baptist Church. Pastor, Rev. Ivory Barnes. Trustees, Adam Floyd, J. Stewart, Wm. Moran. M. E. Church. St. George street. Pastor, J. G. Howard. Trustees, F. E. Witsell, H. M. Emmerly, Lewis Whaley, Jacob Jordan, SamÂ’l Crosby.

PAGE 11

ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 7 SOCIETIES. Ancient City Lodge, F. & A. M., No. 76. JV. M., H. M. Snow. S. JV., Roscoe Perry. Sec., Wm. Moody. Treas., W. Milford Ingraham. J. W., W. R. Harris. Seminole Lodge, No. 4, A. O. U. W. M. JV., W. Milford Ingraham. F. M. JV., J. W. Allen. Fin., W. H. Atkins. Rec., John T. Carr. Foreman, L. H. White. Recorder, A. J. Corbett. St. Augustine Catholic Benevolent Society. President, A. E. Lopez. Vice-President, John H. Dowd. Sec., John P. Bridier. Treas., Nicholas P^ogero. W. C. Temperance Union. Pres., Mrs. Dr. DeWitt Webb. Treas., Mrs. Dr. L. Alexander. J^ice-Pres., Mrs. C. C. McLean, Mrs. Dr. Phillips, Miss Mary Reynolds. Sec., Mrs. C. E. Mackey. St. Augustine Lodge, I. O. G. T. JV. C. T, E. T. Hyde. IV. V T, Miss Mary Beasley. JV. S., F. H. Greatorex. JV. M., W. Allen. JV. C., J. W. Woltz. JV. F. S., Miss Bruce. JV. T, Wm. Darby. JV. I. G., L. Taunton. JV. O. G,, M. T. Masters. COLORED. K. OF P., San Marco Lodge, No. 3. P. C. T>. D., D. M. Papy. C. C., F. A. Papy. K. of R. S., Jacob Jordan. Knight Templars. E. C., D. M. Papy. Prelate, H. M. Emmerly. R., R. D. McKinney. Keystone Chapter, R. A. M.— Mt. Horeb Lodge, F. & A. M. M., H. M. Emmerly. Sec., Sam’l Crosby. Lincoln Temperance Society. Pres., Wm. Nattiel. Sec., S. M. Savelle. Treas., Chas. Bram.

PAGE 12

8 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. St. Augustine Institute of Natural Science. Preside?it, Rev. Milton Waldo, D.D. Vice-President^ DeWitt Webb, M. D. Sec. and Treas,^ Miss Mary R. Reynolds. Curator and Librarian.^ Chas. W. Johnson. Regular meetings are held on the first and third Tuesdays of each month, at 7.30 o’clock P. M., at the rooms of the Society, corner St. George and St. Hypolita Streets. SCHOOLS. Cou 7 ity Superintendent., Peter Arnau. School Commissioners : A. Lopez, John Allen. L. A. Colee. M. S. Usina. W. S. M. Pinkham. No. I. High School, Hospital Street; 145 pupils. Principal^t Walter E. Knibloe. Teachers., Miss Mary Brown, Miss Hortensia Rogero, Miss Grace Eilliot. Trustee., Dr. J. K. Rainey. No. 2. (Colored,) Spanish Street; 115 pupils. Principal., Miss Emma R. Caughey. Teachers., Miss Helen Barton, Miss Mary E. Howard. Trustees: Dr. DeWitt Webb, Benjamin Riley. No. 12. Sisters OF St. Joseph, St. George Street; 180 pupils. Teachers^ Sister Gertrude Capo, Sister Agnes Hernandez, Sister M. Fitz-Simmons. Trustees: D. Lopez, Dr. R. B. Garnett, B. Genovar. St. Augustine Academy for Young Ladies. Prmcipal^ Miss L. S. Munday.—(6’^^ adv.) St. Augustine School for Boys. Principal, Edward S. Drown.— { See adv.) St. Joseph Academy for Young Ladies. Prmcipal, Rev. Mother Lazerus.— { S ee adv.)

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ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 9 Colored Industrial School. President, John L. Wilson. Secretary, Andrew Anderson, M.D. P'easurer^ Fred. Ballard. Trustees: C. F. Hamblen and above-named officers. Ladies'" Executive Board : — President, Miss Sarah A. Mather. Secretary, Mrs. DeWitt Webb. Vice-Presidents, Mrs. John L. Wilson, Mrs. Col. Tra cey, Mrs. C. F. Hamblen, with ten managers, selected from the different church organizations. PUBLIC OFFICIALS. Municipal Officers. Mayor, John G. Long. Aldermen, B. F. Oliveros, C. C. Beasley, Roscoe Perry, Jacob Jordan, A. B. Phillips, E. F. Joyce, Geo. W. Atwood, John T. Ed wards, D. M. Papy. Clerk, William H. Atkins. Marshal, John Papino. Collector, Edward J. Houston. Assessor, A. A. Papy. Treasurer, James W. Allen. County Officers. Cotmty Judge, M. R. Cooper. Coimty Clerk, B. F. Oliveros. County Sheriff, R. Hernandez. County Collector, D. L. Dunham. County Treasurer, C. Pomar.. County Assessor, R. Ximanies. Supt. Schools, Peter Arnau. County Commissioners, M. S. Usina, A. B. Phillips, H. H. Floyd, Benj. Masters, Perry McCullar. Board of Public Instruction. M. S. Usina, A. E. Lopez, L. A. Colee, W. S. M. Pinkham, John Allen. Secretary, Peter Arnon. Federal Officers. Postmaster, W. W. Dewhurst. Collector of Customs, F. E. Witsell. Deputy Collector of Customs, Geo. A. Alba. U, S, Commissioner, B. F. Oliveros. County Board of Health. Drs. J. K. Rainey, L. Alexander, H. C. Sloggett, B. Genovor, Wm. Hernandez. President, Dr. J. K. Rainey. Secretary, C. L. Collins.

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lO ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. NEWSPAPERS. St. Augustine Press, weekly, $2.00 a year; John P. Whitney, Publisher, Spanish street. St. Johns Weekly, G. W. Dickinson, Publisher, King street; weekly, $2.00 a year.

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St. Augustine Directory. Abbott Miss Lucy, house Perry ave. and Shenandoah st. Alba E. M. M.D. druggist, Plaza street, house King. Alba George A. deputy collector. Custom House, house King street. Alba W. E. King street. Allen Daniel, carpenter, house Charlotte street. Allen Edward C. pilot, house Charlotte street. Allen J. W. book-keeper (C. F. Hamblen), house Bravo. Alexander A. J., cor. St. George and Bridge st. Alexander H. L. millinery, St. George st., house Charlotte Alexander L. M.D. City Drug Store, St. George street, house Perry avenue. Ammidon Philip, house St. George street, near King. Anderson Andrew, M.D., house King st., near Bronson. Anderson E. L. laborer, Lincolnville. Andreu John, jr. house North city. Andreu Antonio, sr. laborer, house North city. Andreu Antonio, jr. laborer, house North city. Andreu Edward, laborer, house North city. Andreu Edward, jr. laborer, house North city. Andreu Emanuel, carpenter, house Charlotte street. Andreu Francis A. laborer, house North city. Andreu F. F. mason, house Cuna street. Andreu Francis P. laborer, house Tolomato st., near Cuna. Andreu Robert, carpenter, house Charlotte street.

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12 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Andreu William, laborer, house North city. Andreu William J. mason, house North city. Andrews W. J. clerk (C. T. Hamblen), St. George street. Anheuser Julius, (Will, Anheuser & Co.) Charlotte street, near St. Francis. Armstrong R. F. real estate, St. George street, boards Hasseltine House. Arnau Paul, ex-mayor, house St. George street, near Cuna. Arnau Peter, superintendent schools, house Spanish street, near Cuna. Arndt Otto, laborer, house North city. ARTESIAN WELL DRILLING CO., Orange street. Ashmead William A. Plorida House, St. George street. Aspinwall Rev. Jno. A. house corner Bay street and Artil lery lane. ATKINS ALLRED C. P'lorida House, St. George street. Atkins Charles A. Llorida House, St. George street. Atkins Charles L. P'lorida House, St. George street. ATKINS GEORGE L. & SONS, Florida House. ATKINS WILLIAM H. City Clerk, house Orange st. ATWOOD GEORGE W. livery stable near San Marco Hotel, house Bridge street. Bailey Edward, house Orange street. Ball Mrs. H. house Tolomato street. Ballard F. J. ticket agent and jewelry, St. George street. BANK OF ST. AUGUSTINE, St. George street. Barnes E. L. clerk, (Sabin, Moulton & Co.), boards Seaside house. BATES, W. T. confectioner. Treasury street. Battle S. W., M.D. (U. S. Navy), office San Marco Drug Store, St. George street. Bausket W. T. (Hopkins & Bausket) real estate, Rainey building. Baya Elotario, laborer, house North city. Bayer Erank, laborer, house North city. Beasley C. C. house Sanford street. Benet Acilimo, laborer, house North city.

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ST. AUGUSTINE DIKECTORY. I Benet Francis, fisherman, house Charlotte st., near Fort. Benet Joseph, fisherman, house Charlotte street. Benet J. R. grocer, corner St. George and Cuna streets, house do. Benet Necacio, laborer, house North city. Benet S. F. laborer, house North city. BENHAYON & GONZALEZ, Charlotte street. Benhayon J. S., cigars, etc., Charlotte street. Berry Alfred, painter, house Spanish st., cor. Hypolita. Beven A. H. (Tower & Co.) King street. Beverly James Porter, house Charlotte street. Biddlecome Edward, boats, house Marine* street, near St. Francis. BLAKE A. M. Cleveland House, St. George street. BLAKE L. Cleveland House, St. George street. Bloomfield Mrs. newsdealer, St. George street, house do. Boutwell W. O. clerk, (Will Anheuser & Co.), boards at Seaside house. Boynton William H. boarding-house St. George street. Bradford James A. laborer, house Bradford avenue. Bradford Joseph A. sawyer, house Sanford street. BRAINARD JOSEPH, ^Willula,Â’^ King street. Bravo Donato, gardener, house St. George street. Bridier E. T. carpenter, house King street. Bridier John M. carpenter, house Tolomato street. Britt John, gardener, house Tolomato street. Bronson Robert, house St. George street, cor. Bridge. BRUCE & HOYT, contractors and builders, St. Louis avenue. Bruce E. A. builder, house Sebastian avenue. BRUCE F. W. surveyor and civil engineer, house St. Louis avenue. Bruce Fred J. Bruce T. W. (Bruce & Hoyt), house St. Louis avenue. Bryan A. J. house North city. Buck A. O. livery, Tolomato street. Buckhalter E. Ocean View. BUNTING GEORGP^ T. furniture, Charlotte street, house St. George street.

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14 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY, Burgess H. (Burgess & Co.) fruit, St. George st, house do. Burnett William, ''The Cedars,” North city. Burt George, house St. George street. Burton W. R. tinsmith, Charlotte street, house Comache Island. Campbell J. T. (Monson & Campbell), Charlotte street. Campbell O. E. builder, house Orange street. Carrera John G. clerk, (with Estes, Brown & Co.), house Spanish street. Carrera Stephen, house St. George street. CANFIELD HETH, builder, Bronson street, house San ford street. Canova Alexander, carpenter, house Spanish street. Canova James, bar-tender, house Spanish street. Canova John L. mason, house St. George street, corner St. Francis. Canova J. R. laborer, house Spanish street. Canova Lucien, saloon Charlotte st., house Hypolita st. Capellia E. L. cigars, house Charlotte street. Capellia Lawrence, laborer, house North city. Capellia Severnno, tailor, house North city. Capo Antonio, laborer, house Charlotte street. Capo E. laborer, house Charlotte street. CAPO E. G. jeweler, St. George street. Capo John jr. laborer, house North city. Capo John H. butcher, house North city. Capo Joseph, laborer, house Charlotte street. Capo Lewis, gardener, house North city. Capo Paul, laborer, house Anastasia Island. CAPO PHILIP, bath house Bay street. Capo Philip jr. mason, house North city. Capo Vernancio, pilot, house Charlotte street. Capo Victorina, mason, house North city. Capo William sen. house Locust avenue. Capo William jr. laborer, house Locust avenue. Carr John T. clerk St. Aug. Nat. Bank, house Bay street. CARVER C. P. dentist King street, house St. Francis st.

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ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Chamberlin W. S. house Bay street. Chapin D. W. house King street. Chapin Geo. H., real estate, oflhce cor. Charlotte and Fort streets. CHAPIN & CO., wholesale and retail curiosities. Museum building. Clason Rufus, Sanford street. Clayton J. R. house Sanford street. CLEVELAND HOUSE, cor. St. George and Cuna sts. Cole J. B. builder, Bronson street, house Bravo street. Colee J. B. livery, house Sanford street. Colee J. L. surveyor, house Spanish street. Colee J. R. salesman (with W. Lyon & Co.), house Spanish street. Colee L. A. livery, Tolomato street. Colee William, wheelwright, Hypolita street. Collins C. F. watchmaker and jeweller, St. George street. Collins C. I. attorney. Court House. Compton & Vedder, Charlotte st., druggists and notions. CONNER O. T. fruits and refreshments, St. George st. house same. COOK & LIBBEY, wood-turners, etc., factory Bravo st. Cook John L. carpenter, house New Augustine. Cook J. L. (Cook & Libbey) house Bravo street. Cook Robert, carpenter, house New Augustine. Cook S. L. builder, house New Augustine. Cooke Charles W. Florida Stone Co., North city. COOKE HENRY A. Florida Stone Co., North city. Cooper C. M. attorney-general, house Charlotte street. Cooper E. M. house Orange street. Cooper Fred, house Orange street. Cooper M. R. attorney and county judge. Court House, house New Augustine. Corbett A. J. attorney. Custom House. Corbett T. F. steamboats, Hypolita street. Cowdon J. S. teacher, house Bridge street. Cox W. A. photographer, St. George street, house St. George street.

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i6 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. CRADDOCK MRS. J. E., Craddock House, Bridge st. Craven F. W. St. Augustine Gas Co. house Marine street. Crawford George, laborer, house North city. Crichlow S. W. telegraph operator, Cuna street. CUNNINGHAM JOHN, Rainey Building, St. George st. Dale Thomas, painter, house North city. Dale William, DaleÂ’s Rosery, Shell road. Darling J. J. merchant, Charlotte street, house Charlotte, cor. Treasury street. Davis Geo. T. painter, house St. George street. Davis Mrs. H. B., dry goods, (Davis & Jenkes), Char lotte street. Davis James O. painter, St. George street. Davis Thomas M., barber, Charlotte street. De MEDICIS EDMUND P. produce, Charlotte street, house New Augustine. De MEDICIS EMANUEL E. merchant, Charlotte st., cor. Cuna. De Medicis Emanuel J. house St. George street. De Medicis Frank A., saloon, Charlotte street. Desselberger William, meats and restaurant, Charlotte street. Dewell C. H. East Florida Bottling Co., house Putnam st. Dewell J. H. produce, Charlotte street. Dewhurst W. W, postmaster and attorney-at-law, house Marine street. Dickinson G. W. St. Johns Weekly, house King street. Dillingham Elwood, sawyer, house Bridge street. Dorr H. A. clerk, (Sabin, Moulton & Co.), house Bay street. Dow G. N. laborer, house North city. Dowd John, tinsmith, Hypolita street. Dowd Peter, clerk, (E. E. De Medicis), St. George street. Doyle James, carpenter, house St. George street. Doyle Jerry, gardener, house North city. Drown Edward S., principal St. Augustine School, Abbott Mansion, near Hotel San Marco. Drown Rev. E. T. rector Episcopal Church, house King street.

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ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 17 DROWN W. S. artist, studio, post-office building, boards King street. Drysdale L saloon Charlotte street, house North city. Drysdale V. manager St. Augustine saw-mill, boards North city. Dumas Henry, house Bridge street. Dummitt Miss Anna, St. George and St. Francis streets. Dunham David L. county collector. Court House, house Spanish street. Dunham F. T. F. house Charlotte street. Dunham Charles, M.D. Charlotte street. Eastman George L. house Orange street. Edgar Daniel, house Bay street. Edgar Leroy, house Bay street. Edge Albert J. laborer, house North city. EDWARDS HOUSE, Charlotte street. EDWARDS JOHN T. Edwards House, Charlotte street. EICHBAUM W. P. supt. St. Augustine Gas Co., Marine street. Elliott Joseph, ice-cream, cor. Treasury and St. George st. Emerson George, builder, house Clinch street. Enslow J. A. jr. travelling salesman, house cor. St. George and St. Francis streets. Erreger George, bar-tender. Bay street. Estes, Brown & Co. Gordon Block. Evans J. D. house Orange street. Falana Fernanda, butcher, house North city. Falana Thomas, butcher, house North city. Fields A. J. carpenter. Filkins M. carpenter, house Ballard avenue. Fink J. J, carpenter, house Spanish street. Fisher Albert, porter with G. T. Bunting, house Tolomato street. FLORIDA HOUSE, St. George street. Floyd J. B. laborer, house North city. Foster William F. boats. Bay street.

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i8 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Foster Andrew P. carpenter, King street. Foster Charles G. carpenter, Marine street. F'oster Mrs. E. boarding-house, St. George street Foster Frank, laborer, house North city. Foster Mrs. G. house King street. Fowler F. M. painter, Charlotte street. Frazer Mrs. H. Ingleside House, St. Francis street. Furman S. S. driver, house Ballard avenue. Gaillard C. R. (Canal Co.), Bay street Gaillard E. M. (Collins & Gaillard), Rainey building. Gaillard Henry (Canal Co.), Bay street. Gard C. E. (W. Lyon & Co.), house Charlotte street. Gardner Charles P. produce, Charlotte street. Gardner Joseph E. produce, Charlotte street. Gardner Stephen J. produce, Charlotte street. Garnett R. B. house Shell road and St. Louis ave. GAUZENS F. sewing machines and notions, Charlotte street, house Orange street. Geer A. H. engineer, house North city. GEMMINGEN, VON G. civil engineer. Marine street. GENOVAR B. groceries and wines, Charlotte st., house Marine street. Genovar F. B. Orange Grove, Cassacola. Genovar N. F. planter, house North city. Genovar William, clerk with B. Genovar, house Spanish street. GIBBS GEORGE W. (St. Augustine National Bank, St. George street), house Perry avenue. Gilbert Mrs. A. house King street. Gomez G. R. boats. Bay street. Gonyer Joseph, drayman, house Washington street. Gonzalez Frank, Charlotte street. GOODRICH E. M. dentist, oflfice St. George, house St. George street. Gordon J. T. house Marine street. Gordon R. H. house King street. Graves C. A. painter, house Spanish street.

