Citation
Morocco temple

Material Information

Title:
Morocco temple pictorial history from 1888 to 1978
Creator:
Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine for North America -- Morocco Shrine Temple (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Language:
English
Physical Description:
124 unnumbered pages : illustrations, portraits (some color) ; 31 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fraternal organizations -- History -- Florida -- Jacksonville ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
"Illustrious Potentate - 1978; Charles D. Gunter."--T.p.
General Note:
"Illustrious Potentate - 1978; Charles D. Gunter."
General Note:
"Presented by R & R Publishing Co., Inc., Greenville, South Carolina"--Page 4 of cover.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
UF Special Collections
Rights Management:
The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. This item may be protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. §107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
029562935 ( ALEPH )
39512902 ( OCLC )
Classification:
HS835.8.J32 M775 1978 ( lcc )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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This item has the following downloads:


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Oorocco
Temple
Pictorial History from 1888 to 1978
MOROIllustrious Potentate 1978; Charles D. Gunter
IIlustrious Potentate 1978: Charles D. Gunter




Pote
Messa~ge
To the Nobles and Ladies of Morocco Temple:
It was my considerable pleasure to see so many of you at the Temple on the picture-taking days for this Yearbook. Just as you probably used to do occasionally with your high school annual -and possibly still do- I am sure in years to come you will get this book out and look up "ole so and so."
Someone once said a picture was worth a thousand words. If that is the case here, then we at Morocco Temple have the pictorial equivalent of a stack of prose shoulder high on a giraffe!
The Yearbook was planned and produced by the Pilgrimage Committee. We hope you enjoy it for years to come. The main thing is, the Yearbook is, about our Temple and our people.
It will be a source of intense pride to me forever ... to have been your Illustrious Potentate during this rather remarkable year.
Fraternally,
Charles D. Gunter
Illustrious Potentate-1978




Morocco
A Great Temple
A group of enthusiastic Masons in March of 1888 throught Orlando and Hadji Temple in Pensacola. Then from Egypt came that Jacksonville, being a good Masonic town, should have an Araba Temple in Fort Myers, and Amara from Mahi. organization with good moral and upright teachings but also In Georgia, Yaarab released jurisdiction to Alee in Savanhave a little clean fun at their meetings. They then petitioned nah chartered June 9, 1897 as the 74th Temple; Al Sihah in the Imperial Council of the Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Macon chartered July, 1911 as the 122nd Temple. Then from Mystic Shrine for a charter with thenameof Morocco. In Juneof Alee, Hasan Temple was chartered in Albany, Georgia on July that year the Charter was issued to them as the 42nd Temple of 12, 1951 as the 162nd Temple. North America. The original jurisdiction was Florida, Georgia In Alabama, Zamora Temple released jurisdiction to Abba and Alabama. Temple which was formed in Mobile, chartered July 9, 1903 as
We prospered with this jurisdiction but realized it was the 88th Temple. Alcazar was formed in Montgomery and was entirely too large. We granted a group of Atlanta, Georgia chartered in 1914as the134thTemple. Then CahabaTemplewas permission to form a Temple in Atlanta. TheirTemplewas to be formed in Huntsville and was chartered from Zamora July 1st, named Yaarab and they were chartered June, 1890, as the 52nd 1971 as the 171st Temple. Temple. From this record you can see Morocco was great in 1888 and
The same occurred in Alabama. Birmingham, in November from that start we created a chain of many other Temples. While 1890 went through the same procedure and when applying to we were great in 1888, we were still greater in 1978. the Imperial Council was chartered in June, 1891 with the name It has been a distinct pleasure to me to have served of Zamora. They were the 54th Temple. Morocco Temple as its Recorder and in completing 18 years as
At-this timewewere likethis: Morocco in Florida, Yaarab in such. Thanks to the Nobility for allowing me this privilege. Atlanta, and Zamora in Birmingham. All of the three Temples
realizing again that the jurisdiction for each was too large began W. LAWRENCE JACKSON to release territory to other Temples. RECORDER
In Florida first was Egypt in Tampa, Mahi in Miami, Bahia in




Divan
Charles D. Gunter
Potentate
Roland S. Kennedy Russell J. Godwin Dr. William H. Wood Joe Hill
Chief Rabban Assistant Rabban High Priest and Prophet Oriental Guide
William B. Watts W. Lawrence Jackson Ben Reed Lew Brantley
Treasurer Recorder Second Ceremonial Master Captain of the Guard




History Of Shriners Hospitals
"Editorial Without Words"
The first Shriners Hospital For Crippled Children was opened in What is so unique about a Shriners Burn Unit? For one thing, special Shreveport, Louisiana, September 16, 1922. As the need increased, equipment and facilities enable the staff to provide superior care for more Units were added until today there are 22 Units throughout the severely-burned patients. United States, Canada and Mexico. Patients are under visual observation at all times and electronic
These Units of the Shriners Hospitals For Crippled Children repre- monitoring devices attached to a patient under intensive care transmit sent a construction investment of many, many million dollars. It is not heartbeat, temperature, blood pressure and respiration to a central hard to realize the huge operating cost of these 22 Units when you station. consider that Shriners Hospitals actively care for approximately 30,000 Special beds facilitate handling the patient when necessary. patients each year (in-and out-patients); that 8,000 of these patients are Laboratory teams constantly evaluate the patient's condition. The retreated as in-patients, with an average days' stay of 45 days in the search program studies ways to improve the treatment of all types of Orthopedic Units and 57 days for acutely burned children in the Shrin- burns. ers Burns Institutes; and that there are more than 66,000 out-patient What is the cost of patient care? It has been estimated that the cost clinic visits each year. of treatment for a severely burned patient may be more than $10,000. In
Since the first hospital opened in 1922, more than 160,000 children addition to this, massive amounts of blood -often as much as 100 pints have been treated, with 180,000 admissions to the hospitals, and nearly are also needed. 2,000,000 clinic visits to the out-patients' dept. Shriners Hospitals For As in the case of the Orthopedic Units, admission standards for the Crippled Children have provided more than 14,000,000 Orthopedic Shriners Hospitals For Crippled Children, Burns Institutes, are that a patient days since the first Unit was opened in 1922, and Shriners Burns child must be 15 years of age or under, and his parents or guardians are Institutes have provided nearly 100,000 patient days since the first Burns unable to pay for treatment. Unit was opened in Galveston, Texas, March 20, 1966. How can application forms be obtained? Application forms can be
The Burns Institutes of the Shriners Hospitals For Crippled Chil- obtained from a Shriner, Shrine Temple Recorder, Shrine Clubs, Shrindren have a three-fold purpose to save children's lives and restore ers Hospitals or by writing to George M. Saunders, Secretary, SHRINtheir bodies through intensive care to prevent the crippling effects of ERS HOSPITALS FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN, 323 North Michigan Avsevere burns, to undertake research in burns therapy, to advance enue, Chicago, Illinois 60601. A completed application form should be medicine's ability to care for and treat children with burns, and to returned to the Shriners Hospital nearest your home. Application must instruct medical personnel in the care and treatment of burned chil- be accompanied by a birth certificate of affidavit as to child's age and if dren. guardian is signer, a certified copy of the court order. Parents or guarThe Shrine chose "~Children's Burns" as an extension of the Shrin- dian and sponsor will be notified as to status of application. If applicaers Hospitals For Crippled Children, because it was felt that severe tion is approved, notification will be sent to parents or guardian, as to burns in children, unless properly treated, are our country's greatest future procedure. unmet medical need. Some authorities call burns the largest single
hazard of childhood.
SHRINERS HOSPITALS FOR, CRIPPLED CHILDREN
MONTREAL UNIT LOS ANGELES UNIT PORTLAND UNIT BOSTON UNIT
ST. LOUIS UNIT GALVESTON UNIT CINCINNATI UNIT SPRINGFIELD UNIT
INTERMOUNTAIN UNIT HONOLULU UNIT
WINNIPEG UNIT
CHICAGO UNIT
HOUSTON UNIT SPOKANE UNIT M, Aw
-- SREVEORT NITMEXICO CITY UNIT
GREN VLLELEXINGTON UNIT PHILADELPHIA UNIT
GREVLEUNIT TWIN CITY UNIT ERIE UNIT SAN FRANCISCO UNIT




Imperial Divan Officers For 1978-1979
Warren F. Weck, Jr. Charles J. Claypool F. T. H'DoubIer, Jr., M.D. Randolph R. Thomas Daniel E. Bowers, M.D.
Imperial Potentate Deputy Imperial Potentate Imperial Chief Rabban Imperial Assistant Rabban Imperial High Priest and Prophet
Thomas W. Melham George M. Saunders Richard B. Olfene Gene Bracewell Walker S. Kisselburgh
Imperial Oriental Guide Imperial Treasurer Imperial Recorder Imperial First Imperial Second
Ceremonial Master Ceremonial Master
I
Russell H. Anthony, DVM Voris King Edward G. McMullan
Imperial Marshal Imperial Captain Outer Guard
of the Guard




History of the Mystic Shrine of North America
The Shrine was founded August 13, 1870, by two Scottish lions and pageantries and is an important part of the Order's Rite Masons, William J. Florence, one of that era's most promi- tradition. nent actors, and Dr. Walter M. Fleming. On June 16, 1871, The Shrine, as agreat Fraternal Order, started as afun order eleven other Scottish and York Rite Masons were received into in 1872 but found its soul in 1921 when the dream of its planners the Order of the Mystic Shrine, and in 1872, the first formally and thinkers became a reality when a resolution for the estaborganized Temple in the United States, Mecca, located in New lishment of the Shriners Hospitals for Crippled Children was York City, was formed. The Shrine was started for fellowship adopted unanimously atthe46th Annual Session of the Imperial and fraternity and has thrived under the mantle of pageantry, Shrine Council in Portland, Oregon. This indeed was the vehiritual and ceremony. It has grown from the original thirteen cle needed to make the Shrine something far greater than a founding Shriners to over 900,000 members in more than 180 mere playground for Masons! The Shrine Hospitals began with Temples located throughout the North American Continent, the opening of the first one in Shreveport, Louisiana, in 1922,
The Shrine's own history states, that "despite its name, it is and has grown to 22 Orthopedic and Burns Hospitals, located as American as Apple Pie," and its diverse membership and throughout North America. It was decided at the very outset objectives, goals and entrance requirements certainly bear out that the hospitals would be open to all children, regardless of this description. It supports our Government. It requires a race or creed whose parents were unable to pay for needed belief in God of all its members. It loves children and devotes surgical, medical and hospital facilities. This great humanitarian most of its energy and resources to assisting and healing those project has, throughout the years, become one of the world's who are handicapped. finest philanthropies. With vision and wisdom, today's Shrine
Before becoming a Shriner, a potential member must com- leaders are making plans for extensive research facilities to help plete three Masonic degrees accompanied by a series of tests discover the "whys" and reasons for various diseases, as well as after which he becomes a "Master Mason." After becoming a the needed treatment. Master Mason an aspiring Shriner must then proceed through The good the Shrine does at its hospitals can be measured the rituals of the Scottish or York Rites, both being Masonic in terms of the lives it changes. They are great in number and organizations that confer "degrees" on their members after have found happiness! elaborate dramatic rituals. Only after all this, a Mason may apply The Nobles that make up the Shrine come from all walks of to become a Shriner. life and include foremost leaders of business, the professions
Despite the belief by some that the Shrine is a religion; it is and Government. These men have found something of value in not. It does practice quasi-religious rites that are as secret as the the work of the Temples. They enjoy the association of their passwords that admit members to official ceremonies and serve fellows, men whose loyalty, worth and dependability were proas a form of communication understood only by Shriners. Its yen by the fact they are members. No or-anization in North rituals are carefully and colorfully staged with Shriners wearing America better understands the value of liberty. Its cost and ornate oriental robes, gowns and medals in their meeting halls what must be done to maintain it and its loyalty to the countries called Temples or Mosques, with exotic Arabic names. Its in which it functions is outstanding. pageantry and long, colorful parades have become a part of The Shrine's parades and pageantry will continue as part of America's folklore and the spectacular floats and motorized their tradition and the smiling, happy faces of their young wards units, the precision marching corps, the intricate maneuvers of in Shrine Hospitals and children at their circuses will continue highly-trained horses, the crowd pleasing music of bands, drum to glow. The real story of the Mystic Shrine of North America is and bugle groups, have pleased and made millions of spectators that nearly a million men, Freemasons all, join together to mix happy with spine-tingling sensations. fellowship, pleasure, entertainment, good will and vast charity
Members of the Mystic Shrine, since the beginning, were in a grand scale program of fraternal good works. They fit in a permitted to wear an emblem that was distinctive and would set comfortable niche o 'f the contemporary American picture and them apart from others. This is the Shriner's Red Fez which have truly earned the title of NOBLE. they are all proud of and cherish. It is worn at all official func-




Origin And Early History
Exactly when the idea was first advanced that Jacksonville, Morocco Temple is unsurpassed in fellowship as many Florida should have a Shrine Temple is not definitely known, things are sponsored to bring us together fraternally. Besides but the archives reveal a penned letter to Mr. Henry S. Ely of our Ceremonials, we have our business meetings, ladies nights Jacksonville from the then Imperial Chief Rabban, Noble James at the Temple, birthday gifts for our Nobles when present that H. Thompson, dated March 25, 1888, stating that the name Month, dances, trips and yearly attendance prizes. "Morocco" had been approved by the Imperial Council and Morocco Temple has 26 Uniformed Units and 28 Shrine that all of Florida, Georgia, and Alabama would be in Morocco's Clubs. All are very active and bring credit to the Temple wherjurisdiction. Morocco Temple's dispensation was dated March ever they are on display. 28, 1888. The date of the Charter is June 25, 1888. In Florida, from Morocco Temple came Egypt Temple in
The home of Morocco had varied locations from its incep- 1918 and from Egypt Temple came Araba Temple in Fort Myers, tion until its building program was begun in 1910and completed in 1967. In 1922, Mahi Temple war formed from Morocco jurisin 1912 at its present location at Newnan and Monroe Streets. diction in Miami, as was Bahia Temple in Orlando, in 1955; and The first Unit of the Temple was the Arab Patrol, organized in last in Florida, from Moroccowas the formation of Hadji Temple 1911. It took over the duties of handling candidates throughout in Pensacola. All of these Temples have a total membership as of the Second Section and also performed in precision drills, ex- January 1, 1976 of 36,256 members. hibitions, and parades. In 1913, the first Morocco Band was In Georgia, Morocco Temple first gave jurisdiction to organized. Yaarab Temple in Atlanta in 1890; in 1897 from Yaarab in Atlanta
We were very active in the First World War assisting in came Alee Temple in Savannah and from Alee Temple came "Liberty Band" and "Red Cross Drives" and in "home guard Hasan Temple in Albany. From Yaarab Temple came Al Sihah units." Temple in Macon. These Temples have a membership as of
In 1919, at Chicago, the Shrine Directors Association was January 1, 1976 of 22,708.
formed. Two of our Past Potentates, Hal H. Rush and T. K. In Alabama, Zamora Temple in Birmingham was first charStokes, Jr., have served as their President; Rush is now its tered in 1891; then Abba in Mobile in 1903; then Alcazar in Secretary. In 1921, the Shrine Recorders Association was or- Montgomery in 1914 and a new one in Huntsville, Cahaba Temganized. Morocco Temple has always been an active part in pie in 1971. Total membership in Alabama in 1976 is 12,281. both of these organizations. One can easily tell Morocco Temple has quite a heritage in
Morocco Temple sponsors annual Clinics in Jacksonville these three States. From its organization by about 20 members where crippled children from our jurisdiction, who are appli- in Jacksonville in 1888 to a total in Florida of 36,256, Georgia cants and out-patients of our hospitals, can have examinations 22,708, and Albama 12,281, or a grand total in the three States of by Orthopedic Surgeons from our Greenville, South Carolina 71,245 members and a total of 13 Temples. Hospital. The Black Camel Fund composed of members of Morocco
In 1923, the Chanters Unit was organized, as was the Drum Temple, was organized in 1922 to bring financial relief to and Bugle Corps. In 1929 came the Saxtette, and in 1934 the widows and dependents when death enters the home. Many, famed Morocco Wrecking Crew which at that time took over many times the funds are delivered the very next day after the handling of candidates in the Second Section, was or- notification. ganized. The fraternal and benevolent side too, is that you are makMorocco Temple has been active in the work of the Imper- ing a small contribution when a brother Noble is called to the ial Council and also in the Southeastern Shrine Association, Great Beyond. both of which meet annually. Jacksonville and Morocco Temple The contribution you must make for each death of a have hosted the S.E.S.A. Convention many times, and all who member belongingto this Fund is $1.10. The 10cents is used for have come here want to come back. Some of our Past Poten- the entire operation ofthe Fund, and the $1.00 is contributed to tates have worked through the chairs of Vice Presidents to serve the beneficiary of the deceased member. A statement is mailed as President of the Southeastern Shrine Association. Another of each month listing the members who have passed during the our Past Potentates served through the offices of the Imperial last thirty day period and gives the total amount due the Fund Council and only sudden death by two months prevented his for that period of time. This statement means that amount has election to the office of Imperial Potentate. The honor of Hon- been paid out for you and you are merely reimbursing the Fund. orary Imperial Potentate Roland D. Baldwin was extended him The members of the Fund are stricly on a voluntary basis, and at that Session of the Imperial Session in July 1951. We have has grown to a membership of nearly 3,800. another Morocco Temple Past Potentate in the Imperial line
who this year (1976) is serving as Imperial Oriental Guide, Illus- W. LAWRENCE JACKSON, Recorder
trious Randolph R. Thomas.




Randolph R. Thomas
All




Pilgrimage Committee
.....n
.40,
Bob Craig Ebb Sistrunk Ed Scott Ed Turner
Chairman Chairman Emeritus Vice Chairman Secretary
Pilgrimage Committee Pilgrimage Committee Pilgrimage Committee Pilgrimage Committee
L. D. VanBenschoten Orien Pass William "Bill" Bridger John Carter
Treasurer Chairman Finance Committee Finance Committee
Pilgrimage Committee Finance Committee Pilgrimage Committee Pilgrimage Committee
Pilgrimage Committee




Past Potentates
I9
William A. McLean Otis L. Keene Benjamin H. ChadwickThomas G. Hutchinson William M. Bostwick Dr. Charles W. Johnson
1892 1893 1894 to 1897 1899 to 1913 1914 1915
Harry B. Roberts William R. Stechert Arthur Y. Milan Ernest E. McLin Lauriston G. Moore Thomas E. Jordan
1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921
Harry B. Holt Giles L. Wilson John Chandler Reynolds Edward J. Burke Dr. Paul R. Davis Louie W. Strum
1922 1923 1924 to 1925 1926 1927 1928
0 'V
William E. Sweney Ben S. Weathers Dr. M. B. Herlong George W. Parkhill Thomas C. Imeson William T. Dow
1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934
IO
George C. Blume Frank W. Norris Roland D. Baldwin George H. Hodges Robert H. McMillan W. M. McCrory
1935 to 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941




T. G. Buckner JD. Kennedy T. T. Phillips Alfred Miller Norman C. Edwards H. R. Fretwell
1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946
y?
Paul C. Tanner W. Fred Cobb Warren L. Jones Wilbur W. Masters, Jr. George Tobi Dr. John R. Owens
1946 1947 1948 1949 1953 1954
i .......
James L. Ingram Leon Forbes Erwin T. Brooks Olen Fletchall Hal H. Rush John M. Hardy
1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960
1
Horace Graham J. Wendell Fargis Joseph H. Riggs Thomas E. Taylor Frank Winchell Wilford C. Lyons, Sr.
1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966
Ollie B. Nail Randolph R. Thomas T. K. Stokes, Jr. Richard 0. Hardage John Thomas Rouse, Jr. John Jelinek 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972




Wilford C. Lyons, Jr. Harold A. Martin John Ek Bill Maddox J. R. Hall, Jr.
1973 1974 1975 1976 1977
Chairman of the First Annual Project
Noble Craig has served with the Pilgrimage Committee five years; in 1977 and 1978 he was elected to the Chairmanship of the Committee. He is a Past President & Life Time Member of the Beaches Shrine Club, Past Captain of the Provost Guard, Ambassador At Large, Recipient of the 1974 Individual Southeastern Provost Guard Award, Past Chairman of the S.E.S.P.A. for 1976. A member of the Arlington Shrine Club, Lifetime Member of the Wesconnect Shrine Club, Ambassadors Association. Noble Craig holds Honorary Membership in the Wrecking Crew and Gay Ninety Units of Morocco Temple. He is Past Chairman and President of several civic and fraternal organizations and holds various awards and plaques for outstanding and distinguished services rendered.
Noble Craig has been a member of Morocco Temple since 1962, a member of the Provost Guard for fifteen years. A Scottish Rite Mason and a member of Ribault Masonic Lodge #272 for twenty-seven years.
Noble Craig has resided in Duval County, Florida since 1940 and has lived in the beaches area for thirty years, coming from Tampa, Florida. He is married to the former Dollie C. Gore and they have three daughters.
Noble Craig is the owner of Affiliated Polygraph Services in The First Annual Project was presented to the Pilgrimage Jacksonville, Florida. Prior to this, he was a Security Director Committee Officers in the Spring of 1978. The Chairman, Bob and Consultant for several large companies and corporations in Craig and the officers thought this to be a very worthwhile the southeast. He served on the police department as a Captain endeavour for the eleven thousand members of Morocco Temple and was Chief Deputy Constable for the Fifth District amountand every three years henceforth. ing to twenty-two years in law enforcement. He served honoraThe Annual was presented to Illustrious Potentate Charles bly in combat zones in the Navy during World War 11 and three Gunter and he agreed it would be in harmony with the 90th years in the Army Reserve Unit. birthday of the temple. This met with his approval wholeheartedly. Noble Craig has dedicated this 1978 Annual To Morocco Noble Craig decided to make this his personal contribution to Temple in its Glorious Ninety years of fabulous history, to all of the Morocco Temple Pilgrimage Committee, Uniformed the Nobility, past, present, and future. Especially to those noUnits, Shrine Clubs, and General Nobility and undertook the bles who have served so faithfully and fervently in making-1978 a Chairmanship personally. Banner Year for Morocco Temple.




)Iolrocco
SJJArl"C U"itS




Circus Activities
A,
Left to Right: Ernest Lea, Business Manager, Bob Craig, Pilgrimage Committee Chairman; Ed Scott, Vice
0 1
7
Left to Right: Bob Craig, Chairman Pilgrimage Committee; Bill Left to Right: Morocco's Giant 8 Foot Fez; Ernest Lea, Business Manager. Ed Kaye, Circus Promoter. Scott, Vice Chairman Pilgrimage Committee; Bob Craig, Chairman Pilgrimage
Committee; Orien Pass, Chairman Finance Committee.
Left to Right: Bob Craig, Chairman Pilgrimage Committee; Luther Cooper, Honorary Ring Master, Ernest Lea,




Activity Committee
The Activity Committee was formed in 1970 under the lead- We have progressed each year in sales and we are now a ership of Noble Leon Frank; to be working Unit of the Pilgrim- well organized Unit, under the leadership of Noble Bob Craig, age Committee. Our duties are to sell jewelry at all Ceremonies Chairman Pilgrimage Committee and Noble J. D. King, Chairand novelties at the Circus. We were allowed seven (7) mem- man of the Activity Committee. bers. We did not fill our quota of members until this year.
1978
Arab Patrol
0#
- 1b ,
'0t I.,




Bally Hoo
Standing Left to Right: J. 0. Douberly, Bill Collier, Buck Carter, Jim George Sprouse, Archie Batchelor, Sonny Anderson. Absent from picHitt, Ken Sowers, Robert Miller. Kneeling Left to Right: Leon Sikes, ture: Pete Maliniak, Jack Solomon, Porter Johns.
Capers
During the early summer of 1972 the Illustrious Potentate Within a few short years the formation of similar units has Johnny Jelinek stated he would like to see within Morocco spread to many temples throughout North America. The CarTemple a new unit which would appeal to children of all ages toon Capers of Morocco Temple have won the distinct honor of a nursery rhyme unit. Six weeks later on August 18, 1972 five being the first official Cartoon Caper unit in Shrinedom. cartoon characters made their debut on the streets of Ocala. It The Capers have proven to be one of the most hard workwas the birth of a "Bunch of Animals." Since that eventful day ing and fun loving units and have certainly become an exciting the Cartoon Capers have grown to twenty-eight different addition to Morocco Temple. characters.




Chanters
Rich in tradition, the Chanters was one of the first units to convention held there of the Mystric Shrine and was chosen to be organized in Morocco. Their participation in the Morocco sing on Tom Brenomen's "Breakfast with Sardi." Also it was the Temple All Star Minstrels brought top dollar in funds for the first term as Mayor for Chanter Brother, Hayden Burns, who Temple. Many of Morocco Temple Potentates belonged to the debated with the Mayor of Los Angeles and came out on top. Chanters, with outstanding Nobles also. Each year, the Chan- Our present recorder, W. Lawrence Jackson, is also a former ters sing for various civic organizations and at Christmas time Chanter. So, under the leadership of our President, Welmer for the senior citizens. We still have one member who has been Grage, and with new ideas coming up every day, we hope that active for 41 years, Noble E. H. (Teddy) Henson, who was Vice our future will be in keeping with our past activities. President in 1937. In 1950 the Chanters visited Los Angeles at the
FRONT ROW.- Left to Right Waterman, A. T.; Bowman, R.; Grage, H. B., Jr.; Nicols, W. H.; Shoemaker, P. D.; Randall, H. F.; Walker, C. W.,
W.; Roberts, R. R.; Spicer, 0. M., Jr.; Dyer, T. M. MIDDLE ROW." Left to Sr.; Hadley, F. M., Jr.; Womble, L. A. NOT IN PICTURE Barber, R. W.;
Right Byrd, B. C.; Johnson, L. A.; Camett, F. W., Sr.; Jesnes, I.; Doro, W. T.; Henson, E. H.; Kirk, F. A.; McDougall, R. W.; Ridge, G. W.;
Langston, C. D., Jr.; West, D. R.; BACK ROW: Left to Right Chafin, M. Rocher, R. F., Skinner, T.; Wells, R. J.; Ogier, D. E.




Cyclones
.M2M
1'AL
ow
The Cyclones of Morocco Temple are a twelve man unit Indianapolis, Indiana, and Atlantic City, New Jersey.
dedicated to supporting the Temple in all endeavors promoting The Captains listed chronologically are 1968 Vernon Stacy; the Shrine however and wherever the Potentate may direct. 1969 Fred Ammes; 1970-1971 John Koons; 1972 Buck Shiver; Besides selling circus ads, Shrine candy, football programs, and 1973 James Waits; 1974 Lewis Perry; 1975 John Howell; 1976 Bob circus tickets, we have also donated blood supporting the Kerr; 1977 Dick Hunt; and 1978 Emory Holsenbeck. Shrine Blood Bank Program. Every year most Cyclones work all In order to cement the bonds of fellowship even stronger, five shows at our Shrine Circus. All is not Temple work. Be- the Cyclones are the most fortunate to have their families totally tween times we ride motorcycles in parades and practice con- committed in our support. We have the usual dinners or socials tinuously. We fill the middle weight division riding Honda 500 at members' homes -swimming parties -picnics tubing cc cycles. Ourcdominant color is red accented by black orwhite. parties and fish fries. Also it is a regular family get-together at
The idea began back in 1967 when South Jacksonville our "hospitality affairs" during ceremonials and conventions. Shrine Club needed a flashy group to represent them in Our Christmas parties have become annual feast almost hosted parades. This was the era of Metropolitan Shrine Clubs. By early by the Poteet and Hughes family. Incidentally being a family 1968 the Cyclones were motorized on white Honda 160 cc cy- unit you would expect and find among our membership cles. Our first parade was in Mac Clenny, Florida honoring our brothers such as Emert and Floyd Poteet as well as a fathier-sonl Imperial Sir-Randy Thomas. Then in 1970, we petitioned the combination Buck and Jeff Shiver. Other members not previTemple and were placed on probation status. Complete full ously named are Richard Byerly, Orris Hughes, Howard Temple unit acceptance did not come till late 1972. Kaminee, Bill Nolan, C. J. Powell, Dick Hunt, Emory HolsenThis unit has participated in conventions from Toronto, beck, and William Wilson. As a unit now over ten years old, we Canada to Miami, Florida including Kansas City, Missouri, and have become one of Morocco Temple's most colorful Memphis, Tennessee. We enjoyed Atlanta, Georgia several motorized and helpful units. times, attended Nashville, Tennessee, Orlando, Florida, and




Drum and Bugle Corps
MR0FoG TEMPLE 0
Ao1IL
In the year 1923 the Morocco Temple Drum Corps was when Roy T. Lord was Potentate. Glockenspiels or bell lyres organized, with a charter membership of fifteen. were added in 1955. In 1962a big, sixfoot drum on a carriagewas
When this unit was originally formed Morocco member- added and is sometimes put in parades. The first drum major ship was hesitant to join; but it is interesting to note that after was Frank Clark; the present drum major is Herbert Weeks. the 1st Imperial Council Convention in Los Angeles back in The Corps did not grow and expand membership until after 1925, when all expenses were paid, the general Nobility evinced the depression days, and after World War 11. At the conclusion a marked increase in interest to join this organization. of World War I the Corps stepped up its social activities and it
Between 1925 and 1949 the Corps experienced many was during this time that a waiting list was necessary for memdiffficulties as well as many pleasant experiences. Surmounting bership. the difficulties and surviving the pleasant experiences the The Morocco Drum & Bugle Corps has traveled far and Corps continued to progress. Membership was increased, wide; from Toronto to Key West and from New York to Califorbugles were added, and the Corps assumed the title of Morocco nia. For the corps success is habitual, fellowship is natural, and Temple Drum & Bugle Corps. The bugles were added in 1950 acclaim is our goal.




First Aid
*
Funsters History
FRONT ROW: Rex Altman, SNAPPY Higgenbotham, PEANUTS Cox, THIRD ROW: JINGLES Winstead, WEE T Locker, GRUMPY Kogge, CUDCHUCKLES Field, BUSTER Macomber, WORMEY Colson, RAGS Voght, DLES Smallwood, TANK Tankersley, JOLLY Williams, POP POP Benz. DOC Bridger, CHOO CHOO Dowling, PEE WEE MILLER. SECOND PICTURE SHY: FRECKES Anderson, CANDY Jones, BOBO Montgomery, ROW: SWEET PEA Brannen, PETE THE PIRATE Brown, FLASH Hileman, TOBY Toban, SOLO Shapiro, FREDDIE Smith, DIMPLES Doss. GUSTO Bass, SPOTTIE Griffith, HAPPY Brooks, GOO GOO Mattox.
The Funsters Unit was born out of the Hospitality Unit in The original charter of the Funsters called for 15 members. 1957, and in 1958 was admitted as an official unit of Morocco Of the first 15 members, the following are still active: Buster Temple for the purpose of furnishing wholesome entertain- Macomber, Tank Tankersley and O'Neal Mattox. O'Neal was ment to the nobility and general public. one of the first Presidents of the unit and served in that capacity




for four consecutive years. The following past presidents are tending all Temple functions, working at the Circus for all perstill active and very much a working part of our unit. O'Neal formances, and attending any other functions that our PotenMattox, Cliff Kogge,William R. Bridger, Russell Macomber, Von tate might request of our unit. In addition to participation in Voght, Don Winstead, Charles Williams. required functions, many members of our unit attend many
In 1958 the Southeastern Shrine Clown Association was civic functions on a voluntary basis.
formed with the Morocco Funsters being one of the charter 1975 was a year of many honors and awards for the Funsters members. Since becoming a member of SESCA, the Funsters Unit. For the first time in the history of the Funsters, the first have won numerous trophies. place or "Number One" unit award was claimed at both the
In 1968 the Funsters entered the newly formed National National Convention in Toronto, Canada and the Southeastern Clown Association and in 1969 was named the number one Convention in Orlando. This is quite an accomplishment for clown unit in all of Shrinedom at the national convention in our unit. Seattle, Washington. In the past ten years the Funsters have never failed to return
Since 1957, The Funsters have increased in size to our from competition a winner. This can be attributed to the present membership of 25 regular members and 6 probationary enthusiasm, dedication and hard work of each and every members with several applications for membership on file. member who make up the Funsters Unit.
Some of the many duties required of the Funsters are atGay 90's
!I W
i 4 m: ........
..............




