Citation
The Story of the Miracle of Miami Beach

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Title:
The Story of the Miracle of Miami Beach
Language:
English
Physical Description:
72 pages : illustrations ; 34 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
History -- Miami Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Education -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

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General Note:
Title from cover.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
UF Special Collections, Florida History
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The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. This item may be protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. §107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
034539481 ( ALEPH )
958434216 ( OCLC )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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THE MIAMI BEACH
FIRST NATIONAL BANKRESOURCES OVER $19,000,000
OFFICERS
F. Lowry Wall
President
THOMAS J. PANCOAST CHARLES H. ALCOCK
Vice President Cashier and Trust Officer
JOHN J. HUTCHESON FRANK SMATHERS, JR.
Vice President Assistant Trust Officer
ASSISTANT CASHIERS
E. E. Stockwill F. Rouse Smith
Colton L. Lohr H. H. Culbertson
COMMERCIAL, BANKING TRUST AND CUSTODIAN DEPARTMENTS SAFE DEPOSIT AND STORAGE VAULTS NIGHT DEPOSITORY
Oldest and Largest Bank in Miami Beach Corner Lincoln and Alton Roads
- -4 - - - - - -- - - - - - ---




The PAN AMERICAN Solar System
was first to use the following
FOUR IMPORTANT IMPROVEMENTS
ROCK WOOL ,HORIZONTAL TANK
N o. Double. GlzdHae/ ha esHte
No. 4 A Solar Heater Guaranteed not to Freeze
Any Place in the U. S. A. at Small Additional Cost These Assure Unequalled Efficiency
When we first put these improvements into general use our competitors said we were crazy; today they are trying to imitate.
100% More Heating Surfae on our coil pipes, and approximately 20% more metal surface, per square foot, to the sun's rays than other types of solar heaters. For ,this reason we can heat water much faster.
PAN AMERICAN SOLAR HEATER, Inc.
E. L. BRIM AN, President P. J. OweNs, Vice-President R. E. BooT, Secretary-Treasurer
2730-34 N. W. SECOND AVENUE, PHONE 3-5226, MIAMI, FLORIDA 212 WEST BAY 'STREET, PHONE 3-5588, SAVANNAH, GEORGIA D. B. BRIGMAN, Vice-President and General Manager TERMS IF DESIRED 1, 2, 3 YEARS TO PAYNO DOWN PAYMENT Member Florida State Bureau of Publicity




2 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
2T
Red and Gray Sun Room by "Grand Central Wicker Shop"
(Selected by and for "HOUSE BEA UTIFUL'S" Bride House of 1940)
Our clientele of past twenty years has included such distinguished names as:
Mr. W. K. Vanderbilt Mrs. G. F. Baker, Jr. Countess De Frasso
Miss Anne Morgan Mr. Win. Ziegler, Jr. Miss Frances Alda
Mr. Dupont De Nemours Mr. Walter P. Chrysler Mr. Jascha Heifetz
Mr. Clarence H. Mackay Mrs. Win. Fahnstock Mr. "Al" Jolson
Mr. Edward F. Hutton Mrs. J. K. Willys Mr. Harry Richman
Mr. John McEntee Bowman Mrs. T. Suffern Taller Mr. Thomas Meighan
Mr. Clarence Dillon Mrs. 1. Straus
Miami-Biltmore, Miami The New Breakers, Palm Beach
Roney-Plaza, Miami Whitehall, Palm Beach
The Everglades, Miami Bath & Tennis Club, Palm Beach
Hotel Flamingo, Miami Seminole Club, Palm Beach
Our Manufacturing Experience of Twenty YearsOur Convenient Location Bein g Out of the High Rent AreaOur Personal Attention to Every Detail
enables us to offer the finest quality rattan fu rniture in exclusive styles or made to your
specifications-at prices that mean substantial savings.
A Visit to Our Showrooms Will Convince You
PAUL L. DUJARDIN WILLIAM B. BRADY
President Secretary & Treasurer
GRAND CENTRAL WICKER SHOP, INC.
1253 DADE BOULEVARD AT ALTON ROAD MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA Phone 5-1931