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ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 19 Greatorex F. H. auctioneer, house St. George street. Greeno George S. Greeno House, Marine street. Greer Harry C. clerk, (Hamblen & Co.), house North city. Hagans William, boats, Charlotte street. Hager Charles, painter, house St. George street. Hallam W. H. baker, house Charlotte street. Hamblen C. F. merchant. King street, house do. Harn W. A. light-keeper, Anastacia Island. HARMON A. W., Savannah Club Stable, Spanish street. Harris W. R. builder, house Ballard avenue. Harrison Geo. painter, house North city. H ASSELTINE MISS R. E. Hasseltine House, St. George street. Hayes Geo. W. laborer, house North city. Heade M. J. artist, house Shell road. HENDERSON J. W. attorney-at-law, County Building, boards Edwards House. Henderson W. T. carpenter, house North city. Hernandez Alonzo, carpenter, house Cuna street. Hernandez Deigo J. carpenter, house Bronson street. Hernandez Eugene, laborer, house Tolomato street. Hernandez Hubert, carver, house St. George street. Hernandez Joseph, clerk, house Charlotte street. Hernandez Joseph, shoemaker, Charlotte street. Hernandez Joseph, jr. carver, St. George street. Hernandez Mrs. J. V. Hernandez House, Charlotte street. Hernandez Ramon, sheriff, house Tolomato street. Higgins Wm. carpenter, St. George and Orange street. Hildreth J. A. book-keeper for G. T. Bunting, house North city. HINCH & SON, painters and grainers. Treasury street house Mulberry street. Hinch James (Hinch & Son), Treasury street, Hinch William E. (Hinch Sc Son), Treasury street. Hinman A. C. house Sanford street. Hite Lewis, boats. Bay street. HOPKINS & BAUSKET, real estate, Rainey building.

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20 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Hopkins C. F. jr. (Hopkins & Bausket), real estate, Rainey building. House William E. engineer, house Putnam street. Howard T. H. (Howard Bros.), St. George street. HOWARD, T. H. paints and oils, St. George street. Howatt George (Geo. Myers & Co.), Tolomato street. HOWES O. King street (Rink San Marco), house Shenan doah street. Hoyt A. J. builder (Bruce & Hoyt), house St. Louis ave. Hulett Philander, house Orange street. Hyde E. T. clerk (C. F. Hamblen), house Charlotte street. Ingraham W. Milford, paints and oils, Charlotte street, house Cuna street. Irwin John A. livery, Bridge street. Irwin John J. laborer, house Bridge street. Irwin R. L. livery. Hospital street. Iwanowskie, Alex, boats, Marine street. Jenks M, J. (Davis & Jenks), Charlotte street. Johnson C. E. salesman (W. Lyon & Co.), house Orange street. JOHNSON L. E. artist, Craddock House. Joseph B. merchant tailor, (Joseph & Myerson), St. George street. Joseph & Myerson, clothiers, St. George street. JOYCE, E. F. Artesian Well Co., St. George, house Orange street. Joyce Henry, driller, Orange street. Kane Stafford, fisherman, house Marine street. Keith Mrs. W. H. house Lincolnville. Kingsland H. P. house Shell road. Kirkpatrick T. W. Orange street. Knibloe W. E. teacher, house Orange street. Knowlton D. R. St. Augustine Mill, house Shell road and Grove avenue. KROM J. J. (clerk, Magnolia Hotel), house St. George st.

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ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 21 Krom Mrs. J. J. hair dealer, St. George street, house do. Krowtoske Frank, watchman, house Cedar street. Lane H. B. agent St.Johns Railway, house New Augustine. Lawler Michael, gardener, house Charlotte street, Lawler William, bar-tender, house Charlotte street. Lawrence L. P. drug clerk, boards Cleveland House. Lee W. R. carpenter, house King street. Leonardy Celestial, wood, house Marine street. Leonardy F'ernando, carpenter, house Marine street. Leonardy John, laborer, house Marine street. Leonardy Joseph ist, carpenter, house Marine street. Leonardy Joseph 2d, mason, house Marine street. Leonardy Lewis, carpenter, house Marine street. Leonardy Mathias, laborer, house Marine street. Leurand E. C. porter, house Plaza place. Lewin A. H. laborer, house North city. Lewis Henry, porter, house Charlotte street. Libby J. E. (Cook & Libby), St. Augustine Saw-mill, house Sanford street. Llambias A. M. watchman, house Charlotte street. Llambias D. J. printer, house Charlotte street. Llambias Jerome, clerk, house Charlotte street. Llamblais Joseph F. wood dealer. Bridge street. Long John G. (mayor), attorney-at-law, house Shell road. Lopez A. E. gunsmith, Cuna street. Lopez A. M. clerk, house Cuna street. Lopez Andrew, carpenter, house St. George street. Lopez Antonio, laborer, house King street. Lopez Emanuel, hunter, house Tolomato street. Lopez Ignatio, laborer, house Charlotte street. Lopez James L. hunter, house Cuna street. Lopez Jerome, wood, house Cuna street. Lopez J. D. drug clerk (with Dr. E. M. Alba), house Tolo mato street. Lopez John P. printer, house Spanish street. Lopez Justo F. laborer, house King street. Lopez Lewis, carpenter, house Spanish street.

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22 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Lopez Mannie, clerk, Charlotte street. Lorrillard Geo. L., house St. George street. Louis C. E. B. laborer, house Sanford street. Louis Henry, laborer, house Sanford street. Lusby J. H. clerk (C. F. Hamblen & Co.), house Orange st. Lynch Rev. P. J. house Plaza place. LYON W. & CO. King street, cor. St. George. MACKEY C. E. newsdealer and curiosities, St. George street, house do. MACKEY & CO. curiosities, St. George street. MacMillan Andrew F. house St. George street. MacWilliams W. A. attorney. Court house. MAGNOLIA HOTEL, St. George street. Mance John N. steward Magnolia Hotel, house Ballard av. Mance & Mitchell, contractors. MANCE & COLE, builders, Bronson street. Mance, S. B. builder, house Ballard avenue. Manucy Charles, printer, house Spanish street. Manucy Mark, carpenter (with G. T. Bunting), house St. George street. Markle William H. builder, house Tolomato street. Martin John F. carpenter, house North city. Masters Antonio, butcher. North city. Masters B. A. butcher, house Shell road. Masters D. S. blacksmith, house Shell road. Masters Edmond, barber, Charlotte st., house Tolomato st. Masters Emanuel J. mason. North city. Masters Eugene, clerk (Sabin, Moulton & Co.), bds. Taylor House. Masters Gasper, carpenter, house St. George street, corner Orange. Masters Gasper S. driver, house St. George street, corner Orange. Masters John, laborer, house North city. Masters John S. house Charlotte street. MASTERS MARION T. livery. Orange street, house do. Masters Peter, laborer, house Charlotte street.

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ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. MASTERS PETER C. mason, house Charlotte street. Masters Sylvester, blacksmith, Hypolita street, house North city. Masters William H. mason, house Orange street. McBride Edward, plumber, house San Marco. McCall Frank, printer, St. George street. McClelland J.A. St. Albans House, St. George street. McClelland, S. St. Albans house, St. George street. McCobb Ernest, carpenter, house Spanish street. McEuen David, carpenter, St. Johns House. McGave James, laborer, house Charlotte street. McGuire David, carpenter, house North city. McGuire Edward, carpenter, house Shell road. McGuire. J. A. builder, house Shell road. McLean Rev. C. C. pastor M. E. Church, house Bronson street. McNeil John R. clerk (C. F. Hamblen), Charlotte street. Meltcher William, driver, house Bronson street. Mickler Daniel, laborer, house Marine street. Mickler Ernest F. boards Marine street. Mickler James J. wood, Charlotte street. Mickler Paul A. hunter, house Charlotte street. Mickler William, civil engineer, house Charlotte street. Miller Miss E. E. Hasseltine House, St. George street. Misson E. jeweller and curiosity dealer, St. George street, house do. Mitchell M. carpenter, house St. George street. Mitchell W. H. (Mance & Mitchell) St. George street. Monson Anthony, boats, Charlotte street. Monson Anthony, (Monson & Campbell), boots and shoes, Charlotte street. MONSON & CAMPBPILL, boots and shoes, Charlotte street. MONSON FRITCHIFF, livery. Orange street, house Cuna street. Montena A. T. baker. Shell road. Montero August, baker, Charlotte street.

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24 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Montgomery Nathaniel, Charlotte street. Moody William, clerk (C. F. Hamblen & Co.), Charlotte st. MOUREY WM., paper hangings, glass, etc., cor. Spanish and Cuna streets. Mourgon L. E. dyer, house Charlotte street. MUNDAY MISS L. S. ladiesÂ’ academy. Cedar street. Museum The, opposite Fort Marion near city gate. Myers George (Geo. Myers & Co.), house Bronson street. Myers George & Co. grocers, King street. Myerson Alfred (Joseph & Myerson), house Charlotte st. Myrick S. steward St. Augustine Hotel. Nelligan H. H, St. George House. NELSON JOSEPH F. painter, house Charlotte street. Nelson Mrs. Dora, house Charlotte street. Nelson Thomas H. clerk with B. Genovar, boards Char lotte street. Nesbitt R. W. road master J. St. A. & H. R. R. Noda A. J. house Hypolita street. Ocean View House, Bay street. OLIVEROS BARTOLA, house St. George street, near city gates. OLIVEROS B. E. county clerk, notary public and commis sioner of deeds for New York, County building, house St. George street. Oliveros Ernest, clerk (C. F. Hamblen), house Spanish st. Opdike M W. carpenter, Marine street. Opera House, St. George street. Pacetti Albert, mason, house North city. Pacetti Bartola E. pilot, house North city. Pacetti D. F. saloon Charlotte st., house Cuna street. Pacetti S. J. carpenter, Tolomato street, house North city. Pacetti Thomas A. agent, Cuna street. Pacetty A. N. soda-water, Charlotte street. Pacetty B. A. mason, house North city. Pacetty B. J. mason, house North city.

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ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 25 Pacetty Felix, baker, Charlotte street. Pacetty Gabriel, views, St. George street, house St. George street. Pacetty Joseph R. baker, Charlotte street, Pallicer Antonio, laborer, house North city. Palmer E. L. house North city. PALMER W. W., propÂ’r Magnolia Hotel, house Ravenswood. PAPY GASPER N. St. Albans House, house Shell road. PAPY T. M. St. Albans dining rooms, St. George street. PAPY O. F. livery stable, house Shell road. Paris H. B. clerk, Bridge street. Paris Robert, dry goods Gordon block, house Bridge street. PARKER E. C. Rolleston House, Peck John E. M.D. cor. St. George and Treasury streets. Peebles R. P. conductor J. St. A. & H. R. R. Pellicer Andrew J. sen. carpenter, house Hypolita street. PELLICER ANDREW J. jr., tinner and plumber, Char lotte street, house Bridge street. Pendleton John, house Hospital street, same. PENNINGTON H. J. Philadelphia House, Tolomato street. Perpall Chas. F. clerk, house St. George street. Perpall Chas. W. laborer, house St. George street. Perpall Francis E. saloon Bay street, house Cuna street. Perpall William G. bartender, house St. George street. Perry Roscoe, groceries and provisions, Ceilland street. Phares J. B. Sulzner & Phares, North city. Phelps Robert B. carpenter, house North city. Phillips A. B. dentist. Bay street. Phillips John Lott, house St. George street. Pinkham W. S. M. Ocean View, Bay street. Pollock C. G. Florida House, St. George street. Pomar A. D. carpenter, Spanish street. Pomar Bartola, laborer, house Spanish street. Pomar Christopher, wheelwright. New St. Augustine. Pomar C. O laborer, house North city.

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26 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Pomar Joseph, ice-cream, St. George street, house same. Pomar Peter, laborer, house Spanish street. Pomar William, laborer, house Spanish street. Ponce Alonzo, laborer, house Spanish street. Ponce James A. hunter, house Spanish street. Ponce James B. carpenter. Fort street. PONCE M. J. millinery, cor. Fort and Charlotte streets. Ponce William G. agent, St. George street. Poor Daniel A. house Bravo street. PROCTOR JOHN, St. Sebastian Mills. Pullis Washington, house Bridge street. QUEST & MITCHELL, boots and shoes, Charlotte street. Quigley J. B. grocer. North city. Quigley J. O. carpenter. North city. Quigley J. W. carpenter. North city. Rainey J. K., M.D. RaineyÂ’s building, St. George street. Ranty Felix, carpenter. Shell road. Ranty Joseph, light-keeper, Anastacia Island. Reed Morton, Sanford street. REHNBERG GUSTAV, jeweller, St. George street, house same. REHNBERG PAUL, jeweller. Treasury st., house same. Relf J. S. Ice Co. Bridge street. Relf Miss L. E. (cashier, W. Lyon & Co.), boards Bridge street. Reyes Raymond, Marine street. REYES WILLIAM J. St. Augustine saw-mill, Bridge street, house Charlotte street. Reynolds Burnett S. Cedar street. Reynolds Mrs. C. O. (Rose Garden), Cedar street. Rice Samuel, carpenter, house North city. Ridell John, painter, St. George street. Rogero A. D. Charlotte street. Rogero Nicholas, cigars, St. George street, cor. Hypolita. Rogero Raymond, printer, St. George street, cor. Hypolita.

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ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 27 Rohde Henry M. Ohio avenue and Shell road. ROLLESTON HOUSE, St. George street. Rolleston William, watchmaker, St. George street. Roote Rev. E. house Bridge street. Rose Bartola, fish. Marine street. Russell William H. clerk (Sabin, Moulton & Co.), house Spanish street. Ryals Richard, manager Club Stables, house Spanish street. Sabate R. P. boots and shoes. Treasury, corner TolomatO' street. Sabin E. D. (Sabin, Moulton & Co.), St. George street. SABIN, MOULTON & CO. dry goods, Rainey building. Salter J. D. B. house Orange street. Sanchez Emanuel, boatman, house Marine street. Sanchez Frank M. house Marine street. Sanchez Joseph, boatman, house Marine street. Sanchez Joseph S. boats. Marine street. SANCHEZ J. W. painter, boards Hypolita street. Sanchez Venancio, Spanish consul, corner Hospital and King street. Sanchez V. (Sanchez & Son), King, corner Hypolita st. Sanchez William J. (Sanchez & Son), King, corner Hypohta street SAN MARCO HOTEL, Shell road. Savage W. P. house Ravenswood. Schneur Charles F. curiosities, under St. Augustine Hotel. Schroeder Mrs. S. C. .SCOTT J. L. Rolleston House, St. George street. SEAVEY O. D. manager Hotel San Marco. Sedgewick W. D. cabinet-maker (with G. T. Bunting),. boards at W. H. BoyntonÂ’s. Segui Bartola, clerk, Spanish street. Segui Celestial, fish, Tolomato street. Segui Eugene, drug clerk (Dr. E. M. Alba), house Tolo mato street. Segui P. A. clerk (B. Genovar), Spanish street.

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28 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Sharpe J. D. grocer, Charlotte street, h. Tolomato street. SHARP E. P. fruit and confectionery, St. George street. Sherman William J. Art. Well, St. Francis street. Shine William F., M.D. Bridge street. Short Howard, Pdorida House, St. George street. SISTERS ST. JOSEPHÂ’S CONVENT, St. George st. Silcox & Carpenter, Spanish street. Skiles J. T. St. Augustine Hotel. Sloggett Dr. H. C. (E. F. L. Sc I. Co.), King street. Smith Franklin, Villa Zoradia, King street. Smith F. F., M.D. Custom House, boards Magnolia Hotel. Smith H. B. boards St. George House. Smith James, clerk. Shell road. Smith John, baker, St. .George street, house same. Smith J. Hayden, curiosities, Hypolita street. Smith J. Milton, clerk, (Gardner Bros.), Charlotte street. Smith O. B. (W. Lyon & Co.), house Shell road. Snow H. M. Transfer Co. Charlotte street. Sommey P. A. clerk (Paris & Co.), house Shenandoah street. Spear A. C. St. George street. Speissegger T. W. Sc Sons, drugs. Bay street, house cor. Orange and Tolomato streets. SPENCER J. A. dry goods and groceries. Bridge street. Spencer Rev. M. agent. Orange street. Stafford O. N. Shell road. Stanbury Mrs. S. C. St. George street. ST. AUGUSTINE HOTEL, Plaza street. ST. AUGUSTINE GAS CO. W. P. Eichbaum, supt. St. Augustine Water Works, E. F. Joyce, superintendent. St. Johns Railway Depot, New Augustine. Stevens L. H. painter. North city. Stevens Sydney G. St. George street. Steward J. N. dry goods, Charlotte street. STEWART CHARLES, building mover, house Spanish street. Stickney Mrs. J. B. Shell road. SULZNER & PHARES, music store. Treasury street.

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ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 29 Sulzner Frederick (Sulzner & Phares), house Shell road. Sutton L. A. carpenter, house South Augustine. Sweeney Morgan, saddler, St. George street. Tallman Miss Katie A. Ocean View Hotel. Tauntin W. S. grocer, cor. St. George and Orange streets. Taylor H. clerk (Sabin, Moulton & Co.), house Bridge st., near St. George street. Taylor R. H. Seaside House, Bridge street. Thomas Mrs. J. C. millinery. Treasury street. Thomas J. C. house Treasury street. Tower G. M. (G. M. Tower & Co.) King street, house Put nam street. Tracey Albert, Major U. S. A. house cor. St. George and Hypolita streets. TRAVER JAMES W. hardware, St. George street. Treat W. J. (with C. E. Hamblen), King street. Triay J. A. mason, house North city. Triay Phillip R. mason, house North city. Tyler Charles, Tyler House, corner King and St. George streets. Tyler L. H. Tyler House, corner King and St. George streets. Uckos John, barber, St. George street. Updike Fred W. carpenter. Marine street. Updike George F. restaurant, Charlotte street. Updike George M. restaurant Bay street. Upton B. F. photographer, Hypolita street. Usina Albert, shoemaker, house North city. Usina Frank A. carpenter, St. George street. Usina Joseph, printer, Cuna street. Usina M. S. shoemaker. Shell road. Usina Phillip, carpenter. Marine street. VAILL E. E. St. Augustine Hotel. Vaill E. G. St. Augustine Hotel. Van Balsam R. house Bridge street.