Highlanders
The Highlanders were chartered in 1962 as a Temple Unit. 1966............................... Dudley D. McKinlay
There were eight charter members and the Unit still has one 1967...................... .............. Harry Mangles
active charter member today (Dudley D. McKinlay). 1968................................ William D. Watson
The Unit had only one musical instrument which was a 1969............................... Robert W. McDaniel
saxophone, and the uniforms were not even thought of at the 1970 ....................................... Jim Hagan
time. In due time the Temple supplied the necessary bagpipes 1971 .................................. Harold Johnston
and drums as they were needed. The first uniforms consisted of 1972 ................................. Charlie Davidson
a kilt which was made by some of the members' wives and white 1973............................... Richard C. Davis, Sr.
shirts bought by the members. 1974 ..................................... John Boyette
The Unit continued to make progress and in 1970 the mem- 1975................................... P. L. Kicklighter
bers along with help from the Pilgrimage Committee bought 1976.................................. William McConn
complete uniforms from Scotland. The tartan (McNicol) was 1977................................... C. 1. Kicklighter
selected for the kilts and plaids along with the other accessories 1978 ....................................... Wiley Hart
common to a complete uniformed Highlander. The Highlander Unit's Drum Major is Ian (Scotty) Milloy
The Highlander Unit is a member of the Southeastern who is well qualified since he has been leading and directing Shrine Pipe Band Association and has been since it was char- pipe bands in Scotland and the United States for many years. tered. The Highlanders have represented Morocco Temple at Today the Highlander Unit of Morocco Temple is recogall Southeastern and Imperial conventions since they were nized as an example to follow in producing bands for champiformed and have many trophies which were won in competi- onship competition. tion. The Highlanders have performed at the Shrine Circus and The Highlander Unit in perspective Good Fellowship, have received national recognition in CIRCUS REPORT. Social relations and congeniality. A Unit of Great Pride, Dignity
The Past Presidents from the beginning are: and merit. Proud to represent apart of the Heritage of Scotland
1962 and 1963............................... Al Mitchell in Morocco Temple.
1964 and 1965............................ Kenneth Lamb




Honor Guard
South Side Shrine Club
CU *
History of the Morocco Temple Horse Patrol
The Morocco Temple Horse Patrol was organized on May8, and Treasurer and served two terms in that position.
1964. The Charter members consisted of seven (7) of the finest The first parade was held in Perry, Fla. at the Pine Tree men who ever wore shoe leather: Jim Mott, Dallas Thomas, Festival. That was truly and event. Tom Pionessia, Harold Haimowitz, Gibbes Vincent and Dr. The members, member wise, has fluctuated from seven (7)
Johnson. to twenty-two (22). They were a grand group to associate with
Tom Pionessia was elected the first Captain of the Unit and and it was a one for all and all for one. served a bobtailed term. Gibbes Vincent was elected Secretary




Hospitality
The historical background of this unit began in 1947 when and prestige within the 20 uniformed units of the temple. Many Potentate W. Fred Cobb appointed Noble Ralph Williams to of our former members continue to serve in important leaderhead a committee of 24 members to be known as the Hospitality ship functions within the temple, including our current potenCommittee to perform greeting and other hospitality functions tate, Charles Gunter. The Hospitality Unit is proud of its historifor the membership of Morocco Temple. This committee con- cal background and pledges to continue to serve our great tinued to function with expanding duties until 1965, when Morocco Temple. Potentate Frank Winchell approved "Unit" status for the committee. The current membership consists of 25 regular and 10 Historian Committee: Ch. Ceilon Rentz, Hershell Lee, Dick probationary members. The unit continues to grow in functions Harlan, John Clarke.
The above picture shows the 1978 membership of the Hospitality Unit. Cooper, Cliff Register, Harold Taylor, Ben Davis, Jack Heard, and Leon From left to right are: FIRST ROW: B. J. Bjorkman, Herschell Lee, Don Hedrick. FOURTH ROW: Wilbur Towsend, Bill Vogel, Bill Snead, Larry Harjung, Harris Bolin, Harry McDowell, and Dick Harlan. SECOND Clayton, Frank Kodatt, and George Yancey. NOT SHOWN: Sam BozeROW: Ceilon Rentz, Luther Cooper, D.F.C. Robertson, Cecil Mathis, Bill man, Gaston Dickens, Axel Economou, Curtiss Carter, George Lantz, Hughes, Percy Baker, and Rocky Roquemore. THIRD ROW: George Hiron Peck, and Bob Smith.




Hot Sparks
I7
Standing -Left to Right: Tony Rogers, Bill Kelly, Potentate, Thomas, Junior White, Buddy Williams. Charles D. Gunter, Mike Feit. Kneeling Left to Right: Lewis
Legion of Honor
Morocco Temple Legion of Honor had its conception when Treasurer -C. Cecil Irwin J. Wendell Fargis, then Assistant Rabban of Morocco Temple, Chaplain -Hugh P. Davis talked to the National Commander of the National Association Historian -Armand Dufresne of the Legions of Honor at the Imperial Shrine Session at Den- The attendance and interest of about fifty prospective ver, Colorado in 1960 about forming a Legion of Honor in members more than compensated for the many long hours Morocco Temple. No action was taken until 1962 when Noble spent by the committee under the watchful direction of the Fargis met with Noble Frank C. Gusky to talk seriously about the Divan. Here the Legion of Honor was born. matter. Installation of officers was carried out on 23 October 1963,
In 1963 Illustrious Potentate Joseph Riggs took definite Southeastern Shrine Association Legion of Honor Commander action on the formation of the Legion of Honor and an applica- Frank Hadden, Jr. and First Vice Commander Edward Morrison tion was in the March issue of the "Nashra."' presided at the Ceremonies.
From the overwhelming response of the application by During the Diamond jubilee celebration of Morocco Temactive duty or former service men holding honorable dis- pie, National Lt. Commander A. D. Cone presented to Illustricharges who were members of the Shrine, a meeting was called ous Potentate Joseph Riggs a certificate dated 15 November by the Divan and held in May of the sameyearwith the following 1963 membership of the Legion of Honor into the National Nobles: Hugh P. Davis, Frank C. Gusky, C. Cecil Irwin, Edward Association of the Legions of Honor and an American flagwhich R. Moore, C. W. Shiver, Jr. and Robert Weiss. Noble Frank C. had been flown from our Nation's Capitol, Washington, D.C. Gusky was appointed chairman of the Committee to organize The Legion of Honor since its formation has taken an active and bring into reality a dream of three years. part in all Temple activities and takes great pride in being the
After drawing up a suggested constitution and By-Laws that official Color Guard at all Temple functions.
met the approval of the Divan the first meetings was called on 22 In 1964 elections were conducted and the appointed offiOctober 1963. At this meeting Illustrious Potentate Joseph Riggs cers were elected to a regular term of office. appointed the following Officers. Commanders who have served the Legion of Honor since
Commander Frank C. Gusky its establishment are as follows:
Vice Commander Robert Weiss 1963 -Frank C. Gusky (appointed)
Adjutant C. W. Shiver, Jr. 1964- Frank C. Gusky 0




1965 Robert Weiss D 0 No longer a Member
1966 Clayton A. Shiver, Jr. 0 PSEC Past SESA LOH Commander
1967 Floyd G. Yeager PSEC 1969-70 The Legion of Honor throughout its existence has entered
1968 -Charles C. Irwin all Southeastern Shrine Associations Legions of Honor competi1969 William D. Hendricks tive events always ranking high in the standings.
1970 Donald A. Nelson PSEC 1974-75 Many of its Nobles have served in offices of the SESA
1971 Alvin R. Butler Legions of Honor from Commander through appointed posi1972 John S. Kemp D tions, also in appointive offices in the National Association of
1973 Haven A. Morrison D the Legions of Honor.
1974 -Alvin P. Beckman Contributions to the Crippled Childrens Fund is the
1975 Thomas A. Darby foremost project of the Legion of Honor. Large contributions
1976 John W. Baird are made annually.
1977 James A. Hogan This is the Legion of Honor of Morocco Temple comprised
1978 W. A. Bud Johnson of a Marching Team and a Degree Team, serving the Temple
D Deceased faithfully in all duties, but primarily in the patriotic functions.
MOROCCO TEMP L E
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Mini's
Motorcycle Escort
Morocco Temple Motorcycle Escort was organized in the Ed Corley, a member for 30 years is also an honorary member. early 1920's, at that time it was under the Patrol, there were only The next oldest member is Lester A. Yeomans, accepted in the four members. In 1949 the membership was raised to six mem- Escort in 1949, and still active in the Unit. In 1955 there were six bers. It was suggested that the escort be put under the Wreck- more accepted in the Unit, as of this date, the membership has ing Crew. The members of the Escort met with the Potentate been increased to 20 members. and Wrecking Crew; every one was in agreement that the Es- Up through 1965 the Temple owned all motors, and in 1967 cort should have their own Unit. As of this date, we have each member bought his own motor and maintains the up keep Elbert Whitman who has been in the Temple for 56 years and of each. rode 40 years in the Escort, and is an honorary member today.




G) _A)
Front Row Left to Right: Gary Pickren, Lester Yeomans, Bob Andrews, Dill, J. L. Fussell, Willie Scott. Henry Howard. Second Row -Left to Right: Ed Scott, Bob Adams, Wayne
Oriental Band
For a period of fifteen years Morocco Temple was without the unusual musical instruments we play make a combination the services of an Oriental Band. But in 1956 a group of in- that has helped us arouse crowd enthusiasm wherever we go. terested Shriners formed the nucleus of what was to be an We have produced one potentate, two past presidents of outstanding organization. the S.E.S.O.B.A., one past president of the A.S.O.B., and one
Our first parade was in Lake City during our spring cere- member currently the fourth vice president of the A.S.O.B. monial in 1957. This was not an occasion to cause us to feel the Richard Hardage is the potentate, the late Harry Maddox was flush of success, but it gave us much needed experience and past president of the S.E.S.O.B.A. and the A.S.O.B. George enabled us to make a creditable showing later in the year in Hewell is a past president of the S.E.S.O.B.A. and is now fourth Atlanta at the Southeastern Shrine Association Convention. vice president of the A.S.O.B. However, our greatest thrill was to be at our first Imperial Although we Oriental Bandsmen greatly enjoy the fellowparade in Chicago the following year. ship and the pilgrimages to distant places, we never lose sight of
Throughout the years, our band has been blessed with our purpose for being Shriners; namely, the rehabilitation and outstanding and dedicated leadership which has enabled us to saving lives of crippled and burned children, and all our efforts put together an entertaining and crowd pleasing unit while are so directed. performing in public. A fine drum major, Jessie Keene, has At last count eight charter members are still active, and attracted national attention and our colorful costumes com- twelve of our past presidents are most active members of our plete with gold colored shoes with turned up toes along with band.




44.
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FIRST ROW: Left to Right Fred L. Grigg, Secretary; Norman G. Moore, George C. Cellar, Harold Cherry. FOURTH ROW: Left ro Right William Director; Joseph C. Joyce, Jr., Treasurer; Ralph Blackwell, President; W. Campbell, Jack P. Saam, Bill Nichols, Joseph H. Veates, Gene George H. Hewell, Fourth Vice-President-A.S.O.B.; Harold A. Kelly, Schramel, Ralph E. Hutchinson, Delbert L. Vise, Joe W. Blake, Burton
Chaplain A.S.O.B.; Jesse M. Keene, Drum Major. SECOND ROW: Left to Riley. NOT IN PICTURE: Malcolm C. Hearn, Vice President; Delmar B. Right David B. Ballantine, Tony N. Assaf, L. D. VanBenschoten, L. D. Austin, M. R. Bob Ballantine, Hunter M. Hudgins, James E. Jinright,
Vandegriff, Paul L. Tate, Thomas M. Boyette, Jr. Herman Hesse, George William F. Leslie, Jr., Kenneth C. Ward, J. W. Wolliams, Sam Barkett. LIFE D. Copeland, Jr. THIRD ROW: Left to Right Henry S. Herr, Calvin L. MEMBERS NOT IN PICTURE: Fred Cotton, Richard Hardage, Ralph InBrown, Gerald F. Sweat, John Ballantine, John H. Hennies, W. J. Phillips, glis, Gibson Poole, Clarence Webster.
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Peddlers Temple Photographer
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Joe Tull
Provost Guard
Unofficially, the Provost Guard Unit was formed in the 1950's. Noble H. V. (Tiny) Branch was the sole Provost for the whole temple. The Potentate seeing the need for this unit, then appointed Noble Branch the Captain along with nine original members.
* Noble Branch remained the appointed Captain until the
Provost Guard was made an official part of the Uniform Units of
- Morocco Temple. Noble Branch was elected by his peers as the
first Captain and re-elected successfully for the following eleven years. Upon his retirement as Chief of Detectives for the City of Jacksonville, Florida; after forty-four years of loyal and honorable service, he also retired from the Provost Guard. 3SI : Noble Branch then was elected to Captain Emeritus by the
members and remained with this title until his recent death in 1978. His Fez is on display in the archives of Morocco Temple to honor him as such.
Since the original formation of the nine members, the Photo showing Captain Bob Breckenridge and members of the Morocco Provost Guard has grown to twenty-five regular members and Temple Provost Guard receiving a Unit Citation Trophy at the ten probationary members. This unit serves directly under the Southeastern Shrine Association Meeting, Louisville, Kentucky. Potentate at his will and pleasure and attends and works each




and every function where Morocco Temple Nobles gather. lie Arnold was just recently elected to Fourth Vice President of
Our present Captain is: Calvin Jones, First Lieutenant, the Southeastern Provost Guard. In 1974 this unit was Awarded Charlie Arnold; Second Lieutenant, Buddy Pickett; Secretary, the Most Outstanding Provost Guard Unit of the SESPGA. Past Gene Blackburn; Sergeant-At-Arms, Manning Woodley; and Captain Bob Craig was Chairman of the SESPGA Convention in our Chaplain is Jim Pfeiffer. Nobles McCoy Stanley and Bob 1974 and was Awarded the Most Outstanding Provost Guard Craig are the Pilgrimage Committee members. Member of the year. In 1977 he was elected as Chairman of the
We are honored to have two Past Southeastern Provost Pilgrimage Committee and again in 1978. There are several Guard Presidents: Nobles Tiny Branch and Bob Breckenridge. members who are Past Masters of their Blue Lodge. The Provost
Our Past Captains are: Noble Tiny Branch, Bob Brecken- Guard Unit was awarded the Most Outstanding Unit in the ridge, Emmett Lee, Jim Heard, Heywood Tillman, Crash Carter, SESPGA in 1977 and again in 1978. Russ Godwin, Jim King, Bob Craig, Buddy Bailey and Roger Altho our primary duties as the Police Department of our Koons. Great Temple is to look after the safety and well being of all of
Past Captain Russ Godwin is the Assistant Rabban of the Nobility, we are ever mindful of our Most important funcMorocco Temple and will be our Potentate in 1980. Noble Char- tion ... OUR CRIPPLED AND BURNED CHILDREN.
4r-4
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FIRST ROW: Left to Right McCoy Stanley, Gene Blackburn Secretary, Lawton Morris, George Smith. THIRD ROW: Bob Pace, John Koons, Tom Buddy Pickett Second Lieutenant, Calvin Jones Captain, Charlie King, Levi Starling, Mack Franklin, Ed Emanuel, Curtis Adams, Milt Arnold First Lieutenant, Troy Smith, Clyde Baker, John Johnston, Hugh Graddy, Bill Johnson, John Lacy. FOURTH ROW: Art Sheddan, George Kaiser. SECOND ROW: Gilbert Fennel, Roger Koons, Manning Wood- Boyle, John Foshee, Jim Pfeiffer, Missing from Photo -J. D. Sparkman. ley, Bob Breckenridge, Joe Wall, Gerry Fallin, Bob Craig, Bill Lanier,
Roadrunners




Sidewinders Spitfires




Strummers
'.00
FRONT ROW: left Walter A. Cox, William F. Long, James B. Leggett, Coleman, Walter C. Guetherman, Paul R. Stevens, James E. Wingate, John Justice. SECOND ROW Bill Sherrill, Earl C. Tiffany, Milburn Missing Clarence Brown, Harley D. Giese, Bill Fly. McGinnis, Lee M. Noble. THIRD ROW-James]. Maciejewski, Ephaim L.
Knowing what Shrine-dom stands for and keeping these Wilford C. Lyons, Jr., requesting transfer to the Morocco Temideas in mind, a small group of men in August 15th, 1972 assem- pie with 19 regular and 5 probationary members. bled and began to shape up a unit. Being members of the July23rd, 1972sawthe Strummers moving into the Temple Wesconnet Shrine Club they naturally needed their sanction as a recognized Unit. The Chairman of the group, Noble Earl which was freely given and helped to lay the ground work for Boocks became the first President but because of illness had to the Unit that was later to be called the "STRUMMERS." step down. Noble James Maciejewski finished out the year as
With due consideration for other organizations the temporary president and was elected for the full term in 1973. Strummers adopted the American musical instrument, "5 String Jacksonville Beach in November of 1972 saw the initiation Banjo," and the Revolutionary period dress suit became the of the Strummers as a Parade Unit, and they have been seen on official parade uniform. For the work uniform, the Banjo, in parade ever since, demonstrating their good-will from Orlando gold and white was embossed on the back of a coal black jump Florida to Toronto, Canada. suit, leaving no doubt in anyone's mind what unit the members To date, of the original 12 charter members, Nobles Walter belong to. Guetherman, James Maciejewski, Paul Stevens and Earl Tiffany
On May 15th, of 1973, with permission from the Wesconnet are still parading as strong as ever and enjoying all the funcShrine Club a letter was written to the Illustrious Potentate, Sir tions.




Transportation
U
--ago




Wrecking Crew
The Ceremonials of Morocco Temple and those of many was named Director. Many of the stunts that he created were other Shrine Temples were for a number of years often staged used for many years. He was followed by Roland Speas who by a committee chosen by the Potentates. Many times the stunts brought national recognition to the Crew. When Roland left the were improvised at the last minute and they were sometimes City, Hal H. Rush became the Director. The Crew responded to crude and disorganized. This situation led to the formation of his great leadership and became an outstanding Unit. When Hal the Shrine Directors' Association, a national organization, with advanced on the Divan, T. K. Stokes was named Director and the purpose of improving the quality of the Second Sections. proved a good one. When T. K. advanced on the Divan, W. F.
Morocco Temple's Ceremonials were conducted for the Johnston was named Director and the Crew has had many fine most part by a group drawn largely from the Patrol. The late J. years since that time and has given Morocco Temple manygreat Dillon Kennedy became active in the group and later directed it. Second Sections. After attending a Shrine Directors' Association he saw the need While the Director is an appointed member of the Divan, of Morocco Temple having a Unit solely responsible for the the Members of the Crew are volunteers from the Temple Second Section and the Wrecking Crew was created. It was to membership. They come from diverse backgrounds and posbe a group having talents to create, ability to produce, and sess varied talents. They blend into a smoothly working team, experience to conduct a Second Section. combining experience and freshness to provide a smooth and
When 'J.D.' had to relinquish this activity, N. R. Peterson entertaining Ceremonial of fun and good taste.
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Noble Luther Cooper
Luther Cooper receives plaque for Most Circus Ad Sales and Gold Whistle as Honorary Ring Master for The Morocco Temple 1978 Shrine Circus with a purpose. Charles D. Gunter Potentate 1978.
4 Noble Cooper has won these awards every year for the past five years.
A
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Noble Rex Sweat
Rex Sweat grew up as a South Georgia, Camden County farm boy. Seven days after the United States declared war on Germany, he enlisted in the infantry. Not long afterward, he was in France where he had been assigned to Co.B, 106th Engineers, 31st Dixie Division.
Sweat proudly served the Jacksonville area as sheriff for 25 years. Sweat rode to victory election after election on a crest of popularity and political sharpness for a quarter of a century. He faded from the public eye and into retirement after his defeat in 1956. Sweat naturally has aged a bit since he left office in the late 1950's, but he still has the easy going, friendly personality that once had him on a first-name basis with state and national political figures. His law enforcement career officially spanned some 36 years.
A couple of hours spent with Rex Sweat is a 50-year step back into history, back to the days when Atlantic Boulevard was the Beach Road, a bumpy, dusty route to the seashore.
In honor of Noble Rex Sweat, a popular member of Morocco Temple.




.40rocco
Tc"ivjc
sjrjI*"c clubs




Baker County
Thousands lined the main thoroughfare as the shriners brought on their oriental splendor of Bands, Motor Bikes and Scottish Kilts in the lengthy parade that led the crowds out to the Ball Field.
Once there, they heard Judge Warren Jones of Jacksonville trace the history of the shrine and tell how the New Baker County Shrine Club will fit into the activities of the Morocco Temple.
One of the Shrine's major activities was then visibly revealed from the stands where Douglas Thrift, 3 years old of Macclenny, stood on his crutches and watched the ceremonies. Crippled from a very early age he had learned to walk through the help of one of the Shrine's 26 hospitals for crippled children and victims of burns in North America. Afterwards a delicious Southern Fried Chicken Dinner was served.
This year being the 10th anniversary of the Baker County Macclenny is the county seat for Baker County, only thirty Shrine Club we showed appreciation to our first President, miles west of Jacksonville and Morocco Temple with which the Ambassador at Large Noble W. A. Kirsopp. Noble Wilf Kirsopp Baker County Shrine Club is affiliated. For years the only high- was one of our hardest working nobles to get the Baker County way leading west from Jacksonville was the old highway 90, but Shrine Club started. Each year the club has tried to have a since the late fifties when Interstate 10 opened up it has made money making project going to raise money for our (rippled Macclenny a little easier to reach from the big city of Jackson- and burned children. Since Noble Kirsopp's time as President ville. the club has had 10 presidents.
It was on a Saturday afternoon of February the 3rd, 1968, In the year 1972, under the leadership of Noble President that the Baker County Shrine Club was presented a Charter for William E. Lyons our club had another good year of Shrinedom. its club by the Potentate of Morocco Temple, a home town boy Illustrious Potentate Johnny Jelinek of Morocco Temple of Baker County, Noble Randy Thomas. The Charter was pre- brought thousands of folks out to Macclenny for the Baker sented to our First Shrine Club President Noble W. A. Kirsopp in County Shrine Club's annual Southern Fried Chicken Dinner a program finale that officially brought in the 24 charter mem- and Parade. This was a great turn-out for Baker County. This bers of the local club. And it was a big day for Macclenny where same year the Baker County Shrine Club f-"med its own Motor no one could recall having seen such a gathering in town be- Cycle Unit, under the leadership of our first captain Berry Rhofore. During the afternoon, Master of Ceremonies Noble John den. A unit was formed consisting of nine riders and was named J. Crews introduced distinguished guests on hand for the occa- the "Blue Devils." Our ladies are named the Devilettes. sion. They included Senate President Verle Pope of St. Augus- The Blue Devils unit of Baker County Shrine Club has since tine, State Treasurer, Broward Williams of Tallahassee, Senator tried to perform in nearly all Morocco Temple ceremonies and John Mathews, Jr. of Jacksonville, Grand Master John Rouse, Jr. other parades to date. of the Florida Masons, and Roy T. Lord, of Jacksonville, all Membership in our club at this time is approximately 65 ranking officials in the Shrine hierarchy. members.
Beaches Club Directors
R. T. "Rick" Padilla, P.P. 1978 A. "Jack" LeClair C. V. "Chuck" Nugent, P.P. 1976 J. B. "Jim" Adams Jacksonville Beaches G.O0. "George" Folmar
SHRINE CLUB OFFICERS
1979 Past Presidents
T. B. "Bernie" Chastain, President 1946 William S. Gufford* 1964 Bob Saylor
W.H. "Bill" Seldon, 1st V. Pres. 1947 Frank E. Brunson* 1965 Jimmy Milligan
H. H. "Herb" Lewis, 2nd V. Pres. 1948 Clarence Wilkerson 1966 John McCoy
John W. Hall, Sec/Treasurer 1949 Earl H. Lighty* 1967 Robert Craig
T. J. "Ted" Algard, 111, Sgt.-at-Arms 1950 Ronald D. Gray, Jr. 1968 Jessie E. Loper
1951 Ken Hendryx* 1969 Keith Ingle
1952 Linton Floyd* 1970 Gordon Casey
1953 Jack Callahan* 1971 John Gibbs
1954 Dale W. Hendryx 1972 Larry Haines
1955 Herb Patten 1973 Louis Gay
1956 Louie Wellbrock* 1974 0. Murl Smith
1957 Henry Bostick* 1975 Clayton Thompson
1958 Homer Avery* 1976 Charles Nugent
1959 Edward F. Smithers* 1977 A. L. Wilchar
1960 Robert DeBell* 1978 Richard T. Padilla
1961 James H. Smith
1962 Gene Hodges
1963 Claude R. Parker




Fernandina Beach
The Fernandina Beach Shrine Club was organized in 1944 as the Fritz Hobein Shrine Club. There were fifteen charter members. The club was presented with a charter from Morocco Temple in August 1945. It was the fourth club to be chartered by Morocco Temple. The name was changed to the Fernandina Beach Shrine Club in 1958 and has a 1978 membership of 112.
In 1955, with 37 members, the club held its first Annual Bar-B-Q. In that year, Bar-B-Q was served for 11/2 hours as a community service. The club charged only enough to pay for the food. Entertainment was provided by the high school band and by Tracy Russell at the piano. Also, Prof. R. C. Newman entertained with his "astounding feats of magic."
In time, the Bar-B-Q became a fund raising affair for the Shrine Hospitals and in 1964, $600.00 was presented to the Temple for the Crippled Children's Fund. Through the years the Bar-B-Q has grown into an all-day affair (serving from 11:30a.m. to 7:00 p.m.) with a parade of Shrine Units down Centre Street to start things off. In 1977, nearly 3,000 plates of Bar-B-Q were served.
Several years ago another fund raising activity was undertaken. The club operates a Food Booth at the Annual Fernandina sixteen members. This unit participates in many of the parades Beach Shrimp Festival, selling Bar-B-Q sandwiches and cokes. endorsed by Morocco Temple. This activity, together with the Annual Bar-B-Q and Paper Sale, The Club holds a dinner meeting each month and invites raised $10,000.00 for the Shrine hospitals' Fund in 1977. the ladies. Summer meetings are often cook-outs which include
A Shrine Minicar Parade Unit was formed in 1974 with children as well as the ladies.
Flagler County
Back in early 1954 there was a move underway in the Na- Officers for 1978 are: George Horton, President; Flynn tional Shrine Association to incorporate Flagler County into a Edmonson, Vice President; Tom Durrance, Vice President; Jeff new Temple being formed in Orlando-Bahia Temple. Nobles Seale, Treasurer; Robert Weed, Secretary; George Moody, George Wickline, Levi Brannam, Shelton Brooks, John C. Rice, Chaplain. Clarence Shultz, John Botterbusch, R. L. McNab, Stanley Novak, and many other Nobles of Flagler County decided they did not want to become associated with Orlando but rather with Morocco Temple in Jacksonville where so many of their friends belonged. Noble Shelton Brooks spearheaded this group and spent many hours traveling back and forth to Jacksonville and meeting with then Recorder Sparks Jones to formally have Flagler County become a part of Morocco Temple. Finally, in early September 1954, this was accomplished, and on October 1, 1954, the organizational meeting of the Flagler County Shrine Club was held at the Masonic Temple in Bunnell. Charter members were: 0. F. Alford, P. H. Beach, G. L. Biddle, J. H. Botterbusch, Levi Brannam, Shelton Brooks, A. D. Burrows, J. M. Canakaris, H. H. Corley, Ernest Decker, Howard Dolch, L. H. Drady, Talt Endsley, Jack Garcia, Tom Holden, Jimmy Landrum, Jesse Medders, Warren Michaels, George Moody, Sr., R. L. McNab, Stanley Novak, R. A. Powell, John C. Rice, Rudye Shamblen, Clarence Shultz, Raphael Sturman, W. C. Sullivan, Walter S. Toole, Henry Wells, and George Wickline. The officers elected for the charter year were: John C. Rice, President; Flag/er Beach Shrine Club Officers Man Seated Center: George HorGeorge Moody, Sr., 1st Vice President; Henry Wells, 2nd Vice ton, President; Standing Left to Right: Bob Weed, Secretary; Flynn President; Secretary, John M. Canakaris; Treasurer, W. C. Sul- Edmonson, Vice President; Tommy Durrance, Vice President; Jeff Seale, livan and lessee W. Medders, Chaplain. Treasurer.