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 3
The CAILLACMiami Beach's New and Exclusive
The CA ILLACHotel on the Ocean
0
Towering majestically above the green palms and white sands of Miami Beach at Collins Avenue and 39thi Street arises THE CADILLAC,
This hotel, steam-heated, with 125 rooms and penthouses, is an expression of the most modern in construction-luxuriously furnished and providing unlimited public space. Guests may lounge in two large lobbies and mezzanine-stroll out of doors through walks and tropical gardens-or again enjoy a dip in the attractive swimming pool-or along the block front of private beach. Here the new Cabana Club becomes a popular social center-as well as the beautiful dance patio planned for those who would dance under tropical stars. The exquisitely appointed dining room and cocktail lounge provide further convenience and enjoyment for guests, as well as a completely equipped beauty salon, barber shop, card and mahjong rooms and novelty shop.
* ~* Mr. E. H. Dine, owner of THE CADILLAC, first became asso~s~h' iciated with Miami Beach in 1924. At that time he came from Chicago to regain his health. Having regained it he decided ~? to make Miami Beach his home.
A year later, 1925, he acquired The La Flora, a 42-roomn hotel L.~. which he operated until 1935. In that year he became owner of
The Netherlands, a hotel of 105 rooms, where for five years ~ he was a successful and genial host.
Mr. Dine, who is now associated with Mr. Nathan Bonin of Detroit, Michigan, may well be proud of THE CADILLAC, L his newest achievement in hotel ownership and construction.
We alue tis anof vision-whose creation of THE CADILLAC provides another beauty spot in Miami Beach.
_ FOR RESERVATIONS WRITE OR WIRE
DIRECTLY ON THE OCEAN FRONT E. H. DINE, MANAGING DIRECTOR
A Federal Savings
Institution Which
Has Never Paid Less
Than 3% Dividends
On Insured Savings
The First Federal Savings ahd Loan Association of Miami is the largest mutual savings institution in the South. It is the oldest Federal in America, operating under United States Charter Number One. The account of each savings investor in the First Federal is insured up to $5,000 by the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, of Washington, D. C., an instrumentality of the United States Government. In addition to the payment of liberal dividends, the Association has accumulated many times the required reserves.
Fii~st Federal savings come largely from conservative persons who seek maximum safety and fair return, free from uncertain business conditions and the ris !-s of market fluctuation.
IRESOURCES OVER .$16,000,000.00
FIRST DEALPL
SAVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI
One Hundred N. E. First Avenue
W. H. WALKER, President




4 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
SMAIPT dnd NEW
*DANCES and ENTERTAINMENT Where
.SWIMMING POOL to
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
FREE PARKING Live
* PALM GARDENS in
" -Miami
Typical Royalton Bedroom
-ATilE ROYALTON-Owned and operated by the Midwest Hotel Manage4)( ment Co., Inc., who also operate the Marlboro Apartments, 425 S. W. 10th Avenue, Miami. Deluxe bedroom apartments-completely furnished and equipped OPEN ALL YEAR -All outside rooms-in the exclusive Southwest residential section of Miami.
BLACKS TONE Your Inspection Most Cordially Invited... Write
Hotel and Cabana Club J. M. BAER, Manager, ROYALTON HOTEL
ALFRED STONE 131 S. E. FIRST STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA
MANAGING DIRECTOR.
ANNOUNCING A NEWCOMER TO
WIOD'S EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS
1 ~"The Teacher Hour"
0D EVERY SUNDAY AT 4:15 P. M.
D CONDUCTED BY MRS. LESSIE COLLINS
(Educational Director of WIOD)
Added to these "regulars":
University of Chicago Roundtable
University of Miami Radio Workshop
WIOD Classroom of the Air
Five Important News Analysts at Collins Avenue
Overseas Broadcasts Between 17th and 18th Streets
Latin American News
0
Music, Science, History Programs
NEW NINETY ROOM HOTEL "Always a Star Performance"
Always one important thought,. . . . . . ....... Your comfort and convenience.
NBC Red
610 K. C.
A STONE'S THROW FROM THE OCEAN