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30 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Van Dorn R. S., M.D. King street. Van Velsor A. N. carpenter, house North city. Vaught J. F. carpenter. Vedder Charles J. (W. Lyon & Co.), house Bridge street. VEDDER JOHN, dentist and curiosities. Bay street, house do. Villula The, King street. Vogel Madam Leo. R. Abbott Mansion, North city. Von Gemmingen C. E. architect, office and house Marine street. Walker H. carpenter. North city. Walker James F. laborer, Florida House. Wallace Colin A. house Bravo street. Walter Robinson S. Florida House, S.t. George street. Walton Geo. H. H. boat-builder Charlotte street, house do. Walton George W. merchant, Charlotte street. Watson James, tailor, St. George street. Webb DeWitt, M.D. St. George street, house do. Weigler William, baker, Charlotte street. Wescott John, attorney, Bay street. Western Union Telegraph Co. office Hospital street. WHITE L. H. boots and shoes, St. George street. White R. clerk, Charlotte street. Whiteside George A. clerk, (John Whiteside), St. George st. Whiteside John, grocer, St. George street, house do. Whitney Everett C. electrician, St. George street. Whitney John F. Pro. Ravenswood. Whitney J. P. (St. Augustine Spanish street, boards Magnolia Hotel. Whitney S. G. captain steamer Georgia, St. George street. Whitney T. H. clerk. Wild B. H. Sanford street, house Bravo street. Will, Anheuser & Co. groceries. Hospital street. Will W. C. H. (Will, Anheuser & Co.), house Tolomato street. Williams H. H. Williams Garden, Shell road. Williams M. agent J. St. A. & H. R. R. Orange street.

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ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 31 Williams Thomas G. Shell road. Wilson John L. St. George street. ‘ Wilson Rev. S. T. pastor Presbyterian Church, parsonage St. George street. Wilson D. M. Orange street. Wise L. W. blacksmith. Witham Henry, carpenter, Bravo street. WOLTZ C. E. & BRO. builders, Rhodes avenue. Woltz James H. (C. E. Woltz & Bro.), carpenter, house Rhodes avenue. Woltz J. W. (C. E. Woltz & Bro.) builder, house Bridge st. Woltz Robert (C. E. Woltz & Bro.), builder, house Bravo street. Woodall Samuel (American House), Orange street. Worden W. G. Electric Gas Co. Worth Miss M. Bay street. Ximanies Antonio, saloon, Spanish street. Ximanies Rafael, assessor, Spanish street. YAEKEL R. tailor, St. George street. Young A. restaurant, St. George street.

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The Lorlllard Villa, St, Augustine.

PAGE 37

ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. COLORED. Adams Toney, laborer, Cedar street. Adams George, tailor. Bridge street. Adams Toney, Jr. laborer, Lincolnville. Adams James, laborer, Lincolnville. Argrett L. hackman. Argrett Major, hackman, Washington street. Armstrong William, cook. North city. Artis John, barber, house Lincolnville. Barnes Ivory, Rev. Washington street. Benedee Charles, clerk C. F. Hamblen, Lincolnville. Benjamin Steven, laborer, Washington street. Benjamin Phillip, laborer, Spanish street. Benjamin William, boatman, Lincolnville. Benjamin Edward, boatman, Spanish street. Blanchard C. laborer, St. George street. Bryant Alexander, clerk W. Lyon & Co., Lincolnville. Bram Charles, laborer, Lincolnville. Bram Sandy, laborer. Marine street. Burns Adam, laborer, Lincolnville. Blake John, porter St. Augustine Hotel, Lincolnville. Brown Henry, laborer. Shell road. Baley Cato O. laborer, lincolnville. Burns John, laborer, Lincolnville. Brown Frank, laborer, Lincolnville. Burns H. J. laborer, Lincolnville.

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34 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Baldwin Robert, laborer, North city. Burns Abram, laborer, Lincolnville. Barley Joseph, laborer, Lincolnville. Brackett William H. painter, Lincolnville. Brown Frank, laborer, Lincolnville. Bagley Frank, laborer, Lincolnville. Brown Daniel, laborer, Lincolnville. Brint Richard, laborer, Lincolnville. Blanchard Jos. F. S. house St. George street. Bloxham Robert, house Lincolnville. Brown Judge, house Lincolnville. Burns John L. house Lincolnville. Burns Charles, laborer, Lincolnville. Burns Robert, laborer, Lincolnville. Clark Benjamin, mattress-maker, Charlotte street Crosby Samuel, painter. Orange street. Crosby Sheppard, laborer, Lincolnville. Cassmay James, hackman, Lincolnville. Cassmay Moses, drayman, Spanish street. Clavan Charles, livery, Shennodoh street. Clavan William, livery, Shennodoh street. Clavan Calvin, drayman, Tolomato street. Ceesor James, laborer, Lincolnville. Catlin Charles C. laborer, Lincolnville. Chambers Robert, laborer, Lincolnville. Collins Clmrles W. waiter, Lincolnville. Crosby Richard, waiter, Lincolnville. Coleman Isaac, laborer, Lincolnville. Colsom Simon, laborer. North city. Crosby Phillip, laborer, Lincolnville. Coniors Robert, laborer, Lincolnville. Collie John, restaurant, Charlotte street. Cristie J. H. laborer, Lincolnville. Clark John W. laborer, Lincolnville. Clark John, laborer, Lincolnville. Clark George, house Lincolnville. Colloway A. S, waiter Cleveland House.

PAGE 39

ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 35 Daniels Everett, driver, Lincolnville. Dummitt William, boatman, Lincolnville. Daniels John, laborer, Lincolnville. De Free Thomas, laborer, Lincolnville. Davenport Peter, laborer, Lincolnville. Dennison Marion, laborer, Lincolnville. Davis Gasper, laborer, Lincolnville. Edwards George, oysters, Washington street. Emmerly Henry M. carpenter. Artillery Lane. Edwards Warren, laborer, Lincolnville. Eugene Eddie, laborer, Lincolnville. Evans Thomas, house Lincolnville. Foward Michael, laborer, Lincolnville. Flemming Henry F. drayman, Washington street. Finnish May, laborer, Lincolnville. Farmer John, laborer, Lincolnville. Felder Rev. J. Lincolnville. Floyd Adam, drayman, Lincolnville. Fields Adam, laborer, house Spanish Alley. Flagg James J. barber, Charlotte Street. Gibbs Lymas, livery, Washington street. Granger, Frank, drayman. Bay street. Gray Pablo, laborer, Lincolnville. Growls James, drayman, St. Francis street. ^ Glenn Toney, waiter, St. George street. Green Daniel, laborer, Lincolnville. Grant Benjamin, laborer, Lincolnville. Grisson Dennis, laborer, Lincolnville. Gathers William, laborer, Lincolnville. Glover Henry, boatman. Marine street. Green William, boatman, Lincolnville. Grant George W. laborer, Lincolnville. Hancock Miles, laborer, Lincolnville. Hern Richard, boats, Lincolnville.

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36 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Harrison John, laborer, Lincolnville. Houston Edward, clerk, Charlotte street. Hammond Adam, waiter, Lincolnville. Hicks W. B. gardener. Bridge street. Hammond Emanuel, waiter, Lincolnville. Harrison Henry, laborer, Lincolnville. Hicks Richard, waiter, Lincolnville, Hanner Harry, hackman, Lincolnville. Inglish John, hackman, Lincolnville. Inglish Edward, hackman, Lincolnville. Inglish Lewis H. hackman, Lincolnville. Inglish Julius, laborer, house Lincolnville. Johnson Frank, gardener, Lincolnville^ Jenkins Henry, laborer, Lincolnville. Jenkins Abraham, laborer, Lincolnville. Johnson William, laborer, Lincolnville. Johnston H. S. laborer. Orange street. Jackson Jonas, laborer, Lincolnville. Johnson Moses, laborer, Lincolnville. Jackson Nathaniel, laborer, Lincolnville. Jones H. J. laborer, Lincolnville, Jackson Davis, laborer, Lincolnville. Jackson David E. laborer, Lincolnville. Jordan Jacob, teacher, Lincolnville.* Jackson Samuel, laborer, Lincolnville. Jackson Warren, produce, Charlotte street. Jackson Miles, laborer, Lincolnville. Johnson Jerome, laborer, Lincolnville. Jones James, laborer, Lincolnville. Jones Isaac, laborer, Lincolnville. Jones Harry, laborer, Lincolnville. Jones Robert, laborer, Lincolnville. Jordan Samuel, laborer, Lincolnville. Johnson Robert, laborer, Lincolnville. Jackson Levi, house Lincolnville. Jenkins Prinnus, house Lincolnville.

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ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 37 Kelter Joe, laborer, Lincolnville. Kinney, Joseph B. laborer, Lincolnville. Kennedy James, house Lincolnville. Larkins Julius, laborer, Lincolnville. Lawrence Joseph, waiter, Lincolnville. Lawrence J. M. head-waiter, Spanish street. Lee Butler, mason, Lincolnville. Linington John, laborer, Lincolnville. Leonardy John, hackman, Lincolnville. London James, laborer, Lincolnville. Lawrence Andrew, hackman, Lincolnville. Longwood Andrew, peddler, Lincolnville. Long John A. laborer, Lincolnville. Martin Lewis, drayman, Lincolnville. McKinney Richard, waiter, Lincolnville. Mungin Jack, drayman, Lincolnville. Martin Alexander, mason, Spanish street. Martin Mariano, mason, Orange street. Maran, William, driver, Lincolnville. Martin Ben, mason. Orange street. Martin Stephen, mason. Orange street. McKeever Abraham, laborer, Lincolnville. Morrill James H. gardener, Lincolnville. Moris James, mason, Bronson street. Moore Isaac, porter, Lincolnville. McKinney Richard, Jr., waiter, Lincolnville. Macon Wilfred, waiter, Lincolnville. McMillen James S. carpenter. North city. Mitchell Frank E. hackman, Lincolnville. MacMillan A. D. carpenter, North city. Morgan Samuel, laborer, Lincolnville. McKenney James T. laborer, Lincolnville. Mobley C. laborer, Lincolnville. McGurt Alexander, laborer, Lincolnville. McNiel Alex, carpenter, Lincolnville. McCoy William, barber Charlotte street, house Cedar.

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38 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Martin Lewis, Jr., drayman, Lincolnville. Morand N. M. laborer, Lincolnville. McMillan Nelson, carpenter, Lincolnville. Moore James, boatman, Lincolnville. Myers, William, laborer, Lincolnville. McDuffie Washington, drayman. Bay shore. Morgan Solomon, laborer. Bay shore. Mason, Robert, shoemaker, Hospital street shop. McKnight Elija, laborer, Lincolnville. Mack Sam, laborer, Lincolnville. Moore Jasper, laborer, Lincolnville. Mabry Charles, laborer, Lincolnville. Myers Moses, laborer, Lincolnville. McCormack Joe, laborer, Lincolnville. Martin John, laborer, Lincolnville. Munford Sutton, gardener, Tolomato street. McCoy James, house Lincolnville. Nattiel William, Lincolnville. Nattiel Richard, Lincolnville. Nattiel William 3d, Lincolnville. Nattiel Frank, Lincolnville. Newman James H. Washington street. Nelson Richard R. Lincolnville. Nesbey Jacob, Lincolnville. Nelson A. B. house Lincolnville. Osborne Emanuel, Marine street. Osborne William, Marine street. Papy Antonio, waiter. North city. Papy D. M. groceries, Washington street. Papy A. F. barber, Washington street. Papy John, laborer, Lincolnville. Papino John, city marshal, mason, Lincolnville. P^apino Emanuel, waiter, Lincolnville. Pierson James, livery, Lincolnville. Pierson Mac, laborer, Lincolnville.

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ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. 39 Parker Jas. laborer, Lincolnville. Parsons Gus. laborer, Lincolnville. Paine Balaam, laborer, Lincolnville. Payne Joseph, laborer, Lincolnville. Plummer Joseph, drayman, house Charlotte street. Reddick Pierce, cook, Charlotte street. Reul Charles, laborer, Lincolnville. Riley Henry, laborer, Lincolnville. Riley Benjamin, Shell road. Robinson John, laborer, Lincolnville. Rochell Henry, laborer, Lincolnville. Roach, John, laborer, Lincolnville. Richardson Thomas, laborer, Lincolnville. Robinson Samuel, laborer, Lincolnville. Ross James, laborer, Lincolnville. Robinson Benjamin, laborer, Lincolnville. Robinson Robert, house Lincolnville. Redmond John, house Lincolnville. Robinson B. house Lincolnville. Stephens Domingo, laborer, Lincolnville. Sessions Daniel, gardener, Lincolnville. Stewart Jake, laborer, Lincolnville. Savelle Bartola, painter, Lincolnville. Sanks Adam, laborer, Lincolnville. Savelle Frank, porter, Lincolnville. Savelle James, laborer, Lincolnville. Sanders Sampson, laborer, Lincolnville. Sanders August, hackman, Lincolnville. Simmons William S. laborer, Lincolnville. Small John, laborer, Lincolnville. Sharpe George H. clerk, Lincolnville. Sanders James, hackman, Lincolnville. Stewart James, laborer, Lincolnville. Scott Rev. D. S. Lincolnville. Smith Robert, laborer, Lincolnville. Smith James, laborer, Lincolnville.

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40 ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Smith Robert E. laborer, Lincolnville. Saveliy M. S. laborer, Lincolnville. Stiner William, wood. Shell road. Saunders James Lee, laborer, Lincolnville. Sylvester John, house Lincolnville. Thomas James B. merchant, Washington street. Tillman, Tiby, mason, Lincolnville. Thomas Frank, laborer, Lincolnville. Thomas William, laborer, Lincolnville. Turner David, laborer, Lincolnville. Tatum Hamilton, laborer, Lincolnville. Thompson Rev. Thomas, Lincolnville. Trottman Joseph, driver, Lincolnville. Tomberlin Stephen, laborer, Lincolnville. Valley Michael, laborer, Lincolnville. Valley Joseph, laborer, Lincolnville. Van Dyke Wm. A. carpenter, house Lincolnville. Welters' restaurant, Charlotte street, corner Treasury. Welters John A. painter, Lincolnville. Welters Michael, painter, Lincolnville. Williams William, painter, Lincolnville. Walton Joseph, drayman, Lincolnville. Williams John, waiter, Lincolnville. Welters David, painter, Lincolnville. Waiters, William, butcher, Lincolnville. Whertas Toney, painter. Bridge street. Wilson Jacob, gardener, St. George street. Windley Morris, driver, Lincolnville. Welters Robert W. restaurant, Charlotte street. Witsell F. E. collector customs, Spanish street. Williams Thomas, laborer, Lincolnville. Williams Simon, laborer, Lincolnville. Wintley Henry, laborer, Lincolnville. Whertas Robert, painter, Lincolnville. Wilson B. Sandy, laborer. Marine street.

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I ST. AUGUSTINE DIRECTORY. Wane John, laborer, Lincolnville. Whaley Lewis, waiter, Lincolnville. Woods Miles, laborer, Lincolnville. Williams Alfred A. waiter, Lincolnville. Whitby John, laborer, Lincolnville. Williams Thomas, Jr. hackman, Lincolnville. Washington Fred, hackman. North city. Wing F. R. S. waiter, Lincolnville. Williams David, waiter, Lincolnville. Wise Moses, laborer, Lincolnville. Wilson Dan, laborer, Lincolnville. White Charles, bill-poster, house Lincolnville. Wallace Robert, house Lincolnville. Warren Jeff, waiter, house Lincolnville. Young Charles, hackman. Hospital street. Young F. D. S. waiter. Hospital street. 41

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J. W. TRAVER, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in HARD IVA RE. WOODEN WARE, TIN WARE, Edge Tools, Garden Tools, Table and Pochet Cutlery, and House Furnishing Goods. — ALSO — IRON PIPE AND PLDMBERS’ SDPPLIES, LAM PS, FIRE IRON SETS, Etc., Etc. Estimates given for Furnishing Hotels and Large Boarding Houses. CONTRACTORS’ AND CARPENTERS’ SUPPLIES AT LOWEST RATES. St. George St., above Ctina, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA.

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TREASURY STREET, NEAR ST. GEORGE ST Paul Rehnberg, Manufacturer of Alligator, Sea Bean, and Shell Jewelry, MOUNTED IN SOLID GOLD AND SILVER. Orders hy ddctil ^roirtpily A.ttertded to. SPECIAL PRICES TO DEALERS. ifanfl 5^ainting oB 51ni|i5a ScenEi[y A SPECIALTY. LARGE STOCK OF SHELLS ALWAYS ON HAND. Address, Paul Rehnberg, Box 24, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA. -Send for Price-Ijist.

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ST. ALBANS, 0n J§urapem md ^tijericm ^hn. St. George St., Opposite Opera House, one block from Plaza and Post Office, • ST. J^TJG-TJSTZTTIE, T^Xj.A.. This house has sunny rooms, with Verandas, and is newly furnished throughout. Can ac commodate Sixty guests. TERMS, $3.00 to $3.00 PER DAY. S. McClelland, Erofrietor. ^T. 4LBAM^ Dltliplll ST. GEIORGE ST., OPP. OPERA HOUSE. First Class Table. # # # # # # Board by the Day or Week. Wedding Parties, Dinners and Suppers, supplied at Short Notice. For Terms apply to T. Former Proprietor of Florida House.

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Lyt. E. Johnson, PORTRAIT AND

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NDIAN pti OR/NGES. Florida Packing Co., EDWARD P. SHARP. Indicin (Riv'er Oranges of the Best Qaaltty in any gnantity, Bachedt aixcL Shipped to any jdddress. MAILLA-RD CONFECTIONERY, Guava Jelly, etc. ST. GEORGE ST. {OPPOSITE FLORIDA HOUSE,) St. Aizgizstzne, WtopiUcL,

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K. G. CAPO, Manufacturer of Alligator and BoarÂ’s Tusk EWELRY. V. Wcutclxes, Clocks cltxARIND#iURIOSITIES.ii PoMAE Building, Opposite the LorriUard Villa, ST. AUGUSTIN K, PL A.

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CRADDOCK=z=z H o u s e gitt0uisitittf, |ta. This well known and popular House having been greatly enlaiÂ’ged and refurnished, is now open for the season. The location is within TERMS, $2.00 PER Day. Special Rates by the 'Week, Month, or Season. J. E. CrcLcldock.