We
Gadsen
Gainesville
Old Man Father Time gets his nose into almost everything. In 1947 with Noble Earl V. Simpson at the helm, the club His activities are called history now-a-days and that accounts for brought to Gainesville its first Shrine ceremonial in twentythis narrative pertaining to the Gainesville Shrine Club. seven years. Also in 1947 the club sponsored the Morocco
In the beginning there was no Shrine Club but somehow Minstrels, the proceeds of which helped to buy new uniforms and within the hearts of Gainesville area Nobles an idea was for the Gainesville High School Band. The year 1950brought the conceived. Why not fulfill a need by organizing a club as pro- organization of a ladies' auxiliary which flourished until Imvided by Morocco Temple? Why not have club activities here at perial Edict No. 5 of 1954 eliminated it as such. Since then home where we can have social affairs, participate in charitable the ladies have operated without portfolio. endeavors, attend to our business and have fun while doing so? The year 1956 was a banner year for the Gainesville Shrine
The Shrine has often been called a playboy organization. Club. The building which was purchased in 1954 had been This is largely true because the founders of the Shrine wanted a completely renovated and painted on the outside. Much of this romping ground that would keep alive the spirit of the boy in was made possible in 1955 by the fine work of President W. D. man and generate good cheer and fellowship. Yet, its cere- (Pat) Padgett. monies are with purpose, beautiful to watch and with serious Although Noble William R. Steckert, a Gainesville resident intent.
Gainesville area Nobles were given substantial encouragement in 1945 when Potentate Norman C. Edwards of Morocco Temple decided to increase the interest in Shrinedom by creating clubs in outlaying areas of the Temple's jurisdiction. During this year and the following year when Potentate Paul C. Tanner appointed him organizational chairman for the Shrine Clubs, Noble Edwards sponsored twenty-one clubs.
It was on Friday, March 22, 1946, that a gathering of twenty-eight area Shriners, under guidance of Noble R. A. (Gus) Cox, met at the Thomas Hotel for the purpose of organizing a Shrine Club in Gainesville. At this meeting Noble Neal Adams was elected as the first president with Nobles Cox and E. D. Hague serving as vice presidents. Noble T. J. Price was elected secretary-treasurer. On May 15, 1946, the Gainesville Shrine Club received its charter, making it the eleventh club to be organized under Morocco Temple's jurisdiction.
Although the first Wednesday of each month was designated the regular meeting night the club met only upon call by the president for the first several years. At its second meeting a motion was made and passed that "A committee be appointed consisting of Nobles J. C. Adkins, Horace Zetrouer, Gus Cox, E.2 D. Hague and Fred Clayton to investigate the possibility of Gainesville Shrine Club Officers FRONT ROW: Left to Right C. W. securing a location and erecting a club building." It was not Peterson, President; Edwin D. Hartman, First Vice President. BACK until 1954, under the guidance of President E. C. (Curly) Kuehn, ROW: Left to Right George Pringle, Secretary; William R. Samples, Jr., that this objective materialized. Second Vice President.




and a member of Gainesville Lodge No. 41, F. and A. M., passed food mixed with good fellowship. At present ten units are away prior to the formation of the Gainesville Shrine Club, it is available for parades and they are in demand by communities noteworthy that he served as Illustrious Potentate of Morocco throughout North Florida for festive occasions. Temple in 1917 and was the first known non-Jacksonville resi- With a present membership of two hundred and seventydent to be elected Potentate of this Temple. five the Gainesville Shrine Club is very much alive and includes
The club had diversified interests within its ranks. A rather Nobles residing in various communities in the area. Regular large group of Nobles had worked up various crazy cars to be meetings are held on a monthly basis and special functions are used for parade purposes. With this interest at heart, the well attended with social and fund-raising projects in evidence Gainesville Shrine Club Nomads was organized in 1960 and its as the occasion requires. The successive presidents and officers members are those who are implicated in parade units. They have faithfully performed their duties and have laid the meet each month to conduct business affairs and enjoy fine groundwork for a strong and active future.
Gateway Club and Their
Indian Unit
hiam Mattox, who alo holds Gateway Shrine Club membership E W#4Card #1.
k We held our first Fish Fry in September 1977 on Heckscher
were privileged to have had many gospel singers to the delight
.RC( of our supporters and workers. It was a big success.
We had an Easter Egg Hunt, picnics and a Christmas party for the children and several get-togethers for our members and their ladies.
We were able to work with Hollyford Civic Club to have the use of their building on Ford Avenue for our meetings and activities. It is a perfect centrally located club. Our meetings are held the second Friday of each month with a covered dish supper every other month in which our ladies put forth their best efforts and come up with dishes that are superb.
Gateway Shrine Club received their charter in December Our 1978 officers were: J. Daniel Colson, President; Carl P. 1976 and officers were installed at a dinner meeting at the Bryant, 1st Vice-President; Richard Rix, 2nd Vice-President; Bonanza Restaurant. The 1977 elected officers were: Wayne James L. Yankey, Secretary and Glenn Crews, Treasurer. Stout, President; J. Daniel Colson, 1st Vice-President; Carl P. In June of this year, we held our first Bar-B-Que Chicken Bryant, 2nd Vice-President; Paul Binkley, Secretary and Herb dinner and then in October, our second annual Fish Fry. Both McKinney, Treasurer. Installing officer was 1977 Potentate Wil- were again on St. Regis property on Heckscher Drive. We were




again honored with entertainment of the best gospel singing around and at the Fish Fry, the Temple's "Melody Boys" were great entertainment. The Ladies served desserts and sold bazaar items at all of these functions.
Our Indian Unit was formed with the assistance of our lovely ladies. They made and hand-painted the Indian Vests which we wear in the parades. Although our unit is still small, we participated for the first time in the parade at the Spring Ceremonial. Our Indian Chief in all his splendor with his color- L
ful $100.00 headdress, our Indian drummers beating out the rhythm on their war drums, the braves doing their war dance around our mechanical "Little Chief" mascot were a sight to behold. Also our little Indian "Whoop It Up" giving out with his war hoops to let everyone know "The Indians are Coming!" Many compliments were received.
Our Indian Unit also paraded at St. Mary's on the 4th of July and at the ceremonial in Tallahassee in September. We hope to have more "Indians" next year.
Our paper drive was good in 1977 but we more than doubled the amount in 1978.
The collection of aluminum cans was a very successful financial project this year.
All in all, it has been a great two years for Gateway Shrine Cluband the Gateway Indian Unit. But keep youreyeson us, for we are determined to do bigger and better things in the future.
mum
or
A




Gator
Smith and Edward L. Conner, contacts with other nobles and proper authorities a meeting was called on December 1,1961, of all interested Nobles, for the purpose of laying the ground work of organizing a Shrine Club. This was done by accepting a set of by-laws and electing a president and Secretary-Treasurer. Itwas then in order to petition Morocco Temple for a Charter. Present at this meeting were the following: Nobles Robert H. Smith, Edward L. Conner, Donald G. Hagan, Clifford W. Brandies, William P. Dinkle, Paul Berger, Roy L. Wingate, Jr., Lloyd W. Herrin, Frank Ellis, Charles V. Hochrien, Jacob J. Wells, Martin L. Taylor, Hugh F. Stone, Jimmy S. Stevens and Lamar Perdue.
On December 13,1961 a request for issuance of a Charter to the Gator Shrine Club of Callahan was presented to Morocco Temple. After due consideration, Potentate, Horace D. Grahan, with the Divan of Morocco Temple granted the Charter on January 10, 1962. With this act the Gator Shrine Club became a reality.
The Gator Shrine Club was so named because of the historical aspect of the skirmish that took place in the American Revolution of Alligator Creek Bridge on June 30, 1778. Over the past several years it has been the dream of some
Nobles living in the Callahan area for a Shrine Club to be ***The Gator Shrine Club has progressed and has approxiorganized. After many hours of work by Nobles Robert H. (Cap) mately 45 members now.
Keystone Heights Shrine Club Officers Left to Right: Homer B. Sikes, Jr., Second Vice President; Mike Hanks, President; D. A. Thomas, First Vice President; Ray C. Eddy II, Secretary-Treasurer.
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VT




Lake City
The Lake City Shrine Club was organized in January 1950 with 28 charter members; some are active today. Officers of 1950 were:
J. W. Nelson President
0. B. Bradley -Vice President Jack Burgess 2nd Vice President James Niblack Treasurer
J. F. McCall Secretary
J. T. Lipscomb Publicity
This Club has contributed yearly to the Shrine Crippled Children Hospitals ever since it was organized.
The first Shrine Ceremonial held in Lake City was in September, 1953 and this Club can boast of over 200 members today.
Our Nobles meet the second Monday of each month and include our ladies for dinner several times a year.
It is the distinct responsibility of our President to name a Ceremonial after a Noble who has worked for the Club for many years and each Noble named is highly honored.
In 1967, we organized a Mini-Bike Troup and after many started a Building Fund and are requesting each member to give weeks of practice, this Unit paraded with other Shrine Clubs at $10.00 a year so we may own our Club House in the future. the fall Ceremonial held in Jacksonville. The present Officers are as follows:
Our Pan Cake Day has provided approximately a thousand Thomas S. Tramel, Jr. President dollars each year which is donated to the Shriners Hospital George Hunter 1st Vice President Fund. Wilford Croft 2nd Vice President
This Shrine Club meets each second Monday in the month Robert Curtiss Treasurer ina restaurant as we have noclub house at the present. We have Eulyn P. Croft Secretary
MAYO
The Mayo Shrine Club was chartered on April 2, 1945 with thirteen members. Potentate of Morocco Temple at that time was Norman C. Edwards; Treasurer John M. Register and Recorder Hugh B. Cowan. The Mayo Shrine Club's first President was Will Winburn. Today we have six of the original thirteen members still living. The original thirteen members were as follows: Lester Summersill, Robert Mayton, Harlow Land, Thomas E. Taylor, Maurice Folsom, George Breare, Leon Land, Karl Owens, J. W. Winburn, 0. A. Winburn, Bill Birchfield, Mabry Green and Will Winburn. Today we have twenty members in the Mayo Shrine Club and we have had the pleasure of having Thomas E. Taylor, now deceased, Potentate of Morocco Temple for the year of 1964. Mayo Shrine Club was and may still be the smallest Shrine Club in North America. The members of Mayo Shrine Club have had many enjoyable meetings in the Mayo Shrine Club Officers FRONT ROW: Left to Right A. J. King, past years and hope to have many more. President; F. H. Hamlin, Vice President; BACK ROW: Left to Right-L. B.
Sessions, Crippled Children Committee; W. E. Land, Secretary; Harlow H. Land, Treasurer.




Ocala Perry
Putnam County
Starke
Southside
J I
U-.ii~i
7,




Jacksonville
like it was rejected from the junk yard. The lone, ragged buggy evolved into a unit of beautifully built, identical bodied beach buggies called the "Bally-Hoo Buggies."
As the club grew it needed more organization for providing hospitality for its members and other nobles. The need was filled. A group of nobles formed the West Jacksonville Shrine Club Boosters and have been serving the hospitality needs since.
A fire engine and three Nobles provided the last unit of the club. The unit was called the "Hot Sparks." The "Hot Sparks" unit is now a group of custom bodied but non-identical VW autos.
_ Money-raising projects has always been a need of Shrine
Clubs. West Jacksonville Shrine Club was tried most all of them.
Two Nobles of the West Jacksonville Shrine Club developed and invested in the "We Help Crippled Children Walk" The West Jacksonville Shrine Club was chartered in Oc- decal for the club's Crippled Children's fund. The decal sells for tober, 1967. A group of interested and active Shriners chartered a buck and now you see them everywhere. All proceeds go to theclub forthe purposeof fellowship and assistance tocrippled the West Jacksonville Shrine Club's Crippled Childrens Fund. and burned children. After ten years the purpose of the West Two official publications have been used to notify club Jacksonville Shrine Club is still the same, but its scope is much members of meetings and keep them upwith the news. The first larger. The West Jacksonville Shrine Club assists its members with room reservations on out of town junctions, provides social events and a place to congregate for its members during many events. Also the club provides orthopedic shoes and devices for children within the jurisdiction of the club as well as transportation for the children and their families when needed.
The illustrious Nobles who have piloted the club have been so numerous that I won't use names for fear of leaving someone unmentioned. Many unselfish people have contributed time and energy to make The West Jacksonville Shrine Club what it is today.
It was natural that units and committees would grow from our club. The first was the "Roadrunners" on 300cc Honda Dream motorcycles. The unit now rides 850cc Moto Guzis. The second unit was called the "Mini's" and consisted of about 35 Nobles on Fox 4 HP mini bikes. The "Mini's" now ride 50cc Honda trail bikes.
Next came a lone driver of a VW beach buggy that looked




was "The Informer" which was followed by the "West Jax Clubhouse, Pat and Mike's Restaurant and the Londontowne Round-Up." Apts. We now make our home at the Carpenter's Hall.
In the early days a notice was helpful if you wanted to find In short, the West Jacksonville Shrine Club provides its the correct location for a meeting. Some of the club's meeting members with fun, service and identity with the Shrine Ideals. places were Mr. Dees, the Pizza Inn, Lake Shore Jaycees
! 'x
West Jacksonville Shrine Club Officers BACK ROW: Left to Right Tommy McLeod, Secretary; Buck Carter. Treasurer; Ken Sowers, Second Vice President. FRONT ROW: Left to Right Mike Feit, First Vice President; Lewis Thompson. President.
Iv
- Breckenridge
tLeft to Right: Bob Breckenridge; De Ane Breckenridge, Grand Daughter;
Wormey the Clown; Wayne Breckenridge Kena.




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Herb Abbott Robert j. Absher Elbert A. Adams John Lepnard Adams Vernon E. Adams W. 1. Adams Stanley E. Adamson
Hubert E. Aenchbacher, Forrest L. Agnew J. E. Aides, Sr. Robert P. Aitken Denny Albertson
0. E. Albritton
1 H. S. Albury
R. H. Alexander, Ph. D. T. J. Algard Maxwell V. Allen Herbert H. Alley Harvey P. Allison W. I. Allison Howard A. Altman
Millard Altman N. J. Alvarez
-S. L. Amos Daniel Gober Anderson Ire A[ G. L. Anderson
Harold C. Anderson James Hubert Anderson
James W. Anderson Clyde H. Andrews, Sr.
- George B. Apple
Thomas N. Applewhite
-MinusD Armstrong YJ' / George Arnau
R. C. Arnau
Arnold D. Arnett C. E. Arnold Tracey 1. Arpen John Aspinall Toney N. Assaf Robert G. Atwell r ,1OW Eugene T. Austin
Wally Aycock Walter E. Badger E. C. Bailey Henry J. Bailey al Howard L. Bailey
William C. Bailey David R. Baker
Samuel Glenn Baker W. C. Baker William E. Baker John M. Banister George A. Barber Jerry F. Barber [ [ Richard A. Barger




James W. Burnette Jack B. Burns Joe P. Burns, Jr. George F. Bush Jack B. Bush L. E. Butler, Jr. Walter D. Butler '
Birt C. Byrd Burman Byrd John B. Byrd William S. Calbert Elwood C. Caldwell James Franklin Calhoun R. E. Calhoun
Howard Callahan Harold C. Campbell Kenneth R. Campbell /Ruben E. Campbell William David Campbell Philip Cannon Phillip H. Cannon
George Caribaltes A Kam
Al K. Carlisle Glenn E. Carlisle Ron G. Carmichael I L
Frank W. Carnett Carlyon Carroll Grady B. Carroll, Sr.
John A. Carroll Anthony Gregory Carson, Sr. Jesse E. Carter
J. Harold Carter
John Carter
John S. Carter ..
Nathaniel L. Carter, Jr. 44
Paul W. Carter
Robert L. Carter, Jr.
James W. Cartledge, Jr.
Harrison A. Cartwright
James T. Castle
William R. Cesery
James A. Chaffin
Joe H. Chafin
Thomas P. Chaires, Sr.
C. W. Chancey, Jr.
William 0. Chancey
T. L. Chastain
Wade H. Chesser
John Church, Jr.
Martin S. Clance
B. Scott Clark
Garrie G. Clark Philip A. Clark
F. E. Clayton
L. W. Clayton, Sr.
Lawrence C. Clayton V




Obie Clayton ...Tommy Clayton Alexander B. Clifton ... C. W. Clifton
Frank L. Cline Toney Cline Charles C. Coats, III
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Jerry L. Cobb W. Fred Cobb q j Herschel Q. Cody
E. L. Coleman Neil L. Coleman ..Roscoe D. Coleman SICarrol C. Colgan
Robert L. Collum W. L. Collum C. C. Connors La w, Ramon A. Cooey '.aT. T. Cook Winston L. Cook vL J. D. Cooke
ki Ken Cooksey, Jr.
George W.Cooper H. Cooper Jeff Cooper Luther H. Cooper W. S. Cooper K /1 George D. Copeland, Jr.
ab 'Wallace F. Cordero I =Oscar W. Cordero 4: Glen E. Cotner
Emory J. Counce James H. Cox S. David Cox Walter A. Cox
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Lawrence R. Coyner Walter L. Crabtree Marion H. Craft Bob Craig T. D. Craig George Craven F. T. Crawford
0. Dewitt Crawford James E. Creamer Edwin L. Crenshaw
4 K. L. Crocker
Ad Eulyn P. Croft
a Freeman J. Croft
Wilford Croft
William E. Croft Robert H. Croom James A. Crosby J. Roy Crowther Gary E. Croyle William Q. Cruce William S. Cruse




Walter G. Fallin Kendrick A. Farmer Donald C. Farrar James I. Farris N. A. Farris MI,
Marshall Fausold Carl L. Felt /
Michael H. Feitf George A. Ferber Thomas R. Ferguson W. V. Ferguson Joseph J. Ferrara Donald D. FieldjK Dan Fielder
Roy T. Fields ....
E. Mack Fillingham William B. Fish C. L. Fitzpatrick C. F. Fletcher J. S. Flinchpaugh E. D. Floyd
Samuel L. Floyd Dan P. Folsom G. W. Forbes, Jr. Arvine Foreman Robert W. Foshee Larry K. French Robert Lee Fridy
Ernest L. Friedmann George M. Fries Robert B. Frohock, Jr. Gary R. Frye John Fulcher Elmer L. Fulghum, Jr. Luie R. Fuller
Marshall Fullwood Howard E. Funk John J. Fuqua Sam Futch David M. Gadd is;
John Galbas 1
Parron G. Gallop
Odie T. Gambill ...
G. F. Gammage Joseph E. Ganci f vf
Aurelio F. Garcia Edgar N. GayC Ernest E. Gay Louis Gay
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James Ernest Geer George W. Geiger, Jr. John Bill Geiger Vance N. Geiger Homer J. Geoghagin Edwin G. George, Jr. Wilbur D. Getz




Melvin Gibson Harley D. Giese Francis Gill Joe H. Gill William B. Gillespie
, / f 'Norman F. Gillis
'' [.... ...-" ..- Sid G illis
Robert T. Glasure Richard H. Glenn Merrill E. Glisson Alfred E. Glover Herman Goble 1< Frank L. Gocek
, ...
... .....Russell J. Godwin
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William S. Goethe Charles W. Goff R.L. Golson Dieter R. Goltz RoyGoodson
Walter L. J. Goodwin Alton Buck Gordon
George W. Gordon William F. Gouchnour Ernest E. Graham Harvey S. Graham t Erich Grammel
V I ,Riley G. Granger A 'Roger Grant
Roland E. Grant George W. Green L. H. Green Winfred L. Green A A Arthur R. Greene, Jr.
( 1 Luther E. Greene
Wade M. Greene
Wade M. Greene, Jr. William Grenson Charles A. Griffin
- Jasper Griffin
Jesse P. Griffin, Jr.
1 Irvin Griffith [a Fred L. Grigg
Fred Grim Fred Grimsley Ervin B. Gross Horst R. Grossmann James H. Groves Pierce S. Guerry Walter C. Guetherman
Eustis P. Gunter H. W. Gunter McHugh Gunter I James H. Gwynes
Johnny H. Gwynes Frank M. Hadley, Jr. Frederick A. Hagel




Joseph T. Hagen J,
Keith L. Haid Robert L. Haid Ross E. Hair George D. Hale, Sr. Idk1
William A. Hale, Sr. Edward L. Hall
James H. Hall Joseph Drew Hall Vern Hall C. E. (Gene) Halley Richard E. Halligan James R. Halter Martin Halter
Bernt G. Halverson Fred Hamlin Thomas L. Hamm Phil W. Hammaker L. H. Hammond Edgar S. Hamon Walter 0. Hampton
William J. Hamrick Mike L. Hanks
Harold I. Hanna Nicola E. Hanna Paul H. J. Hansen Harry Hansgen Ralph Harbeson
James Hardee Jimmie Walter Harden Joseph R. Harding
0. J. Harding Clayton Hardy -Ad
William W. Hare D. V. Harjung
Richard H. Harlan, Jr. Asa Lamb Harllee John E. Harlee Milliage H. Harney ,
B. W. Harper 1 i I
Robert L. Harper I L'
William L. Harrell
Wilbur E. Harrelson
Brody C. Harris Cecil Harris David F. Harris
John M. Harris-t
Alan E. Hart4 W. Ben Hart A/ I/ V1t
Wiley Hart Dr. Wesley C. Harter John R. Hartsfield E. E. HarveyZ Walter Harvey1r William A. Harvey, Jr. 1
Lawrence Hasty




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Stacy Hatcher Carper D. Hayes D.C. Hayes E. A. Haygood David H. Haywood A Fred T. Hays
Miles C. Hays
* IrIII
Philip Hazouri Charles M. Head, Jr.
R. L. Headstrom Malcolm C. Hearn t. It iDaniel B. Heeth, Jr.
R. L. Helmly Loren A. Helms
Arnold S. Hempel Elmer Hendl
. E. Hedeso 'v Valentine Hennemann
l aJohn H. Hennies E. H. Henson R. S. Heriot
Henry S. Herr r. F. H. Herring
John G. Herring Ken Herring I J. Herman Hesse
Martin Hesse George H. Hewell
D. Dashwood Hicks SlThomas P. Hicks 'T7 L, Wilborn D. Hicks
Edward M. Hiers
-s t J. Miles Hiers
/ / hDan Higginbotham
/ John T. Higginbotham III
fA .R. E. Higginbotham W. Frank Higginbotham E. H. Hill
William Hill William R. Hindman Gerald D. Hines Raymond L. Hines
AFi William L. Hite
42/ James N. Hitt, Sr.
Fred G. Hobbs Fred J. Hockaday E. E. Hodges William W. Hodges H. H. Hodgson, Sr.
Frank C. Hoffman
Raymond A. Hoffman A. W. Hofmeister Charles Hofstetter ii William V. Hogan
Harry L. Hogancamp A I Walter Hogg




Robert D. Holden Carlos Vernon Holder W. M. Holder Fayette Holland
Zachary G. Holland, Jr.
C. Hollis K
Percy D. Holloway
Ancel D. Holmes
0. K. Holmes 0-1
Emory M. Holsenbeck Lonnie J. Holton W. J. Holtzman Cornelius F. Hoorn Kenneth R. Hoover
George E. Hopwood, Jr. L. D. Horne, Sr. Donald G. Horsman George J. Horton James Columbus Horton c
Mitchell A. Hovan Thomas Howard
William K. Howard George Howell Lawrence L. Howell R. L. Howell T. J. Howle Charles H. Hubbard Milton Hudson
W. M. (Bill) Hudson C. P. Huffman 4*q
Charles W. Humphrey Milton J. Humphries Clarence T. Hundley Charlie Hunter ? fConnie H. Hunter, Jr.
William C. Hurley Harry C. Huxham Billy Allen Hurst Howard L. Hurst James E. Hurst Tillman F. Hutto t
Herman Ibach
D. W. Ingram Bruce D. Inman C. L. Irwin Cecil Irwin Robert K. Isenberg J. C. Isenhower A. W. Jackson
Clarence W. Jackson Donald M. Jackson Ellis B. Jackson Kenneth A. Jackson W. Lawrence Jackson Michael A. Jacobacci Herbert L. Jacobs




Max Jaffe
Michael R. James Ralph James Walter Henry James
i /B. F. Jarrell
I II Stanley R. Jefson
Gary L. Jenkins, Sr.
Harold E. Jenkins Menso H. Jenkins 4W. L. Jennings Paul joanos Leif T. Johannesen Porter B. Johns I Daniel Leroy Johnson
David R. Johnson Edward L. Johnson Floyd Johnson Harry F. Johnson
i J. D. Johnson
Joseph R. Johnson Robert L. Johnson, Sr.
Rolfe F. "Slick" Johnson Thomas A. Johnson W. J. Johnson William A. Johnston ..A. 0. Jones A Carl L. Jones
Ii James C. Jones
Jim Jones John S. Jones Leroy Casey Jones Lester W. Jones 4Nathaniel Jones, M.D.
Reefus Jones Robert D. Jones
. ..
W. Calvin Jones W. H. Jones, Sr. 4- iWilliam E. Jones
-j *PIN iBen E. Jordan
Edwin R. Jordan Arthur Jossim Charles W. Jowers
John W. June
John Justice, Jr Larry Justice F. R. Kahoe, II Chris J. Kalfas George P. Kalv Mitchel G. Katibah
Howard C. Kaufold W. B. Keene, Sr. Gordon G. Keith William E. Keith, Jr. Charles E. Kelley Lawrence A. Kelley J A. M. Kelly, Jr.




Eddie J. Kelly
Harold Kelly Omer E. Kelly Roy F. Kelly Williamr J. Kelly David E. Kemp Cecil Kendrick
AS
0. H. Kennedy
Raymond C. Kennedy Roland S. Kennedy Roy F. Kennedy
Walter F. Kennedy Charles Kent Earl Kerby .
Victor H. Kerr J. C. Kersey Morton A. Kesler Harry F. Kessinger C. J. Kicklighter P. L. Kicklighter Gus Kierce
Russell Kight Thomas M.rd Kilgore, Jr. C. E. Kinard, Jr. A. J. King Alton King o C. H. King James D. King
Jennings King John Pyram King, Sr. Thomas H. King, Jr. Archie A. Kinghorn Robert George Kinghorn W. N. Kinsey Dr. Daniel K. Kirk
Byron W. Kirkland William M. Kirkland Joseph E. Kiser, Sr. Joseph E. Kiser, Jr. 41
Charles Kivler, Jr. Richard W. Klebs f r
Marcus E. Knapp .
A. D. Knight Morris S. Knight Melvin C. Knowles Vernon W. Knox E. A. Koester, Sr. Clifford Kogge Harry Kolchin
larek Koleilat Floyd C. Koons Roger B. Koons Roger B. Koons, Jr. Henry J. Krages !
Zoli Jack Kranyik Roger T. Krell




Stanley Kremensky
,Carl E. Kunsman Joe Kubos SLouis A. Kurta E. R. Kurtz, Jr. N Alvin L. Kyle, Sr.
S / Ersie J. Kyle
Frank J. Labbance L -John W. Lacy Benjamin M. Lamb Rufus M. Lamb Harold L. Lambert Charles M. Lance Harlow Land
Thomas F. Land W. E. Land Y Charlie N. Lane
E. Edward Lane G. W. Lane Hovis L. Lane Raymond L. Lane
* ..
Harold F. Langford Raymond Langieri Ben Lanier E. Andrew Lanier William D. Lanier, Jr. Carl Laseman fW. J. Lastinger
-Ralph R. Latner E. P. Lawrence Wallace H. Lawson A.J. Lawton Clayton F. Lazenby t ,A. "Jack" LeClair
A .J. Herschell Lee
James B. Leggett Ralph M. Lemley, Sr. Elmer L. Leslie E. B. Lester William B. Lewis
/ 7James R. Libby
/ / ). S. Liddell
George M. Lieber E. J. Lincoln, Jr.
..eJohn E. Lindberg Herman E. Linderman A. L. Lingenfelter Milton Lipkowitz G R. A. Litkenhaus
Hal W. Lively, Jr. Ansel L. Livingston 4 James W. Livingston
Woodrow W. Lloyd R. W. Lockett S- John R. Loftus
Charles K. Logan




William F. Long, Jr. Keith Lovell Edwin C. Lowe, Sr. James 0. Lucas, Sr. George Lundrigan j
William Lloyd Luttrell, Jr. Woodrow P. Lynch, Jr. ______Billy R. Lyons Wilbur A. Lyons William E. Lyons R. R. Macomber Arthur D. Macon N.
Bernard J. Magary, Jr. Burt F. Maguire .. ...1. Z
Roy C. Maiden L. M. Maier Harold J. Maiwald -@
Melvin Malcolm 4
Brent R. Malever Stanley Malever Peter Maliniak
Robert E. Malott John E. Maloy Gene Mann Ray E. Manning Joseph R. Marcy Kenneth B. Marsh Stanley L. Marsh AIM
George B. Marshall, Jr. Adee C. Martin Grady W. Martin Harmon E. Martin Harry I. Martin L. Weeks Martin Maynard M. Martin
Robert L. Martin William C. Martin 1
Robert W. Mask C. L. Mason Adis Mathis Cecil E. Mathis Peter R. Mathis, Sr.
Paul H. Mathisen William H. Matthews William W. Matthews William H. Maule Ak
E. R. Maxey Roy J. Maxwell William H. May
W. R. "Buck" Maynard Harold D. Mayo James B. Mays M. A. Mazeau, Jr. Marcel Mazeau Daniel Roscoe McBride George R. McCaffrey




C
Clyde H. McCaleb Gene Milfred M cCallum James D. McCallum C. D. McCarter Roy W. McCaskill JH. S. McCiain Elton McClellan
Robert McClure, Jr. James W. McCord Richard M. McCorkle Eran K. McCormack, Sr. John H. McCormick James F. McCrary / Eugene R. McDaniel
..John L. McDowell Elwood McEIhaney LMontford J. McGill Milburn McGinniss t Clyde McIntyre
Thomas K. McKee
A Dudley D. McKinlay
' ~Frank H. McKinley John Paul McLarty, Jr. Earl R. McLaughlin Glenn W. McLaughlin
Scott R. McLean George H. McLemore C. Tommy McLeod
Walter E. McMahan C. Bruce McRae Robert M. McRae Thomas H. McRorie I Jess Meadows
__ Robert P. Mechum
i Homer Q. Melgaard, III
" mH. Chris Melonson
A /Tommy Melton, Jr.
Robert E. Menotte Irvin E. Mercer j John C. Merrill
James F. Michael / A. W. Wes Miller
Daniel D. Miller Hinton Z. Miller Ralph F. Miller Richard B. Miller Walter B. Miller gj James W. Milligan
Mart Mills Ray R. Mills Roy E. Mills I /{ k" John H. Mimbs
j' /1 C. Arthur Miracle, Jr.
~Emerson K. Mitchell




Frank Terrence Mitchell Ivan J. Mitchell Gordon S. Mobley, Jr. Donald S. Modesitt Arthur M. Moegenberg J. D. Moffitt Richard S. Morohovich I.
George M. Moody
1. 1. Moody Jesse W. Moody -.
J. A. V. Moon Milton J. Moon0 Joseph V. Mooney Aoo 0 ....
J. Fred Mooneyham J
Chauncey Moore Gleason A. Moore James D. Moore, Sr. Joseph S. Moore Leon A. Moore, Jr. Loys H. Moore ,
Norman C. Moore
Sanford E. Moore Jesse W. Morgan 4\
Mack D. Morgan Ralph T. Morgan Robert E. Morgan Byon M. Morris Daly D. Morris
Harry G. Morris Joe G. Morris Lawton Morris P. L. Morris, Jr. Paul H. Morris Arthur I. Morrison Harry Morrison
William B. Mosley Philip Mosias 4i ,
Jack A. Motley, Sr. Robert E. Mouro Clyde C. Murphy, Jr. G. H. Murrah, Jr. /
Elmer A. Murray
H. N. Murray W. Scott Murray, Sr. Keith Musgrove William H. Myers Penn E. Myrick j,4/a
Henry Nagel U1
Clark H. Nasworthy
William Earl Naylor Dalton M. Neal J. R. Neal, Jr. Curtis G. Neighbors Donald A. Nelson Oscar J. Nelson I
Anthony Neri