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ji

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t. Augustine, Florida. The Name. The city of St. Augustine {Ciudad de San Augustin) received its name from its founder, Pedro Menendez de Aviles, who took possession of the place in the name of Philip II, King of Spain, on the 8th day of Sep^^mber, 1565. As he had arrived on the co: t the 28th of the preceding month, the day dedicated to St. Augustine, he was led to name the city in honor of that celebrated Latin Father. The Indians whom he found there called the place Selooe, or Seloy, from the numerous dolphins (porpoises) seen along the shore; ^ the Spaniards had Alatanzas and the ~ St. Sebastian Rivers, and is a The Old City Gates. port of entry, and the capital of St. JohnÂ’s County, Florida. Its latitude is 29^, 48 30'^ north ; its longitude 81, 35^ west, and it is about 30 miles south of Jacksonville, 160 miles south of Savannah, and 200 miles east of

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Tallahassee. It is separated from the sea by Anastasia Island and the Matanzas River, forming a safe harbor about one half mile in width? with some 20 feet depth of water. A triangulation of the harbor was made by the U. S. Coast Survey in 1859, which gives the mean height of the rise of the tide 4.2 feet. The site of the city is level and elevated only about 12 feet above the water. It is in the form of a parallelogram and extends along the harbor about one mile, having the old Fort Marion on the north, and the U. S. Barracks on the south. Its width is about three-quarters of a mile. The orange, olive, date and other groves, in and around the city, impart to it a lovely rural aspect. The entrance to it through the bloom and bright verdure of these semitropical trees,, is very charm ing. St. Francis Street. The Streets. After the manner of the old country, and for the sake of shade, the streets were laid out very narrow. They vary in width from seven to eighteen or twenty feet, and thus remind one of the streets of Venice. They generally intersect each other at right angles, and are said to have been paved in ancient times with “coquina,” a con cretion of shells and sand quarried on Anastasia Island. Commencing at the harbor, the first street running north and south is Bay Street, which is the widest in the city and overlooks the water. Then running parallel and west of it, is Charlotte Street, then severally and in the same direction, St. George, Tolomato and Hospital Streets. Beginning at Fort Marion on the north, the streets extending east and west are, one after the other. Orange, Cuna, St. Hypolita, Treasury—the narrowest of all—King, Bridge and St. Francis Streets. In addition to these thoroughfares the city has several lanes and promenades. The drive

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from the depot through King Street, with its orange trees and magno lias, to the Plaza, is one of the finest in the city. St. George Street has the most conspicuous buildings, and Bay Street affords fine views of the harbor, the fort, and the light-house on Anastasia Island. In his account of the city, 1769, Dr. William Stork says: “The streets are regularly laid out and intersect each other at right angles. They are built narrow to afford shade. The town is about half a mile in length, regularly fortified with bastions, half bastions, and a ditch. Besides the works it has another sort of fortification, very singular, but well adapted against the Indians, an enemy the Spaniards had most to fear. It consists of several rows of Palmetto trees, planted very close along the ditch, up to the parapet. Their IDointed leaves are so many cheveaux-de-frize^ which make it entirely impenetra ble. The two southern bas tions are built of stone.” W. C. Bryant said of the streets in 1843: ‘T have called the streets narrow. In few places are they wide enough to allow two car riages to pass abreast. I was told that they were not originally intended for car riages, and that in the time The Palmetto Tree, when the town belonged to Spain, many of them were floored with an artificial stone composed of shells and mortar, which in this climate takes and keeps the hardness of rock; and that no other vehicle than a hand-barrow was allowed to pass over them. In some places you see remnants of this ancient pavement, but for the most part it has been ground into dust under the w'heels of the carts and carriages introduced by the new inhabitants.” The Shell Road. This highway, leading from the City Gates north to Jacksonville, was built by subscription in 1765, and was for a

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long period known as King s Road. It is the favorite driveway outside of the city, and leads by the old Huguenot Cemetery, the beautiful resi dence of Mr. H. P. Kingsland, the Catholic Cemetery, and Magnolia Grove, noted for the grand avenues of live oaks, which are profusely draped with Spanish moss. Other pleasant drives are to Ponce de Leon Spring, the Bridge of Sighs and Century Oak, the Genevar Orange Grove, Dr. VeddePs, HildrethÂ’s and WilliamsÂ’ plantations. Anastasia Island. This narrow strip of land extends along the coast about eighteen miles, and forms a natural breakwater for the city. from which it is about half a mile, city are at the southern points of main channel beNear this entrance Light-house, one structures of the lantic coast. It of 164 feet, and at a cost of more The cost of the sends its light out the sea was some a good engraving Pharos here. It visitor to ascend the magnificent both from the Not far from this tial tower, may be separated by Matanzas River. Its average width is The inlets to the northern and the island; the ing at the north, stands the new of the noblest kind on the Atrises to the height was built in 1873 than $100,000. lantern which many leagues over $16,000. We give of this splendid will well repay the the steps and enjoy view presented ocean and land, lofty and substanseen the ruins of The Light-house, Anastasia Island. the old Spanish light-house, erected towards the close of the 17th cen tury, and which was, on the 20th of June, 1880, carried away by the violence of a storm. A cannon was at one time placed on it to give notice^of an approaching vessel. Coquina Quarries. The shellstone, or Coquina quarries, whence material for masonry has been for ages taken, are not far distant from the light-house. This coquina is formed by the action of sea water on shells and sand. The concretion, though not very hard, is durable, and is to some extent still used for building purposes.

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Fort Matanzas. At the southern terminus of the island are the picturesque remains of old Fort Matanzas, erected more than 140 years ago. In his Florida, Romans thus speaks of it “Twenty miles south of St. Augustine is the Lookout, or Fort Matanzas, on a marshy island, commanding the entrance of Matanzas, which lies opposite to it. This fort is to be seen at the distance of about five leagues. It is of very little strength, nor need it be otherwise, as there is scarce eight feet of water on this bar at the best of times. The Spaniards keep a lieutenant here; the English a sergeant.” The little settlement here is called Matanzas; it has one hotel and many visitors, on account of the good fishing grounds off the shore. It may be reached in about three hours from St. Augustine. Boiling* Spring. “There is,” says a writer, “three miles off the coast of Matanzas a spring o f fresh water, boiling u p from abasin a hundred feet below, the surr o u n d i ng salt water being about fifty feet deep. Such is the force Rolleston’s Block. ^ ^ this spring that a boat cannot float over it, but is driven aside by the strength of the current.” A French vessel of the fleet of Jean Ribault, was wrecked near Matanzas in 1565, and several hundred Huguenots were inhumanly massacred, “not as Frenchmen, but as Lutherans,” by the ruthless Adelantado, Pedro Menandez de Aviles. Gen. Oglethorpe erected a sand battery, traces of which remained on Anastasia Island in 1740, opposite Fort Marion, but he was in this, as well as in his subse quent assault, unable to take the city. Dwelling Houses. The old habitations of the city present a very quaint and singular appearance. They are mostly constructed of

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coquina, covered with stucco, two stories high, close upon the line of the street, with ample balconies projecting from the second story. These approach so near to the balconies opposite that conversation can easily be carried on across the street. The roofs in former times were flat and, as in Naples, covered with flowers. The outward aspect of these old two-storied Spanish buildings is not particularly inviting, but the courts and gardens in the rear of many of them, are teeming with the rarest plants, flowers and fruits of this delicious climate. The beauty is within. In contrast with these antiquated coquina buildings, with their projecting balconies and windows, many modern houses have been erected by gentlemen from the North, which decidedly improve the appearance of the city. Among the tasteful buildings on St. George Sunnyside. the Residence of Capt. T. F. House. Street, may be noticed the handsome house of Mr. A. J. Alexander, of Kentucky, and the fine grounds and residence of the late Holmes Ammidown, of New York. On the same street, north of the Plaza, stands the well-constructed mansion of the Rt. Rev. Bishop Moore, This street is also beautified by the pleasant residence of Mr. R. D. Bronson, of New York; the beautiful estate of Mr. J. L. Wilson, of Framingham, Mass.; the winter home of Col. Tyler, whose garden abounds in rare plants, and is also noted for its noble date tree; the elegant grounds and stylish buildings, with the windmill, of Mr. George Lorillard, of New York; and the tastefully arranged garden of Mr. J. P. Howard, of the same city. The residence of Capt. T. F. House, known by the pretty name of “Sunnyside,” is, with its handsome decorations, an

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'Ornament to the city. Mrs. Ball’s house, the approach to which is through a splendid orange grove, on Tolomato Street, is in some res pects a model; and the home of Mr. Gilbert, as well as that of Dr. A. Anderson, whose orange grove is one of the attractions of the city, have an air of taste and comfort. The house of Mr. D. Edgar, of New York, stands at the corner of Treasury Street, opposite to the Bay, and that of Mr. Aspinwall, of the same city, a little south of the Plaza ; both are well constructed and commodious. The house of H. P. Kingsland, with its extensive grounds, is just without the City Gates. The parsonage of the Presbyterian Church is an old and unique coquina Boating on the River. structure, on St. George Street; its extensive grounds are well stocked with semi-tropical fruits. John Gerard Williams de Brahm, writing of St. Augustine more than a century ago, says : “All the houses are built of masonry; their entrances are shaded by piazzas, supported by Tuscan pillars or pilasters, against the South sun. The houses have to the east, windows projecting i6 or i8 inches into the street, very wide and pro portionally high. On the west side their windows are commonly very small, and no opening of any kind to the north, on which side they have double walls, six or eight feet asunder, forming a kind of gallery, which answers for cellars and pantries. No house has any

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chimney for a fireplace. The Spaniards made use of stone urns, filled them with coals, left them in their kitchens in the afternoon, and set them at sunset in their bed-rooms, to defend them against those winters which required such care.” Water Supply. The various wells (some Artesian) and cisterns, furnish water in abundance. In some instances the windmill is used for raising water, and its revolutions serve to enhance the picturesqueness of the city. Population. This has varied from time to time with the changing fortunes of the city. Menendez started from Spain in 1565 with 2,60c The Presbyterian Parsonage. men, but many were lost on the way. Through disaffection some 500 deserted Menendez during his government of the colony. When Sir Francis Drake made his attack on the town in 1586, the garrison con sisted of 150 men. The population then, according to Barcia, was in creasing rapidly, and there were two “religious houses.” The number of house-holders in 1648 was upwards of 300, and the whole population, might have been about 1,500. In 1740 the total population was 2,143, of which about 740 were soldiers. Dr. William Stork says that at the evacuation of the town, 1763, the population was 5,700, of which num ber 2,500 belonged to the garrison. In 1840 the population was about 2,000. In i860, 1,914, and in 1870, 1,717. Mr. Fairbanks says (in. 1881), “that the population has neverexceeded 3,000, which is probably about its present number of inhabitants.” These consist of descendants of the old Spanish families and the Minorcans, many persons who have

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come to the city to regain their health, or to enjoy the salubrity of the climate, soldiers and Africans. Geological. The underlying rock is calcareous, which occasionally outcrops the surface. This friable formation is overlaid by sand inter mixed with decomposed shells and clay, favorable to the growth of pine, cedar, oak, magnolia and orange. Its porosity is also conducive to the dryness of the soil, aid this to the preservation of health. The Climate. Though somewhat humid, the air of St. Augustine is pure and salubrious. It is tempered and softened by alternate breezes from the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. Flowers are in blossom all. Miss Hasseltine’s. the year round. The extremes of heat and cold are less than in the cities farther north, and the atmosphere is so exhilarating, and yet so mild withal, that just to breathe it is a benediction. After living in this city 20 years, Mr. J. D. Lopez says : ‘T have never known of a single case of malarial fever to have originated in this city or its near prox imity.” The healthfulness of St. Augustine was noticed by De Brahm in the time of its occupancy by the British. “Among the 3,000 who evacuated St. Augustine,” he says, “the author is credibly informed were many Spaniards near and above the age of 100 years.” Speaking of the salubrity of the climate of this city, W. C. Bryant said, in 1843 : “The mornings are sometimes a little sultry, but after two or three hours a fresh breeze comes in from the sea, sweeping through the broad piazzas and breathing in at the windows. At this season (April) it comes

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laden with the fragrance of the flowers of the Pride of India, and some times of the orange tree, and sometimes brings the scent of roses now in bloom. The nights are gratefully cool, and I have been told by per sons who have lived here many years, that there are very few nights in summer when you can sleep without a blanket. Among the acquaintances I have made here I remember many who having come here for the benefit of health, are detained forlife by the amenity of the climate. This delightful, and at the same time healthful climate, is attracting many invalids from all quarters to the city. An Alligator Swamp In the Interior, and when they come they in many instances remain. In a letter dated February 12, 1883, Mr. O. B. Smith, says: “Never before though we have resided in the mountains of East Tennessee six years, and on the shores of Lake Michigan as much longer, and in our pleas ant home near New York seven years, have we so heartily enjoyed a summer as we did that of 1882 at St. Augustine. The mild climate, which the Northerner can neither import nor manufacture, enabled us to spend our whole time in the open air, and our health improved daily. But some will ask, do you pretend that summer in the South is more

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pleasant than at the Nortli ? This is what we believe. This of itself reconciles us for the loss of many good things we enjoyed at the North; but we also have fruits in most luxuriant abundance; we find people here who are generous and kind, and after careful consideration have decided to remain for life, if it be the will of Providence, among the oranges, figs, guavas, plums, strawberries, peaches, and other pleasant things, too numerous to mention.” In summer the thermomThe Pine Forest. eter commonly stands in the shade between 8o^ and 90. It rarely freezes in winter, and so rare is snow that the Spaniards called it, when it did appear, “white rain.” There is not, perhaps, taking the whole year through, a finer or more healthful climate in the world, and the low death rate, together with the great influx for years past of strangers in search of health, would seem to verify this statement. The rainy season begins about the middle of July and ends about the middle of September.

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ber. It is said that the average annual number of fair sunny days in Florida amounts to 250. As in Italy, the showers, when they do come, are followed by immediate sunshine. The land and sea breezes are always uniform at St. Augustine, the dews are heavy, and the nights are always cool and healthful. The temperature rises higher in every other State in the Union than it does in Florida, and no other State equals it The Spanish Bayonet Tree. in the salubrity of its climate A considerate writer assigns the follow ing reasons for its healthfulness: ‘T.— The calcareous and antiseptic quality of the soil, which neutralizes and absorbs the malaria. 2.—The pine forests, filling the air with healthful aroma. 3.—The abundant sea surroundings, always a purifier of the air. 4.—The coolness of the sum mer breeze, and dryness and clearness of the winter air; and superadded to all is the mild and friendly influence of her warmer climate.” Though the atmosphere at St. Augustine is humid, it has an elasticity and a purity which at once invigorates an invalid from the North, and renders it an exquisite pleasure just to breathe. Hence, of all places in th^

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world, this is the very best for him for the regaining of his health, and for the luxury of living when health is regained. It is the Montpelier of America. Forest Trees. — T he principal forest trees in and around the city are the yellow pine (Pinus Australis), and the bald cypress {Cupressus distichurn), both of which attain to a remarkable height, and are of great economic value, being used for boards, shingles, railway ties^ and for many other purposes. Intermingled with these trees is the Live Oak {Quercus Virens), highly Y3l\ied both for ship-building and for fuel. The Magnolia rises to the height of 8o or 90 feet, and while the oak may be called the King, this may be called the Queen of the Forest. The Palmetto, or Spanish Bay onet, with its sharp, point ed leaves, is common, and is sometimes used in build ing. It sends out, like “the fretful porcupine,” its sharp points on every side, and forms Avenue in Mrs. Ball’s Orange Grove, when growing in line, an impenetrable palisade. Veg*etable Gardens. — T he soil and climate are finely adapted to the growth and ripening of culinary vegetables, and nowhere do we find better or cheaper melons, squashes, tomatoes, okra, sweet corn, pota toes, yams, artichokes, peas, beans, cauliflowers, and other vegetables for the supply of the table, than in St. Augustine. These productions come early and remain late, and are raised without much labor. In this sunny clime they have nothing to do but grow, and they are, as all who taste can tell, of superior quality. Green peas and other vege tables are on the table early in February. ^ Orange Groves. — These are the pride of the city. The Orange Tree (Citrus aurantiuni), with its shining leaf, white blossom and

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golden fruit, flourishes finely here, and is one of the staple products of the place. The Floridian variety is very sweet and fresh, and hence commands a high price in the market. Though the orange tree is not large, it is long-lived and very productive, and the owner of a good orange grove may be considered well-to-do in the world. The orange grove of Dr. A. Anderson, on King Street, contains about 1500 fruitbearing trees, and that of Mrs. Ball, near by, is much admired for the tasteful disposition of the grounds, as well as for the variety of semitropical fruit. The orange has long been cultivated here and has yielded considerable reve nue to the people. A visitor in 1817 thus speaks of its abundance: “The houses and the rear of the town are inter sected and covered with orange groves; thus green fruit and deep green foliage not only render the air agreeable, but beautify the appearance of this interesting little town.” An acquaintance of Mr. Bryant said to him in 1843, “Twelve years ago, when I first visited St. Augustine, the orange groves were the wealth and ornament of the place, and their produce maintained the inhabitants in comfort. Orange trees of the height and size of The Date Palm, the pear tree, often rising higher than the roofs of the houses, embowered the town in perpetual verdure. They stood so close in the groves that they excluded the sun, and the atmosphere was at all times aromatic with their leaves and fruit, and in the spring the fragrance of the flowers was almost oppressive.” The soil is congenial to the growth of this estimable fruit, and renewed attention is now given to its cultivation here, as well as in other parts of Florida. From the superior quality of the Florida oranges, a market has been found for them in Western Europe, and more and more

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attention will undoubtedly oe paid to the cultK^ition Oi this delicious fruit. Other Fruits.—In addition to the^^orange, the soil of St. Augustine produces strawberries of superior size and flavor, plums and peaches oi the finest quality, figs, grapes, pomegranates, guavas, bananas, dates, pineapples, citrons, olives, limes, lemons, and other semi-tropical and delicious edibles. The Banana {Musa Sapientu 7 n)^ of whose blossom we present a cut, has leaves about six feet long, and is profuse in flowers as in fruitage. The Date Palm Tree has a straight, scaly trunk, which is crowned with a tuft of long, pendent leaves, at the summit. The fruit, when fresh, has a very agreeable taste and perfume. A writer thus describes this tree : “Its branches attract notice from their singular beauty and constant rustling, like aspen leaves, as well as from the pecu liarity of the under branches, which resem ble and serve the purpose of ladders, by which to ascend the tree. The fruit in form resembles the largest acorn, and is covered with a thin, transparent, yellowish mem brane, containing a soft saccharine pulp, of a somewhat vinous flavor, in which is en closed an oblong, hard kernel. When ripe it affords an agreeable nourishment.” The Floral Kingdom.—Florida is the land of flowers. “It is,” a writer truly says, “an ever-green land, in which wild flowers never cease to unfold their petals.” This arises from the warmth and moisture of its delightful climate. The fields and forests around St. Augustine abound in wild flowers, remarkable for the variety and the Blossom of the Date Tree, brilliancy of their colors. The flower of the Magnolia {Grandifolia)^ is seen here in its perfection. Its large white corolla contrasts beauti fully with the deep green, glossy leaves of the tree, and fills the air with fragrance, sometimes to the distance of a mile. The forests are filled with clambering vines, as the clematis, dodder and yellow jessamine, whose bright yellow flowers sometimes cause the traveller to smile, he knows not why. The Spanish Moss drooping from the trees, imparts to them an*air of grandeur, in fine contrast wit!