Charles D. Nesbit Joseph E. Neth David E. Newbill 7 j Charles Newbold
George G. Newhart Herbert B. Newland Leon Edward Newman
A01To
Bill Nichols Robert L. Nichols Samuel L. Nickell W. Henry Nicols M. Nierenberg V Maynard S. Nighbert
Charles L. Ninmann
Lee M. Noble Vernon M. Nolan
- Alfred H. Noll
Einor T. Nordeng, Jr. i James Norman
Samuel M. Norman I io 4/ Frank R. Norris
C. E. North Harold H. Nygaard
4 Elmer L. Oakley
--O -Joseph D. Oblinger, Sr.
: ,Oscar A. Odlund Malcolm H. Odom Marvin V. Odom
Fred P. Oliveros, Sr. R. F. Oliveros
Link Olson Jack E. O'Neal j -Wallace O'Neal William D. Osborn X- D. J.Osborne
George M. Osborne, M. D. EdwardC. Osmond yI. C. Othen William Ott
7 .Allen Overall Thomas R. Overstreet j Edward L. Overton
*/ H. Clark Overton
Gordon N. Owen
Robert D. Owen Cecil Owens James A. Owens William H. Owens, Jr. William J. Owens
William N. Pace A. S. Padgett Victor Papa Felix N. Parham James R. Parham /Raymond C. Park James 0. Parker




T. J. Parker George H. Partin
John H. Patterson Dale E. Patton James G. Paulk Tihomas R. Payne W. H. Peacock
James H. Peak Harold W. "Charlie" Pearson John M. Peavy 1
E. W. Pellicer James W. Penn William E. Penny i
Vincente Penoso
J. W. Perritt Charles F. Peters Ralph E. Peters e C. W. Peterson, Jr. Henry G. Peterson George E. Pettingill Jerry T. Petty
William H. Petty James L. Pfeiffer David O. Pheil Henry P. Phelps, Jr. Howard S. Phelps James E. Phillips L. W. Phillips
W. D. Phillips William J. Phillips Wiley M. Pickren W. V. Picolo George A. Pierce George H. Pierce Dr. William V. Pierce
Jack 0. Pinch
Alex Pete Pippins Troy F. Pitmon Harold R. Pittman Cecil L. Platt /
Marvin L. Platt J. C. Plummer k
Elton E. Pope Leverne Porter Windle Portier Billy D. Powell Walton C. Powell James C. Prescott [ i j
Edward Preston
George M. Prevatt Nathan Nelson Prevatt Thomas R. Priddy William F. Priest Wade Priester George Pringle S. M. Pritchard I




Albert P. Pryle \ Paul P. Puleo
D i W. L. Purcell
Clyde R. Putman Harry Putnal William L. Queen Chenry C. Quinn
Mike Rady
-William H. Railsback
Herbert Rain J. Cecil Ramsey | l, J Lulack Ramsey
- At Carl C. Rankin T Leonard L. Rash
L. W. Raulerson Alvin I. Rawlerson Afton S. Rawls Benjamin H. Ray ilk, Theron H. Ray
-.Ward A. Rayfield Jesse Y. Reagan
Byron M. Reber, Sr. David M. Redstone Gilbert Reed William H. Reed F. L. Reese, Jr. C. A. Register, Sr. Larry G. Register
Thomas W. Register B. K. Reichel ,- Hubert H. Reid
Stuart W. Reid rW. L. Reis Ceilon H. Rentz Calvin Lex Reynolds
Jesse E. Reynolds Woodrow W. Rhoden John C. Rice William L. Rice D. L. Richardson G. W. Ridge
F. C. Ridgway
Robert H. Ridgway William C. Riggs, Sr. Burton M. Riley Robert K. Ringwald J. Ray Rivenbark W. Fred Robbins /1 Edgar S. Roberts
Gerald V. Roberts Irvin Rowland Roberts Kenneth E. Roberts Meredith E. Roberts Edgar H. Robie, Jr. ,, Ross H. Robins
Arnold R. Robinson




John M. Robinson Robert F. Robinson, Jr. Max W. Robinson Marvis 0. Rodgers Roy J. Rodgers Walter G. Rodgers rA;
E. C. Rogers, Sr. -n ....
Edgar C. Rogers, Jr. James W. Rogers Tony N. Rogers Willis W. Rogers 'li
W. E. Rolfe 0-450 l
H. W. Rollins William P. Root ,
1 ....
John H. Roper Ben J. Rothschild Raymond L. Rountree William J. Rountree Donald F. Rowe Ivan L. Rowe Kenneth W. Rowden
Harold W. Rowland Milton E. Ryberg Louis Safer Moe B. Safer Julius Sais Marion B. Salis lye;Manuel E. Sanchez
George Sanders Jesse B. Sanders vt
T. D. Sanders P ..
S. G. Sandlin W. S. Sanford, Jr. John M. Satterfield John M. Saunders .....
Kenneth Saunders Curtis E. Saxon Nile C. Schaffer H. F. Scharle Hilmer C. Schmidt John E. Schotter .
Bernie Schramm
William S. Schroeder L. H. Scott, Jr. Robert F. Scott Noble D. Scroggins Angelo L. Scussel IM
Clinton Seal Joseph J. Seale
W. W. Seaward Tony Sebastiani Fernie F. Selby, Jr. Roy L. Sellers Ralph G. Seng Eugene B. Sessions j
L. B. Sessions