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The Banana Tree.

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the brightness of the flowers that bloom around them. The flower of the Spanish Bayonet (Yucca gloriosa), is very beautiful. It can be seen in its perfection only on its native soil. Flower Gardens. — T hese form one of the attractions of St. Augustine. The people are very fond of flowers, and as they blossom here in profusion and perfection, almost every family cultivates them to a greater or less extent. The evening breeze is redolent with the per fume of a thousand different kinds of flowers. The city has always been celebrated for the beauty and pro fusion of its roses, red and white, and nothing can be more lovely than some of the rose gardens, such, for instance, as that of Mrs. Rey nolds, on Bronson Street. The rose tree of Mr. 01 iveros\ near the City Gates, has attained the height of fifteen feet, and when in blossom attracts general attention. Mr. H. H. Williams has extensive grounds and nurseries known as Paradise Grove and Rose Gardens, on the Shell Road, and is always ready to welcome visitors to his delightful grounds. An old coquina building, covered with trailing vines and bril liant flowers, is always picturesque, and such “a vision of beauty” is to be met with only in this ancient Spanish city. Many of the old houses, unprepossessing in front, have beautiful flower gardens covered with honeysuckles, roses, jessamines, cactus, and other favorites of the floral kingdom, in the rear. Many of these flowers are in full bloom ere the snows have melted from the rigid hills of the north. The Plaza de la Constitucion.— This fine public square open ing on the Bay and in the central part of the city, where people “most do congregate,” was in a pitiable condition, being for a long time, as the Campo Vaccina at Rome, the resort of cattle, until improved by the late Mr. Holmes Ammidown, of New York. It is shaded by the Pride of

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India, oak and other noble trees, and flanked by the Spanish Cathedral, Trinity Episcopal Church, the St. Augustine Hotel, and other notable structures. A monument, in the form of an obelisk, about twenty feet high, stands near the centre of the Plaza. It was erected in 1812-13 under the direction of Don Geronimo Alvarez, Alcalde, to commemorate the Spanish Constitution, and bears the following inscription on a mar ble tablet:— PLAZA DE LA CONSTITUCION. PROMULGA EN ESTA CIUDAD DE SAN AUGUSTIN DE LA FLORIDA, ORIENTAL EN 17 DE OCTOBRE, DE 1812, SIENDO GOBERNADOR EL BRIGADIER DON SEBASTIAN KINDALAM, CABALLERO PARA STERNA MEMORIA, EL AYUNTAMIENTO CONSTITUCIONAL ERIGIO ESTE OBELISCO DIRIGIDO POR DON FERNANDO DE LA MAZA ARREDONDO, EL JO YEN REGIDOR DECANO, DON FRANCISCO ROBIRA, PROCURADOR SINDICO. ANO DE 1813. The Old Market. It may be thus translated: Plaza of the Constitution. Proclaimed in this city of St. Augustine, East Florida, on the 17th of October, 1812, Brigadier Don Sebastian Kindalem, Knight of the Order of San Diego, being then Governor. For eternal remembrance, the Constitu tional City Council erected this obelisk, under the supervision of Don Fernando de la Maza Arredondo, the young municipal officer, oldest member of the Corporation, and Don Francisco Robira, Attorney and Recorder.” On the downfall of the Spanish Liberal Constitution, orders were given that this monument should be demolished, and the people removed the marble slabs containing the inscription. But as the obelisk

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Avas allowed to remain, the tablets were in i8i8 restored to their places. Strangely enough for a Catholic city, as St. Augustine was when tliis monument was erected, the Masonic emblems of the square and com pass are cut in the tablet immediately under the date. In his history of the city, Mr. Dewhurst thus accounts for it: “Soon after the close of the War of the Rebellion, the ‘young bloods’ amused themselves by endeavoring to create an alarm in the mind of the United States Commandant, and by executing a series of cabalistic marks at different localities throughout the town, to convey the impression that a secret society was in existence and about to do some act contrary to the peace and dignity of the United States. Besides other marks and notices posted upon private St. George Street, Showing the Bishop’s Mansion. and public buildings about the town, this square and compass was one night cut upon the Spanish monument, where it will remain as long as the tablet exists, an anomaly without this explanation.” The Confederate Monument, erected by the Ladies’ Memorial Society in 1880, in memory of the St. Augustine soldiers lost in the late war, stands opposite the Spanish monument, and in addition to the names of the soldiers, bears the following inscriptions: “Our dead. Erected by the Ladies’ Memorial Association, of St. Augustine, Florida, A. D. 1872.* In Memoriam. Our loved ones who gave their lives in the service of the Confederate States.” These inscriptions are on the east and west sides of the monument. On the south side are the lines: “They died far from the home that gave them birthand on the side A broken shaft was raised this year on St. George Street to the memory of the fallen soldiers.

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Bird’s-Eye Viewed St. Augustine from Fort Marion, Showing the Sea Waif, facing north : “They have crossed the river and rest under the shade of the trees.” These two monuments are unique in style and give peculiar interest to this fine old Plaza. Another object that attracts the at tention of .the visitor is a curious old bruised and battered building, sus tained by huge square pillars, and surmounted by a cupola and bell, and bearing the name of the Old Market. It stands on the Plaza, east of the last-named monument, and is of a style of architecture, which the books have not laid down. By whom or when, or for what pur pose it was built, will probably be never known. There is an Artesian well in the central part of the Plaza, affording a supply of mineral water whose virtues have excellent reme dial qualities. The Sea Wall.— This structure is built of coquina and capped with granite, and extends from Fort Marion along the Bay, in front of the city, for about one mile. It was built by the United States Govern ment, 1837-43, at an expense of about one hundred thousand dollars. The design of it is to protect the city from the encroachment of the sea. It rises about ten feet above low water mark, and the coping is just wide enough for two persons to walk abreast. It hence forms a favorite promenade for lovers in the gloaming. The listening stars above and whispering waves below, alone

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can tell what tender sentiments have been expressed, what love-troths plighted, on this long line of rock that separates the city from the deep. The ruins of an old sea wall, extending from the Fort to a point op posite to the Plaza, are still visible. It was begun in 1690 by Governor Diego de Ouiroza y dosada. Fort Marion. — Anciently San Juan de Pinos, and San Marco, this celebrated structure stands at the north-eastern extremity, covers about four acres of ground, and commands the city, the harbor, and its entrance from the sea. It is built of coquina and its walls are 21 feet in height and 12 feet in thickness. It has four bastions and is constructed in accord ance with the plans of the famous French engineer Marachal de Vauban. In all respects it is a military castle, and so in former times was designated. It has 27 case mates, 35 feet long and 18 feet wide, and its complement is 100 guns and 1,000 men, though it has room for many more. It is surrounded by a moat, and its main entrance was by a draw-bridge, but for this a movable bridge has been substituted. A block of stone over the door exhibits in alto relievo the Spanish coat of arms with a globe and The Gateway and Coat of Arms, Fort Marion, and cross above, and a Maltese cross and lamb below, together with this inscription:— REYNANDO EN ESPANA EL SER’^ DON FERNANDO SEXTO Y SIENDO GOV^^ Y CAP" DE ES^ S^^ AUG" DE LA FLORIDA Y SUS PROV ^ EL MARESCAL DE CARNPO D" ALONZO FERN^^ HEREDA ASI CONCLUIO ESTE GASTELLO EL AN OD 1756 DIRIENDO LAS OBRAS EL CAP INGN DN PEDRO DE BROZAS Y GARAY.

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Which being translated is : “Don Ferdinand the Sixth, being King of Spain, and the Field Marshal Don Alonzo Fernando Hereda, being Governor and Captain-General of this place, St. Augustine, of Florida, and its province. This fort was finished in the year 1756. The works, were directed by the Captain-Engineer Don Pedro de Brazos y Garay.” On his arrival at St. Augustine in 1565, Menendez constructed a wooden fort, probably on or near the site of Fort Marion, and is sup posed to have named it “San Juan de Pinos.” Sir Francis Drake, in 1586, found the fort deserted. It was built of wood, octagonal in form, and had fourteen brass cannon. In 1665 the fort had a garrison of 200 men. The present fort was probably commenced in 1690, at which The Interior of Fort Marion. period the foundations of the old sea wall were laid. In 1740, the fort, then called San Marco, had 50 guns, casemates, and four bastions, on which were the names of St. Peter, St. James, St. John and St. Paul. With the exception of the marks of time and the water battery, which serves as a pleasant promenade, the fort remains substantially as when completed in 1756. The name San Marco gave place to that of Fort Marion on the cession of Florida, in 1821, to the United States. Several Spanish guns, one of which bears the date of 1735, then came into oui possession. The labor of constructing this ancient, solid and picturesque fortress, was in part performed by the Appalachian Indians and convicts from Mexico. It was for a long time considered the strongest military

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castle in America. It certainly has never been captured. Dr. William Stork said in 1769, that “it might justly be deemed the prettiest fort in the king’s dominions.” A writer said of it in 1817 : “The garrison is composed of a detachment from the Royal Regiment of Cuba, with some black troops, who together form a respectable force. This marine substance (coquina of which the fort is constructed), is superior to stone, not being liable to splinter from the effects of bombardment; it receives and imbeds the shot, which adds rather than detracts from its strength and security.” “We saw where it had been struck with cannon balls,” wrote W. C. Bryant, the poet, in 1843, “which in stead of splitting the rock, became imbedded and clogged among the loosened fragments of shell.” The marks of can non shot of Gen. Oglethorpe are still visible. The parade ground at the fort is about 100 feet square, and one of the casemates has an altar and two niches,which are sup posed to have contained ves sels of holy water. This bomb proof was evidently once used as a chapel. There is a plat form in another casemate raised about five feet, on which, it is said, the judge took his seat when a courtmartial happened to be held for the trial of some delinThe Dungeon in Fort Marion, quent. A gloomy dungeon, twenty teet long and six feet wide, under the northeast bastion, received those sentenced by the stern tribunal. Many stories are told of dreadful tragedies which the dark walls of the subterranean vaults of this old time-worn fort have witnessed. One of them is that on the falling in of the terre-plein of a casemate, about fifty years ago, and the clearing up of the ruins a dismal dungeon was revealed, which contained two iron cages, somewhat in the shape of a coffirf, and holding human bones. An old resident of the city, who was present at

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Cat.” In the first Seminole war he was taken captive and kept in the southwest casemate of the fort, which has a platform five feet high and over it an embrasure, about two feet high and only nine inches wide. Through this narrow aperture the wily Indian pressed his body, attenu ated by abstinence, let himself down into the moat, then dry, escaped the guards and rejoined his people. He was afterwards recaptured, and was used by Gen. James Worth for the surrender of his tribe. He was ordered by the General to deliver by messengers, twenty twigs, one for each day, to his people ; the last twig was to be broken, showing them that unless they reported themselves at the General’s headquarters within twenty days, they were to be exterminated. Three days before the expiration of the allotted time they were all in Gen. Worth’s camp. The United States Barracks. and prepared for their departure to the west. From May, 1875, May, 1878, some wild Indians of the Cheyenne, and other western tribes, were held as prisoners in the fort, and while here some of them were taught to read and write. The older ones, among whom was the noted “Medi cine Water,” were sent to Fort Sill, Indian Territory, and the younger ones to Hampton Normal Institute, at Hampton, Virginia. St. Francis Convent, now the U. S. Barracks.—The walls of this famous building are perhaps the most ancient of any in the country. It stands at the southern extremity of the city, and is at pres ent used as barracks for the U. S. troops. Prior to the assault of Sir Francis Drake on the city, in 1586, the Franciscans had established here a convent, hence the walls of this structure may be now three

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centuries old. But great changes have been made in the appearance of the building by our government. In olden times it was surmounted by a circular tower which overlooked the city, bay and island. De Brahm, writing at the time the city was occupied by the English, says : “The convent church and convent is in the body of the barracks, i, e. the bar racks were built around them.” An English writer in 1817 says : “At the southern extremity of the town stands a large building, formerly a monastery of Carthusian friars, but now occupied as a barrack for the troops of the garrison.” He also adds that a Franciscan friar was the chaplain to the garrison. The building, as will be seen from the engrav ing, is symmetrical in form, with a long balcony and pillars in front. The City Gates.— Two picturesque square pillars of coquina, sur mounted with Moorish capitals, 'and bearing the marks of great antiquity, stand at the head of St. George Street, west of Fort Marion. A dry ditch and the ruins of an ancient wall extend to some dis tance from both of these quaint pillars, and some suppose that they once de fended in its whole extent the land side of the city. But this is mere conjec ture. When or by whom A Side View of the City Gates. these curious pillars and these old walls were erected we have no means of ascertaining; though probably the work was done at the time of the building of the first sea wall, which extended from the fort as far as the public square. The ditch, still visible, extended from the fort to St. Sebastian River, where it terminated with a bastion. The defence along the ditch consisted, it is probable, of a stockade built of logs, but no trace of it remains. The pillars of the city gate remind one of the entrance to some of the south ern cities of Spain, and were doubtless planned and raised by engineers from that country. They certainly rank among the curiosities of this

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romantic city, and while they attract the attention of the traveller by their imposing and unique appearance, furnish ample scope for the speculation of the antiquary, inasmuch as Nomina si at umbra. The Catholic Cathedral.—This unique and antiquated church, constructed of coquina, at a cost of $16,650, in 1793, stands on the north side of the Plaza, and attracts the attention of every visitor. The win dows of the church are high and narrow; the belfry is of the Moorish style and contains a chime of four bells, placed in four several niches, three of which form a horizontal line across the tower, and the other is above. These, together with the clock below, are so arranged as to The Catholic Cathedral. form a perfect cross. One of these bells, supposed to be the oldest in this country, bears the following inscription: Sancte JosephOra pro nobis. D. 1689. [Anglice—Holy Joseph, pray for us. Dedicatio, 1689.] This bell is supposed to have belonged to an earlier church. The bell in the upper niche was the gift of Don Geronimo Alvarez, an Alcalde, to the church. The entrance to the church is by a plain vesti bule, on the left of which is a crucifix, from the chapel of Nra Sra de la Leche. What countless genuflexions have been made before it! The organ, built by George Stevens, of Cambridge, Mass., about 45 years

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ago, has 555 pipes, and is considered of superior tone. It is 15 feet high, 10 feet wide, and 6 1-4 feet deep. There is a painting of considerable merit on the walls, which is supposed to represent the landing of the Spaniards in Florida. It bears the following interesting inscription: “First mass in St. Augustine, Florida, Sep. 8, 1565, at the Landing of the Spaniards under Pedro Menendez. With religion came to our shores civilization, arts, sciences, and industry.” A silver lamp, kept constantly burning, hangs near the altar of the church. The old Catholic church stood on the west side of St. George Street. Trinity Episcopal Church. — This building stands on the south side of the Plaza, opposite to the Catholic Cathedral. It was begun in 1827 and finished in 1833, when it was consecrated by Bish op Bowen, of South Carolina. The Presbyte rian Church.— This is a plain struc ture of coquina, built about 53 years ago, and stands on St. George Street. It has a good, substantial parsonage, of which we present a view. The chapel is in the St, Joseph’s Convent. rearofthe Post Office. The Methodist Chapel,—This building was erected about 1846, and is occupied by colored people. The Methodists are now building a convenient house of worship on King Street. The Military Burial Place, which is situated a little south of the United States Barracks, contains three coquina pyramids, covered with stucco, set up in memory of Major Francis L. Dade and his 107 soldiers, who were massacred December 28, 1835, while on their way from Fort Brooke, at Tampa, to join General Duncan L. Clinch, on the Withlacoochee River. The massacre took place near Fort King. The Seminoles, amounting to about 800, of whom about 100 were mounted, awaited in ambush Major Dade’s force, and shot down more than half

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of his men at the first fire. The rest returned tne tire, and used with good effect a six-pounder cannon until the artillery men were killed. After about one hour’s hard fighting, the Indians withdrew for awhile, allowing our men time to throw up a temporary breast-work of trees. But the Indians soon renewed the attack, and, settingup the war whoop, fought so desperately hand to hand that in a short time Major Dade and all his men but three were either killed or wounded. Scalping their victims, the Seminoles held a war dance over their remains, and left them as they fell in the conflict. They were subsequently buried on the spot, and the cannon was set upright as a memorial. At a later date the relics of these ill-fated men were all exhumed and carefully IVlonuments to Major Dade and his Soldiers, removed to this quiet military burying-ground, where they sleep peace fully beneath the flag of the nation. St Joseph’s Convent.—This is a substantial three-story building with a handsome portico, on St. George Street, south of the public square. It is constructed of coquina, and occupied by the Sisters of St. Joseph, whose fine specimens of needle-work are much admired. Visit ors are cordially received at the Convent. We give a good illustration of the building. The Oldest House. — It is no easy matter to determine which it is. Some say that the old wall on St. Francis street, over which inclines the notable date palm tree (of which we give a picture), is believed to be the most ancient structure in the city. “We have heard it remarked