Wpm -Mack Sessions
Rex Setzer S...John 0. Shackelford
Everett J. Sharp 1 <" t Ralph H. Sharp
:: /Clifford R. Sheffield, Sr.
Homer M. Shelfer
1. N. Shepard George Sherman John D. Shinall, Sr.
1 1969.John S. Shipp, Jr. d 4James M. Shuman
4Homer B. Sikes, Jr.
* .. F. E. Silas
Glenn R. Simmons Bernard L. Simms
~~~~R G. RGSimpkins
Amor W. Simpson
-Howard G. Simpson James C. Simpson, Sr.
Lewis M. Sirmans Frank Sirmons Virgil L. Sirmons Abner C. Sistare David R. Sistrunk Raleigh R. Sistrunk Paul D. Sitz
Lee E. Skinner Franklin D. Skinner '.9 Charles W. Skipper, Sr.
" > Philip Smart
' ~~~~ ~ ~ ~ C ii I B/ 'lCSmith
Charles W. Smith h j f / k Clarence E. Smith
To 4 Frederick Smith
/ Harold L. Smith
Henry L. Smith Hugh Madison Smith Jackson Lee Smith tJames C. Smith, Jr. 'L. Ross Smith
M. Durwood Smith Robert H. Smith Roddy W. Smith William E. Smith B. E. Snipes, Jr. Richard Snyder Perry Solomon
Sam H. Solomon Ill Grady L. Sorrell tKenneth I. Sowers I. D. Sparkman
*Sanford S. Sparkman NCharles V. Sparks, Jr.
Thomas E. Spencer




Kenneth Spiers William A. Spinks
Walter H. Spurge Carson L. Squires John W. Stancil Lee Stanfield McCoy Stanley, Jr.
A. H. Starling Larry L. Starling Levi E. Starling Eugene H. Stauber, Jr. Roy R. Steed Donald E. Stemburg Dewey A. Stemen
Glenn Stephens Paul Roper Stevens Joseph H. Stewart /
Philip C. Stewart Robert R. Stewart Russell Stewart Harry L. Stiegel
Thomas A. St. Mire Warren C. Stokes John A. Stone Donald D. Strauser E. Howard Stringer, Jr. A
Edward A. Sturgeon Roy H. Suberly /
George C. Sullivan Harold L. Sullivan Richard A. Sullivan Thomas F. Sullivan George E. Summers, Jr. Nevin M. Summers Alan M. Swanwick
Gerald F. Sweat Rex Sweat Carlton H. Sw.etland Albert B. Swiler Bobby F. Swin'ney F. G. Symonds Richard C. Tackett
James P. Tanner 4J
Wallace E. Tanner James Tarrant Paul L. Tate Albert E. Taylor James W. Taylor /4
Lee Taylor
Linton A. Taylor Robert W. Taylor, Jr. Roy G. Taylor Isaac Roy Teagle, Jr. ,!
B. Frank Teele Harold L. Terlecky E. C. Terry




Ottis C. Teston S. T. "Thad" Thames Arthur Thomas Chalmer L. Thomas Clifford L. Thomas Donald L. Thomas James R. Thomas
Norwood B. Thomas Henry S. Thompson John W. Thompson Lannie H. Thompson Leonard K. Thompson V .., Lewis H. Thompson
Paul L. Thompson
R. R. Thorn, Sr. Earl C. Thrower John Tiernan Earl C. Tiffany ANAL Kyle M. Tincher, Jr.
F. W. Tingley
-, Fred R. Toney
Royce A. Toney J. Marvin Toomey D. J. Torrent '7 James W. Townsend
Thomas Tramel M. W. Trammell &Finley Tucker
B. L. Turner "il /Ed Turner
Marvin A. Turner W. H. Turner Wilfred B. Turner Richard M. Tuttle
STommy Tyer
Reyno A. Tyre Russell L. Tyre, Sr. 4, Mercer F. Ubele
Wayne Ussery
-L. D. Van Benschoten Edward F. Vandergriff David B. Vaughan
David G. Vaughan Richard T. Vermeulen Herman E. Vick John V. Vickers R. A. Vickers Ernest D. Vining
, ;// ,R. W. Vogel
Henry VonDerHeyde Fred Voss, Jr. Aubrey L. Waff Cecil C. Wainwright Jonathan M. Wainwright LClyde W. Walker, Jr.
James N. Walker




Jerry H. Walker Joseph D. Walker Lemiel E. Walker, Jr. Robert D. Walker William D. Walker e
William M. Walker
Larry L. Wallacef1
.... .......
Harry J. Walters Cecil M. Wamsley Lester C. Ward William G. Ward -0,
William F. Ware Thomas J. Warwick George H. Wasson
S. F. W asson III...l .
George W. Watkins, Jr. A. E. Watson ..
Charles M. Watson James Watson jg
Tillman Watson Harold L. Watts, Sr.
Wm. B. Watts Joseph E. Weatherford, Sr. T. R. Weathersby W. L. Weaver Oscar C. Webb James M. Webber
Clarence Webster
t I. Robert E. Weed Fred C. Weeks Howard Wehnes, Jr. Lawrence Weiler Charles W. Wells, Jr. /- i /
David R. West m'
McKira West, Sr. it
G. R. Wetherington Al Wetmore Bill N. Wheeler, Sr. Billy Wheeler Daniel "Rev" Whiddon Jack G. Whiddon Bruce J. White, Sr.
H. C. (Carl) White Jackson F. White Richard H. White Robert J. White David H. Whitehead
Sandy Whitelawlo Garret C. Whitlatch....
William M. Whittaker .
Albert Wichman George E. Wickline r1
Robert F. Wilbert A. L. Wilchar, Sr. Kenneth F. Wiley Lloyd Wilkerson




Air N. Wilkes 4 H. W. Wilkes
71 4 Benny T. Wilkins
% ." Horace V. Wilkins
Al W. K. Wilkins
4 A. R. Williams, Sr.
C. E. Williams
4Charles D. Williams, Sr.
i/ i l iColin Williams
Douglas L. Williams Edgar B. Williams Elliott M. "Jack" Williams Fairleigh Williams
Frank Williams
0 SGeorge B Williams, Sr
George W. Williams, Jr.
Glenn Williams Harry W. Williams fJames W. Williams Merrill E. Williams tN. Arrie Williams
Danny B. Williamson H. Lincoln Williamson Woodrow W. Williford .dog \C. Willis
Aubrey F. Wilson, Jr.
- :Charles E. Wilson Derl W. Wilson
Dwight A. Wilson Oft ,Frank M. Wilson George L. Wilson Harold N. Wilson Harry E. Wilson Jack C. Wilson Robert A. Wilson
W. Ray Wilson
, l : :,/ William L. Wilson
William R. Wilson 0. A. Winburn, Jr. Richard G. Windom, Jr. Philip A. Wineman /I "James E. Wingate
Wendell H. Winko, Jr.
/ :, Arthur C. Winn, Jr.
D. L. Winstead Thornton L. Wise
4 Reford Witt
f Frank C. Wood
William H. Wood ,. ... '-.' Col. James T. Woodall, Jr.
Russell D. Woodard Jack W. Woodley
M. M. Woodley, Jr. 1 Robert T. Woodward




B. Fred Woolsey Edward D. Wright Glen M. Wright Malcolm W. Wright Wilton L. Wright Milton C. Wyche
Robert S. Wynn
Clarence W. Yeager Floyd G. Yeager Earle S. Yerger, Jr. Lester A. Yeomans John Lewis Yonn R. A. Young Roy B. Young
H. J. Youngblood Jimmie B. Youngblood M. L. Youngblood Azell B. Zipperer Lawrence A. Zonker W




)lorocco
Tc"ivlc
A*lb
* fl
Ao




Herb Abbott *
Elbert A. Adams John Leonard Adams Vernon E. Adams Stanley E. Adamson Hubert E. Aenchbacher, Jr.
J. E. Aides, Sr. Robert P. Aitken
0. E. Albritton H. S. Albury R. H. Alexander, Ph.D. Maxwell V. Allen
Herbert H. Alley A,
Howard A. Altman N. J. Alvarez Daniel Gober Anderson ,
James W. Anderson George B. Apple
Minus D. Armstrong George Arnau R. C. Arnau Robert G. Atwell Wally Aycock E. C. Bailey
Henry J. Bailey David R. Baker W. C. Baker William E. Baker Richard A. Barger William R. Barker
Lowell E. Barnhart 9
Charles P. Barrier C. F. Bateman Carey Baxley Thomas E. Beach Jean L. Beardsley
Richard F. Beck A. P. Beckman John C. Beechley Edward Belcher Buford Bell
Johnnie Bell




Luke P. Bell Harry J. Bender Jesse C. Bennett L. J. Bennett William B. Bennett, Jr. Robert W. Benson
,19p,"John L. Berry V. P. Bianco Paul R. Binkley Wilbur Birkitt Ralph Bishop Robert Ray Bishop
, A- Leroy R. Bjorkman
Norman R. Blackwell
A Ralph Blackwell
Marcel R. Blanco Jack Blanar Trenton A. Blanton
I Allen I. Block
Thomas Blount S William F. Blowers J. H. Boggs
James M. Bolin
- ~ Ronald N. Bolser
Marvin L. Boos, Sr. S414 -IHenderson Boree t Grady L. Bostick
John H. Botterbusch E. L. Bouchelle, Sr. D. Ray Bounds
i1 E.R.Bounds
Edward Lee Bourne F. L. Bowden Milton C. Bowles Curtis C. Boykin 4i Joe Bracewell
7 f Pat H. Bradley
B. W. Bradshaw E. F. Bradshaw
Francis D. Branan -Lee F. Branan
r, -Eugene A. Branch




Chalres A. Brandeburg Levi L. Brannamri Lester A. Branning James Bransford Ish W. Brant 40
Lewis B. Brantley
R. D. Breckenridgeo Henry Breitmoser Herman W. Brewer W. R. Bridger Fred C. Brock 4A
Herbert Bronson
Frank G. Brooks A. D. Brown Areese I. Brown Augustus W. Brown Clarence Brown, Jr. J. Emmett Brown
Raymond Brown Richard C. Brown .
John W. Bryson Frank W. Buchan Reuben H. Buffkin Daniel K. Buie
G. A. Buie Mark P. Burke Clarence E. Burnett Harvey M. Burnette James W. Burnette Joe P. Burns, Jr.
Jack B. Bush Walter D. Butler Birt C. Byrd Burman Byrd John B. Byrd James Franklin Calhoun
R. E. Calhoun Harold C. Campbell Kenneth R. Campbell George Caribaltes Glenn E. Carlisle Frank W. Carnett




%)
V Grady B. Carroll, Sr.
John A. Carroll Jesse E. Carter Paul W. Carter Robert L. Carter, Jr. Harrison A. Cartwright
-IJames T. Castle
rj iWilliam R. Cesery
- James A. Chaffin
Joe H. Chafin \ C. W. Chancey, Jr.
hT. L. Chastain
49A John Church, Jr.
Garrie G. Clark / Philip A. Clark
, 1 Lawrence C. Clayton
_. "Obie Clayton
Tommy Clayton
C. W. Clifton Frank L. Cline Toney Cline Jerry L. Cobb W. Fred Cobb Herschel Q. Cody
! E. L. Coleman
Carrol C. Colgan 3 ARobert L. Collum W. L. Collum Ramon A. Cooey T. T. Cook
Winston L. Cook J.D. Cooke Ken Cooksey, Jr. Luther H. Cooper George D. Copeland, Jr. Wallace F. Cordero
ir11
,* Oscar W. Cordero
- Glen E. Cotner James H. Cox Walter A. Cox
4 Lawrence R. Coyner
Marion H. Craft




T. D. Craig George Craven James E. Creamer Edwin L. Crenshaw Z
Eulyn P. Croft -Freeman Croft
...
Wilford Croft William E. Croft Robert H. Croom Gary E. Croyle William Q. Cruce William S. Cruse
James E. Cumbie Milton T. Cummings J. D. Cundiff Blande M. Dagley Arvid P. Dahl Christy Duncan Dale
John W. Dallis Norman H. Daniel Jerry K. Daniels S. W. Danielson John D. Darden William E. Darden, Jr.
Benjamin A. Davis I
Dewey W. Davis G. G. Davis H. D. Davis Lavelle W. Davis ,,
R. C. Davis, Sr.
William E. Davis Robert J. Day Kermit Daywalt Roy 0. Deal Howard M. Dean Harry C. DeBruhl
Edward M. DeFoor Julian P. Dekle Herbert DelaBarre Thomas Albert Delegal Clarence C. Dellinger Harold A. Dence




Larol Denmark Tommy S. Denmark A. Steve Dennis Clark I. Detane, r. 40 lJess W. Devero
Richard W. Diaz
John R. Diehl George E. Dillinger Charles E. Dixon William H. Dodd George T. Dolan Stephen M. Donelan
fi Arthur L. Doss, Jr.
Clarence B. Douglas Robert L. Douglas Danny D. Dowling S, / H. Dozier Dowling
, Horace L. Dowling
Lenard L. Dowling Rudolph J. Dowling I Elmer K. Drake
/_John E. Dunklin James R. Dunn C. A. Dupont
Jas. E. Durst Walter E. Dutton V ~Sam Duvall, Jr.
S T. M. Dyer iA "R. B. Eadie, Jr.
-. "Kenneth L. Earle
Norman W. Earls Bernard M. Eaton
Clifford W. Echols Ford Edenfield Kenneth A. Edenfield Ronnie Edenfield
,William M. Edenfield
L Charles D. Edwards
SHarold S. Elliott Robert G. Elliott Robert C. Ellis
- Gerald T. Elmore




William Engelman Christian R. Ericksen C. Harvey Estes Louis J. Ezell Kendrick A. Farmer \
James I. Farris
N. A. Farris George A. Ferber Thomas R. Ferguson W. V. Ferguson Joseph J. Ferrara Donald D. Field
Dan Fielder Roy T. Fields '
E. Mack Fillingham William B. Fish C. L. Fitzpatrick J. S. Flinchpaugh
Samuel L. Floyd Dan P. Folsom Robert W. Foshee Larry K. French Robert Lee Fridy Ernest L. Friedmann
George M. Fries Robert B. Frohock, Jr. John Fulcher Luie R. Fuller Marshall Fullwood A
Howard E. Funk
John Galbas Parron G. Gallop Odie T. Gambill G. F. Gammage Joseph E. Ganci Aurelio F. Garcia A.
Edgar N. Gay Ernest E. Gay Louis Gay
Duke J. Geary James Ernest Geer Vance N. Geiger




Homer J. Geoghagin Wilbur D. Getz kHarleyD. Giese Francis Gill Norman F. Gillis Richard H. Glenn
Merrill E. Glisson Alfred E. Glover
---Herman Goble
William S. Goethe
-.. R. L. Golson 1il Dieter R. Goltz
-.. .'.Walter L. J. Goodwin Alton Buck Gordon William F. Gouchnour Ernest E. Graham IV Harvey S. Graham
Erich Grammel
Al
Roger Grant Roland E. Grant L. H. Green Luther E. Greene Wade M. Greene Si William Grenson
;" Jasper Griffin
Jesse P. Griffin, Jr.
Ae Irvin Griffith Fred L. Grigg Fred Grim Fred Grimsley
9741
,1 ,/j James H. Groves
, k-,Walter C. Guetherman
.Eustis P. Gunter James H. Gwynes Johnny H. Gwynes Frank M. Hadley, Jr.
4 1 Frederick A. Hagel
Joseph T. Hagen Ross E. Hair Edward L. Hall
SJames H. Hall Joseph Drew Hall




Vern Hall Martin Halter Bernt G. Halverson Fred Hamlin "4 A
Phil W. Hammaker L. H. Hammond
Edgar S. Hamon William J. Hamrick Nicola E. Hanna Paul H. J. Hansen Ralph Harbeson James Hardee
Jimmie Walter Harden Joseph R. Harding s
William W. Hare Asa Lamb Harllee ai Milliage H. Harney Robert L. Harper
William L. Harrell Brody C. Harris Cecil Harris David F. Harris John M. Harris Alan E. Hart
W. Ben Hart Dr. Wesley C. Harter John R. Hartsfield Walter Harvey William A. Harvey, Jr. Lawrence Hasty
Stacy Hatcher Carper D. Hayes E. A. Haygood David H. Haywood Miles C. Hays Philip Hazouri
Charles M. Head, Jr.
R. L. Headstrom Malcolm C. Hearn R. L. Helmly Loren A. Helms Arnold S. Hempel




W. S. Henderson
Elmer Hendl Valentine Hennemnann John H. Hennies Henry S. Herr John G. Herring
J. Herman Hesse George H. Hewell D. Dashwood Hicks Tr Wilborn D. Hicks
S Edward M. Hiers J. Miles Hiers
NI
I f Dan Higginbotham
John T. Higgenbotham, III William Hill Gerald D. Hines Raymond L. Hines
S ,Fred G. Hobbs
William W. Hodges Frank C. Hoffman Raymond A. Hoffman A. W. Hofmeister k Charles Hofstetter
Harry L. Hogancamp
Walter Hogg
- Robert D. Holden
Carlos Vernon Holder W. M. Holder Zachary G. Holland, Jr. C. Hollis
Percy D. Holloway Ancel D. Holmes Lonnie I. Holton W. J. Holtzman Cornelius F. Hoorn Kenneth R. Hoover
.7'.George E. Hopwood, Jr.
.3 ) Donald G. Horsman
George J. Horton Mitchell A. Hovan William K. Howard George Howell




Reefus Jones W. Calvin Jones W. H. Jones, Sr. William E. Jones Ben E. Jordan
Arthur Jossim
Charles W. Jowers John W. June
Chris J. Kalfas George P. Kalv Mitchel G. Katibah W. B. Keene, Sr.
Gordon G. Keith W illiam E. Keith, Jr. A. M. Kelly, Jr. Eddie J. Kelly Harold Kelly Omer E. Kelly
Roy E. Kelly David E. Kemp O. H. Kennedy Raymond C. Kennedy Roy F. Kennedy Walter F. Kennedy
Charles Kent Earl Kerby Victor H. Kerr Harry F. Kessinger C. J. Kicklighter P. L. Kicklighter
Russell Kight Thomas M. Kilgore, Jr. %
C. T. Kinard, Jr. A. J. King
C. H. King James D. King
Archie A. Kinghorn /
Robert George Kinghorn W. N. Kinsey ..
Joseph E. Kiser, Jr. Richard W. Klebs Marcus E. Knapp




12. .
Lawrence L. Howell Milton Hudson 1W. M. (Bill) Hudson Charles W. Humphrey Milton I. Humphries Clarence 1. Hundley
Charlie Hunter Connie H. Hunter, Jr. Howard L. Hurst James E. Hurst Herman Ibach D. W. Ingram
9ei Irti
A. W. Jackson Clarence W. Jackson Donald M. Jackson
-! W. Lawrence Jackson
AI. ..Michael A. Jacobacci
Herbert L. Jacobs dl Max Jaffe
Michael R. James Ralph James
Walter Henry James B. F. Jarrell
Gary L. Jenkins, Sr. 1' .~ Meno H. Jenkins
1 ....... Menso H. Jenkins
W. L. Jennings Leif T. Johannesen ,,Edward L. Johnson
Floyd Johnson Harry F. Johnson J. D. Johnson Role F. (Slick) Johnson Thomas A. Johnson William A. Johnston
...9
Carl L. Jones James C. Jones
4 Jim Jones
f John S. Jones
/ Leroy Casey Jones
Lester W. Jones




E.A. Koester, Sr. Harry Kolchin 3
Tarek Koleilat Floyd C. Koons Roger B. Koons
Roger B. Koons, Jr.
Henry J. Krages Zoli Jack Kranyik Roger T. Krell Stanley Kremensky Joe Kubos ,..- f
Louis A. Kurta
E. R. Kurtz, Jr. Frank J. Labbance John W. Lacy Benjamin M. Lamb LHarold L. Lambert Charles M. Lance ,
Harlow Land Charlie N. Lane Hovis L. Lane
Harold F. Langford '-r
Raymond Langieri William D. Lanier, Jr.
Carl Laseman Ralph R. Latner .
A. J. Lawton Clayton F. Lazenby James B. Leggett Elmer L. Leslie
E. B. Lester 6
William B. Lewis James R. Libby George M. Lieber E. J. Lincoln, Jr. John E. Lindberg
Herman E. Linderman A. L. Lingenfelter Milton Lipkowitz, R. A. Litkenhaus Hal W. Lively, Jr. Ansel L. Livingston A




Full Text

PAGE 1

MOROCC

PAGE 5

Morocco Temple Pictorial History from 1888 to 1978 Illustrious Potentate — 1978; Charles D. Gunter

PAGE 6

Potentate's Message To the Nobles and Ladies of Morocco Temple: It was my considerable pleasure to see so many of you at the Temple on the picture-taking days for this Yearbook. Just as you probably used to do occasionally with your high school annual — and possibly still do — I am sure in years to come you will get this book out and look up "ole so and so." Someone once said a picture was worth a thousand words. If that is the case here, then we at Morocco Temple have the pictorial equivalent of a stack of prose shoulder high on a giraffe! The Yearbook was planned and produced by the Pilgrimage Committee. We hope you enjoy it for years to come. The main thing is, the Yearbook is, about our Temple and our people. It will be a source of intense pride to me forever ... to have been your Illustrious Potentate during this rather remarkable year. Fraternally, (g) Charles D. Gunter Illustrious Potentate-1978

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Morocco — A Great Temple A group of enthusiastic Masons in March of 1888 throught that Jacksonville, being a good Masonic town, should have an organization with good moral and upright teachings but also have a little clean fun at their meetings. They then petitioned the Imperial Council of the Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine for a charter with the name of Morocco. In June of that year the Charter was issued to them as the 42nd Temple of North America. The original jurisdiction was Florida, Georgia and Alabama. We prospered with this jurisdiction but realized it was entirely too large. We granted a group of Atlanta, Georgia permission to form a Temple in Atlanta. Their Temple was to be named Yaarab and they were chartered June, 1890, as the 52nd Temple. The same occurred in Alabama. Birmingham, in November 1890 went through the same procedure and when applying to the Imperial Council was chartered in June, 1891 with the name of Zamora. They were the 54th Temple. At this time we were like this: Morocco in Florida, Yaarab in Atlanta, and Zamora in Birmingham. All of the three Temples realizing again that the jurisdiction for each was too large began to release territory to other Temples. In Florida first was Egypt in Tampa, Mahi in Miami, Bahia in Orlando and Hadji Temple in Pensacola. Then from Egypt came Araba Temple in Fort Myers, and Amara from Mahi. In Georgia, Yaarab released jurisdiction to Alee in Savan nah chartered June 9, 1897 as the 74th Temple; Al Sihah in Macon chartered July, 1911 as the 122nd Temple. Then from Alee, Hasan Temple was chartered in Albany, Georgia on July 12, 1951 as the 162nd Temple. In Alabama, Zamora Temple released jurisdiction to Abba Temple which was formed in Mobile, chartered July 9, 1903 as the 88th Temple. Alcazar was formed in Montgomery and was chartered in 1914 as the 134th Temple. Then Cahaba Temple was formed in Huntsville and was chartered from Zamora July 1st, 1971 as the 171st Temple. From this record you can see Morocco was great in 1888and from that start we created a chain of many other Temples. While we were great in 1888, we were still greater in 1978. It has been a distinct pleasure to me to have served Morocco Temple as its Recorder and in completing 18 years as such. Thanks to the Nobility for allowing me this privilege. W. LAWRENCE JACKSON RECORDER

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Divan Charles D. Gunter Potentate Roland S. Kennedy Chief Rabban Russell J. Godwin Assistant Rabban Dr. William H. Wood High Priest and Prophet Joe Hill Oriental Guide Ben Reed Second Ceremonial Master Lew Brantley Captain of the Guard William B. Watts Treasurer W. Lawrence Jackson Recorder

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History Of Shriners Hospitals “Editorial Without Words" The first Shriners Hospital For Crippled Children was opened in Shreveport, Louisiana, September 16, 1922. As the need increased, more Units were added until today there are 22 Units throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. These Units of the Shriners Hospitals For Crippled Children repre sent a construction investment of many, many million dollars. It is not hard to realize the huge operating cost of these 22 Units when you consider that Shriners Hospitals actively care for approximately 30,000 patients each year (in-and out-patients); that 8,000 of these patients are treated as in-patients, with an average days' stay of 45 days in the Orthopedic Units and 57 days for acutely burned children in the Shrin ers Burns Institutes; and that there are more than 66,000 out-patient clinic visits each year. Since the first hospital opened in 1922, more than 160,000 children have been treated, with 180,000 admissions to the hospitals, and nearly 2,000,000 clinic visits to the out-patients' dept. Shriners Hospitals For Crippled Children have provided more than 14,000,000 Orthopedic patient days since the first Unit was opened in 1922, and Shriners Burns Institutes have provided nearly 100,000 patient days since the first Burns Unit was opened in Galveston, Texas, March 20, 1966. The Burns Institutes of the Shriners Hospitals For Crippled Chil dren have a three-fold purpose — to save children's lives and restore their bodies through intensive care to prevent the crippling effects of severe burns, to undertake research in burns therapy, to advance medicine's ability to care for and treat children with burns, and to instruct medical personnel in the care and treatment of burned chil dren. The Shrine chose "Children's Burns" as an extension of the Shrin ers Hospitals For Crippled Children, because it was felt that severe burns in children, unless properly treated, are our country's greatest unmet medical need. Some authorities call burns the largest single hazard of childhood. What is so unique about a Shriners Burn Unit? For one thing, special equipment and facilities enable the staff to provide superior care for severely-burned patients. Patients are under visual observation at all times and electronic monitoring devices attached to a patient under intensive care transmit heartbeat, temperature, blood pressure and respiration to a central station. Special beds facilitate handling the patient when necessary. Laboratory teams constantly evaluate the patient's condition. The re search program studies ways to improve the treatment of all types of burns. What is the cost of patient care? It has been estimated that the cost of treatment for a severely burned patient may be more than $10,000. In addition to this, massive amounts of blood — often as much as 100 pints — are also needed. As in the case of the Orthopedic Units, admission standards for the Shriners Hospitals For Crippled Children, Burns Institutes, are that a child must be 15 years of age or under, and his parents or guardians are unable to pay for treatment. How can application forms be obtained? Application forms can be obtained from a Shriner, Shrine Temple Recorder, Shrine Clubs, Shrin ers Hospitals or by writing to George M. Saunders, Secretary, SHRIN ERS HOSPITALS FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN, 323 North Michigan Av enue, Chicago, Illinois 60601. A completed application form should be returned to the Shriners Hospital nearest your home. Application must be accompanied by a birth certificate of affidavit as to child's age and if guardian is signer, a certified copy of the court order. Parents or guar dian and sponsor will be notified as to status of application. If applica tion is approved, notification will be sent to parents or guardian, as to future procedure. MONTREAL UNIT SHRINERS HOSPITALS FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN %  —*****’, warn LOS ANGELES UNIT PORTLAND UNIT BOSTON UNIT ST. LOUIS UNIT GALVESTON UNIT ^CINCINNATI UNIT ‘ SPRINGFIELD UNIT WINNIPEG UNIT SHREVEPORT UNIT GREENVILLE UNIT LEXINGTON UNIT PHILADELPHIA UNIT TWIN CITY UNIT ERIE UNIT — 1 | ilia HOUSTON UNIT SPOKANE UNIT INTERMOUNTAIN UNIT HONOLULU UNIT MEXICO CITY UNIT SAN FRANCISCO UNIT CHICAGO UNIT

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Imperial Divan Officers For 1978-1979 Warren F. Week, jr. Imperial Potentate Charles J. Claypool Deputy Imperial Potentate F. T. H'Doubler, Jr., M.D. Imperial Chief Rabban Randolph R. Thomas Imperial Assistant Rabban Daniel E. Bowers, M.D. Imperial High Priest and Prophet Thomas W. Melham Imperial Oriental Guide George M. Saunders Imperial Treasurer Richard B. Olfene Gene Bracewell Imperial Recorder Imperial First Ceremonial Master Walker S. Kisseiburgh Imperial Second Ceremonial Master Russell H. Anthony, DVM Imperial Marshal Voris King Imperial Captain of the Guard Edward G. McMullan Outer Guard

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History of the Mystic Shrine of North America The Shrine was founded August 13, 1870, by two Scottish Rite Masons, William J. Florence, one of that era's most promi nent actors, and Dr. Walter M. Fleming. On June 16, 1871, eleven other Scottish and York Rite Masons were received into the Order of the Mystic Shrine, and in 1872, the first formally organized Temple in the United States, Mecca, located in New York City, was formed. The Shrine was started for fellowship and fraternity and has thrived under the mantle of pageantry, ritual and ceremony. It has grown from the original thirteen founding Shriners to over 900,000 members in more than 180 Temples located throughout the North American Continent. The Shrine's own history states, that "despite its name, it is as American as Apple Pie," and its diverse membership and objectives, goals and entrance requirements certainly bear out this description. It supports our Government. It requires a belief in God of all its members. It loves children and devotes most of its energy and resources to assisting and healing those who are handicapped. Before becoming a Shriner, a potential member must com plete three Masonic degrees accompanied by a series of tests after which he becomes a "Master Mason." After becoming a Master Mason an aspiring Shriner must then proceed through the rituals of the Scottish or York Rites, both being Masonic organizations that confer "degrees" on their members after elaborate dramatic rituals. Only after all this, a Mason may apply to become a Shriner. Despite the belief by some that the Shrine is a religion; it is not. It does practice quasi-religious rites that are as secret as the passwords that admit members to official ceremonies and serve as a form of communication understood only by Shriners. Its rituals are carefully and colorfully staged with Shriners wearing ornate oriental robes, gowns and medals in their meeting halls called Temples or Mosques, with exotic Arabic names. Its pageantry and long, colorful parades have become a part of America's folklore and the spectacular floats and motorized units, the precision marching corps, the intricate maneuvers of highly-trained horses, the crowd pleasing music of bands, drum and bugle groups, have pleased and made millions of spectators happy with spine-tingling sensations. Members of the Mystic Shrine, since the beginning, were permitted to wear an emblem that was distinctive and would set them apart from others. This is the Shriner's Red Fez — which they are all proud of and cherish. It is worn at all official func tions and pageantries and is an important part of the Order's tradition. The Shrine, as a great Fraternal Order, started as a fun order in 1872 but found its soul in 1921 when the dream of its planners and thinkers became a reality when a resolution for the estab lishment of the Shriners Hospitals for Crippled Children was adopted unanimously at the 46th Annual Session of the Imperial Shrine Council in Portland, Oregon. This indeed was the vehi cle needed to make the Shrine something far greater than a mere playground for Masons! The Shrine Hospitals began with the opening of the first one in Shreveport, Louisiana, in 1922, and has grown to 22 Orthopedic and Burns Hospitals, located throughout North America. It was decided at the very outset that the hospitals would be Open to all children, regardless of race or creed whose parents were unable to pay for needed surgical, medical and hospital facilities. This great humanitarian project has, throughout the years, become one of the world's finest philanthropies. With vision and wisdom, today's Shrine leaders are making plans for extensive research facilities to help discover the "whys" and reasons for various diseases, as well as the needed treatment. The good the Shrine does at its hospitals can be measured in terms of the lives it changes. They are great in number and have found happiness! The Nobles that make up the Shrine come from all walks of life and include foremost leaders of business, the professions and Government. These men have found something of value in the work of the Temples. They enjoy the association of their fellows, men whose loyalty, worth and dependability were pro ven by the fact they are members. No organization in North America better understands the value of liberty. Its cost and what must be done to maintain it and its loyalty to the countries in which it functions is outstanding. The Shrine's parades and pageantry will continue as part of their tradition and the smiling, happy faces of their young wards in Shrine Hospitals and children at their circuses will continue to glow. The real story of the Mystic Shrine of North America is that nearly a million men, Freemasons all, join together to mix fellowship, pleasure, entertainment, good will and vast charity in a grand scale program of fraternal good works. They fit in a comfortable niche of the contemporary American picture and have truly earned the title of NOBLE.

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Origin And Early History Exactly when the idea was first advanced that Jacksonville, Florida should have a Shrine Temple is not definitely known, but the archives reveal a penned letter to Mr. Henry S. Ely of Jacksonville from the then Imperial Chief Rabban, Noble James H. Thompson, dated March 25, 1888, stating that the name "Morocco" had been approved by the Imperial Council and that all of Florida, Georgia, and Alabama would be in Morocco's jurisdiction. Morocco Temple's dispensation was dated March 28, 1888. The date of the Charter is June 25, 1888. The home of Morocco had varied locations from its incep tion until its building program was begun in 1910 and completed in 1912 at its present location at Newnan and Monroe Streets. The first Unit of the Temple was the Arab Patrol, organized in 1911. It took over the duties of handling candidates throughout the Second Section and also performed in precision drills, ex hibitions, and parades. In 1913, the first Morocco Band was organized. We were very active in the First World War assisting in "Fiberty Band" and "Red Cross Drives" and in "home guard units." In 1919, at Chicago, the Shrine Directors Association was formed. Two of our Past Potentates, Hal H. Rush and T. K. Stokes, Jr., have served as their President; Rush is now its Secretary. In 1921, the Shrine Recorders Association was or ganized. Morocco Temple has always been an active part in both of these organizations. Morocco Temple sponsors annual Clinics in Jacksonville where crippled children from our jurisdiction, who are appli cants and out-patients of our hospitals, can have examinations by Orthopedic Surgeons from our Greenville, South Carolina Hospital. In 1923, the Chanters Unit was organized, as was the Drum and Bugle Corps. In 1929 came the Saxtette, and in 1934 the famed Morocco Wrecking Crew which at that time took over the handling of candidates in the Second Section, was or ganized. Morocco Temple has been active in the work of the Imper ial Council and also in the Southeastern Shrine Association, both ofwhich meet annually. Jacksonville and Morocco Temple have hosted the S.E.S.A. Convention many times, and all who have come here want to come back. Some of our Past Poten tates have worked through the chairs of Vice Presidents to serve as President of the Southeastern Shrine Association. Another of our Past Potentates served through the offices of the Imperial Council and only sudden death by two months prevented his election to the office of Imperial Potentate. The honor of Hon orary Imperial Potentate Roland D. Baldwin was extended him at that Session of the Imperial Session in July 1951. We have another Morocco Temple Past Potentate in the Imperial line who this year (1976) is serving as Imperial Oriental Guide, Illus trious Randolph R. Thomas. Morocco Temple is unsurpassed in fellowship as many things are sponsored to bring us together fraternally. Besides our Ceremonials, we have our business meetings, ladies nights at the Temple, birthday gifts for our Nobles when present that Month, dances, trips and yearly attendance prizes. Morocco Temple has 26 Uniformed Units and 28 Shrine Clubs. All are very active and bring credit to the Temple wher ever they are on display. In Florida, from Morocco Temple came Egypt Temple in 1918 and from Egypt Temple came Araba Temple in Fort Myers, in 1967. In 1922, Mahi Temple war formed from Morocco juris diction in Miami, as was Bahia Temple in Orlando, in 1955; and last in Florida, from Morocco was the formation of Hadji Temple in Pensacola. All of these Temples have a total membership as of January 1, 1976 of 36,256 members. In Georgia, Morocco Temple first gave jurisdiction to Yaarab Temple in Atlanta in 1890; in 1897 from Yaarab in Atlanta came Alee Temple in Savannah and from Alee Temple came Hasan Temple in Albany. From Yaarab Temple came Al Sihah Temple in Macon. These Temples have a membership as of January 1, 1976 of 22,708. In Alabama, Zamora Temple in Birmingham was first char tered in 1891; then Abba in Mobile in 1903; then Alcazar in Montgomery in 1914 and a new one in Huntsville, Cahaba Tem ple in 1971. Total membership in Alabama in 1976 is 12,281. One can easily tell Morocco Temple has quite a heritage in these three States. From its organization by about 20 members in Jacksonville in 1888 to a total in Florida of 36,256, Georgia 22,708, and Albama 12,281, or a grand total in the three States of 71,245 members and a total of 13 Temples. The Black Camel Fund composed of members of Morocco Temple, was organized in 1922 to bring financial relief to widows and dependents when death enters the home. Many, many times the funds are delivered the very next day after notification. The fraternal and benevolent side too, is that you are mak ing a small contribution when a brother Noble is called to the Great Beyond. The contribution you must make for each death of a member belonging to this Fund is $1.10. The 10 cents is used for the entire operation of the Fund, and the $1.00 is contributed to the beneficiary of the deceased member. A statement is mailed each month listing the members who have passed during the last thirty day period and gives the total amount due the Fund for that period of time. This statement means that amount has been paid out foryou and you are merely reimbursingthe Fund. The members of the Fund are stricly on a voluntary basis, and has grown to a membership of nearly 3,800. W. FAWRENCE JACKSON, Recorder

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Randolph R. Thomas

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Pilgrimage Committee Bob Craig Chairman Pilgrimage Committee L. D. VanBenschoten Treasurer Pilgrimage Committee Ebb Sistrunk Chairman Emeritus Pilgrimage Committee Orien Pass Chairman Finance Committee Pilgrimage Committee Ed Scott Vice Chairman Pilgrimage Committee William '‘Bill" Bridger Finance Committee Pilgrimage Committee Ed Turner Secretary Pilgrimage Committee John Carter Finance Committee Pilgrimage Committee

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Past Potentates William A. McLean 1892 Harry B. Roberts 1916 Harry B. Holt 1922 William E. Sweney 1929 George C. Blume 1935 to 1936 Otis L. Keene 1893 William R. Stechert 1917 Arthur Y. Milan 1918 Ernest E. McLin 1919 Lauriston G. Moore 1920 Thomas E. Iordan 1921 Giles L. Wilson John Chandler Reynolds 1923 1924 to 1925 Edward ). Burke 1926 Ben S. Weathers 1930 Dr. M. B. Herlong 1931 George W. Parkhill 1932 Dr. Paul R. Davis 1927 Louie W. Strum 1928 Thomas C. Imeson 1933 William T. Dow 1934 Robert H. McMillan 1940 W. M. McCrory 1941