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by one of our old Spanish Dons, seventy-eight years ago,” says Mr. Bloomfield, “that he remembers both wall and tree stood there when he was a child.” Brinton, 1869, considered the house on the corner of Bay Street and Green Lane, once the residence of the English AttorneyGeneral, the oldest habitation. Mr. Fairbanks agrees with him. It was once a handsome house, but much of its wood has been cut up for walking-canes. We present a view of the solid coquina corridor of an old Spanish domicil on Hospital Street, now used for storage. The walls of the U. S. Barracks are very ancient, and the old sea wall, traces of which remain, carry us back in imagination to the times of Charles the Second. The Governor’s House. — This old building on the Plaza, at the corner of St. George and King streets, and now used for the Post The Corridor of an Ancient House. Office and business offices, was formerly one of much pretension, and is associated with many noted persons and events of the ancient times. Dr. Stork thus speaks of it in 1769: “The apartments are spacious and suited to the climate, with high windows, a balcony in front, and gal leries on both sides. To the back part of the house is joined a tower, called in America a look-out, from which there is an extensive prospect towards the sea, as well as inland.” A writer visiting St. Augustine in 1817, speaks of this house as “in a state of dilapidation and decay from age and inattention.” It was formerly surrounded by a heavy coquina wall, having at the corners pillars, one of which is standing. This

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house used to be called “The Palace,” but, with its ancient honored inmates, its unique appendages have departed, and it now presents the appearance only of a structure built for business. Hotels.—These are an ornament and an honor to the city. The three most popular and commodious are “The St. Augustine,” “The Magnolia,” and “The Florida House.” The St. Augustine has accom modations for 300 persons, and its charges are $4.00 per day. It has a frontage of 200 feet on the Plaza, and on the east commands a fine view of the city, bay, Anastasia Island, and the ocean. It is lighted with gas and many of the sleeping rooms are finely frescoed. Captain E. E. Vail is the proprietor. The Magnolia Hotel, at the corner of St. George and Treasury streets, has a capacity of 250, and its charges are $4.00 per day. Its St. Augustine Hotel, accommodations are first-class, and guests are promptly served by its genial proprietor, W. W. Palmer, Esq. The Florida House, George L. Atkins & Sons, proprietors, is open from January ist till April 15, and accommodates 225 persons. The building is four stories high, and is surrounded by handsome lawns and piazzas, and furnished with a steam elevator and electric bells. Some of the rooms are elegantly furnished. The charge is $4.00 per day. The tables of these popular houses are plentifully supplied with game and fish and tropical fruits, and the visitor always leaves the well venti lated rooms and broad piazzas with regret and with the hope of entering them again. These fine hotels rise in striking contrast with the old coquina buildings of the city, and together with the many elegant private dwellings recently constructed, impart to it a modern air. In addition to its hotels the city has several pleasant boarding-houses, where good

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accommodations may be had at from $1.50 to $3.00 per day. Of these mav be mentioned “The Sunnyside,’’ Captain Thomas F. House, pro prietor, which has a capacity of 40, and charges $2.50 per day. The “Hernandez House,” on Charlotte Street, accommodates 50, and charges from $2.00 to $3.00 per day. The Hon. George S. Greeno’s, on Marine Street, capacity 60; Mrs. J. F. Edwards’, on the Bay, accomdating 30; Miss R. E. Hasseltine’s, on St. George Street, capacity 25 ; Mrs. E. A. Fosters ; Mrs. H. H. Neligan’s ; Mrs. W. R. Harris’; E. J. De Medicis’ and W. Rolleston’s, on the same street, and Mrs. Frazer's, on St. Francis Street. The Press.— S t Augustine has two ably conducted weekly news papers, “The St. Augustine Press” is edited by John P. Whitney, Esq., The Florida House. and published every Saturday evening. “The St. John’s Weekly,” is edited by M. R. Cooper, Esq., and published every Friday evening. The New York, Boston, Chicago and Philadelphia papers are received here about a day and a half from the date of publication. Telegraphy. —By the electric wire communication is made instantly with all parts of the country. Boating and Pishing. — This city furnishes fine facilities for ex cursions on the water. Yachts and fishing boats and tackle may be had at reasonable rates, and experienced seamen are always on hand. The waters furnish an abundance of drum, bass, cat-fish, shark, sheepshead and green turtle. Oysters, crabs, clams, and other shell-fish, are also

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abundant. A little steamer runs constantly between the North Beach (Point Ouartell) and the South Beach, and the Bay is often dotted with sail-boats scudding away to this or that delightful spot. After a heavy storm the sea-bean, shells, and other marine curiosities, maybe gathered up along the beaches. A sail by moonlight over the bay, especially with a genial company and music, is very enjoyable. Like Venice, St. Augustine is a city of the sea, and its moonlight scenes upon the water are as lovely as those by the ducal palace or the famed Rialto. The Yacht Club House.— T his building, of which we give a picture, is situated opposite the Plaza on the Bay, of which it commands The Yacht Club House. a pleasant view. The Yacht Club has its gala days in March, and on one night illuminates not only the building, but every yacht in the bay, which then presents a scene as brilliant as a poet’s fancy can conceive. Hunting’.—The sportsman finds a great variety as well as a great abundance of game in the vicinity of the city. Small migratory birds, as the robin, rice bird, cedar bird, red bird, oriole, etc., are found here in great numbers during the winter season. Wild pigeons, partridges, and several species of ducks are numerous, and sea-fowl wait only to be shot, bagged and eaten. Among the curious birds the hunter will find in this region are the greedy spoon-bill, the indolent pelican, and the tall flamingo. Rabbits, black squirrels and opossums, with their curious pouches for their young, are common. Deer may be found in the forests at no very great distance from the city. A good sportsman does not

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often return from a morning’s hunt without game to keep and game to give away. The mimic song of the mocking bird delights him while at rest beneath the orange tree. Cost of Living*.—While the prices of board at the hotels does not vary much from that of other Southern Atlantic cities, the expense of house-keeping is quite moderate. Rents are low, fuel is cheap, and not much of it is needed. Service is easily obtained, and the cost of winter clothing is much less than at the North, for the simple reason that not so much of it is wanted. Owing to the abundance of fish and game, A Characteristic Scene. and especially of vegetables, such as yams, melons, tomatoes, beans, sweet corn, okra, and the like, together with such fruits as peaches, plums, grapes, dates, bananas, pomegranates, figs and oranges, which are very cheap indeed, the cost of supplying the table is much less than at the North. As in other cities, it is better here to procure a home of one’s own, even if the stay is brief, than to incur the expense of living in a hotel or boarding-house. Late Improvements. — Owing to the healthfulness of the place, (it being free from all malaria) the profusion of semi-tropical fruits, the

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salubrity of the air, the opening of the St. John’s Railroad, the facilities for fishing and bathing, the moderate cost of living, and other causes, the influx of prominent Northerners has of late been very great. Ele gant cottages have been erected in the city and its suburbs, commodious hotels have been opened, orange groves planted, gardens extended and new buildings projected. A new order of things has been introduced, and the city now begins to assume a modern aspect. The society, in the winter season especially, is full of life and gayety, and as genial and A Picturesque Cabin. refined as any in the country. From the slumber of three centuries the city is awakening, and its prospects for the future are most cheering. The city is now accessible from all points, and will doubtless soon come to be one of the liveliest, as it is now one of the prettiest, and healthiest spots in Florida. Historical—Ponce de Leon.—St. Augustine has the honor of being the first city in America settled by Europeans. The date of its settlement is prior to that of Jamestown, Va., by forty-three years, and

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of Plymouth, Mas-s., by hfty-five years. Searching for the “Fountain of Youth,” whose virtues were credulously believed to renew the vigor of the aged, Juan Ponce de Leon landed on the coast a little to the north of St. Augustine in the spring of 1512, and as it happened to be on Palm Sunday (Pasqua Florida), he named the country Florida. Revis iting the peninsula again in 1521, he was mortally wounded in a contest with the aborigines. The Huguenots and Menendez.— Under the direction of the celebrated Admiral Jasper Coligny, Jean Ribault, (1520-1565) with two vessels and a colony of Huguenots, arrived on the coast near St. Au gustine in 1652, landed near the mouth of St. John’s River, and then proceed ing northwards, built Fort Charles for the protection of his colony at Port Royal, left twenty-five men as a garri son, and returned to France. Reduced almost to starvation, this colony con structed a rude bark and set sail for Europe. After great suffering at sea they were discovered by an English ship and taken into port. In the pros ecution of his design, Coligny sent Reme Goulaine de Laudonni6re, with three vessels, to America. He arrived at St. Augustine in the spring of 1564, and thence proceeded to St. John’s River, which he named “La Riviere de Mai,” where about two leagues from the entrance he erected Fort Caroline. The colonists here were soon reduced to great misery, and were devising means to return to France, when Jean Ribault, Lock to the Door of Fort Marion, who left Dieppe May 22, 1565, arrived with a fleet of seven vessels and abundant supplies. In the mean time Philip II, King of Spain, despatched Pedro Menendez de Aviles (1519-1574) to Florida, with eleven vessels and 2600 men, and with orders to “behead and gibbet all Protestants in those regions.” About one-half of this fleet, the rest hav ing suffered wreck, arrived in the harbor of St. Augustine, then called “The River of Dolphins,” on the 7th day of September, 1565, and the

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next day Menendez, with much pomp and ceremony, took possession of the Indian village of “Selooe,” which stood upon the site now occupied by this city. Eighty cannon were landed from the ships and entrench ments for defence erected. The following account of the disembarkation is given by Francisco Lopez de Mendoza, chaplain of the fleet: “On Saturday, the 8th day of September, the day of the nativity of Our Lady, the General disembarked, with banners displayed, trumpets and other martial music resounding, and amid salvos of artillery. Carrying a cross I proceeded at the head, chanting the hymn Te Deu 7 n Laudamus. The General marched straight up to the cross, together with all those who accompanied him, and kneeling they all kissed the cross. A great looked upon these number of Indians ceremonies and imidone. Thereupon the sion of the country in Majesty. All the ofliof allegiance to him as lantado (Governor) of After driving the coast, Menendez (Sept, the wilderness to Fort arrived early on Friday by a sudden assault the place and massaof the women and people. Hanging seveover their heads the Frenchmen, but as Look-Out at Fort Marion. tated what they saw General took possesthe name of His cers then took an oath their General and Adethe whole country.’’ French fleet from the 2i) marched through Caroline, at which he morning. Sept. 20, and gained possession of cred, with the exception children, most of the ral of them, he placed inscription, “ Not as Lutherans.” Laudoniere and several others made their escape to a vessel in the river. The whole number of persons in the fort was 240. Changing the name of the fort to San Matheo, and leaving in it a garrison of 300 soldiers, Menendez soon returned to St. Augustine, when a mass was performed in commemoration of his victory. In the meantime Ribault, in an expedition for an attack on St. Augustine, had his four vessels wrecked in a storm and cast upon the shore south of Matanzas. The leader and his followers, with incredible hardship, made their way along the coast to the Matanzas River, where about 350, including Ribault himself,surrendered themselves to the tender mercies (?) of Menendez. Crossing over the river in a skiff* they were nearly all massacred in cold

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blood, ten by ten, with their hands tied behind them. This is one of the most tragic scenes in history, and brands the name of the minion of the bigoted King of Spain with infamy. Well may the inlet here be called “The Bloody River of Matanzas,” Well has Mr. George R. Fairbanks said in his excellent History and Antiquities of St. Augus tine: “At some point on the thickly wooded shores of the Island of Anastasia, or beneath the shifting mounds of sand which mark its shores, may still lie the bones of some of the 350 who, spared from destruction by the tempest, and escaping the perils of the sea and of the savage, fell victims to the vindictive rancor and blind rage of one than whom history recalls none more cruel, or less humane. But while their bones thus scattered on earth and sea, unhonored and unburied, were lost to human sight, the tale of their destruction and sad fate, scattered in like manner over the whole world, has raised to their memory through sympathy with their sad fate, a memo rial which will endure as long as the pages of his tory.” Incensed at the atrocities of Menendez, the Chevalier Domenique de Gourgues (1530-1593) with some other Huguenots, equipped a small fleet and arrived at St. John’s River with about 250 men in April, 1568. The fortifications at the mouth of the river and Fort Caroline were soon taken and the garrisons put to the sword. Over those hung he placed the inscription: “Not as to Spaniards, nor as to outcasts; but as to traitors, thieves and murderers.” Under their chief Satouriara, the Indians around St. Augustine committed many depredations, and during the governorship of Menendez killed more than a hundred of its inhab itants. Assault of Drake.— T he celebrated Sir Francis Drake (15371596) made an attack on the town in 1586, one-half of which he reduced to ashes. This was done in consequence of the killing of one of his

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men by a Spaniard, The inhabitants fled to the fort at San Matteo, on St. John’s River. Drake found the fort at St. Augustine deserted. It was then built entirely of wood, and in it were twelve brass cannon and a treasure chest, containing £2,000 sterling. Franciscans. — I n 1592 twelve Franciscan missionaries came to labor among the people, one of whom, Francis Panja, made “an Abridgement of Christian Doctrine” in the Yemasee language. Father Corpa had an Indian mission house at Talomato, in the north-west part of the city. He was afterwards murdered while at prayer, by one of his converts whom he had publicly rebuked. Father Montes, whose Indian church was on Cano de la Leche, shared also the same tragic fate. The Indians of the south, as well as of the north, were generally more friendly to the French than to the Spanish or the English. The Indians.—A war broke out in 1638 between the Spaniards and the Apalachian Indians, and soon terminated in the defeat of the aborigines, who were then compelled for more than sixty years to labor on the fortifications of the city. The Yemasees, whose chief village was Macarisqui, near the city, and one of whose chiefs the Governor had executed, in 1686 made an attack on the people, drove them into the fort, and gave those they found outside of it no quarter. They con tinued long the inveterate enemies of the Spaniards. In the year 1687, Don Juan de Aila introduced the first African slave into the colony.* Gov, Moore’s Attack. — O n the breaking out of the war between England and the two kingdoms, France and Spain, in 1702, James Moore, Governor of South Carolina, planned an injudicious expedition both by land and sea, against St. Augustine. He held the town for three months, the inhabitants having betaken themselves to the castle. He was frightened away, after burning the town, by the appearance of two small ships in the offing, which he took to be two formidable Span ish men-of-war. To meet the expense of this foolish expedition, the first paper money [bills of credit] was issued in South Carolina. Assault of Oglethorpe.—General James Edward Oglethorpe [1698-1785], Governor of Georgia, besieged the city in the summer of 1740. The fort had been put into good condition and had a garrison of more than 700 soldiers, with fifty pieces of artillery. Oglethorpe erected one battery on Anastasia Island, called Poza, the remains of which are still visible, and others not far distant, from which he fired upon the Fairbanks, p. 68.

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town and fort. The siege continued thirty-eight days; but while the artillery drove the people from their dwellings into the fort, it made but little impression on that solid rampart, for its walls received the shot like a battery of sand, as may still be seen by the marks remaining. On the 25th of June a sortie was made from the castle against Fort Moosa, about two miles north of the city, when a company of Highlanders, under Captain John McIntosh, displayed great gallantry, but were taken prisoners. Finding his guns inadequate to the reduction of San Marco, Mrs. Stowe’s Orange Grove at Mandarin. then under the command of Governor Manuel Monteano, General Ogle thorpe withdrew his forces. Two years later he made another unsuc cessful demonstration against the fort. Cession of the City to the English. — In 1763 Florida was ceded to England in exchange for Havana, when many of the Spanish residents of St. Augustine left the city. In his work published at this time, Mr. Roberts speaks of the city as “running along the shore at the foot of a pleasant hill, adorned with trees. Its form is oblong, divided by four regular streets, crossing each other at right angles; down by the sea-side, about three-fourths of a mile south of the town, standeth

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the church and monastery of St. Augustine. The best built part of the town is on the north side, leading to the castle, which is called St. John’s Fort. It is a square building of soft stone, fortified with whole bastions, having a rampart twenty feet high, with a parapet nine feet high, and it is casemated. The town is fortified with bastions and with cannon. On the north and south, without the walls of the city, are the Indian towns.” The English occupied St. Augustine for about twenty years, and made many improvements. They constructed large barracks in the southern part of the city, built what were called the King’s Roads, one leading to New Smyrna, and the other to Jacksonville ; bridged the St. Sebastian River, and added 6o feet to the height of the light-house on Anastasia Island. The Minorcans.—During this period a remnant of the colony of Minorcans, who had been cruelly used by Dr. Nicholas Turnbull, settled in the northern part of the city, and in 1780 about sixty noted South Carolinians, among whom appear the names of Edward Rutledge and Arthur Middleton, were sent liere as prisoners of war. On the reception of the news of the Declaration of Independence, the patriots Samuel Adams and John Hancock were burned in effigy on the Plaza. Recession to Spain. — O n the rcoccupation of St. Augustine by the Spaniards, in 1784, most of the English families departed, and the castle was manned by Spanish troops under the command of Governor Vincente Manuel de Zespedez. Change in Flags.— I n 1821 Florida became, by the payment of five million dollars to Spam, a territory of the United States, and (ien. Andrew Jackson its first governor. The Seminoles. — A visit of these Indians to the city in 1817, is thus vividly described : “About thirty of the hunting warriors of the Seminoles, with their squaws, had arrived for the purpose of selling the produce of the chase, consisting of bear, otter, tiger, and other skins, bear’s grease, and other trifling articles. This savage race, once lords of the ascendant, are the most formidable border enemies of the United States. After trafficking for their commodities, they were seen at various parts of the town, assembled in small groups, seated upon their haunches, like monkeys, passing round their bottles of aqnedente (the rum of Cuba), their repeated draughts upon which soon exhausted their contents. They then slept off the effects of intoxication under the walls, exposed to the influence of the sun. Their appearance was extremely wretched; their .skins of a dark, dirty chocolate color, with

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long, straight, black hair, over which they had spread a quantity of bear’s grease. In their ears and the cartilages of the nose were inserted rings of silver and brass, with pendants of various shapes ; their features were prominent and harsh, and their eyes had a wild and ferocious expression. A torn blanket, or an ill-fashioned, dirty, linen jacket, is the general costume of these Indians ; a triangular piece of cloth passes around the loins. The women vary in their apparel by merely wearing short petticoats, the original color of which was not distinguishable from the various incrustations of dirt. Some of the young squaws were toler ably agreeable, and if well washed and dressed would not have been unin teresting ; but the elder squaws wore an air of misery and debasement.” Fort Marion, Showing the Water Battery and Hot Shot Furnace. Curiosity Stores. — There are several in St. Augustine, where the natural productions of Florida can be obtained, but the most popular store is the mammoth establishment known as the Fort Marion Store, in the Museum Building, opposite Fort Marion, where everything in the curiosity line can be obtained. Having collectors in the southern por tion of the State and in the Bahama Islands, the proprietor is able to offer the most valuable tropical curiosities at reasonable prices. The Fort Marion Store is a favorite resting place for ladies, while taking their morning walk. Easy chairs are provided, and on chilly mornings (for there are chilly mornings in Florida) a fire will be found burning, and the many novelties presented to view make this a very popular resort.

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The Rainey Building,'Bunting’s Building, the Ocean View House, the Beach Cottage, the Cleaveland House, and the residence of Dr. Goodrich, the Dentist, are well described in our engravings. The Museum, opposite Fort Marion, near the City Gates, is one of the principal attractions of the ancient city, and is worthy of particular mention. The reader will obtain a good idea of the value of this col lection from the following communications from prominent citizens of St. Augustine. Hon. John G. Long, Mayor of St. Augustine, says: “We regard the St. Augustine Museum as the most valuable ac quisition to the at tractions of the place. Weeks might be prof itably spent in the examination and study of the exten sive collections of rare and valuable histo rical relics, confined not only to the dis covery and early set tlement of this secThe Rainey Building. tion, but of national scope and interest.” The Tropical Paradise of Jacksonville says : “At the Museum there is an almost endless collection of historic relics connected with the early history of St. Augustine, and visitors should not fail to view it. Visitors are enthusiastic, and no one should fail to examine the rare %  collection of old Spanish relies as well as the relics of slavery, the wonderful whale exhibit, and multitudes of strange curios to be seen no where else. Hon. M. R. Cooper, Judge of Probate, thus describes his visit to the Museum in an article in the St. yohns Weekly: “Our visit was so pleasant, and the subject proved so interesting, that we give it more than a passing notice.

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The Cleaveland House. Residence and Office of Dr. Goodrich.

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The old local relics, such as the flint-lock musket, found in the dun geon of Fort Marion ; the old battle-axe, found at Moultrie ; the human bones, found in excavating north of the Fort; the old implements of war used by the Spanish, and many other antiquities connected with the early history of St. Augustine, will be of peculiar interest to tourists and visitors. The birds of Florida occupy over fifty cases, and are of pleasing plumage and great variety. The collection of birdsÂ’ eggs, from the tiny humming bird to the monstrous ostrich, numbers several thousands, of all colors and sizes. The collection of old books, autographs, papers and deeds, are of inestimable value, and will be eagerly examined by the antiquarian. There are many foreign curiosities which are worthy of note. One room con tains a life-size soldier in armor, from Japan ; a Hin doo Priest from India, lifesize, and numerous figures, idols, and curious things from Japan, China and India. From the Holy Land is a lamp 3,000 years old ; carved rocks from the garden of Gethsemene, besides other relics from that sacred spot which will interest any and every one. The pottery made by the Indians, their war shields, bow-arrows, stone implements, remains from the mounds, teeth and silver necklaces, blankets, clothing, and various other things made by them, would alone be of sufficient attraction to induce a visit to the Museum. But to us the most interesting feature of the whole exhibit is the jaws of a large sperm whale, containing most of the teeth. These jaws are of immense proportions, having been taken from a whale which yielded one hundred and fifty barrels of oil. There is a whale ship with all of the equipage and implements used The Ocean View House.

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on a voyage, which comprises the various kinds of harpoons and lances used during the past half century, and the bomb lance, which has superseded the old style lance. There can be seen the fragments of a bomb that killed a whale, and were afterwards extracted and presented to the Museum by Hon. Samuel Osborn, the famous whaler of Massa chusetts. The alligator room will be appreciated by our visitors, for there is an immense female alligator with her nest, in which the young alligators are breaking through the egg, and, of course, look very innocent and cunning. The room devoted to bric-a-brac will also be appreciated by the The Beach Cottage. average Northerner, for here is an old piano which we think without doubt, judging from its appearance and style of manufacture, is the oldest in America. There is also an antiquated loom, used in 1812; the flint and steel with tinder box, used before the discovery of matches. Every ex-Confederate soldier will be interested in the collection of relics of the late war to be found here; the old cartridge boxes and knapsacks, which have actually seen service, together with muskets, swords and pistols, of Southern manufacture, look exceedingly familiar,, and almost like old friends to those who wore the gray. > There is among the varied stock of this exhibit soft morsels for the old-time abolitionist in the way of slavery bills of sale, which will be

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greatly enjoyed, no doubt, as they are real relics of that which has created so much imaginary trouble in the minds of certain people. The shell and coral collection is wonderful, over a hundred thousand speci mens, and are worthy of an extended description, but our space forbids at present. The tooth of the Mastodon, and the many specimens of petrifactions, fossils, minerals, and precious stones, are of great interest. Every visitor should see this splendid collection of interesting and instructive relics ; the school children would gain a vast deal of inform ation by studying these specimens. We congratulate St. Augustine upon the acquisition of this exhibit to its other attractions.” John P. Whitney, Esq., editor of the SL Augustine Press, says: “We hear the most enthusiastic praises of the St. Augustine Museum, and visitors will not fail to examine the collection of Spanish relics. The mysterious bones found in excavating north of the Fort, are, as near as can be ascertained, the very bones that were found in the iron cage which were buried north of the Fort. It was John Capo, the old harbor pilot, who removed the rocks and found the cage in the inner dungeon. This is, without doubt, the finest collection of curiosities ever seen in the South. We were particularly interested in Mr. Bunting’s Store, the collection of rare and precious stones, comprising agates, turquoise^ moonstones, opals, gold and silver ore, j^earls, carbuncles, aqua-marine, emeralds, malachite, topaz, crystals, and many other rare gems. In the collection of whaling implements, besides the mammoth whale’s jaws, the teeth, rough and carved, is a reel made of whale’s ivory and joined by rivets made of old Spanish dollars. The collection of insects is particularly large. The Confederate relics attract great attention, as also the relics of slavery. There is an ancient halberd, supposed to be more than 500 years old, a sword of

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The St. Augustine Museum, opposite Fort Marlon.

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date of 1400, the old Major Moody chair, 150 years old, and among the rare old books is one printed in 1629, which describes Florida as bounded on the north by Virginia, and on the west by Mexico; a schedule of mails of 1695, and besides these there are so many other curiosities that it would require columns to enumerate, and occupy sev eral days to thoroughly examine. It is impossible for us to do full justice in our description of this Museum; suffice it to say that it has taken fifteen years in making the collection, a fact that proves that too great compliment cannot be paid to it.'’ Rev. S. D. Paine, Pastor of the M. E. Church, says: “The St. Augustine Museum is an honor to the State and to the South. Valua ble donations of articles of historic interest are constantly being made, and I commend the Museum to our visitors.” Messrs. Geo L. Atkins & Sons, proprietors of the Florida House, say: “The St. Augustine Museum has been a popular resort for our guests during the past season, it being one of the principal attractions of the ancient city. Personally we have greatly enjoyed our visits to it.” Prof. T. C. Cowdon, Principal of the public school, says: “I am filled with wonder that our city should possess so valuable a Museum. The visitor can devote a few hours to its examination with pleasure and profit. He will find no trash, but a collection of rare and curious things, completely filling nine rooms, of which any Northern city would feel proud. Visitors will be more than paid by an examination of the old Spanish relics alone.” Chas. W. Johnson, Curator of the Institute says: “The collection of shells in the St. Augustine Museum numbers fully one hundred thousand specimens, most of which are classified. Conchologists visit ing our city will find a rich treat in store for them.” Reasons for Obtaining a Residence in St. Augustine. For those in quest of health, a mild and equable climate, refreshing breezes from the sea, sun-shine in the day-time, coolness in the night; lor those who would enjoy the wonderful song of the mocking-bird, and would be regaled by the perfume of brilliant flowers all the year round; for those who would delight in yachting or fishing on the sea, or hunting on the land; for those who would have long life, good living, good society, it were not easy to find a better spot than the first city settled on this continent, the ancient and beautiful city of St.Augustine.

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The Hotel San Marco, St. Augustine.

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The Lorillard Villa, St. Augustine.

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MACKEY & CO., MANUFACTURERS OF WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN Chinese and Japanese Novelties and Curiosities. EOI^OpEAB FANdt IJOOD^ OF ALL Shells from the Bahamas, Pacific Ocean, and Mediterranean Sea. Stereoscopic Views, Wooden Goods, Swiss Carvings, Feather Work, Fish Scale Jewelry, Florida Grasses, Canes of Native Woods, Live and Stuffed Alligators, Etc. Two Blocks from Old City Oates, St. Oeorge St., ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA.

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A.J. PELLICER. JR. /N,N/^^PRACTICAL WORKER IN—— ^lumltcrr -ANDCHARLOTTE STREET, (Opp. St. Augustine Hotel.) ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA.

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H/a/Z §dper I#: A FULL STOCK OF WALL PAPER WINDOW GLASS. STEP LADDERS, Rangings in size from 3 to 12 feet high. Prices from $1.25 to $3.50. THE LARGEST STOCK OF WIlOW SHADES A1 FIXTURES IN THE CITY. A LARGE STOCK OF French and American Looking-Glass Plates. Bring your old frames and get them filled, and save the price of a new looking-glass. I have also a very large stock of Wall and Decorating Paper and Room MOULDING. I am prepared to put up a first-class job of DECORATION.. My paper ranges from 10 cents to ^1.50 a roll of eight yards. Glass put in in any part of the city, by leaving word at my store. Also a large stock of House Lining Paper, Roof Felt Carpet Lining, moth proof. Enameled and Colored Glass for Vestibule doors T R A N S O M S Bank, Office, and Steamboat SKYLIGHTS, etc., etc. NO CHARGES FOR CUTTING GLASS TO ANY SIZE. Cor. SPANISH and CUN A Sts., ST. AUGUSTINE.

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O. T. CONNER, FDMIfil ii PlISSTIC FUIT St. George Street, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA. Habla V. Espano ? Parlez-Vous Fran9ais.^ Sprechen Sie Deutsch ? Parlate Italiano ? IN TEN WEEKS You can, at your own Home, by Dr. Richard S. Rosen thal’s MEISTERSCHAFT SYSTEM, learn to speak fluently either Spanish, French, Italian, or German, for the nom inal price of ^5.00 for one language. All subscribers—^^5.00 for each language—become actually pupils of Dr. Rosenthal, who corrects all exercises, and corresponds with them in regard to any difficulties which may occur. Specimen copy, Spanish, French, German, or Italian, 25 cts. Says The Nation^ New York: “ This is without doubt the best system ever devised for learning to speak a foreign language in a short time.” MEISTERSCHAFT PUBLISHING CO., 2S7 "VA/ fi-slxinstoix St., JBositoxi., F. OAUZENS, DEALER IN Musical Instruments, • Curiosities, • Fancy Goods, AND SEWING MACHINES, o zz .A. XI. Xj o 7 %  x* s s*x'xi.x:xi’x‘, ^t. J^ugustine,

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Reliable Information ABOUT FLORIDA, 4*If you would get the bottom facts regarding tlie “ Laml of Flowers,** subscribe for the flasasspiRB fRESS. A Live, Energetic Newspaper, Published Weekly, at #2.00 A YEAR. Sent B^ostpaid for Six Months for 0ne Bollar. HOW TO GROW ORANGES HOW TO FIND A HOME IN FLORIDA! In fact, Everything that an Intended Immigrant would wish to know. ADDRESS, JOHN P. WHITNEY, Publisher, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA

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W. T. BATES, CONFECTIONER. Spanish, near St. George St., St. Augustine, Caramels, Bon-Bons, Chocolate Creams, etc. fresh every hour. ALL KINDS OF GANDIES MADE TO ORDER. Marsh-Mallows and G-lace Fruits a Specialty. The Caramels, Bon-Bons, Marsh-Mallows, etc., sold here are of the same quality as made by me for President Arthur and Party dur ing their stay in St. Augustine. nw) BniEDE^, ORANGE STREET, (Near the City Gates,! St -HORSES AND CARRIAGES TO LET.FLORIDA BAZAAR, 3X. OEIORGE STREIEl-T, ST. AUQUSTINEl, Miss MZZIE BEATHWAITE, Proprietor. Headquarters for Florida Curiosities, Photographs of Florida Scenery, Views on Glass, Wood and Paper. Canes carved and plain, Stuffed Birds and Alligators. Feather Fans, Painted Shells. Sea Beans mounted in Solid Gold in every style, as Charms, Necklaces, Bracelets, Earrings, and Pins. Mounted AlligatorÂ’s Teeth in Broaches, Earrings, Charms, Sleeve Buttons, Vinaigrettes, Scarf Pins, Bangle Rings, etc. BoarÂ’s Tusks mounted in Broaches and Vinaigrettes.

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ST. &EOBGE STBEET, ST. AUSUSTINE, FLA. OPEN ALL THE YEAR. A Good Table. Artesian Water. Everything New and Attractive.

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T. H. HOWARD, AINT /IND IL §TORE, ST. G-EOK^O-E STE.EET, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA. Painting, Frescoing, Calsomining, Graining, Etc., Executed in the best manner at satisfactory prices. SIGN PAINTING.

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BRANCH OK o SaYannali Cki Stable, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA. A. W. HARMON, Pi-oprietor. Vehicles for Tourists with Careful Drivers furnished at airtimes. Buggies and Horses for Hire. HORSES FOR SALE.

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-TRGMULTIFOI^AllI ^TOlllE and dO. OF ST. AUGUSTINE, Manufacturers of N. A. COOKE'S PATENT FACE AND COMMON BRICK, Also, PLAIN and ORNAMENTAL BUILDING STONE, Such as Ashler for Facings, Caps, Sills, Corner Blocks, Belting, Steps, Ornamental Fireplaces, Thim bles, Mantels, Vases, Tiling in Colors, Sinks, etc. \ CEMETERY LOTS CURBED. Monuments (square and round), Flue Pipes, Chimney Tops, etc., etc. COQUINA WORK IN VARIETY. FACTORY, on the shore front, North of Fort Marion. SAMPLES may be seen at CHAPIN 8c CO.Â’S STORE, Museum Building. TERRITORIAL RIGHTS FOR SALE. H. A. COOKE, Supt.

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THE ST. AUGUSTINE COMPANY Are now prepared to supply every hing in the line of all kinds of GAS FIXTURES GAS STOVES, Kept constantly on hand, and for sale at lowest market prices. W. P. EICHBAUM, Superintendent and Agent.

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F. W. Bruce, CIVIL ENGINEER Town Surveying and Railroad Work a Specialty. OFFICE: ROOM 4, RAINEY BUILDING, St. Augustine, Florida. P. O. BOX 134. ST. CrOHiTS and oystei[ house, A. YOUNG, Proprietor. ST. GEORGE ST., ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA. R. YAEKEL, FASHIONABLE TAILOR. ST. AUGUSTINE, PLOEIDA. (3 Doors North of Cleveland House.) Cutting and (Repairing (Promptly (Done. Also, Cleaning and Dyeing.

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I F you want good, northern cooking, white waiters, and a real home-like place. — ^top at the CLEVELAND HOUSE, Si. George St., Si. Augustine. A. M. BLAKE, Proprietor. aooording to the room, which is sure to he satisfactory. AND NEXT SUMMER VISIT THE Long Island, Lake Winnepisseogee, N, H. Grand Mountain Scenery. Superior Boating, Fishing, and Gunning. A. M. BLAKE, Proprietor. II.I.USTRATED CIRCULAR ON APPLICATION. I

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PHILADELPHIA pOU^E, Situate on Tolomato Street, directly opposite the new hotel PONCE DE LEON, which is now being built. THIS IS A. Private Boarding House And will accommodate from Twenty to Thirty Persons. Terms from $15.00 to $20.00 per Week, And from $2.50 to $3.00 per Day. SPECIAL TEEMS POE THE SEASOM. Mrs. H. J. PENNINGTON, St. Augustine.

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Dr. DEWH'T WEBB, Office and Residence, St. George St., OPPOSITE LORILLARDÂ’S VILLA. PSTBK C. llASTBBg, -MASON,All work done promptly and in the best man ner. Estimates Furnished. CHARLOTTE STREET, .. ST. AUGUSTINE. S. VON GEMMINGEN, ^nfiUeci ^ivil Engineer, Office and Residence, MARINE STREET, ST. AUGUSTINE. E. E. De MEDICIS, -Dealer inDFMMrclo f HiMro TRUNKS, ETC. 0l[arilotte coi]. 6una, Augustine, 5^^!. PRICES ALWAYS THE LOWEST.

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Florida photographic VibW^. STEREOSCOPIC VIEWS. Twenty-six for $1.00. Comprising the St. AUGUSTINE RELICS, ORANGE, PINE-APPLE, and other GROVES, scenes on the St. JOHNSÂ’ and OKLAWAHA RIVERS, etc., giving one a good idea of life in Florida. Postage 10 cents extra. Unmounted Photographs Of FLORIDA, GEORGIA, and THE CAROLINAS, from our own Negatives. Price, 50 Cents per Dozen, post-paid. BirdÂ’s-eye Views of St. Augustine, (From the Tower of the San Marco Hotel.) SIX COMPREHENSIVE CABINET VIEWS, highly finished, in Alligator Paper Case. Priccj .50 Cents, post-paid. FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPHS, CABINET SIZE. $1.00 per Dozen. BAHAMA SEA-FANS, With OVAL PHOTOGRAPHIC VIEWS of the CITY GATES CATHEDRAL, LIGHT HOUSE, etc. Price, 35 Cents. CHAPIN & CO., Publishers, Museum Building, St. Augustine, Florida.

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THE FLORIDA HOUSE Is Open for the reception of guests from December to April. The house is one of the largest and best located in the city, being on the principal avenues, and contiguous to the stores and other hotels. It is surrounded by piazzas and beautiful lawns. The house has undergone thorough renovation, and has had many new improvements added for the convenience and comfort of hotel visitors. The rooms are large, elegantly furnished, well ven tilated, and are lighted throughout with gas. A steam passenger elevator carries guests to the fourth floor. The introduction of steam into the building insures a warm and comfortable house. The proprietors intend to add to the popularity of the house by supplying the necessary comforts, and a strict attention to business. Electric bells in each room connect with the office. Terms, $4.00 per day. A liberal reduction given to parties desiring to engage rooms for the season. Special rates for January. George L Atkins and Sons, St. Augustine, Florida.

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LIVERY STABLE, Bronson Street, (NEAR KING STREET,) St. Augustine, Florida. STYLISH TURNOUTS FURNISSJE-D JlT SHORT J^OTICE, With or without Drivers. -ONE OF THESest J^qnippetl IN THE STATE.