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T. C. Buckner 1941 ). D. Kennedy 1942 Paul C. Tanner 1946 W. Fred Cobb 1947 James L. Ingram 1955 Leon Forbes 1956 Florace Graham 1961 J. Wendell Fargis 1962 Ollie B. Nall 1967 Randolph R. Thomas 1968 T. T. Phillips 1943 Warren L. Jones 1948 Erwin T. Brooks 1957 Joseph H. Riggs 1963 T. K. Stokes, Jr. 1969 Alfred Miller Norman C. Edwards H. R. Fretwell 1944 Wilbur W. Masters, Jr. 1949 Olen Fletchall 1958 Thomas E. Taylor 1964 1945 George Tobi 1953 Hal H. Rush 1959 Frank Winchell 1965 1946 Dr. John R. Owens 1954 John M. Hardy 1960 Wilford C. Lyons, Sr. 1966

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Wilford C. Lyons, Jr. 1973 Harold A. Martin 1974 )ohn Ek 1975 Bill Maddox 1976 ). R. Hall, Jr. 1977 Chairman of the First Annual Project The First Annual Project was presented to the Pilgrimage Committee Officers in the Spring of 1978. The Chairman, Bob Craig and the officers thought this to be a very worthwhile endeavour for the eleven thousand members of Morocco Temple and every three years henceforth. The Annual was presented to Illustrious Potentate Charles Gunter and he agreed it would be in harmony with the 90th birthday of the temple. This met with his approval wholeheartedly. Noble Craig decided to make this his personal contribution to the Morocco Temple Pilgrimage Committee, Uniformed Units, Shrine Clubs, and General Nobility and undertook the Chairmanship personally. Noble Craig has served with the Pilgrimage Committee five years; in 1977 and 1978 he was elected to the Chairmanship of the Committee. He is a Past President & Life Time Member of the Beaches Shrine Club, Past Captain of the Provost Guard, Ambas sador At Large, Recipient of the 1974 Individual Southeastern Pro vost Guard Award, Past Chairman of the S.E.S.P.A. for 1976. A member of the Arlington Shrine Club, Lifetime Member of the Wesconnect Shrine Club, Ambassadors Association. Noble Craig holds Honorary Membership in the Wrecking Crew and Gay Ninety Units of Morocco Temple. He is Past Chairman and Presi dent of several civic and fraternal organizations and holds various awards and plaques for outstanding and distinguished services rendered. Noble Craig has been a member of Morocco Temple since 1962, a member of the Provost Guard for fifteen years. A Scot tish Rite Mason and a member of Ribault Masonic Lodge #272 for twenty-seven years. Noble Craig has resided in Duval County, Florida since 1940 and has lived in the beaches area for thirty years, coming from Tampa, Florida. He is married to the former Dollie C. Gore and they have three daughters. Noble Craig is the owner of Affiliated Polygraph Services in Jacksonville, Florida. Prior to this, he was a Security Director and Consultant for several large companies and corporations in the southeast. He served on the police department as a Captain and was Chief Deputy Constable for the Fifth District amount ing to twenty-two years in law enforcement. He served honora bly in combat zones in the Navy during World War II and three years in the Army Reserve Unit. Noble Craig has dedicated this 1978 Annual To Morocco Temple in its Glorious Ninety years of fabulous history, to all of the Nobility, past, present, and future. Especially to those no bles who have served so faithfully and fervently in making 1978a Banner Year for Morocco Temple.

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Morocco Temple Shrine Units

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Circus Activities Left to Right: Ernest Lea, Business Manager; Bob Craig, Pilgrimage Committee Chairman; Ed Scott, Vice Chairman. Left to Right: Bob Craig, Chairman Pilgrimage Committee; Bill Left to Right: Morocco's Giant 8 Foot Fez; Ernest Lea, Business Manager. Ed Kaye, Circus Promoter. Scott, Vice Chairman Pilgrimage Committee; Bob Craig, Chairman Pilgrimage Committee; Orien Pass, Chairman Finance Committee. Left to Right: Bob Craig, Chairman Pilgrimage Committee; Luther Cooper, Honorary Ring Master; Ernest Lea, Circus Business Manager.

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Activity Committee The Activity Committee was formed in 1970 under the lead ership of Noble Leon Frank; to be a working Unit of the Pilgrim age Committee. Our duties are to sell Jewelry at all Ceremonies and novelties at the Circus. We were allowed seven (7) mem bers. We did not fill our quota of members until this year. We have progressed each year in sales and we are now a well organized Unit, under the leadership of Noble Bob Craig, Chairman Pilgrimage Committee and Noble J. D. King, Chair man of the Activity Committee. 7 978 Arab Patrol

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Bally Hoo Standing Left to Right: I. O. Douberly, Bill Collier, Buck Carter, Jim George Sprouse, Archie Batchelor, Sonny Anderson. Absent from picHitt, Ken Sowers, Robert Miller. Kneeling Left to Right: Leon Sikes, ture: Pete Maliniak, lack Solomon, Porter Johns. Capers JiMOKfr During the early summer of 1972 the Illustrious Potentate Johnny Jelinek stated he would like to see within Morocco Temple a new unit which would appeal to children of all ages — a nursery rhyme unit. Six weeks later on August 18, 1972 five cartoon characters made their debut on the streets of Ocala. It was the birth of a "Bunch of Animals.” Since that eventful day the Cartoon Capers have grown to twenty-eight different characters. Within a few short years the formation of similar units has spread to many temples throughout North America. The Car toon Capers of Morocco Temple have won the distinct honor of being the first official Cartoon Caper unit in Shrinedom. The Capers have proven to be one of the most hard work ing and fun loving units and have certainly become an exciting addition to Morocco Temple.

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Chanters Rich in tradition, the Chanters was one of the first units to be organized in Morocco. Their participation in the Morocco Temple All Star Minstrels brought top dollar in funds for the Temple. Many of Morocco Temple Potentates belonged to the Chanters, with outstanding Nobles also. Each year, the Chan ters sing for various civic organizations and at Christmas time for the senior citizens. We still have one member who has been active for 41 years, Noble E. H. (Teddy) Henson, who was Vice President in 1937. In 1950the Chanters visited Los Angeles atthe convention held there of the Mystric Shrine and was chosen to sing on Tom Brenomen's "Breakfast with Sardi." Also it was the first term as Mayor for Chanter Brother, Hayden Burns, who debated with the Mayor of Los Angeles and came out on top. Our present recorder, W. Lawrence Jackson, is also a former Chanter. So, under the leadership of our President, Welmer Crage, and with new ideas coming up every day, we hope that our future will be in keeping with our past activities. 1 1 m J l WESj ? CHI FRONT ROW: Left to Right Waterman, A. T.; Bowman, R.; Crage, H. W.; Roberts, R. R.; Spicer, O. AT, Jr.; Dyer, T. AT MIDDLE ROW: Left to Right Byrd, B. C.; Johnson, L. A.; Carnett, F. W., Sr.; Jesnes, J.; Langston, C. D., Jr.; West, D. R.; BACK ROW: Left to Right Chafin, M. B., Jr.; Nicols, W. H.; Shoemaker, P. D.; Randall, H. F.; Walker, C. W., Sr.; Hadley, F. AT, Jr.; Womble, L. A. NOT IN PICTURE Barber, R. W.; Doro, W. T.; Henson, E. H.; Kirk, F. A.; McDougall, R. W.; Ridge, C. W.; Rocher, R. F., Skinner, T.; Wells, R. J.; Ogier, D. E.

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Cyclones The Cyclones of Morocco Temple are a twelve man unit dedicated to supporting the Temple in all endeavors promoting the Shrine however and wherever the Potentate may direct. Besides selling circus ads, Shrine candy, football programs, and circus tickets, we have also donated blood supporting the Shrine Blood Bank Program. Every year most Cyclones work all five shows at our Shrine Circus. All is not Temple work. Be tween times we ride motorcycles in parades and practice con tinuously. We fill the middle weight division riding Honda 500 cc cycles. Our dominant color is red accented by black or white. The idea began back in 1967 when South lacksonville Shrine Club needed a flashy group to represent them in parades. This was the era of Metropolitan Shrine Clubs. By early 1968 the Cyclones were motorized on white Honda 160 cc cy cles. Our first parade was in Mac Clenny, Florida honoring our Imperial Sir-Randy Thomas. Then in 1970, we petitioned the Temple and were placed on probation status. Complete full Temple unit acceptance did not come till late 1972. This unit has participated in conventions from Toronto, Canada to Miami, Florida including Kansas City, Missouri, and Memphis, Tennessee. We enjoyed Atlanta, Georgia several times, attended Nashville, Tennessee, Orlando, Florida, and Indianapolis, Indiana, and Atlantic City, New Jersey. The Captains listed chronologically are 1968 Vernon Stacy; 1969 Fred Ammes; 1970-1971 John Koons; 1972 Buck Shiver; 1973 James Waits; 1974 Fewis Perry; 1975 John Howell; 1976 Bob Kerr; 1977 Dick Hunt; and 1978 Emory Holsenbeck. In order to cement the bonds of fellowship even stronger, the Cyclones are the most fortunate to have their families totally committed in our support. We have the usual dinners or socials at members' homes — swimming parties — picnics — tubing parties — and fish fries. Also it is a regular family get-together at our "hospitality affairs” during ceremonials and conventions. Our Christmas parties have become annual feast almost hosted by the Poteet and Hughes family. Incidentally being a family unit you would expect and find among our membership brothers such as Emert and Floyd Poteet as well as a father-son combination Buck and Jeff Shiver. Other members not previ ously named are Richard Byerly, Orris Hughes, Howard Kaminee, Bill Nolan, C. J. Powell, Dick Hunt, Emory Holsen beck, and William Wilson. As a unit now over ten years old, we have become one of Morocco Temple's most colorful motorized and helpful units.

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Drum and Bugle Corps MOROCCO TEMPLE O In the year 1923 the Morocco Temple Drum Corps was organized, with a charter membership of fifteen. When this unit was originally formed Morocco member ship was hesitant to join; but it is interesting to note that after the 1st Imperial Council Convention in Los Angeles back in 1925, when all expenses were paid, the general Nobility evinced a marked increase in interest to join this organization. Between 1925 and 1949 the Corps experienced many diffficulties as well as many pleasant experiences. Surmounting the difficulties and surviving the pleasant experiences the Corps continued to progress. Membership was increased, bugles were added, and the Corps assumed the title of Morocco Temple Drum & Bugle Corps. The bugles were added in 1950 when Roy T. Lord was Potentate. Glockenspiels or bell lyres were added in 1955. In 1962 a big, six foot drum on a carriage was added and is sometimes put in parades. The first drum major was Frank Clark; the present drum major is Herbert Weeks. The Corps did not grow and expand membership until after the depression days, and after World War II. At the conclusion of World War II the Corps stepped up its social activities and it was during this time that a waiting list was necessary for mem bership. The Morocco Drum & Bugle Corps has traveled far and wide; from Toronto to Key West and from New York to Califor nia. For the corps success is habitual, fellowship is natural, and acclaim is our goal.

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First Aid Funsters History . fffSjg -nf l HBM ilo-1 t | v J****^m p, i m | r tl Tragr*' FRONT ROW: Rex Altman, SNAPPY Higgenbotham, PEANUTS Cox, CHUCKLES Field, BUSTER Macomber, WORMEY Colson, RAGS Voght, DOC Bridger, CHOO CHOO Dowling, PEE WEE MILLER. SECOND ROW: SWEET PEA Brannen, PETE THE PIRATE Brown, FLASH Hileman, GUSTO Bass, SPOTTIE Griffith, HAPPY Brooks, GOO GOO Mattox. THIRD ROW: JINGLES Winstead, WEE T Locker, GRUMPY Kogge, CUD DLES Smallwood, TANK Tankersley, IOLLY Williams, POP POP Benz. PICTURE SHY: FRECKES Anderson, CANDY Jones, BOBO Montgomery, TOBY Toban, SOLO Shapiro, FREDDIE Smith, DIMPLES Doss. The Funsters Unit was born out of the Hospitality Unit in 1957, and in 1958 was admitted as an official unit of Morocco Temple for the purpose of furnishing wholesome entertain ment to the nobility and general public. The original charter of the Funsters called for 15 members. Of the first 15 members, the following are still active: Buster Macomber, Tank Tankersley and O'Neal Mattox. O'Neal was one of the first Presidents of the unit and served in that capacity

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for four consecutive years. The following past presidents are still active and very much a working part of our unit. O'Neal Mattox, Cliff Kogge, William R. Bridger, Russell Macomber, Von Voght, Don Winstead, Charles Williams. In 1958 the Southeastern Shrine Clown Association was formed with the Morocco Funsters being one of the charter members. Since becoming a member of SESCA, the Funsters have won numerous trophies. In 1968 the Funsters entered the newly formed National Clown Association and in 1969 was named the number one clown unit in all of Shrinedom at the national convention in Seattle, Washington. Since 1957, The Funsters have increased in size to our present membership of 25 regular members and 6 probationary members with several applications for membership on file. Some of the many duties required of the Funsters are at tending all Temple functions, working at the Circus for all per formances, and attending any other functions that our Poten tate might request of our unit. In addition to participation in required functions, many members of our unit attend many civic functions on a voluntary basis. 1975 was a year of many honors and awards for the Funsters Unit. For the first time in the history of the Funsters, the first place or "Number One" unit award was claimed at both the National Convention in Toronto, Canada and the Southeastern Convention in Orlando. This is quite an accomplishment for our unit. In the past ten years the Funsters have never failed to return from competition a winner. This can be attributed to the enthusiasm, dedication and hard work of each and every member who make up the Funsters Unit. Gay 90Â’s

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Highlanders The Highlanders were chartered in 1962 as a Temple Unit. There were eight charter members and the Unit still has one active charter member today (Dudley D. McKinlay). The Unit had only one musical instrument which was a saxophone, and the uniforms were not even thought of at the time. In due time the Temple supplied the necessary bagpipes and drums as they were needed. The first uniforms consisted of a kilt which was made by some of the members' wives and white shirts bought by the members. The Unit continued to make progress and in 1970 the mem bers along with help from the Pilgrimage Committee bought complete uniforms from Scotland. The tartan (McNicol) was selected for the kilts and plaids along with the other accessories common to a complete uniformed Highlander. The Highlander Unit is a member of the Southeastern Shrine Pipe Band Association and has been since it was char tered. The Highlanders have represented Morocco Temple at all Southeastern and Imperial conventions since they were formed and have many trophies which were won in competi tion. The Highlanders have performed at the Shrine Circus and have received national recognition in CIRCUS REPORT. The Past Presidents from the beginning are: 1962 and 1963 .Al Mitchell 1964 and 1965 .Kenneth Lamb 1966 .Dudley D. McKinlay 1967 .Harry Mangles 1968 .William D. Watson 1969 .Robert W. McDaniel 1970 .Jim Hagan 1971 H a r old Johnston 1972 .Charlie Davidson 1973 R i c h a r d C. Davis, Sr. 1974 .John Boyette 1975 .P. L. Kicklighter 1976 .William McConn 1977 .C. J. Kicklighter 1978 .Wiley Hart The Highlander Unit's Drum Major is Ian (Scotty) Milloy who is well qualified since he has been leading and directing pipe bands in Scotland and the United States for many years. Today the Highlander Unit of Morocco Temple is recog nized as an example to follow in producing bands for champi onship competition. The Highlander Unit in perspective — Good Fellowship, Social relations and congeniality. A Unit of Great Pride, Dignity and merit. Proud to represent a part of the Heritage of Scotland in Morocco Temple.

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Honor Guard South Side Shrine Club History of the Morocco Temple Horse Patrol The Morocco Temple Horse Patrol was organized on May 8, 1964. The Charter members consisted of seven (7) of the finest men who ever wore shoe leather: Jim Mott, Dallas Thomas, Tom Pionessia, Harold Haimowitz, Cibbes Vincent and Dr. Johnson. Tom Pionessia was elected the first Captain of the Unit and served a bobtailed term. Cibbes Vincent was elected Secretary and Treasurer and served two terms in that position. The first parade was held in Perry, Fla. at the Pine Tree Festival. That was truly and event. The members, member wise, has fluctuated from seven (7) to twenty-two (22). They were a grand group to associate with and it was a one for all and all for one.

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Hospitality The historical background of this unit began in 1947 when Potentate W. Fred Cobb appointed Noble Ralph Williams to head a committeeof 24members to be known as the Hospitality Committee to perform greeting and other hospitality functions for the membership of Morocco Temple. This committee con tinued to function with expanding duties until 1965, when Potentate Frank Winchell approved "Unit” status for the com mittee. The current membership consists of 25 regular and 10 probationary members. The unit continues to grow in functions and prestige within the 20 uniformed units of the temple. Many of our former members continue to serve in important leader ship functions within the temple, including our current poten tate, Charles Gunter. The Hospitality Unit is proud of its histori cal background and pledges to continue to serve our great Morocco Temple. Historian Committee: Ch. Ceilon Rentz, Hershell Lee, Dick Harlan, John Clarke. Cooper, Cliff Register, Harold Taylor, Ben Davis, lack Heard, and Leon Hedrick. FOURTH ROW: Wilbur Towsend, Bill Vogel, Bill Snead, Larry Clayton, Frank Kodatt, and George Yancey. NOT SHOWN: Sam Boze man, Gaston Dickens, Axel Economou, Curtiss Carter, George Lantz, Hiron Peck, and Bob Smith. The above picture shows the 1978 membership of the Hospitality Unit. From left to right are: FIRST ROW: B. J. Bjorkman, Herschell Lee, Don Harjung, Harris Bolin, Harry McDowell, and Dick Harlan. SECOND ROW: Ceilon Rentz, Luther Cooper, D.F.C. Robertson, Cecil Mathis, Bill Hughes, Percy Baker, and Rocky Roquemore. THIRD ROW: George

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Hot Sparks Standing — Left to Right: Tony Rogers, Bill Kelly, Potentate, Thomas, Junior White, Buddy Williams. Charles D. Gunter, Mike Feit. Kneeling — Left to Right: Lewis Legion of Honor Morocco Temple Legion of Honor had its conception when J. Wendell Fargis, then Assistant Rabban of Morocco Temple, talked to the National Commander of the National Association of the Legions of Honor at the Imperial Shrine Session at Den ver, Colorado in 1960 about forming a Legion of Honor in Morocco Temple. No action was taken until 1962 when Noble Fargis met with Noble Frank C. Cusky to talk seriously about the matter. In 1963 Illustrious Potentate Joseph Riggs took definite action on the formation of the Legion of Honor and an applica tion was in the March issue of the "Nashra." From the overwhelming response of the application by active duty or former service men holding honorable dis charges who were members of the Shrine, a meeting was called by the Divan and held in May of the same year with the following Nobles: Hugh P. Davis, Frank C. Cusky, C. Cecil Irwin, Edward R. Moore, C. W. Shiver, Jr. and Robert Weiss. Noble Frank C. Cusky was appointed chairman of the Committee to organize and bring into reality a dream of three years. After drawing up a suggested constitution and By-Laws that met the approval of the Divan the first meetings was called on 22 October 1963. At this meeting Illustrious Potentate Joseph Riggs appointed the following Officers. Commander — Frank C. Gusky Vice Commander — Robert Weiss Adjutant — C. W. Shiver, Jr. Treasurer — C. Cecil Irwin Chaplain — Hugh P. Davis Historian — Armand Dufresne The attendance and interest of about fifty prospective members more than compensated for the many long hours spent by the committee under the watchful direction of the Divan. Here the Legion of Honor was born. Installation of officers was carried out on 23 October 1963, Southeastern Shrine Association Legion of Honor Commander Frank Hadden, Jr. and First Vice Commander Edward Morrison presided at the Ceremonies. During the Diamond Jubilee celebration of Morocco Tem ple, National Lt. Commander A. D. Cone presented to Illustri ous Potentate Joseph Riggs a certificate dated 15 November 1963 membership of the Legion of Honor into the National Association of the Legions of Honor and an American flag which had been flown from our Nation's Capitol, Washington, D.C. The Legion of Honor since its formation has taken an active part in all Temple activities and takes great pride in being the official Color Guard at all Temple functions. In 1964 elections were conducted and the appointed offi cers were elected to a regular term of office. Commanders who have served the Legion of Honor since its establishment are as follows: 1963 — Frank C. Cusky (appointed) 1964— Frank C. Cusky 0

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1965 — Robert Weiss D 1966 — Clayton A. Shiver, Jr. 0 1967— Floyd G. Yeager PSEC 1969-70 1968 — Charles C. Irwin 1969 — William D. Hendricks 1970— Donald A. Nelson PSEC 1974-75 1971 — Alvin R. Butler 1972 — John S. Kemp D 1973 — Haven A. Morrison D 1974 — Alvin P. Beckman 1975 — Thomas A. Darby 1976 — John W. Baird 1977 — James A. Hogan 1978 — W. A. Bud Johnson D — Deceased 0 — No longer a Member PSEC — Past SESA LOH Commander The Legion of Honor throughout its existence has entered all Southeastern Shrine Associations Legions of Honor competi tive events always ranking high in the standings. Many of its Nobles have served in offices of the SESA Legions of Honor from Commander through appointed posi tions, also in appointive offices in the National Association of the Legions of Honor. Contributions to the Crippled Childrens Fund is the foremost project of the Legion of Honor. Large contributions are made annually. This is the Legion of Honor of Morocco Temple comprised of a Marching Team and a Degree Team, serving the Temple faithfully in all duties, but primarily in the patriotic functions.

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MiniÂ’s Motorcycle Escort Morocco Temple Motorcycle Escort was organized in the early 1920's, at that time it was under the Patrol, there were only four members. In 1949 the membership was raised to six mem bers. It was suggested that the escort be put under the Wreck ing Crew. The members of the Escort met with the Potentate and Wrecking Crew; every one was in agreement that the Es cort should have their own Unit. As of this date, we have Elbert Whitman who has been in the Temple for 56 years and rode 40 years in the Escort, and is an honorary member today. Ed Corley, a member for 30 years is also an honorary member. The next oldest member is Lester A. Yeomans, accepted in the Escort in 1949, and still active in the Unit. In 1955 there were six more accepted in the Unit, as of this date, the membership has been increased to 20 members. Up through 1965 the Temple owned all motors, and in 1967 each member bought his own motor and maintains the up keep of each.

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Front Row Left to Right: Gary Pickren, Lester Yeomans, Bob Andrews, Dill, I. L. Fussell, Willie Scott. Henry Howard. Second Row Left to Right: Ed Scott, Bob Adams, Wayne Oriental Band For a period of fifteen years Morocco Temple was without the services of an Oriental Band. But in 1956 a group of in terested Shriners formed the nucleus of what was to be an outstanding organization. Our first parade was in Lake City during our spring cere monial in 1957. This was not an occasion to cause us to feel the flush of success, but it gave us much needed experience and enabled us to make a creditable showing later in the year in Atlanta at the Southeastern Shrine Association Convention. However, our greatest thrill was to be at our first Imperial parade in Chicago the following year. Throughout the years, our band has been blessed with outstanding and dedicated leadership which has enabled us to put together an entertaining and crowd pleasing unit while performing in public. A fine drum major, )essie Keene, has attracted national attention and our colorful costumes com plete with gold colored shoes with turned up toes along with the unusual musical instruments we play make a combination that has helped us arouse crowd enthusiasm wherever we go. We have produced one potentate, two past presidents of the S.E.S.O.B.A., one past president of the A.S.O.B., and one member currently the fourth vice president of the A.S.O.B. Richard Hardage is the potentate, the late Harry Maddox was past president of the S.E.S.O.B.A. and the A.S.O.B. George Hewell is a past president of the S.E.S.O.B.A. and is now fourth vice president of the A.S.O.B. Although we Oriental Bandsmen greatly enjoy the fellow ship and the pilgrimages to distant places, we never lose sight of our purpose for being Shriners; namely, the rehabilitation and saving lives of crippled and burned children, and all our efforts are so directed. At last count eight charter members are still active, and twelve of our past presidents are most active members of our band.

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FIRST ROW: Left to Right Fred L. Crigg, Secretary; Norman C. Moore, Director; Joseph C. Joyce, Jr., Treasurer; Ralph Blackwell, President; George H. Flewell, Fourth Vice-President-A.S.O.B.; Flarold A. Kelly, Chaplain A.S.O.B.; Jesse M. Keene, Drum Major. SECOND ROW: Left to Right David B. Ballantine, Tony N. Assaf, L. D. VanBenschoten, L. D. Vandegriff, Paul L. Tate, Thomas M. Boyette, Jr. Herman Hesse, George D. Copeland, Jr. THIRD ROW: Left to Right Henry S. Herr, Calvin L. Brown, Gerald F. Sweat, John Ballantine, John H. Hennies, W. J. Phillips, George C. Cellar, Harold Cherry. FOURTH ROW: Left ro Right William W. Campbell, Jack P. Saam, Bill Nichols, Joseph H. Veates, Gene Schramel, Ralph E. Hutchinson, Delbert L. Vise, Joe W. Blake, Burton Riley. NOT IN PICTURE: Malcolm C. Hearn, Vice President; Delmar B. Austin, M. R. Bob Ballantine, Hunter M. Hudgins, James E. Jinright, William F. Leslie, Jr., Kenneth C. Ward, J. W. Wolliams, Sam Barkett. LIFE MEMBERS NOT IN PICTURE: Fred Cotton, Richard Hardage, Ralph Inglis, Gibson Poole, Clarence Webster. Paper Drive Chairman

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Peddlers Provost Photo showing Captain Bob Breckenridge and members of the Morocco Temple Provost Guard receiving a Unit Citation Trophy at the Southeastern Shrine Association Meeting, Louisville, Kentucky. Temple Photographer joe Tull Guard Unofficially, the Provost Guard Unit was formed in the 1950's. Noble H. V. (Tiny) Branch was the sole Provost for the whole temple. The Potentate seeing the need for this unit, then appointed Noble Branch the Captain along with nine original members. Noble Branch remained the appointed Captain until the Provost Guard was made an official part of the Uniform Units of Morocco Temple. Noble Branch was elected by his peers as the first Captain and re-elected successfully for the following ele ven years. Upon his retirement as Chief of Detectives for the City of )acksonville, Florida; after forty-four years of loyal and honorable service, he also retired from the Provost Guard. Noble Branch then was elected to Captain Emeritus by the members and remained with this title until his recent death in 1978. His Fez is on display in the archives of Morocco Temple to honor him as such. Since the original formation of the nine members, the Provost Guard has grown to twenty-five regular members and ten probationary members. This unit serves directly under the Potentate at his will and pleasure and attends and works each

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and every function where Morocco Temple Nobles gather. Our present Captain is: Calvin )ones, First Lieutenant, Charlie Arnold; Second Lieutenant, Buddy Pickett; Secretary, Gene Blackburn; Sergeant-At-Arms, Manning Woodley; and our Chaplain is )im Pfeiffer. Nobles McCoy Stanley and Bob Craig are the Pilgrimage Committee members. We are honored to have two Past Southeastern Provost Guard Presidents: Nobles Tiny Branch and Bob Breckenridge. Our Past Captains are: Noble Tiny Branch, Bob Brecken ridge, Emmett Lee, Jim Heard, Heywood Tillman, Crash Carter, Russ Godwin, Jim King, Bob Craig, Buddy Bailey and Roger Koons. Past Captain Russ Godwin is the Assistant Rabban of Morocco Temple and will be our Potentate in 1980. Noble Char lie Arnold was just recently elected to Fourth Vice President of the Southeastern Provost Guard. In 1974 this unit was Awarded the Most Outstanding Provost Guard Unit of the SESPGA. Past Captain Bob Craig was Chairman of the SESPGA Convention in 1974 and was Awarded the Most Outstanding Provost Guard Member of the year. In 1977 he was elected as Chairman of the Pilgrimage Committee and again in 1978. There are several members who are Past Masters of their Blue Lodge. The Provost Guard Unit was awarded the Most Outstanding Unit in the SESPGA in 1977 and again in 1978. Altho our primary duties as the Police Department of our Great Temple is to look after the safety and well being of all of the Nobility, we are ever mindful of our Most important func tion . OUR CRIPPLED AND BURNED CHILDREN. FIRST ROW: Left to Right McCoy Stanley, Gene Blackburn -Secretary, Buddy Pickett Second Lieutenant, Calvin Iones Captain, Charlie Arnold-First Lieutenant, Troy Smith, Clyde Baker, John Johnston, FLugh Kaiser. SECOND ROW: Gilbert Fennel, Roger Koons, Manning Woodley, Bob Breckenridge, Joe Wall, Gerry Fallin, Bob Craig, Bill Lanier, Lawton Morris, George Smith. TFFIRD ROW: Bob Pace, John Koons, Tom King, Levi Starling, Mack Franklin, Ed Emanuel, Curtis Adams, Milt Craddy, Bill Johnson, John Lacy. FOURTH! ROW: Art Sheddan, George Boyle, John Foshee, Jim Pfeiffer, Missing from Photo -J. D. Sparkman. Roadrunners

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Sidewinders Spitfires

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Strummers FRONT ROW: left Walter A. Cox, William F. Long, lames B. Leggett, Coleman, Walter C. Guetherman, Paul R. Stevens, lames E. Wingate, John justice. SECOND ROW Bill Sherrill, Earl C. Tiffany, Milburn Missing Clarence Brown, Flarley D. Giese, Bill Fly. McGinnis, Lee M. Noble. THIRD ROW-lames /. Maciejewski, Ephaim L. Knowing what Shrine-dom stands for and keeping these ideas in mind, a small group of men in August 15th, 1972 assem bled and began to shape up a unit. Being members of the Wesconnet Shrine Club they naturally needed their sanction which was freely given and helped to lay the ground work for the Unit that was later to be called the "STRUMMERS.” With due consideration for other organizations the Strummers adopted the American musical instrument, "5 String Banjo," and the Revolutionary period dress suit became the official parade uniform. For the work uniform, the Banjo, in gold and white was embossed on the back of a coal black jump suit, leaving no doubt in anyone's mind what unit the members belong to. On May 15th, of 1973, with permission from the Wesconnet Shrine Club a letter was written to the Illustrious Potentate, Sir Wilford C. Lyons, Jr., requesting transfer to the Morocco Tem ple with 19 regular and 5 probationary members. July 23rd, 1972 saw the Strummers moving into the Temple as a recognized Unit. The Chairman of the group, Noble Earl Boocks became the first President but because of illness had to step down. Noble James Maciejewski finished out the year as temporary president and was elected for the full term in 1973. Jacksonville Beach in November of 1972 saw the initiation of the Strummers as a Parade Unit, and they have been seen on parade ever since, demonstrating their good-will from Orlando Florida to Toronto, Canada. To date, of the original 12 charter members, Nobles Walter Guetherman, James Maciejewski, Paul Stevens and Earl Tiffany are still parading as strong as ever and enjoying all the func tions.

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Transportation

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Wrecking Crew The Ceremonials of Morocco Temple and those of many other Shrine Temples were for a number of years often staged by a committee chosen by the Potentates. Manytimesthestunts were improvised at the last minute and they were sometimes crude and disorganized. This situation led to the formation of the Shrine Directors' Association, a national organization, with the purpose of improving the quality of the Second Sections. Morocco Temple's Ceremonials were conducted for the most part by a group drawn largely from the Patrol. The late J. Dillon Kennedy became active in the group and later directed it. After attending a Shrine Directors' Association he saw the need of Morocco Temple having a Unit solely responsible for the Second Section and the Wrecking Crew was created. It was to be a group having talents to create, ability to produce, and experience to conduct a Second Section. When 'J.D.' had to relinquish this activity, N. R. Peterson was named Director. Many of the stunts that he created were used for many years. He was followed by Roland Speas who brought national recognition to the Crew. When Roland left the City, Hal H. Rush became the Director. The Crew responded to his great leadership and becamean outstanding Unit. When Hal advanced on the Divan, T. K. Stokes was named Director and proved a good one. When T. K. advanced on the Divan, W. F. johnston was named Director and the Crew has had many fine years since that time and has given Morocco Temple many great Second Sections. While the Director is an appointed member of the Divan, the Members of the Crew are volunteers from the Temple membership. They come from diverse backgrounds and pos sess varied talents. They blend into a smoothly working team, combining experience and freshness to provide a smooth and entertaining Ceremonial of fun and good taste.