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W. LYON & CO., WHOLESALE Pla.a:a. Sqi-ia.re, ST. JLUaTJSOlINE, FLORIDA. -DEALERS IEIfail5wai|e, ^tOYes, Suililei|sÂ’ ]V[ateiiial. HAY, dORH, AHD OAT^. Proprietors of the MERCHANTS LINE OF PACKET SCHOONERS, Direct from New York to St. Augustine.

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SAN MARCO $KATinG ^ KiDK, NOW OPEN FOR THE sEA.sonsr OF isss-Â’se. 0t., 0t. Su^u^tii^e. O. HOWES, Proprietor. THE Most Elaloorate and. E^xtensive SKATING RINK IN FLORIDA.

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ST. AUGUSTIHS, FLA. This new and elegant Hotel, on land containing forty acres, is situated on the “Shell Road,” opposite the old Spanish Fort, with unobstructed view of Matanzas River and the beauties of the famous “North Beach,” giving a fine ocean and inland view. The hotel is modern in its equipments, and with first-class appointments in every particular for the comfort and health of its patrons, and is supplied with pure water from two artesian wells, besides filtered rain water. The DRAINAGE is perfect, and its other sanitary arrangements are made com plete under the supervision of New York experts. The Hotel contains about two hundred and seventy-five rooms, which have open fireplaces and are lighted with gas, while the corridors and public rooms are heated with steam. It combines all the accessories and improvements of first-class Northern city hotels. Further particulars given by applying to O. D. SEAVEY, Afanageri

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Hasseltines. -One of the Most ^tractive Family Boarding Houses in Si. Hugusiine. St. George Street, Opposite the Magnolia Hotel, St. Augustine, Fla. WRITE FOR TERMS. Open From December To May

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VEDDERÂ’S SeRuiBG (2ui?i@si1iY SteRe FLORIDA ANIMALS, BIRDS AND REPTILES OK i
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CHARLES STEWART, Marble and Tile Works, Shop and Yards on the Shell Road, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA. A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF Marble, Drain Tile, &c. BUILDING MOVING A SPECIALTY.

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ST. JOSEPH'S YOUNG LADIES. -^*S-ST, AUGUSTINE, FLA.^*^ This Institution is under the patronage of the Rt. Rev. Dr. Moore, Bishop of the Diocese, and is situated at St. Augustine, Florida. St. Augustine offers special advantages as to health which deserves the consideration of Parents and Guardians. The building is well ventilated and commands a line view of the ocean. As there is a fine Bath-house, situated on the Bay near the Convent, the young ladies are frequently taken to bathe. The scholastic year is divided into two terms, the first commencing on the fifteenth of September and ending on the last day of January; and the second session commences on the first day of February and ends on the last day of June. The course of study is thorough, and embraces all the branches of a solid and ornamental education. The entire course is divided into three departments — Primary, Junior ana Senior. The Senior department comprises a course of three years; it the last year is satisfactorily completed, the pupil is entitled to receive her Diploma, Unusual advantages are offered for the study of Music. There is a large ana inc:’easing Library to which the Young Ladies have access. Attached to the Academy there is a select class for little ones in this department the French language ana Kindergarten exercises receive particular attention. Pupils of all denominations are received; and, while the utmost care is taken in the instruction of the children of Catholic parents — there is no interference with the children of those of a different belief For the sake of conformity all are required to be present at the Public Exercises French receives special attention, and is taught by competent native teachers; it forms no extra charge. The different kind, of needle work and art embroidery, including all kinds of iace work, are taught gratis to boarders. The uniform which each young lady will require is a light black dress for summer, and a heavy one for winter She will also require six changes of under clothing, six towels, four table napkins, two black aprons, knife, silver fork, table and teaspoon. Letters written or received by the young ladies are inspected by the Superioress. TERMS FOR SCHOLASTIC YEAR Board and Tuition with English and French, including washing, with use of Bed and Bedding, payable quarterly in advance.$150 00 EXTRA CHARGES. Music, with use of Instrument...$ 40 00 Drawing and Painting. 25 00 TERMS FOR DAY PUPILS. Senior Department —per quarter.$ 6 00 Junior Department— “ “ .. 4 50 Primary Department— “ .. —. 3 00

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GUSTAVK RKHNBKRG, DEALER IN WatcFies, decks, Jewelry & Silverware, MANUFACTURER OF Alligator Teeth, Boars* Tusks, and Seabean Jewelry, Eye Glasses, Spectacles, Canes, Curiosities, etc. WATCH REP AIBIHG A SPECIALTY. ST. GEORGE STREET, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA. FOREIGN WATCHES REPAIRED. J. A. SPENCER, I)i|y €[Oo9s anfl €[i[OCEi|iES, CORNER LINCOLN AND BRIDGE STREETS, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA. %  St. jiUGUSTINE S/IW ,^ILL, Corner Bridge and Sebastian Streets, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA. WMJ. REYES, Proprietor. LUMBER OF EVERY DESCRIPTION CONSTANTLY ON HAND. -THEBANK OR ST. AUGUSTINR DOES A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS. Deposits Received. Discounts Made. Loans Negotiated. Collections Made and Promptly Remitted for. Real Estate Bought and Sold on Commission. Rents Collected. GEO. W. GIBBS, Cashier. Correspondents: United States National Bank, N. Y.; First National Bank of Florida, Jacksonville; Bank of Jacksonville, Jacksonville.

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Dr. E. M. GOODRICH, 3igi]g:ttti3gt ST. GEORGE STREET, (Nearlj opp. Cleveland House,) ST. A.TJ&USTINT], FLORIDA.. GAS ADMINISTERED. ALL APPLICATIONS PERFORMED WITH SKILL AND CARE. S^TEETH MOUNTED ON GOLD, CONTINUOUS GUM, OR RUBBER. CARPENTERS & BDILDERS, St. IvOtiis Aventae, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA. ESTIMATES FURNISHED.

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EDWARDS -^ H O T E L COMMANDING A VIEW OF THE BAY AND OCEAN, AND OF ANASTASIA ISLAND. Near the Plaza and Yacht Club House. St, Augustine, Fla. OPEN ALL THE YEAR. sample; room For Commercial Men. JOHN T. EDWARDS PROPRIETOR.

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WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRY GOODS -ANDCLOTHING HOUSE. The Largest and Best Selected Stoclr in the Citfr “ONE PRICE,” AND THAT THE LOWEST. We carry everything to he found in a first=class (Jbry Goods store, and make the prices same as can he bought JJorth. ST, GEORGE ST., NEXT DOOR TO POST OFFICE.

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SliGjlfgÂ’flN'iJ THIS SPACIOUS AND ELEGANT HOTEL Occupies the most commanding situation in the city. It has a southerly front of 200 feet upon the Plaza, or Public Square, and an easterly front of 160 feet upon the Bay, with wide piazzas and hanging balconies from each story overlooking the City, Bay, and Atlantic Ocean. The Dining-Room, Parlors, Billiard-Room, and many of the Sleeping Rooms are elegantly frescoed. It is lighted with gas and provided with EVERY MODERN IMPROVEMENT, Including Water Conveniences, Electric Bells, Etc. The piazza has been raised and enclosed on the south side. The drainage of the Hotel is perfect. THE DINING HALE Is capable of seating over 300 guests, and the table will be furnished with all the liixuries of the Northern Markets, and IS SECOND TO NONE IN THE STATE.

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eHOTEL.-S ST ^UGVSTinE, FLORIDA. W. W. f*i‘opi‘ietoi‘. G^THE MAGNOLIA^^ Is located upon St. George street — the Fifth Avenue of St. Augustine. It stands upon the highest ground in the city, and affords a fine view of the town and ocean, and is SECOHD TO HO HOUSE IE FLORIDA. The springs, beds, mattresses, etc., have been specially selected for comfort and ease. Each room is supplied with electric call bells, and nearly all the rooms are furnished with fire places, etc. The CuisiEe Will ConMe to he in E7er7 Respect Uneiceptionahle.

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H. CANFIELD, J Buildings of all kinds Finished Complete by Contract or on Commission. SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO MOVING BUILDINGS. HEAVY FRAMING DONE TO ORDER. Plans, Specifications, Pills of Lumber, and Contracts furnished at short notice. SHOP AND OFFICE ON BRONSON STREET, ST. AUG-USTIISrE, FLA.

PAGE 137

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF BOOTS & SHOES, GentsÂ’ Furnishing Goods, HATS, CAPS, &c. CHEAPER GRADES OF SHOES ALWAYS IN STOCK, A Full Line of GentsÂ’ Neckwear, Underwear, Over shirts, Suspenders, Collars, Cuffs, etc. MenÂ’s Overshirts from the cheapest to the finest. A FINE LINE OF ]V[EnÂ’s, ^outl^sÂ’, anfl i^cysÂ’ Jfats. We buy for cash and sell for cash, and think we can give you more for your money than any other dealer in the city. Call and see us and we will convince you of the above facts. Q,XJEST IMIITOHIEXjL, Cor. Charlotte and HypoHta Sts.

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ARTESIAN WELL DRILLING CO., ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA. Wells Drilled from Three to Ten Inches in Diameter. E. F. JOYCE %  Superintendent. REFERENCES: H. C. SLOGGETT, Col. GEO. L. EASTMAE, E. E. YAILL, W. EYOE, H. P. KINGSLAKD, H. H. WILLIAMS, PHILIP CAPO, of St. Augustine, F. H. ORYIS, Windsor Hotel, Jackson ville, JOHH CHRISTOPHER, Jacksonville. The St. Augustine UJATGR/f(^OmPAnY !s now prepared to furnish parties with water on St. George, Charlotte, King, Plaza, Cuna, Spanish and Fort Streets, as far as the Water Mains are laid, for Drinking, Cooking, Sprinkling, and all other purposes, at moderate rates. A FULL SUPPLY OF Sahasized Pipe, Brass Pistures and Valves, Hose and Hose-Hossles, And all other supplies needed, kept constantly on hand. All Service Pipes, Fixtures, etc., put in by thoroughly competent men. All Water is supplied from Artesian Wells, and absolutely pure and good. For further information, inquire of E. F. JOYCE.

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St. Augustine f BATH • HOUSE I ON THE SEA WALL (Near the Club House). i*-•!< PHILLIP V. CAPO PROPRIETOR. ^ -^ HOT AND COLD SEA WATER, SHOWER BATHS IN THE SEASON. grfsoLPHUR W ATER Baths ^ow I3cftts to ^ent liy tI|E Jfoui| oi| hy tl^e l)ay.

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COOK & LIBBY, CORNER OF BRAVO AND MILL STREETS, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA. SEIMERAli 00B W0RKBRS FANCY TURNING, SAWING, PLANING, STAIR BUILDING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. STORE, OFFICE, RESIDENCE, AND CHURCH FURNISHINGS. ?mEm ^DjaOTBIiE ^ItIDIN6 WIND0W gC^EEjV^. FRAMES FOR DOORS AND WINDOWS, CURLY PINE AND CYPRESS DOORS, WOOD MANTELS, CABINETS, WARDROBES, DESKS, SIDEBOARDS, TABLES, ETC. ALL KINDS OF Kancy Wood Work MADE FROM SPECIAL DESIGNS.

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Diiawing anti l^ainting W. STAPLES DROWN, formerly of Boston, hav ing decided to permanently locate his Winter Studio in St. Augustine, Florida, is prepared to receive 5^upils in l)i]nwing nnfl ^^ninting, Mr. Drown hopes to give to his pupils all of the usual Studio advantages, and in addition, on account of the delightful cli mate of the South, to give them Winter Sketching lessons from such interesting and quaint subjects as are found in and about the old city of St. Augustine. Mr. Drown refers to Mr. J. Appleton Brown of Boston, and also to many former pupils both in the North and South. STUDIO —POST OFFICE BUILDING, ST. AUGUSTINE. Open during the Season to general visitors on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons until 4.30, and on Friday mornings from II until I o^clock.

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S. B. MANGE. J, B. GONE. COLE & MANCE, Contractors and Builders, Biinnson Augustine. S. B. Mance, Architect and Builder of the Magnolia Hotel, St. Augustine. No Charge for Plans and Specif cations Furnished our Patrons. FIRST-CLASS WORK GUARANTEED. Hotels, Villas, and Queen Anne Cottages a Specialty. C. F. HamlDlin, M. J. Heade, W. W. Palmer, D. R. Knowlton, G. Yan Dorn. P. O. BOX 318.

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^ugnstine ^cailgmy ^ FOR YOUNG LADIES. The St. Augustine Academy is designed to furnish a southern Home to young ladies desiring a liberal education, with such advantages and facilities as are enjoyed in institutions of the highest grade. It is undenominational, but strictly Christian in its influence, disci}3line, and instruction. The sys tematic study of the Scriptures is pursued through all the courses. The Preparatory Department includes Reading, Spelling, Writing, Arithmetic, Geography, and Grammar. The Intermediate embraces in addition to the foreging, Composition, History, Analysis, Roots, Prefixes and Affixes, and Physical Geography. The Senior Class will study, in addition to reviewing the preceding, four new subjects from time to time, till completed, viz.: Algebra, Geom etry, Astronomy, Botany, Geology, Physiology, Natural Philosophy, Chem istry, Rhetoric, etc. Teachers of established competency are provided for each department. The scholastic year includes from C)ct. ist to June ist. Recitation hours are from 9 a. m. to i P. m. ; ^Drawing and Painting, from 2.30 P. M. Weekly reviews, monthly examinations and final examina tions written, and revised by gentlemen not engaged in the Academy. Frequent reunions will be held for the purpose of testing the progress of the pupils in Music, Elocution, and Composition. The Drawing and Painting Department includes Drawing in Pencil, Crayon, India Ink, etc., Painting in Oils and Water Colors, Painting on China, Kensington Painting, Tapestry Painting, etc., etc. Terms on application to L. S. MUNDAY, Principal. REFERENCES: References kindly permitted to : Sir John A. Macdonald, Premier of Canada. Lady Macdonald. Sir Leonard Tilley. Rev. R. P. Duclos, Principal of French Protestant College Rev. Dean Carmichel. Rev. Prof. McLaren... W. Ormiston, D. D. Hon. James Turner. .. Rev. Samuel Lyle. J. M. Gibson, M. D.. James Cahill, Esq. Alex. Gartshore, Esq. Alex. Turner, Esq.. • Ottawa Ottawa Ottawa Montreal Montreal Toronto New York Hamilton Hamilton Hamilton Hamilton Hamilton Hamilton

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ST. AUGUSTINE MUSIC HOUSE. li/iRns, Wholesale and Retail Dealers In PIANOS. ORGANS, Guitars, Banjoes, l/iolins, and Musical Merchandise generally. TUITION IN VOCAL AND INSTEUMENTAL MUSIC. Sewing Machines, Oils, Etc. Mueasuiiy jAusustine. ANCIENT CITY RESTAURANT, BAY STREET, Op|i. m Honse, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA. Xnh ifOTfg?. Table Board by the Day or Week A SPECIALTY. OYSTERS SERVED AT SHORT NOTICE.

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ROLLGWn I)OU$G, COR.ST.GEOp|TI|^EOI[YSTS,. New House, Large Rooms, Handsomely Furnished. In the Centre of the City, in view of the Plaza, Post Office, Etc. NORTHERN HELP.-Rates, $2,00 to $3.00 Per Day, Special Terms to Families by tlie Week. I. L SCOTT and E. C. PARKER, Proprietors, Of Higligate Springs? V^ermont,

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DALEÂ’S ROSERY, SHELL ROAD, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA. The BEST KNOWN Varieties of BOSES adapted to tliis climate, at Wholesale and Retail. Out IJlowEiTS a Specialty. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.

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HAVANA CIGARS. BENHAYON & GONZALEZ, Importers and Manufacturers of Choice Brands of HAVANA CIGARS, All the Best Brands, Wholesale and Retail. The Box Trade a Specialty. CHEWIN6 WJi ^M0KIN6 0B^CC03i£^ -9.3icIMP0REb D0EIESIC 0I6^bEE.S Of all tlie pop'LT.lar iDrancls. WE OUARANTEE S ATI SF ACTION. CHARLOTTE, cor. HYPOUTA STS. ST. AUGUSTINE. THE dOMFEgTIOflEI(Y jlOHgE OF ^T, AUEjU^TINE. The Finest Stock of Nice Goods ever seen in the Ancient City.' Imported and iDomestic Oon^Ections Of tlie Clioicest V^arieties. NUTS OF EVERY KIND CONSTANTLY ON HAND. Orders for Wedding Cake receive special attention. & G0js[ZA;.pz, Cor. Charlotte and Hypolita Sts. St. Augustine.

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HINCH & SON, IND -siiGN # iAIJ^TERS. 5i|ESDoing, 5?^oo3"Sinisl|ing, Calsomining, Graining Burnish, Giiding, Etc. PICTURE AND LOOKING-GLASS FRAMES REGILDED, PAPER HANGINGS. Treasury Street, St. Augustine, Fla. And Bar Harbor, Maine. JAMES HINCH. WM. E. HINCH. 33 F JEREIV O JE S. W. R. Emerson, Architect, Boston. Rotch & Tilden, Boston. Col. George Eastman, St. Augustine, Fla. H. S. OÂ’Brien, St. Augustine, Fla.

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WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ARTISTS^ MATERIALS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. Artists’ Oil Colors in Tubes—Canvas— Academy Boards— Mill Boards & Sketch ing Papers—Fine Brushes for Oil Paint ing—Varnishes—Oils, etc.—Studio, Parlor, and Sketching Easels —Windsor & Newton’s Moist and Water Col ors—India Inks— Cabinet Boxes of Wa ter Colors—Sable and Camel-Hair Pencils —Charcoal and Crayon Drawing Materials— Artists’ China Ware JE2 : e 3 —White and Tinted Drawing Papers in Sheets and by the Roll — Sketching Books and Blocks—Whatman’sDrawing Papers —Tracing Papers and Cloths—Fancy Arti cles for Decorating, including Paper Plaques, Brass, Wood, and Porcelain Plaques, Panels, Rolling Pins, etc.—Fine Stationery, and THE BEST INK ever used in the South. WRITING AND COPYING INK, By the Bottle, Dozen, or Gross, Sample bottles may be obtained Free upon application to Ghapin & Go,, St. Augustine, Florida. OPPOSITE FORT MARION.

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JOHN UCKOS, M I3Sr ST. CrOEElTS HOUSE!, <^eoi[gE ^titEEt, ^ugustinE.

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