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Noble Luther Cooper Luther Cooper receives plaque for Most Circus Ad Sales and Cold Whistle as Honorary Ring Master for The Morocco Temple 1978 Shrine Circus with a purpose. Charles D. Gunter Potentate 1978. Noble Cooper has won these awards every year for the past five years. Noble Rex Sweat Rex Sweat grew up as a South Georgia, Camden County farm boy. Seven days after the United States declared war on Germany, he enlisted in the infantry. Not long afterward, he was in France where he had been assigned to Co.B, 106th Engineers, 31st Dixie Division. Sweat proudly served the Jacksonville area as sheriff for 25 years. Sweat rode to victory election after election on a crest of popularity and political sharpness for a quarter of a century. He faded from the public eye and into retirement after his defeat in 1956. Sweat naturally has aged a bit since he left office in the late 1950's, but he still has the easy going, friendly personality that once had him on a first-name basis with state and national political figures. His law enforcement career officially spanned some 36 years. A couple of hours spent with Rex Sweat is a 50-year step back into history, back to the days when Atlantic Boulevard was the Beach Road, a bumpy, dusty route to the seashore. In honor of Noble Rex Sweat, a popular member of Morocco Temple.

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Morocco Temple Shrine Clubs

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Baker County Macclenny is the county seat for Baker County, only thirty miles west of )acksonville and Morocco Temple with which the Baker County Shrine Club is affiliated. For years the only high way leading west from Jacksonville was the old highway 90, but since the late fifties when Interstate 10 opened up it has made Macclenny a little easier to reach from the big city of Jackson ville. It was on a Saturday afternoon of February the 3rd, 1968, that the Baker County Shrine Club was presented a Charter for its club by the Potentate of Morocco Temple, a home town boy of Baker County, Noble Randy Thomas. The Charter was pre sented to our First Shrine Club President Noble W. A. Kirsopp in a program finale that officially brought in the 24 charter mem bers of the local club. And it was a big day for Macclenny where no one could recall having seen such a gathering in town be fore. During the afternoon, Master of Ceremonies Noble John J. Crews introduced distinguished guests on hand for the occa sion. They included Senate President Verle Pope of St. Augus tine, State Treasurer, Broward Williams of Tallahassee, Senator John Mathews, Jr. of Jacksonville, Grand Master John Rouse, Jr. of the Florida Masons, and Roy T. Lord, of Jacksonville, all ranking officials in the Shrine hierarchy. Beaches Jacksonville Beaches SHRINE CLUB OFFICERS 1979 T. B. "Bernie" Chastain, President W.H. "Bill" Seldon, 1st V. Pres. H. H. "Herb" Lewis, 2nd V. Pres. John W. Hall, Sec/Treasurer T. J. "Ted" Algard, 111, Sgt.-at-Arms Thousands lined the main thoroughfare as the shriners brought on their oriental splendor of Bands, Motor Bikes and Scottish Kilts in the lengthy parade that led the crowds out to the Ball Field. Once there, they heard Judge Warren Jones of Jacksonville trace the history of the shrine and tell how the New Baker County Shrine Club will fit into the activities of the Morocco Temple. One of the Shrine's major activities was then visibly re vealed from the stands where Douglas Thrift, 3 years old of Macclenny, stood on his crutches and watched the ceremonies. Crippled from a very early age he had learned to walk through the help of one of the Shrine's 26 hospitals for crippled children and victims of burns in North America. Afterwards a delicious Southern Fried Chicken Dinner was served. This year being the 10th anniversary of the Baker County Shrine Club we showed appreciation to our first President, Ambassador at Large Noble W. A. Kirsopp. Noble Will Kirsopp was one of our hardest working nobles to get the Baker County Shrine Club started. Each year the club has tried to have a money making project going to raise money for our crippled and burned children. Since Noble Kirsopp's time as President the club has had 10 presidents. In the year 1972, under the leadership of Noble President William E. Lyons our club had another good year of Shrinedom. Illustrious Potentate Johnny Jelinek of Morocco Temple brought thousands of folks out to Macclenny for the Baker County Shrine Club's annual Southern Fried Chicken Dinner and Parade. This was a great turn-out for Baker County. This same year the Baker County Shrine Club farmed its own Motor Cycle Unit, under the leadership of our first captain Berry Rho den. A unit was formed consisting of nine riders and was named the "Blue Devils." Our ladies are named the Devilettes. The Blue Devils unit of Baker County Shrine Club has since tried to perform in nearly all Morocco Temple ceremonies and other parades to date. Membership in our club at this time is approximately 65 members. Club Directors R. T. "Rick" Padilla, P. P. 1978 A. "Jack" LeClair C. V. "Chuck" Nugent, P.P. 1976 J. B. "Jim" Adams G. O. "George" Folmar Past Presidents 1946 William S. Gufford* 1964 Bob Saylor 1947 Frank E. Brunson* 1965 Jimmy Milligan 1948 Clarence Wilkerson 1966 John McCoy 1949 Earl H. Lighty* 1967 Robert Craig 1950 Ronald D. Gray, Jr. 1968 Jessie E. Loper 1951 Ken Hendryx* 1969 Keith Ingle 1952 Linton Floyd* 1970 Gordon Casey 1953 Jack Callahan* 1971 John Gibbs 1954 Dale W. Hendryx 1972 Larry Haines 1955 Herb Patten 1973 Louis Gay 1956 Louie Wellbrock* 1974 O. Murl Smith 1957 Henry Bostick* 1975 Clayton Thompson 1958 Homer Avery* 1976 Charles Nugent 1959 Edward F. Smithers* 1977 A. L. Wilchar 1960 Robert DeBell* 1978 Richard T. Padilla 1961 James H. Smith ‘Deceased 1962 Gene Hodges 1963 Claude R. Parker

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Fernandina Beach The Fernandina Beach Shrine Club was organized in 1944as the Fritz Hobein Shrine Club. There were fifteen charter mem bers. The club was presented with a charter from Morocco Temple in August 1945. It was the fourth club to be chartered by Morocco Temple. The name was changed to the Fernandina Beach Shrine Club in 1958 and has a 1978 membership of 112. In 1955, with 37 members, the club held its first Annual Bar-B-Q. In that year, Bar-B-Q was served for Vh hours as a community service. The club charged only enough to pay for the food. Entertainment was provided by the high school band and by Tracy Russell at the piano. Also, Prof. R. C. Newman entertained with his “astounding feats of magic.” In time, the Bar-B-Q became a fund raising affair for the Shrine Hospitals and in 1964, $600.00 was presented to the Temple for the Crippled Children's Fund. Through the years the Bar-B-Q has grown into an all-day affair (serving from 11:30a.m. to 7:00 p.m.) with a parade of Shrine Units down Centre Street to start things off. In 1977, nearly 3,000 plates of Bar-B-Q were served. Several years ago another fund raising activity was underta ken. The club operates a Food Booth at the Annual Fernandina Beach Shrimp Festival, selling Bar-B-Q sandwiches and cokes. This activity, together with the Annual Bar-B-Q and Paper Sale, raised $10,000.00 for the Shrine hospitals' Fund in 1977. A Shrine Minicar Parade Unit was formed in 1974 with sixteen members. This unit participates in many of the parades endorsed by Morocco Temple. The Club holds a dinner meeting each month and invites the ladies. Summer meetings are often cook-outs which include children as well as the ladies. Flagler County Back in early 1954 there was a move underway in the Na tional Shrine Association to incorporate Flagler County into a new Temple being formed in Orlando—Bahia Temple. Nobles George Wickline, Levi Brannam, Shelton Brooks, John C. Rice, Clarence Shultz, John Botterbusch, R. L. McNab, Stanley Novak, and many other Nobles of Flagler County decided they did not want to become associated with Orlando but rather with Morocco Temple in Jacksonville where so many of their friends belonged. Noble Shelton Brooks spearheaded this group and spent many hours traveling back and forth to Jacksonville and meeting with then Recorder Sparks Jones to formally have Flagler County become a part of Morocco Temple. Finally, in early September 1954, this was accomplished, and on October 1, 1954, the organizational meeting of the Flagler County Shrine Club was held at the Masonic Temple in Bunnell. Charter mem bers were: O. F. Alford, P. H. Beach, C. L. Biddle, J. H. Botter busch, Levi Brannam, Shelton Brooks, A. D. Burrows, J. M. Canakaris, H. H. Corley, Ernest Decker, Howard Dolch, L. H. Drady, Talt Endsley, Jack Garcia, Tom Holden, Jimmy Landrum, Jesse Medders, Warren Michaels, George Moody, Sr., R. L. McNab, Stanley Novak, R. A. Powell, John C. Rice, Rudye Shamblen, Clarence Shultz, Raphael Sturman, W. C. Sullivan, Walter S. Toole, Henry Wells, and George Wickline. The offi cers elected for the charter year were: John C. Rice, President; George Moody, Sr., 1st Vice President; Henry Wells, 2nd Vice President; Secretary, John M. Canakaris; Treasurer, W. C. Sul livan and lessee W. Medders, Chaplain. Officers for 1978 are: George Horton, President; Flynn Edmonson, Vice President; Tom Durrance, Vice President; Jeff Seale, Treasurer; Robert Weed, Secretary; George Moody, Chaplain. Flagler Beach Shrine Club Officers Man Seated Center: George Hor ton, President; Standing Left to Right: Bob Weed, Secretary; Flynn Edmonson, Vice President; Tommy Durrance, Vice President; Jeff Seale, Treasurer.

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Gadsen Gainesville Old Man Father Time gets his nose into almost everything. His activities are called history now-a-days and that accounts for this narrative pertaining to the Gainesville Shrine Club. In the beginning there was no Shrine Club but somehow and within the hearts of Gainesville area Nobles an idea was conceived. Why not fulfill a need by organizing a club as pro vided by Morocco Temple? Why not have club activities here at home where we can have social affairs, participate in charitable endeavors, attend to our business and have fun while doing so? The Shrine has often been called a playboy organization. This is largely true because the founders of the Shrine wanted a romping ground that would keep alive the spirit of the boy in man and generate good cheer and fellowship. Yet, its cere monies are with purpose, beautiful to watch and with serious intent. Gainesville area Nobles were given substantial encour agement in 1945 when Potentate Norman C. Edwards of Morocco Temple decided to increase the interest in Shrinedom by creating clubs in outlaying areas of the Temple's jurisdiction. During this year and the following year when Potentate Paul C. Tanner appointed him organizational chairman for the Shrine Clubs, Noble Edwards sponsored twenty-one clubs. It was on Friday, March 22, 1946, that a gathering of twenty-eight area Shriners, under guidance of Noble R. A. (Gus) Cox, met at the Thomas Hotel for the purpose of organizing a Shrine Club in Gainesville. At this meeting Noble Neal Adams was elected as the first president with Nobles Cox and E. D. Hague serving as vice presidents. Noble T. ). Price was elected secretary-treasurer. On May 15, 1946, the Gainesville Shrine Club received its charter, making it the eleventh club to be organized under Morocco Temple's jurisdiction. Although the first Wednesday of each month was desig nated the regular meeting night the club met only upon call by the president for the first several years. At its second meeting a motion was made and passed that "A committee be appointed consisting of Nobles ). C. Adkins, Horace Zetrouer, Gus Cox, E. D. Hague and Fred Clayton to investigate the possibility of securing a location and erecting a club building.” It was not until 1954, under the guidance of President E. C. (Curly) Kuehn, Ir., that this objective materialized. In 1947 with Noble Earl V. Simpson at the helm, the club brought to Gainesville its first Shrine ceremonial in twentyseven years. Also in 1947 the club sponsored the Morocco Minstrels, the proceeds of which helped to buy new uniforms for the Gainesville High School Band. Theyear 1950 brought the organization of a ladies' auxiliary which flourished until Im perial Edict No. 5 of 1954 eliminated it as such. Since then the ladies have operated without portfolio. The year 1956 was a banner year for the Gainesville Shrine Club. The building which was purchased in 1954 had been completely renovated and painted on the outside. Much of this was made possible in 1955 by the fine work of President W. D. (Pat) Padgett. Although Noble William R. Steckert, a Gainesville resident Gainesville Shrine Club Officers FRONT ROW: Left to Right C. W. Peterson, President; Edwin D. Hartman, First Vice President. BACK ROW: Left to Right George Pringle, Secretary: William R. Samples, Second Vice President.

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and a member of Gainesville Lodge No. 41, F. and A. M., passed away prior to the formation of the Gainesville Shrine Club, it is noteworthy that he served as Illustrious Potentate of Morocco Temple in 1917 and was the first known non-Jacksonville resi dent to be elected Potentate of this Temple. The club had diversified interests within its ranks. A rather large group of Nobles had worked up various crazy cars to be used for parade purposes. With this interest at heart, the Gainesville Shrine Club Nomads was organized in 1960 and its members are those who are implicated in parade units. They meet each month to conduct business affairs and enjoy fine food mixed with good fellowship. At present ten units are available for parades and they are in demand by communities throughout North Florida for festive occasions. With a present membership of two hundred and seventyfive the Gainesville Shrine Club is very much alive and includes Nobles residing in various communities in the area. Regular meetings are held on a monthly basis and special functions are well attended with social and fund-raising projects in evidence as the occasion requires. The successive presidents and officers have faithfully performed their duties and have laid the groundwork for a strong and active future. Gateway Club and Their Indian Unit A Gateway Shrine Club received their charter in December 1976 and officers were installed at a dinner meeting at the Bonanza Restaurant. The 1977 elected officers were: Wayne Stout, President; ). Daniel Colson, 1st Vice-President; Carl P. Bryant, 2nd Vice-President; Paul Binkley, Secretary and Herb McKinney, Treasurer. Installing officer was 1977 Potentate Wil liam Mattox, who alo holds Gateway Shrine Club membership Card #1. We held our first Fish Fry in September 1977 on Heckscher Drive on St. Regis property. Such a beautiful location — shaded with huge trees and along the St. John's River waterfront. We were privileged to have had many gospel singers to the delight of our supporters and workers. It was a big success. We had an Easter Egg Hunt, picnics and a Christmas party for the children and several get-togethers for our members and their ladies. We were able to work with Hollyford Civic Club to have the use of their building on Ford Avenue for our meetings and activities. It is a perfect centrally located club. Our meetings are held the second Friday of each month with a covered dish supper every other month in which our ladies put forth their best efforts and come up with dishes that are superb. Our 1978officers were: J. Daniel Colson, President; Carl P. Bryant, 1st Vice-President; Richard Rix, 2nd Vice-President; James L. Yankey, Secretary and Glenn Crews, Treasurer. In June of this year, we held our first Bar-B-Que Chicken dinner and then in October, our second annual Fish Fry. Both were again on St. Regis property on Heckscher Drive. We were

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again honored with entertainment of the best gospel singing around and at the Fish Fry, the Temple's "Melody Boys" were great entertainment. The Ladies served desserts and sold bazaar items at all of these functions. Our Indian Unit was formed with the assistance of our lovely ladies. They made and hand-painted the Indian Vests which we wear in the parades. Although our unit is still small, we participated for the first time in the parade at the Spring Ceremonial. Our Indian Chief in all his splendor with his color ful $100.00 headdress, our Indian drummers beating out the rhythm on their war drums, the braves doing their war dance around our mechanical "Little Chief" mascot were a sight to behold. Also our little Indian "Whoop It Up" giving out with his war hoops to let everyone know "The Indians are Coming!" Many compliments were received. Our Indian Unit also paraded at St. Mary's on the 4th of July and at the ceremonial in Tallahassee in September. We hope to have more "Indians" next year. Our paper drive was good in 1977 but we more than dou bled the amount in 1978. The collection of aluminum cans was a very successful financial project this year. All in all, it has been a great two years for Gateway Shrine Club and the Gateway Indian Unit. But keep your eyes on us, for we are determined to do bigger and better things in the future.

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Gator Over the past several years it has been the dream of some Nobles living in the Callahan area for a Shrine Club to be organized. After many hours of work by Nobles Robert H. (Cap) Keystone Heights Shrine Club Officers Left to Right: Homer B. Sikes, Ir., Second Vice President; Mike Hanks, President; D. A. Thomas, First Vice President; Ray C. Eddy II, Secretary-Treasurer. Smith and Edward L. Conner, contacts with other nobles and proper authorities a meetingwas called on December 1,1961, of all interested Nobles, for the purpose of laying the ground work of organizing a Shrine Club. This was done by accepting a set of by-laws and electing a president and Secretary-Treasurer. It was then in order to petition Morocco Temple fora Charter. Present at this meeting were the following: Nobles Robert H. Smith, Edward L. Conner, Donald C. Elagan, Clifford W. Brandies, William P. Dinkle, Paul Berger, Roy L. Wingate, Jr., Lloyd W. Herrin, Frank Ellis, Charles V. Hochrien, Jacob J. Wells, Martin L. Taylor, Hugh F. Stone, Jimmy S. Stevens and Lamar Perdue. On December 13,1961 a request for issuance of a Charterto the Gator Shrine Club of Callahan was presented to Morocco Temple. After due consideration, Potentate, Horace D. Crahan, with the Divan of Morocco Temple granted the Charter on January 10, 1962. With this act the Gator Shrine Club became a reality. The Gator Shrine Club was so named because of the histor ical aspect of the skirmish that took place in the American Revolution of Alligator Creek Bridge on June 30, 1778. ***The Gator Shrine Club has progressed and has approxi mately 45 members now.

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Lake City The Lake City Shrine Club was organized in )anuary 1950 with 28 charter members; some are active today. Officers of 1950 were: J. W. Nelson — President O. B. Bradley — Vice President Jack Burgess — 2nd Vice President James Niblack — Treasurer J. F. McCall — Secretary J. T. Lipscomb — Publicity This Club has contributed yearly to the Shrine Crippled Children Hospitals ever since it was organized. The first Shrine Ceremonial held in Lake City was in Sep tember, 1953 and this Club can boast of over 200 members today. Our Nobles meet the second Monday of each month and include our ladies for dinner several times a year. It is the distinct responsibility of our President to name a Ceremonial after a Noble who has worked for the Club for many years and each Noble named is highly honored. In 1967, we organized a Mini-Bike Troup and after many weeks of practice, this Unit paraded with other Shrine Clubs at the fall Ceremonial held in Jacksonville. Our Pan Cake Day has provided approximately a thousand dollars each year which is donated to the Shriners Hospital Fund. This Shrine Club meets each second Monday in the month in a restaurant as we have no club house at the present. We have started a Building Fund and are requesting each member to give $10.00 a year so we may own our Club House in the future. The present Officers are as follows: Thomas S. Tramel, Jr. — President George Hunter — 1st Vice President Wilford Croft — 2nd Vice President Robert Curtiss — Treasurer Eulyn P. Croft — Secretary MAYO The Mayo Shrine Club was chartered on April 2, 1945 with thirteen members. Potentate of Morocco Temple at that time was Norman C. Edwards; Treasurer John M. Register and Re corder Hugh B. Cowan. The Mayo Shrine Club's first President was Will Winburn. Today we have six of the original thirteen members still living. The original thirteen members were as follows: Lester Summersill, Robert Mayton, Harlow Land, Thomas E. Taylor, Maurice Folsom, George Breare, Leon Land, Karl Owens, J. W. Winburn, O. A. Winburn, Bill Birchtield, Mabry Green and Will Winburn. Today we have twenty mem bers in the Mayo Shrine Club and we have had the pleasure of having Thomas E. Taylor, now deceased, Potentate of Morocco Temple for the year of 1964. Mayo Shrine Club was and may still be the smallest Shrine Club in North America. The members of Mayo Shrine Club have had many enjoyable meetings in the past years and hope to have many more. Mayo Shrine Club Officers FRONT ROW: Left to Right -A. ]. King, President; F. FT FLamlm, Vice President; BACK ROW: Left to Right L. B. Sessions, Crippled Children Committee; W. E. Land, Secretary; Harlow H. Land, Treasurer.

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Ocala Perry Putnam County Starke Southside

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Jacksonville The West Jacksonville Shrine Club was chartered in Oc tober, 1967. A group of interested and active Shriners chartered the club for the purpose of fellowship and assistance to crippled and burned children. After ten years the purpose of the West Jacksonville Shrine Club is still the same, but its scope is much larger. The West Jacksonville Shrine Club assists its members with room reservations on out of town junctions, provides social events and a place to congregate for its members during many events. Also the club provides orthopedic shoes and devices for children within the jurisdiction of the club as well as transportation for the children and their families when needed. The illustrious Nobles who have piloted the club have been so numerous that I won't use names for fear of leaving someone unmentioned. Many unselfish people have contributed time and energy to make The West Jacksonville Shrine Club what it is today. It was natural that units and committees would grow from our club. The first was the “Roadrunners" on 300cc Honda Dream motorcycles. The unit now rides 850cc Moto Cuzis. The second unit was called the “Mini's” and consisted of about 35 Nobles on Fox 4 HP mini bikes. The “Mini's" now ride 50cc Honda trail bikes. Next came a lone driver of a VW beach buggy that looked like it was rejected from the junk yard. The lone, ragged buggy evolved into a unit of beautifully built, identical bodied beach buggies called the “Bally-Hoo Buggies." As the club grew it needed more organization for providing hospitality for its members and other nobles. The need was filled. A group of nobles formed the West Jacksonville Shrine Club Boosters and have been serving the hospitality needs since. A fire engine and three Nobles provided the last unit of the club. The unit was called the "Hot Sparks." The "Hot Sparks" unit is now a group of custom bodied but non-identical VW autos. Money-raising projects has always been a need of Shrine Clubs. West Jacksonville Shrine Club was tried most all of them. Two Nobles of the West Jacksonville Shrine Club devel oped and invested in the "We Help Crippled Children Walk" decal for the club's Crippled Children's fund. The decal sells for a buck and now you see them everywhere. All proceeds go to the West Jacksonville Shrine Club's Crippled Childrens Fund. Two official publications have been used to notify club members of meetings and keep them up with the news. The first

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was “The Informer" which was followed by the “West jax Round-Up." In the early days a notice was helpful if you wanted to find the correct location for a meeting. Some of the club's meeting places were Mr. Dees, the Pizza Inn, Lake Shore Jaycees Clubhouse, Pat and Mike's Restaurant and the Londontowne Apts. We now make our home at the Carpenter's Hall. In short, the West Jacksonville Shrine Club provides its members with fun, service and identity with the Shrine Ideals. I West Jacksonville Shrine Club Officers BACK ROW: Left to Right Tommy McLeod, Secretary; Buck Carter, Treasurer; Ken Sowers, Second Vice President. FRONT ROW: Left to Right Mike Feit, First Vice Presi dent; Lewis Thompson, President. Breckenridge Left to Right: Bob Breckenridge; De Ane Breckenridge, Grand Daughter; Wormey the Clown; Wayne Breckenridge Kena.

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Circus Activities ^ ^fc 0 „ i fiScXSEE* 31fc_ <* u i ;KtH eF/it! a 1 : ‘Il’.i v %  %  x %  %  %  '} i f A

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i i mSSI m Wm i, + Jr mSr^ **** ** W* mSitzwm ’’'*i •

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Morocco Temple Nobles

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Herb Abbott Robert ). Absher Elbert A. Adams )ohn Lepnard Adams Vernon E. Adams W. I. Adams Stanley E. Adamson Hubert E. Aenchbacher, | Forrest L. Agnew J. E. Aides, Sr. Robert P. Aitken Denny Albertson O. E. Albritton H. S. Albury R. H. Alexander, Ph. D. T. ). Algard Maxwell V. Allen Herbert H. Alley Harvey P. Allison W. I. Allison Howard A. Altman Millard Altman N. ). Alvarez S. L. Amos Daniel Gober Anderson G. L. Anderson Harold C. Anderson lames Hubert Anderson James W. Anderson Clyde H. Andrews, Sr. George B. Apple Thomas N. Applewhite Minus D. Armstrong George Arnau R. C. Arnau Arnold D. Arnett C. E. Arnold Tracey I. Arpen John Aspinall Toney N. Assaf Robert G. Atwell Eugene T. Austin Wally Aycock Walter E. Badger E. C. Bailey Henry J. Bailey Howard L. Bailey William C. Bailey David R. Baker Samuel Glenn Baker W. C. Baker William E. Baker John M. Banister George A. Barber Jerry F. Barber Richard A. Barger

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James W. Burnette Jack B. Burns Joe P. Burns, Jr. George F. Bush Jack B. Bush L. E. Butler, Jr. Walter D. Butler Birt C. Byrd Burman Byrd John B. Byrd William S. Calbert Elwood C. Caldwell James Franklin Calhoun R. E. Calhoun Howard Callahan Harold C. Campbell Kenneth R. Campbell Ruben E. Campbell William David Campbell Philip Cannon Phillip H. Cannon George Caribaltes Al K. Carlisle Glenn E. Carlisle Ron C. Carmichael Frank W. Carnett Carlyon Carroll Grady B. Carroll, Sr. John A. Carroll Anthony Gregory Carson, Sr. Jesse E. Carter J. Harold Carter John Carter John S. Carter Nathaniel L. Carter, Jr. Paul W. Carter Robert L. Carter, Jr. James W. Cartledge, )r. Harrison A. Cartwright James T. Castle William R. Cesery lames A. Chaffin Joe H. Chafin Thomas P. Chaires, Sr. C. W. Chancey, Jr. William O. Chancey T. L. Chastain Wade H. Chesser John Church, Jr. Martin S. Clance B. Scott Clark Carrie C. Clark Philip A. Clark F. E. Clayton L. W. Clayton, Sr. Lawrence C. Clayton

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Obie Clayton Tommy Clayton Alexander B. Clifton C. W. Clifton Frank L. Cline Toney Cline Charles C. Coats, III Jerry L. Cobb W. Fred Cobb Herschel Q. Cody E. L. Coleman Neil L. Coleman Roscoe D. Coleman Carrol C. Colgan Robert L. Collum W. L. Collum C. C. Connors Ramon A. Cooey T. T. Cook Winston L. Cook J. D. Cooke Ken Cooksey, Jr. George W. Cooper H. C. Cooper Jeff Cooper Luther H. Cooper W. S. Cooper George D. Copeland, Jr. Wallace F. Cordero Oscar W. Cordero Glen E. Cotner Emory J. Counce James H. Cox S. David Cox Walter A. Cox Lawrence R. Coyner Walter L. Crabtree Marion H. Craft Bob Craig T. D. Craig George Craven F. T. Crawford O. Dewitt Crawford James E. Creamer Edwin L. Crenshaw K. L. Crocker Eulyn P. Croft Freeman J. Croft Wilford Croft William E. Croft Robert H. Croom James A. Crosby J. Roy Crowther Gary E. Croyle William Q. Cruce William S. Cruse

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Walter C. Fallin Kendrick A. Farmer Donald C. Farrar James I. Farris N. A. Farris Marshall Fausold Carl L. Feit Michael Ft. Feit George A. Ferber Thomas R. Ferguson W. V. Ferguson Joseph J. Ferrara Donald D. Field Dan Fielder Roy T. Fields E. Mack Fillingham William B. Fish C. L. Fitzpatrick C. F. Fletcher J. S. Flinchpaugh E. D. Floyd Samuel L. Floyd Dan P. Folsom G. W. Forbes, Jr. Arvine Foreman Robert W. Foshee Larry K. French Robert Lee Fridy Ernest L. Friedmann George M. Fries Robert B. Frohock, Jr. Gary R. Frye John Fulcher Elmer L. Fulghum, Jr. Luie R. Fuller Marshall Fullwood Howard E. Funk John J. Fuqua Sam Futch David M. Gadd John Galbas Parron G. Gallop Odie T. Gambill G. F. Gammage Joseph E. Ganci Aurelio F. Garcia Edgar N. Gay Ernest E. Gay Louis Gay James Ernest Geer George W. Geiger, Jr. John Bill Geiger Vance N. Geiger Homer J. Geoghagin Edwin G. George, Jr. Wilbur D. Getz

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Melvin Gibson Harley D. Giese Francis Gill ]oe H. Gill William B. Gillespie Norman F. Gillis Sid Gillis Robert T. Glasure Richard H. Glenn Merrill E. Glisson Alfred E. Glover Herman Goble Frank L. Gocek Russell ). Godwin William S. Goethe Charles W. Goff R. L. Golson Dieter R. Goltz Roy Goodson Walter L. ). Goodwin Alton Buck Gordon George W. Gordon William F. Gouchnour Ernest E. Graham Harvey S. Graham Erich Grammel Riley G. Granger Roger Grant Roland E. Grant George W. Green L. H. Green Winfred L. Green Arthur R. Greene, Jr. Luther E. Greene Wade M. Greene Wade M. Greene, |r. William Grenson Charles A. Griffin lasper Griffin Jesse P. Griffin, Jr. Irvin Griffith Fred L. Grigg Fred Grim Fred Grimsley Ervin B. Gross Horst R. Grossmann James H. Groves Pierce S. Guerry Walter C. Guetherman Eustis P. Gunter H. W. Gunter McHugh Gunter James H. Gwynes Johnny H. Gwynes Frank M. Hadley, Jr. Frederick A. Hagel

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Joseph T. Hagen Keith L. Haid Robert L. Haid Ross E. Hair George D. Hale, Sr. William A. Hale, Sr. Edward L. Hall James H. Hall Joseph Drew Hall Vern Hall C. E (Gene) Halley Richard E. Halligan James R. Halter Martin Halter Bernt G. Halverson Fred Hamlin Thomas L. Hamm Phil W. Hammaker L. H. Hammond Edgar S. Hamon Walter O. Hampton William J. Hamrick Mike L. Hanks Harold I. Hanna Nicola E. Hanna Paul H. J. Hansen Harry Hansgen Ralph Harbeson James Hardee Jimmie Walter Harden Joseph R. Harding O. ). Harding Clayton Hardy William W. Hare D. V Harjung Richard H. Harlan, Jr. Asa Lamb Harllee John E. Harlee Milliage H. Harney B. W. Harper Robert L. Harper William L. Harrell Wilbur E. Harrelson Brody C. Harris Cecil Harris David F. Harris John M. Harris Alan E. Hart W. Ben Hart Wiley Hart Dr. Wesley C. Harter John R. Hartsfield E. E Harvey Walter Harvey William A. Harvey, Jr. Lawrence Hasty

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Stacy Hatcher Carper D. Hayes D. C. Hayes E. A. Haygood David H. Haywood Fred T. Hays Miles C. Hays Philip Hazouri Charles M. Head, )r. R. L. Headstrom Malcolm C. Hearn Daniel B. Heeth, )r. R. L. Helmly Loren A. Helms Arnold S. Hempel W. S. Henderson Elmer Hendl Valentine Hennemann ]ohn H. Hennies E. H. Henson R. S. Heriot Henry S. Herr F. H. Herring )ohn C. Herring Ken Herring ). Herman Hesse Martin Hesse George H. Hewell D. Dashwood Hicks Thomas P. Hicks Wilborn D. Hicks Edward M. Hiers |. Miles Hiers Dan Higginbotham ]ohn T. Higginbotham III R. E. Higginbotham W. Frank Higginbotham E. H. Hill William Hill William R. Hindman Gerald D. Hines Raymond L. Hines William L, Hite lames N. Hitt, Sr. Fred G. Hobbs Fred ). Hockaday E. E. Hodges William W. Hodges H. H. Hodgson, Sr. Frank C. Hoffman Raymond A. Hoffman A. W. Hofmeister Charles Hofstetter William V. Hogan Harry L. Hogancamp Walter Hogg

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Robert D. Holden Carlos Vernon Holder W. M. Holder Fayette Holland Zachary C. Holland, )r. C. Hollis Percy D. Holloway Ancel D. Holmes O. K. Holmes Emory M. Holsenbeck Lonnie ). Holton W. J. Holtzman Cornelius F. Hoorn Kenneth R. Hoover George E. Hopwood, )r. L. D. Horne, Sr. Donald G. Horsman George J. Horton James Columbus Horton Mitchell A. Hovan Thomas Howard William K. Howard George Howell Lawrence L. Howell R. L. Howell T. J. Howie Charles H. Hubbard Milton Hudson W. M. (Bill) Hudson C. P. Huffman Charles W. Humphrey Milton J. Humphries Clarence T. Hundley Charlie Hunter Connie H. Hunter, Jr. William C. Hurley Harry C. Huxham Billy Allen Hurst Howard L. Hurst James E. Hurst Tillman F. Hutto Herman Ibach D. W. Ingram Bruce D. Inman C. L. Irwin Cecil Irwin Robert K. Isenberg J. C. Isenhower A. W. Jackson Clarence W. Jackson Donald M. Jackson Ellis B. Jackson Kenneth A. Jackson W. Lawrence Jackson Michael A. Jacobacci Herbert L. Jacobs

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Max Jaffe Michael R. lames Ralph James Walter Henry James B. F. Jarrell Stanley R. Jefson Cary L. Jenkins, Sr. Harold E. Jenkins Menso H. Jenkins W. L. Jennings Paul Joanos Leif T. Johannesen Porter B. Johns Daniel Leroy Johnson David R. Johnson Edward L. Johnson Floyd Johnson Harry F. Johnson J. D. Johnson Joseph R. Johnson Robert L. Johnson, Sr. Rolfe F. "Slick" Johnson Thomas A. Johnson W. J. Johnson William A. Johnston A. O. Jones Carl L. Jones James C. Jones Jim Jones John S. Jones Leroy Casey Jones Lester W. Jones Nathaniel Jones, M.D. Reefus Jones Robert D. Jones W. Calvin Jones W. H. Jones, Sr. William E. Jones Ben E. Jordan Edwin R. Jordan Arthur Jossim Charles W. lowers John W. June John Justice, Jr Larry Justice F. R. Kahoe, II Chris J. Kalfas George P. Kalv Mitchel C. Katibah Howard C. Kaufold W. B. Keene, Sr. Cordon C. Keith William E. Keith, Jr. Charles E. Kelley Lawrence A. Kelley A. M. Kelly, Jr.

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Eddie ). Kelly Harold Kelly Omer E. Kelly Roy E. Kelly William ). Kelly David E. Kemp Cecil Kendrick O. H. Kennedy Raymond C. Kennedy Roland S. Kennedy Roy F. Kennedy Walter F. Kennedy CFiarles Kent Earl Kerby Victor H. Kerr J. C. Kersey Morton A. Kesler Harry F. Kessinger C. ). Kicklighter P. L. Kicklighter Gus Kierce Russell Kight TFiomas M. Kilgore, Jr. C. T. Kinard, Jr. A. ). King Alton King C. H. King James D. King Jennings King John Pyram King, Sr. TFiomas H. King, |r. ArcFiie A. Kinghorn Robert George Kinghorn W. N. Kinsey Dr. Daniel K. Kirk Byron W. Kirkland William M. Kirkland Joseph E. Kiser, Sr. Joseph E. Kiser, Jr. Charles Kivler, Jr. Richard W. Klebs Marcus E. Knapp A. D. Knight Morris S. Knight Melvin C. Knowles Vernon W. Knox E. A. Koester, Sr. Clifford Kogge Harry Kolchin Tarek Koleilat Floyd C. Koons Roger B. Koons Roger B. Koons, Jr. Henry J. Krages Zoli Jack Kranyik Roger T. Krell

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Stanley Kremensky Carl E. Kunsman Joe Kubos Louis A. Kurta E. R. Kurtz, Jr. Alvin L. Kyle, Sr. Ersie ). Kyle Frank J. Labbance John W. Lacy Benjamin M. Lamb Rufus M. Lamb Harold L. Lambert Charles M. Lance Harlow Land Thomas F. Land W. E. Land Charlie N. Lane E. Edward Lane C. W. Lane Hovis L. Lane Raymond L. Lane Harold F. Langford Raymond Langieri Ben Lanier E. Andrew Lanier William D. Lanier, Jr. Carl Laseman W. J. Lastinger Ralph R. Latner E. P. Lawrence Wallace H. Lawson A. J. Lawton Clayton F. Lazenby A. “Jack" LeClair J. Herschell Lee James B. Leggett Ralph M. Lemley, Sr. Elmer L. Leslie E. B. Lester William B. Lewis James R. Libby J. S. Liddell George M. Lieber E. J. Lincoln, Jr. John E. Lindberg Herman E. Linderman A. L. Lingenfelter Milton Lipkowitz R. A. Litkenhaus Hal W. Lively, Jr. Ansel L. Livingston James W. Livingston Woodrow W. Lloyd R. W. Lockett John R. Loftus Charles K. Logan

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William F. Long, Jr. Keith Lovell Edwin C. Lowe, Sr. James O. Lucas, Sr. George Lundrigan William Lloyd Luttrell, Jr. Woodrow P. Lynch, Jr. Billy R. Lyons Wilbur A. Lyons William E. Lyons R. R. Macomber Arthur D. Macon Bernard J. Magary, Jr. Burt F. Maguire Roy C. Maiden L. M. Maier Harold J. Maiwald Melvin Malcolm Brent R. Malever Stanley Malever Peter Maliniak Robert E. Malott John E. Maloy Gene Mann Ray E. Manning Joseph R. Marcy Kenneth B. Marsh Stanley L. Marsh George B. Marshall, Jr. Adee C. Martin Grady W. Martin Harmon E. Martin Harry I. Martin L. Weeks Martin Maynard M. Martin Robert L. Martin William C. Martin Robert W. Mask C. L. Mason Adis Mathis Cecil E. Mathis Peter R. Mathis, Sr. Paul H. Mathisen William H. Matthews William W. Matthews William H. Maule E. R. Maxey Roy J. Maxwell William H. May W. R. “Buck" Maynard Harold D. Mayo James B. Mays M. A. Mazeau, Jr. Marcel Mazeau Daniel Roscoe McBride George R. McCaffrey

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Clyde H. McCaleb Gene Milfred McCallum James D. McCallum C. D. McCarter Roy W. McCaskill H. S. McClain Elton McClellan Robert McClure, )r. James W. McCord Richard M. McCorkle Eran K. McCormack, Sr. John H. McCormick James F. McCrary Eugene R. McDaniel John L. McDowell Elwood McElhaney Montford J. McGill Milburn McGinniss Clyde McIntyre Thomas K. McKee Dudley D. McKinlay Frank H. McKinley John Paul McLarty, Jr. Earl R. McLaughlin Glenn W. McLaughlin Scott R. McLean George H. McLemore C. Tommy McLeod Walter E. McMahan C. Bruce McRae Robert M. McRae Thomas H. McRorie Jess Meadows Robert P. Mechum Homer Q. Melgaard, III H. Chris Melonson Tommy Melton, Jr. Robert E. Menotte Irvin E. Mercer John C. Merrill James F. Michael A. W. Wes Miller Daniel D. Miller Hinton Z. Miller Ralph F. Miller Richard B. Miller Walter B. Miller James W. Milligan Ian M. Milloy Harold Edgar Mills Mart Mills Ray R. Mills Roy E. Mills John H. Mimbs C. Arthur Miracle, |r. Emerson K. Mitchell

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Frank Terrence Mitchell Ivan J. Mitchell Cordon S. Mobley, )r. Donald S. Modesitt Arthur M. Moegenberg J. D. Moffitt Richard S. Morohovich George M. Moody I. I. Moody Jesse W. Moody ). A. V. Moon Milton J. Moon Joseph V. Mooney J. Fred Mooneyham Chauncey Moore Gleason A. Moore James D. Moore, Sr Joseph S. Moore Leon A. Moore, Jr. Loys FT Moore Norman C. Moore Sanford E. Moore Jesse W. Morgan Mack D. Morgan Ralph T. Morgan Robert E. Morgan Byon M. Morris Daly D. Morris Harry G. Morris Joe G. Morris Lawton Morris P. L. Morris, Jr. Paul H. Morris Arthur I. Morrison Harry Morrison William B. Mosley Philip Mosias Jack A. Motley, Sr. Robert E. Mouro Clyde C. Murphy, Jr. G. H. Murrah, Jr. Elmer A. Murray H. N. Murray W. Scott Murray, Sr. Keith Musgrove William H. Myers Penn E. Myrick Henry Nagel Clark H. Nasworthy William Earl Naylor Dalton M. Neal J. R. Neal, Jr. Curtis G. Neighbors Donald A. Nelson Oscar J. Nelson Anthony Neri

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Charles D. Nesbit loseph E. Neth David E. Newbill Charles Newbold George G. Newhart Herbert B. Newland Leon Edward Newman Bill Nichols Robert L. Nichols Samuel L. Nickell W. Henry Nicols M. Nierenberg Maynard S. Nighbert Charles L. Ninmann Lee M. Noble Vernon M. Nolan Alfred H. Noll Einor T. Nordeng, Jr. James Norman Samuel M. Norman Frank R. Norris C. E. North Harold H. Nygaard Elmer L. Oakley Joseph D. Oblinger, Sr. Oscar A. Odlund Malcolm H. Odom Marvin V. Odom Fred P. Oliveros, Sr. R. F. Oliveros Link Olson Jack E. O'Neal Wallace O'Neal William D. Osborn D. J. Osborne George M. Osborne, M. D. Edward C. Osmond J. C. Othen William Ott Allen Overall Thomas R. Overstreet Edward L. Overton H. Clark Overton Gordon N. Owen Robert D. Owen Cecil Owens James A. Owens William H. Owens, Jr. William J. Owens William N. Pace A. S. Padgett Victor Papa Felix N. Parham James R. Parham Raymond C. Park James O. Parker

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T. J. Parker George H. Partin John H. Patterson Dale E. Patton James G. Paulk Thomas R. Payne W. H. Peacock James H. Peak Harold W. "Charlie" Pearson John M. Peavy E. W. Pellicer James W. Penn William E. Penny Vincente Penoso J. W. Perritt Charles F. Peters Ralph E. Peters C. W. Peterson, Jr. Henry G. Peterson George E. Pettingill Jerry T. Petty William H. Petty James L. Pfeiffer David O. Pheil Henry P. Phelps, Jr. Howard S. Phelps James E. Phillips L. W. Phillips W. D. Phillips William J. Phillips Wiley M. Pickren W. V. Picolo George A. Pierce George H. Pierce Dr. William V. Pierce Jack O. Pinch Alex Pete Pippins Troy F. Pitmon Harold R. Pittman Cecil L. Platt Marvin L. Platt J. C. Plummer Elton E. Pope Leverne Porter Windle Portier Billy D. Powell Walton C. Powell James C. Prescott Edward Preston George M. Prevatt Nathan Nelson Prevatt Thomas R. Priddy William F. Priest Wade Priester George Pringle S. M. Pritchard

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Albert P. Pryle Paul P. Puleo W. L. Purcell Clyde R. Putman Harry Putnal William L. Queen Chenry C. Quinn Mike Rady William H. Railsback Herbert Rain J. Cecil Ramsey Lujack Ramsey Carl C. Rankin Leonard L. Rash L. W. Raulerson Alvin I. Rawlerson Afton S. Rawls Benjamin H. Ray Theron H. Ray Ward A. Rayfield Jesse Y. Reagan Byron M. Reber, Sr. David M. Redstone Gilbert Reed William H. Reed F. L. Reese, Jr. C. A. Register, Sr. Larry C. Register Thomas W. Register B. K. Reichel Hubert H. Reid Stuart W. Reid W. L. Reis Ceilon H. Rentz Calvin Lex Reynolds Jesse E. Reynolds Woodrow W. Rhoden John C. Rice William L. Rice D. L. Richardson G. W. Ridge F. C. Ridgway Robert H. Ridgway William C. Riggs, Sr. Burton M. Riley Robert K. Ringwald J. Ray Rivenbark W. Fred Robbins Edgar S. Roberts Gerald V. Roberts Irvin Rowland Roberts Kenneth E. Roberts Meredith E. Roberts Edgar H. Robie, Jr. Ross H. Robins Arnold R. Robinson

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)ohn M. Robinson Robert F. Robinson, )r. Max W. Robinson Marvis O. Rodgers Roy J. Rodgers Walter C. Rodgers E. C. Rogers, Sr. Edgar C. Rogers, )r. lames W. Rogers Tony N. Rogers Willis W. Rogers W. E. Rolfe H. W. Rollins William P. Root |ohn H. Roper Ben ). Rothschild Raymond L. Rountree William J. Rountree Donald F. Rowe Ivan L. Rowe Kenneth W. Rowden Harold W. Rowland Milton E. Ryberg Louis Safer Moe B. Safer Julius Sais Marion B. Salis Manuel E. Sanchez George Sanders Jesse B. Sanders T. D. Sanders S. G. Sandlin W. S. Sanford, |r. John M. Satterfield John M. Saunders Kenneth Saunders Curtis E. Saxon Nile C. Schaffer H. F. Scharle Hilmer C. Schmidt John E. Schotter Bernie Schramm William S. Schroeder L. H. Scott, |r. Robert F. Scott Noble D. Scroggins Angelo L. Scussel Clinton Seal Joseph J. Seale W. W. Seaward Tony Sebastiani Fernie E. Selby, Jr. Roy L. Sellers Ralph G. Seng Eugene B. Sessions L. B. Sessions

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Mack Sessions Rex Setzer John O. Shackelford Jack B. Shanklin, Sr. Everett J. Sharp Ralph H. Sharp Clifford R. Sheffield, Sr. Homer M. Shelfer I. N. Shepard George Sherman John D. Shinall, Sr John S. Shipp, Jr. James M. Shuman Homer B. Sikes, Jr. F. E. Silas Glenn R. Simmons Bernard L. Simms R. G. Simpkins Amor W. Simpson Howard G. Simpson James C. Simpson, Sr. Lewis M. Sirmans Frank Sirmons Virgil L. Sirmons Abner C. Sistare David R. Sistrunk Raleigh R. Sistrunk Paul D. Sitz Lee E. Skinner Franklin D. Skinner Charles W. Skipper, Sr. Philip Smart C. Smith Charles W. Smith Clarence E. Smith Frederick Smith Harold L. Smith Henry L. Smith Hugh Madison Smith Jackson Lee Smith James C. Smith, Jr. L. Ross Smith M. Durwood Smith Robert H. Smith Roddy W. Smith William E. Smith B. E. Snipes, Jr. Richard Snyder Perry Solomon Sam H. Solomon III Grady L. Sorrell Kenneth I. Sowers J. D. Sparkman Sanford S. Sparkman Charles V. Sparks, Jr. Thomas E. Spencer

PAGE 82

Kenneth Spiers William A. Spinks Walter H. Spurge Carson L. Squires John W. Stancil Lee Stanfield McCoy Stanley, jr. A. H. Starling Larry L. Starling Levi E. Starling Eugene H. Stauber, jr. Roy R. Steed Donald E. Stemburg Dewey A. Stemen Glenn Stephens Paul Roper Stevens Joseph H. Stewart Philip C. Stewart Robert R. Stewart Russell Stewart Harry L. Stiegel Thomas A. St. Mire Warren C. Stokes John A. Stone Donald D. Strauser E. Howard Stringer, Jr. Edward A. Sturgeon Roy H. Suberly George C. Sullivan Harold L. Sullivan Richard A. Sullivan Thomas F. Sullivan George E. Summers, Jr. Nevin M. Summers Alan M. Swanwick t Gerald F. Sweat Rex Sweat Carlton H. Swetland Albert B. Swilpr Bobby F. Swinney F. G. Symonds Richard C. Tackett James P. Tanner Wallace E. Tanner James Tarrant Paul L. Tate Albert E. Taylor James W. Taylor Lee Taylor Linton A. Taylor Robert W. Taylor, Jr. Roy G. Taylor Isaac Roy Teagle, Jr. B. Frank Teele Harold L. Terlecky E. C. Terry

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Ottis C. Teston S. T. "Thad" Thames Arthur Thomas Chalmer L. Thomas Clifford L. Thomas Donald L. Thomas James R. Thomas Norwood B. Thomas Henry S. Thompson John W. Thompson Lannie H. Thompson Leonard K. Thompson Lewis H. Thompson Paul L. Thompson R. R. Thorn, Sr. Earl C. Thrower John Tiernan Earl C. Tiffany Kyle M. Tincher, Jr. F. W. Tingley Fred R. Toney Royce A. Toney J. Marvin Toomey D. J. Torrent James W. Townsend Thomas Tramel M. W. Trammell Finley Tucker B. L. Turner Ed Turner Marvin A. Turner W. H. Turner Wilfred B. Turner Richard M. Tuttle Tommy Tyer Reyno A. Tyre Russell L. Tyre, Sr. Mercer F. Ubele Wayne Ussery L. D. Van Benschoten Edward F. Vandergriff David B. Vaughan David C. Vaughan Richard T. Vermeulen Herman E. Vick John V. Vickers R. A. Vickers Ernest D. Vining R. W. Vogel Henry VonDerHeyde Fred Voss, Jr. Aubrey L. Waff Cecil C. Wainwright Jonathan M. Wainwright Clyde W. Walker, Jr. James N. Walker

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Jerry H. Walker Joseph D. Walker Lemiel E. Walker, Jr Robert D. Walker William D. Walker William M. Walker Larry L. Wallace Harry J. Walters Cecil M. Wamsley Lester C. Ward William G. Ward William F. Ware Thomas J. Warwick George H. Wasson S. E. Wasson III George W. Watkins, Jr. A. E. Watson Charles M. Watson James Watson Tillman Watson Harold L. Watts, Sr. Wm. B. Watts Joseph E. Weatherford, Sr. T. R. Weathersby W. L. Weaver Oscar C. Webb James M. Webber Clarence Webster Robert E. Weed Fred C. Weeks Howard Wehnes, Jr. Lawrence Weiler Charles W. Wells, Jr. David R. West McKira West, Sr. G. R. Wetherington Al Wetmore Bill N. Wheeler, Sr. Billy Wheeler Daniel "Rev" Whiddon Jack G. Whiddon Bruce J. White, Sr. H. C. (Carl) White Jackson F. White Richard H. White Robert J. White David H. Whitehead Sandy Whitelaw Garret C. Whitlatch William M. Whittaker Albert Wichman George E. Wickline Robert F. Wilbert A. L. Wilchar, Sr. Kenneth F. Wiley Lloyd Wilkerson

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Air N. Wilkes H. W. Wilkes Benny T. Wilkins Horace V. Wilkins W. K. Wilkins A. R. Williams, Sr. C. E. Williams Charles D. Williams, Sr. Colin Williams Douglas L. Williams Edgar B. Williams Elliott M. "Jack" Williams Fairleigh Williams Frank Williams George B. Williams, Sr. George W. Williams, Jr. Glenn Williams Harry W. Williams James W. Williams Merrill E. Williams N. Arrie Williams Danny B. Williamson H. Lincoln Williamson Woodrow W. Williford C. Willis Aubrey F. Wilson, Jr. Charles E. Wilson Deri W. Wilson Dwight A. Wilson Frank M. Wilson George L. Wilson Harold N. Wilson Harry E. Wilson Jack C. Wilson Robert A. Wilson W. Ray Wilson William L. Wilson William R. Wilson O. A. Winburn, Jr. Richard G. Windom, Jr. Philip A. Wineman James E. Wingate Wendell H. Winko, |r. Arthur C. Winn, Jr. D. L. Winstead Thornton L. Wise Reford Witt Kingston G. Wolf Frank C. Wood William H. Wood Col. James T. Woodall, Jr. Russell D. Woodard Jack W. Woodley M. M. Woodley, Jr. Clarence E. Woodson, Jr. Robert T. Woodward

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B. Fred Woolsey Edward D. Wright Glen M. Wright Malcolm W. Wright Wilton L. Wright Milton C. Wyche Robert S. Wynn Clarence W. Yeager Floyd G. Yeager Earle S. Yerger, Jr. Lester A. Yeomans John Lewis Yonn R. A. Young Roy B. Young H. ). Youngblood Jimmie B. Youngblood M. L. Youngblood Azell B. Zipperer Lawrence A. Zonker

PAGE 87

Morocco Temple families Frienfcs

PAGE 88

Herb Abbott Elbert A. Adams John Leonard Adams Vernon E. Adams Stanley E. Adamson Hubert E. Aenchbacher, Jr. J. E. Aides, Sr. Robert P. Aitken O. E. Albritton H. S. Albury R. H. Alexander, Ph.D. Maxwell V. Allen Herbert H. Alley Howard A. Altman N. J. Alvarez Daniel Gober Anderson James W. Anderson George B. Apple Minus D. Armstrong George Arnau R. C. Arnau Robert G. Atwell Wally Aycock E. C. Bailey Henry J. Bailey David R. Baker W. C. Baker William E. Baker Richard A. Barger William R. Barker Lowell E. Barnhart Charles P. Barrier C. F. Bateman Carey Baxley Thomas E. Beach Jean L. Beardsley Richard F. Beck A. P. Beckman John C. Beechley Edward Belcher Buford Bell Johnnie Bell

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Luke P. Bell Harry J. Bender Jesse C. Bennett L. J. Bennett William B. Bennett, Jr. Robert W. Benson John L. Berry V. P. Bianco Paul R. Binkley Wilbur Birkitt Ralph Bishop Robert Ray Bishop Leroy R. Bjorkman Norman R. Blackwell Ralph Blackwell Marcel R. Blanco Jack Blanar Trenton A. Blanton Allen I. Block Thomas Blount William F. Blowers J. H. Boggs James M. Bolin Ronald N. Bolser Marvin L. Boos, Sr. Henderson Boree Grady L. Bostick John H. Botterbusch E. L. Bouchelle, Sr. D. Ray Bounds E. R. Bounds Edward Lee Bourne F. L. Bowden Milton C. Bowles Curtis C. Boykin Joe Bracewell Pat H. Bradley B. W. Bradshaw E. F. Bradshaw Francis D. Branan Lee F. Branan Eugene A. Branch

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Chalres A. Brandeburg Levi L. Brannam Lester A. Branning James Bransford Ish W. Brant Lewis B. Brantley R. D. Breckenridge Henry Breitmoser Herman W. Brewer W. R. Bridger Fred C. Brock Herbert Bronson Frank C. Brooks A. D. Brown Areese I. Brown Augustus W. Brown Clarence Brown, Jr. J. Emmett Brown Raymond Brown Richard C. Brown John W. Bryson Frank W. Buchan Reuben H. Buffkin Daniel K. Buie C. A. Buie Mark P. Burke Clarence E. Burnett Harvey M. Burnette James W. Burnette Joe P. Burns, Jr. Jack B. Bush Walter D. Butler Birt C. Byrd Burman Byrd John B. Byrd James Franklin Calhoun R. E. Calhoun Harold C. Campbell Kenneth R. Campbell George Caribaltes Glenn E. Carlisle Frank W. Carnett

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Grady B. Carroll, Sr. John A. Carroll Jesse E. Carter Paul W. Carter Robert L. Carter, Jr. Harrison A. Cartwright James T. Castle William R. Cesery James A. Chaffin Joe H. Chafin C. W. Chancey, Jr. T. L. Chastain John Church, Jr. Carrie G. Clark Philip A. Clark Lawrence C. Clayton Obie Clayton Tommy Clayton C. W. Clifton Frank L. Cline Toney Cline Jerry L. Cobb W. Fred Cobb Herschel Q. Cody E. L. Coleman Carrol C. Colgan Robert L. Collum W. L. Collum Ramon A. Cooey T. T. Cook Winston L. Cook J. D. Cooke Ken Cooksey, Jr. Luther H. Cooper George D. Copeland, Jr. Wallace F. Cordero Oscar W. Cordero Glen E. Cotner James H. Cox Walter A. Cox Lawrence R. Coyner Marion H. Craft

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T. D. Craig George Craven James E. Creamer Edwin L. Crenshaw Eulyn P. Croft Freeman Croft Wilford Croft William E. Croft Robert H. Croom Gary E. Croyle William Q. Cruce William S. Cruse James E. Cumbie Milton T. Cummings J. D. Cundiff Blande M. Dagley Arvid P. Dahl Christy Duncan Dale John W. Daliis Norman H. Daniel Jerry K. Daniels S. W. Danielson John D. Darden William E. Darden, Jr. Benjamin A. Davis Dewey W. Davis G. G. Davis H. D. Davis Lavelle W. Davis R. C. Davis, Sr. William E. Davis Robert J. Day Kermit Daywalt Roy O. Deal Howard M. Dean Harry C. DeBruhl Edward M. DeFoor Julian P. Dekle Herbert DelaBarre Thomas Albert Delegal Clarence C. Dellinger Harold A. Dence

PAGE 93

Laroy Denmark Tommy S. Denmark A. Steve Dennis Clark ). Devane, Sr. )ess W. Devero Richard W. Diaz John R. Diehl George E. Dillinger Charles E. Dixon William EH. Dodd George T. Dolan Stephen M. Donelan Arthur L. Doss, Jr. Clarence B. Douglas Robert L. Douglas Danny D. Dowling H. Dozier Dowling EHorace L. Dowling Lenard L. Dowling Rudolph J. Dowling Elmer K. Drake John E. Dunklin James R. Dunn C. A. Dupont Jas. E. Durst Walter E. Dutton Sam Duvall, Jr. T. M. Dyer R. B. Eadie, Jr. Kenneth L. Earle Norman W. Earls Bernard M. Eaton Clifford W. Echols Ford Edenfield Kenneth A. Edenfield Ronnie Edenfield William M. Edenfield Charles D. Edwards EHarold S. Elliott Robert G. Elliott Robert C. Ellis Gerald T. Elmore

PAGE 94

William Engelman Christian R. Ericksen C. Harvey Estes Louis ). Ezell Kendrick A. Farmer James I. Farris N. A. Farris George A. Ferber Thomas R. Ferguson W. V. Ferguson Joseph J. Ferrara Donald D. Field Dan Fielder Roy T. Fields E. Mack Fillingham William B. Fish C. L. Fitzpatrick J. S. Flinchpaugh Samuel L. Floyd Dan P. Folsom Robert W. Foshee Larry K. French Robert Lee Fridy Ernest L. Friedmann George M. Fries Robert B. Frohock, Jr. John Fulcher Luie R. Fuller Marshall Fullwood Howard E. Funk John Galbas Parron G. Gallop Odie T. Gambill G. F. Gammage Joseph E. Ganci Aurelio F. Garcia Edgar N. Gay Ernest E. Gay Louis Gay Duke J. Geary James Ernest Geer Vance N. Geiger

PAGE 95

Homer ). Ceoghagin Wilbur D. Getz Harley D. Giese Francis Gill Norman F. Gillis Richard H. Glenn Merrill E. Glisson Allred E. Glover Herman Goble William S. Goethe R. L. Golson Dieter R. Goltz Walter L. ). Goodwin Alton Buck Gordon William F. Gouchnour Ernest E. Graham Harvey S. Graham Erich Grammel Roger Grant Roland E. Grant L. H. Green Luther E. Greene Wade M. Greene William Grenson Jasper Griffin Jesse P. Griffin, Jr. Irvin Griffith Fred L. Grigg Fred Grim Fred Grimsley James H. Groves Walter C. Guetherman Eustis P. Gunter James H. Gwynes Johnny H. Gwynes Frank M. Hadley, Jr. Frederick A. Hagel Joseph T. Hagen Ross E. Hair Edward L. Hall James H. Hall Joseph Drew Hall

PAGE 96

Vern Hall Martin Halter Bernt C. Halverson Fred Hamlin Phil W. Hammaker L. H. Hammond Edgar S. Hamon William ). Hamrick Nicola E. Hanna Paul H. J. Hansen Ralph Harbeson James Hardee Jimmie Walter Harden Joseph R. Harding William W. Hare Asa Lamb Harllee Milliage H. Harney Robert L. Harper William L. Harrell Brody C. Harris Cecil Harris David F. Harris John M. Harris Alan E. Hart W. Ben Hart Dr. Wesley C. Harter John R. Hartsfield Walter Harvey William A. Harvey, Jr. Lawrence Hasty Stacy Hatcher Carper D. Hayes E. A. Haygood David H. Haywood Miles C. Hays Philip Hazouri Charles M. Head, Jr. R. L. Headstrom Malcolm C. Hearn R. L. Helmly Loren A. Helms Arnold S. Hempel

PAGE 97

W. S. Henderson Elmer Hendl Valentine Hennemann John H. Hennies Henry S. Herr John C. Herring J. Herman Hesse George H. Hewell D. Dashwood Hicks Wilborn D. Hicks Edward M. Hiers J. Miles Hiers Dan Higginbotham John T. Higgenbotham, III William Hill Gerald D. Hines Raymond L. Hines Fred G. Hobbs William W. Hodges Frank C. Hoffman Raymond A. Hoffman A. W. Hofmeister Charles Hofstetter Harry L. Hogancamp Walter Hogg Robert D. Holden Carlos Vernon Holder W. M. Holder Zachary G. Holland, |r. C. Hollis Percy D. Holloway Ancel D. Holmes Lonnie J. Holton W. J. Holtzman Cornelius F. Hoorn Kenneth R. Hoover George E. Hopwood, |r. Donald G. Horsman George J. Horton Mitchell A. Hovan William K. Howard George Howell

PAGE 98

Reefus Jones W. Calvin Jones W. H. Jones, Sr. William E. Jones Ben E. Jordan Arthur Jossim Charles W. Jowers John W. June Chris J. Kalfas George P. Kalv Mitchel G. Katibah W. B. Keene, Sr. Gordon G. Keith William E. Keith, Jr. A. M. Kelly, Jr. Eddie J. Kelly Harold Kelly Omer E. Kelly Roy E. Kelly David E. Kemp O. H. Kennedy Raymond C. Kennedy Roy F. Kennedy Walter F. Kennedy Charles Kent Earl Kerby Victor H. Kerr Harry F. Kessinger C. j. Kicklighter P. L. Kicklighter Russell Kight Thomas M. Kilgore, Jr. C. T. Kinard, Jr. A. J. King C. H. King James D. King Archie A. Kinghorn Robert George Kinghorn W. N. Kinsey Joseph E. Kiser, Jr. Richard W. Klebs Marcus E. Knapp

PAGE 99

Lawrence L. Howell Milton Hudson W. M. (Bill) Hudson Charles W. Humphrey Milton ). Humphries Clarence T. Hundley Charlie Hunter Connie H. Hunter, jr. Howard L. Hurst lames E. Hurst Herman Ibach D. W. Ingram Cecil Irwin A. W. Jackson Clarence W. lackson Donald M. Jackson W. Lawrence Jackson Michael A. Jacobacci Herbert L. Jacobs Max Jaffe Michael R. James Ralph James Walter Henry James B. F. Jarrell Cary L. Jenkins, Sr. Harold E. Jenkins Menso H. Jenkins W. L. Jennings Leif T. Johannesen Edward L. Johnson Floyd Johnson Harry F. Johnson J. D. Johnson Rolte F. (Slick) Johnson Thomas A. Johnson William A. Johnston Carl L. Jones James C. Jones Jim Jones John S. Jones Leroy Casey Jones Lester W. Jones

PAGE 100

E. A. Koester, Sr. Harry Kolchin Tarek Koleilat Floyd C. Koons Roger B. Koons Roger B. Koons, Jr. Henry J. Krages Zoli Jack Kranyik Roger T. Krell Stanley Kremensky Joe Kubos Louis A. Kurta E. R. Kurtz, Jr. Frank J. Labbance John W. Lacy Benjamin M. Lamb Harold L. Lambert Charles M. Lance Harlow Land Charlie N. Lane Hovis L. Lane Harold F. Langford Raymond Langieri William D. Lanier, Jr. Carl Laseman Ralph R. Latner A. J. Lawton Clayton F. Lazenby James B. Leggett Elmer L. Leslie E. B. Lester William B. Lewis James R. Libby George M. Lieber E. J. Lincoln, Jr. John E. Lindberg Herman E. Linderman A. L. Lingenfelter Milton Lipkowitz R. A. Litkenhaus Hal W. Lively, Jr. Ansel L. Livingston

PAGE 101

James W. Livingston Woodrow W. Lloyd R. W. Lockett John R. Loftus Charles K. Logan William F. Long, Jr. Keith Lovell Edwin C. Lowe, Sr. James O. Lucas, Sr. William Lloyd LuttrelI, Jr. Billy R. Lyons William E. Lyons Arthur D. Macon Bernard J. Magary, Jr. Burt F. Maguire Roy C. Maiden L. M. Maier Harold ). Maiwald Melvin Malcolm Stanley Malever Peter Maliniak Gene Mann Ray E. Manning Joseph R. Marcy George B. Marshall, Jr. Adee C. Martin Harmon E. Martin L. Weeks Martin Robert L. Martin William C. Martin C. L. Mason Adis Mathis Cecil E. Mathis Peter R. Mathis, Sr. Paul H. Mathisen William H. Matthews Roy J. Maxwell W. R. Buck'' Maynard Harold D. Mayo James B. Mays M. A. Mazeau, Jr. Marcel Mazeau

PAGE 102

Clyde H. McCaleb James D. McCallum C. D. McCarter H. S. McClain Elton McClellan Richard M. McCorkle Eran K. McCormack, Sr. John H. McCormick Eugene R. McDaniel John L. McDowell Elwood McElhaney Monttord J. McGill Clyde McIntyre Thomas K. McKee Dudley D. McKinlay Frank H. McKinley John Paul McLarty, Jr. Earl R. McLaughlin Scott R. McLean George H. McLemore C. Tommy McLeod Walter E. McMahan Robert M. McRae Thomas H. McRorie Jess Meadows Robert P. Mechum Homer Q. Melgaard, III H. Chris Melonson Robert E. Menotte Irvin E. Mercer A. W. Wes Miller Daniel D. Miller Ian Milloy Harold Edgar Mills Mart Mills John H. Mimbs C. Arthur Miracle, Jr. Emerson K. Mitchell Ivan J. Mitchell Gordon S. Mobley, Jr. Arthur M. Moegenberg J. D. Moffitt

PAGE 103

Richard S. Morohovich George M. Moody I. I. Moody ). A. V. Moon Milton ). Moon Joseph V. Mooney Chauncey Moore Joseph S. Moore Leon A. Moore, Jr. Norman C. Moore Sanford E. Moore Ralph T. Morgan Robert E. Morgan Daly D. Morris Joe G. Morris Lawton Morris P. L. Morris, Jr. William B. Mosley Jack A. Motley, Sr. Robert E. Mouro Clyde C. Murphy, Jr. Keith Musgrove William H. Myers Penn E. Myrick Henry Nagel Clark H. Nasworthy Curtis G. Neighbors Donald A. Nelson Oscar J. Nelson Anthony Neri Charles D. Nesbit David E. Newbill Charles NewBold George C. Newhart Herbert B. Newland Bill Nichols Samuel L. Nickell M. Nierenberg Maynard S. Nighbert Charles L. Ninmann Lee M. Noble Alfred H. Noll

PAGE 104

Einor T. Nordeng, Jr. James Norman Samuel M. Norman Frank R. Norris C. E. North Elmer L. Oakley Joseph D. Oblinger, Sr. Oscar A. Odlund Wallace O'Neal George M. Osborne, M. D. Edward C. Osmond J. C. Othen William Ott Thomas R. Overstreet Edward L. Overton H. Clark Overton Gordon N. Owen Robert D. Owen Cecil Owens William H. Owens, |r. William J. Owens William N. Pace Victor Papa Felix N. Parham Raymond C. Park James O. Parker T. J. Parker George H. Partin John H. Patterson Dale E. Patton Thomas R. Payne W. H. Peacock James H. Peak Harold W. "Charlie" Pearson John M. Peavy E. W. Pellicer James W. Penn William E. Penny Vincente Penoso Charles F. Peters Ralph E. Peters Henry G. Peterson

PAGE 105

Jerry T. Petty James E. Phillips W. D. Phillips William j. Phillips Wiley M. Pickren W. V. Picolo Jack O. Pinch Troy F. Pitmon Harold R. Pittman Cecil L. Platt J. C. Plummer Elton E. Pope Leverne Porter Windle Portier Billy D. Powell James C. Prescott Edward Preston George M. Prevatt Nathan Nelson Prevatt Thomas R. Priddy William F. Priest Albert P. Pryle Paul P. Puleo W. L. Purcell Clyde R. Putman Harry Putnal Chenry C. Quinn Lujack Ramsey Carl C. Rankin L. W. Raulerson Alvin I. Rawlerson Afton S. Rawls Theron H. Ray Ward A. Raytield Jesse Y. Reagan Byron M. Reber, Sr. David M. Redstone Gilbert Reed C. A. Register, Sr. Thomas W. Register B. K. Reichel Hubert H. Reid

PAGE 106

Stuart W. Reid W. L. Reis Ceilon H. Rentz Calvin Lex Reynolds jesse E. Reynolds Woodrow W. Rhoden )ohn C. Rice D. L. Richardson C. W. Ridge Robert H. Ridgway William C. Riggs, Sr. Burton M. Riley W. Fred Robbins Edgar S. Roberts Gerald V. Roberts Meredith E. Roberts Edgar Robie, Jr. Arnold R. Robinson John M. Robinson Robert F. Robinson, Jr. Max W. Robinson Marvis O. Rodgers Willis W. Rogers W. E. Rolfe H. W. Rollins William P. Root Ben J. Rothschild William J. Rountree Donald F. Rowe Ivan L. Rowe Harold W. Rowland Milton E. Ryberg Moe B. Safer Julius Sais George Sanders S. G. Sandlin John M. Satterfield John M. Saunders Kenneth Saunders Curtis E. Saxon H. F. Scharle Hilmer Schmidt

PAGE 107

John E. Schotter Bernie Schramm William S. Schroeder L. H. Scott, Jr. Robert F. Scott Clinton Seal Joseph J. Seale Tony Sebastiani Fernie E. Selby, Jr. Roy F. Sellers Ralph C. Seng Eugene B. Sessions Rex Setzer John O. Shackelford Jack B. Shanklin, Sr. Everett J. Sharp Clifford R. Sheffield, Sr. Homer M. Shelfer I. N. Shepard John D. Shinall, Sr John S. Shipp, |r. James M. Shuman Homer B. Sikes, Jr. F. E. Silas Glenn R. Simmons R. G. Simpkins Amor W. Simpson Howard C. Simpson Lewis M. Sirmans Frank Sirmons Virgil L. Sirmons Raleigh R. Sistrunk Paul D. Sitz Lee E. Skinner Franklin D. Skinner Charles W. Skipper, Sr. Philip Smart Clarene E. Smith Frederick Smith Harold L. Smith Henry L. Smith Hugh Madison Smith

PAGE 108

Jackson Lee Smith L. Ross Smith Robert H. Smith Roddy W. Smith William E. Smith B. E. Snipes, Jr. Richard Snyder Sam H. Solomon, III Grady L. Sorrell J. D. Sparkman Sanford S. Sparkman Thomas E. Spencer Kenneth Spiers William A. Spinks John W. Stancil Lee Stanfield McCoy Stanley, Jr. A. H. Starling Levi E. Starling Eugene H. Stauber, Jr. Roy R. Steed Donald E. Stemburg Dewey A. Stemen Paul Roper Stevens Joseph H. Stewart Philip C. Stewart Robert R. Stewart Russell Stewart Thomas A. St. Mire Warren C. Stokes Donald D. Strauser E. Howard Stringer, Jr. Edward A. Sturgeon Roy H. Suberly Harold L. Sullivan George E. Summers, Jr. Nevin M. Summers Gerald F. Sweat Rex Sweat Carlton H. Swetland James P. Tanner Wallace E. Tanner

PAGE 109

Paul L. Tate Albert E. Taylor Lee Taylor Linton A. Taylor Robert W. Taylor, )r. Isaac Roy Teagle, Jr. B. Frank Teele E. C. Terry Arthur Thomas Chalmer L. Thomas Clifford L. Thomas James R. Thomas Henry S. Thompson John W. Thompson Lannie H. Thompson Leonard K. Thompson Lewis H. Thompson R. R. Thorn, Sr. Earl C. Thrower Earl C. Tiffany F. W. Tingley Royce A. Toney Thomas Tramel M. W. Trammell B. L. Turner Marvin A. Turner W. H. Turner Wilfred B. Turner Richard M. Tuttle Tommy Tyer Reyno A. Tyre L. D. Van Benschoten Edward F. Vandergriff David B. Vaughan Richard T. Vermeulen Herman E. Vick John V. Vickers R. A. Vickers Ernest D. Vining R. W. Vogel Henry VonDerHeyde Fred Voss, Jr.

PAGE 110

Aubrey L. Waff Cecil C. Wainwright Jonathan M. Wainwright James N. Walker Joseph D. Walker Lemiel E. Walker, Jr. Robert D. Walker William M. Walker Larry L. Wallace Harry J. Walters Cecil M. Wamsley William G. Ward William F. Ware Thomas J. Warwick George H. Wasson George W. Watkins, Jr. Charles M. Watson James Watson Harold L. Watts, Sr. Wm. B. Watts Joseph E. Weatherford, Sr. Oscar C. Webb Robert E. Weed Fred C. Weeks Howard Wehnes, Jr. Lawrence Weiler Charles W. Wells, Jr. David R. West McKira West, Sr. G. R. Wetherington Al Wetmore Daniel "Rev" Whiddon Jack G. Whiddon Richard H. White Robert J. White David H. Whitehead William M. Whittaker Albert Wichman George E. Wickline Robert F. Wilbert Kenneth F. Wiley Lloyd Wilkerson

PAGE 111

Airl N. Wilkes Horace V. Wilkins W. K. Wilkins A. R. Williams, Sr. C. E. Williams Douglas L. Williams Edgar B. Williams Fairleigh Williams Frank Williams George B. Williams, Sr. George W. Williams, Jr. Glenn Williams James W. Williams Merrill E. Williams N. Arrie Williams H. Lincoln Williamson Woodrow W. Williford C. Willis Aubrey F. Wilson, Jr. Deri W. Wilson Dwight A. Wilson Frank M. Wilson George L. Wilson Harold N. Wilson Harry E. Wilson Jack C. Wilson Robert A. Wilson W. Ray Wilson William L. Wilson James E. Wingate Wendell H. Winko, Jr. Arthur C. Winn, Jr. Reford Witt Frank C. Wood William H. Wood Col. James T. Woodall, Jr. M. M. Woodley, Jr. Clarence E. Woodson, Jr. B. Fred Woolsey Edward D. Wright Glen M. Wright Wilton L. Wright

PAGE 112

Milton C. Wyche Robert S. Wynn Earle S. Yerger, Jr. Lester A. Yeomans John Lewis Yonn R. A. Young Roy B. Young H. J. Youngblood M. L. Youngblood Azell B. Zipperer Lawrence A. Zonker

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Morocco Temple families ahO Frfcnt>s

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Robert J. Absher W. J. Adams Forrest L. Agnew T. J. Algard Harvey P. Allison W. I. Allison Millard Altman Clyde H. Andrews, Sr. Thomas N. Applewhite )ohn Aspinall Howard L. Bailey William C. Bailey George A. Barber jerry F. Barber Robert L. Barnes Munir S. Batteh Charles Behm Paul Bennetheun Dale S. Betz Edward C. Booth, jr. Randolph H. Boree George T. Boyle Isaac D. Brandt, III C. C. Brannan Edward Brantley William Clyde Brantley Ira W. Brown Gerald L. Buchanan jack B. Burns William S. Calbert Elwood C. Caldwell Philip Cannon Phillip H. Cannon Ron G. Carmichael Carlyon Carroll Anthony Gregory Carson John S. Carter Nathaniel L. Carter, Jr. William O. Chancey Wade H. Chesser

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Martin S. Clance B. Scott Clark Alexander B. Clifton Neil L. Coleman Roscoe D. Coleman C. C. Connors H. C. Cooper, Sr. Bob Craig O. Dewitt Crawford lames A. Crosby J. Roy Crowther J. W. Dalzell Samuel B. Daniel, Sr. Allen W. Davidson, jr. George L. Davidson Robert A. Dawson L. ). DeMotsis Frank Dense lames I. Dorman W. W. Dulaney Marvin H. Dunn lames L. Dupont Gordon C. Eaddy A. J. Easterling Clinch C. Edenfield F. C. Edenfield Walter G. Fallin Carl L. Feit Michael H. Feit E. D. Floyd Arvine Foreman Elmer L. Fulghum, )r. George W. Geiger, )r. Edwin G. George, )r. )oe Ff. Gill William B. Gillespie Russell ). Godwin Charles W. Goff Roy Goodson Winfred L. Green

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Arthur R. Greene, Jr. Wade M. Greene, Jr. Ervin B. Gross H. W. Gunter McHugh Gunter Keith L. Haid George D. Hale, Sr. Richard E. Halligan James R. Halter Harry Hansgen Clayton Hardy John E. Harlee Wilbur E. Harrelson Wiley Hart E. E. Harvey Fred T. Hays R. E. Higginbotham William R. Hindman William V. Hogan Emory M. Holsenbeck L. D. Horne, Sr. James Columbus Horton R. L. Howell William C. Hurley Billy Allen Hurst Harry C. Huxham C. L. Irwin Robert K. Isenberg Ellis B. Jackson Kenneth A. Jackson Stanley R. Jefson Paul Joanos Porter B. Johns Daniel Leroy Johnson David R. Johnson Robert L. Johnson, Sr. Robert D. lones John Justice, Jr. Charles E. Kelley Lawrence A. Kelley

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Cecil Kendrick Roland S. Kennedy ). C. Kersey Morton A. Kesler Jennings King John Pyram King, Sr. Joseph E. Kiser, Sr. A. D. Knight Vernon W. Knox Alvin L. Kyle, Sr. Rufus M. Lamb Thomas F. Land W. E. Land C. W. Lane Raymond L. Lane J. Herschell Lee Ralph M. Lemley, Sr. Woodrow P. Lynch, Jr. Wilbur A. Lyons R. R. Macomber Brent R. Malever Robert E. Malott John E. Maloy Stanley L. Marsh Grady W. Martin Harry I. Martin Robert W. Mask William H. Maule E. R. Maxey George R. McCaffrey Gene Milfred McCallum Roy W. McCaskill James F. McCrary Milburn McGinniss Glenn W. McLaughlin John C. Merrill James F. Michael Ralph F. Miller Richard B. Miller Walter B. Miller

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James W. Milligan Ray R. Mills Frank Terrence Mitchell Donald S. Modesitt jesse W. Moody J. Fred Mooneyham Gleason A. Moore James D. Moore, Sr. lesse W. Morgan Harry G. Morris Paul H. Morris G. H. Murrah, Jr. Elmer A. Murray H. N. Murray W. Scott Murray, Sr. Dalton M. Neal |. R. Neal, Jr. Leon Edward Newman Robert L. Nichols W. Henry Nicols Vernon M. Nolan Malcolm H. Odom Marvin V. Odom Fred P. Oliveros, Sr. Link Olson D. J. Osborne Allen Overall James L. Pfeiffer David O. Pheil Henry P. Phelps, Jr. L. W. Phillips George H. Pierce Dr. William V. Pierce Alex Pete Pippins Wade Priester S. M. Pritchard Mike Rady Herbert Rain J. Cecil Ramsey Benjamin H. Ray

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Kenneth E. Roberts Ross H. Robins Walter C. Rodgers E. C. Rogers, Sr. Edgar C. Rogers, )r. Tony N. Rogers Marion B. Salis W. S. Sanford, )r. Noble D. Scroggins W. W. Seaward George Sherman Bernard L. Simms James C. Simpson, Sr. Abner C. Sistare David R. Sistrunk C. Smith Charles W. Smith lames C. Smith, Jr. M. Durwood Smith Perry Solomon Kenneth I. Sowers Carson L. Squires Larry L. Starling George C. Sullivan Richard A. Sullivan Thomas F. Sullivan Alan M. Swanwick Bobby F. Swinney F. C. Symonds Richard C. Tackett James Tarrant Roy G. Taylor Ottis C. Teston Paul L. Thompson John Tiernan Kyle M. Tincher, Jr. D. J. Torrent Russell L. Tyre, Sr. Wayne Ussery David G. Vaughan

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Clyde W. Walker, Jr. Jerry H. Walker William D. Walker A. E. Watson T. R. Weathersby W. L. Weaver Bill N. Wheeler, Sr. Billy Wheeler Sandy Whitelaw C. C. Whitlatch A. L. Wilchar, Sr. Benny T. Wilkins Charles D. Williams, Sr. Colin Williams Harry W. Williams Danny B. Williamson Charles E. Wilson William R. Wilson Richard G. Windom, Jr. Philip A. Wineman Thorton L. Wise Kingston G. Wolf Russell D. Woodard Robert T. Woodward Floyd G. Yeager Jimmie B. Youngblood

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Morocco Temple More Nobles, Families Friends

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O. Bauman Hector Conrad David Lilly Curtis A. Shuman Curtis A. Shuman Paul Josiah Snyder A. E. Cooper F. B. Hodges