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 5
~1rTT'ThUTILITIES KEEP PACE
The FLORIDA TEA CH ERi Keeping pace with the rapid growth of the Greater Miami area,
"Florida's Finest Monthly" the Peoples Water and Gas Company has spent more than a million
TRADE MARK REGISTERED dollars during the past year in expansion of service facilities to take
care of the development of Miami Beach. The executives of this firrm ALICE W. CRAWFORD, Editor are ever alert to the duties of their company in providing first clas-Q
-0- service to the public.
A mothl pulictio devtedto he nteest of he cholsteaherForeseeing a continuation of the development in this area, the A mntly ubicaio deotd t te iteest o th shoosteahes, Florida Power and Light Company currently is expending about and others interested in educational work, to acquaint the public with $2,500,000 in Plant construction and expansion for the generation of the progress of education. sufficient power to care for public needs for many years to come.
This great company is built on the keen foresight of its officials in ~,y,, /~-~--~.-contemplating sectional expansions and taking steps to provide ex'r'o cellent service.
EDUCATI OC''ATION BOOK OF THE SOUTH
wo The James 0. Jones Company of New Orleans has completed a
OF AMERICA splendid compendium of Southern personalities, entitled "The Book
of the South." The volume contains more than 500 pages, smartly PUBLISHED ON OR ABOUT THE FIFTEENTH OF EACH MONTH illustrated. The intimate stories of hundred of leaders in the South
EXCEPT JULY AND AUGUST were compiled by the Southern Editorial Association, with Hal LeyBy shon, brillian young editor of The Miami Daily News, as editor-inchief. Mr. Leyshon and his colleagues have done a masterful job and THE TEACHER PUBLISHING COMPANY the book is a distinct contribution to knowledge in the South.
Post Office Box 2648 Miami, Florida_____DownownOffies aluet BildngPhon 3-267Beach Churches DownownOffies aluet BildngPhon 3-267In the rush, bustle and hurrah of life at Miami Beach, the religious J. VICTOR MALONE, 247 Park Ave., New York Representative side has not been neglected. Founder Carl G. Fisher, in the early
HELEN HOCKETT, 311 Duval St., Jacksonville Representative stages of the city's development, donated land sites for two churches.
Other donations have constructed edifices since, so that, today, Miami Entered as Second Class matter April 6, 1939, at Post Office at Beach boasts of the finest churches in Florida.
Miami. Florida, Under the Act of March 3. 1879
Volume VI JANUARY, 1941 Number 5 Beach Schools
Miami Beach schools have kept pace with the rapid growth of Official Publication this miracle city, with a high school and elementary institutions that
FLORIDA CENTENNIAL ASSOCIATION rank among the best in the state. Florida's sixty-seven counties boast
A non-profit corporation organized to assist in arranging for the over 2,700 schools, with more than 14,000 teachers. The progress of
celebration of the one hundred, years of Florida statehood. Miami Beach is exemplified in having schools of top rank.
Executive Offices
326 EAST FLAGLER STREET, MIAMI Monsignor Barry
Among leaders in Miami Beach cultural life, the redoubtable SUBSCRIPTION PRICE Monsignor William Barry of St. Patrick's Parish and the Barry school
Two Dollars per Year Single Copy, 25 Cents is outstanding. Father Barry has devoted many arduous years to the
Advertising Rates on Request development of his parish and school. These institutions always will
stand as a monument to his Christian aggressiveness. Father Barry is The pages of THE TEACHER are open to expressions of opinions which one of the greatest assets of Miami Beach.
are not injurious in any way by the fact of publication
The Fisher Memorial
A TRIBUTE TO THE PIONEER So that the memory of Carl Graham Fiher will never be forgotten
We learn from earliest history that, among many races, there have been and that future generations shall be cognizant of his great leadership 0 in developing Miami Beach from a mangrove swamp into America's
pioneers ...brave adventurers who courageously blazed trails and prepared greatest resort city, the Fisher Memorial Association has been orthe way for others to follow. These men, inspired by vision and an urge to ganized. Plans are being evolved by the committee for a perpetual overcome every obstacle in the path of their progress, have been our true leaders memorial to this great man, who was not only a sportsman and busiand builders, ness executive, but a profound friend of this city.
Farther back than history records we learn of the Norsemen who braved Junior College Movement
the dangers of unknown oceans when the earth was believed to be flat. Among Florida's department of education should make a serious study our early records we learn that Christ commanded His disciples to "go into all of the Junior College movement, as started in New Hampshire. There the world" and carry the story of a new religion. This religion proved so pow- is a steady growth of the idea of junior colleges in cities of secondary erful that it became the strongest influence in causing its followers to seek new size in many states. The proposal offers two years of education
land whrei thy cold njo fredomof orsip.beyond the level of the secondary school and aims to meet the higher land whrei thy cold njo fredomof orsip.educational needs of communities in which they are located; general
Later pioneers, in search of adventure or untilled fields, led the way into education for those who are not planning to attend a university and founding new nations. So has it been all through history that the first to endure specialized preparation for particular occupation, with appropriate the hardships and make the way easier for others to follow were not always the courses of college grade for adults. ones who received due credit and material rewards for their unselfish sacrifices. Splendid Action
America would never have been discovered, nor would Florida have been The National Audubon Society, 1006 Fifth Avenue, New York,
fored utof helus, ropca widenes, ad t ot ee fo or hrd foe-is sponsoring a national camp for adult leaders, the object of which foreaufthers lush, tropinica wilderness had iter otal beenabor our hard fe- is to provide teachers, youth leaders and other interested adults with
fater' fghingan winig i te fceofevey bstcl imgiabl. t i een field experience and practical program suggestions for developing possible that this "Magic City" would still be uncut swamplands and unnavigable general interest in birds, mammals, insects, plants and other wild life. waters of Ponce de Leon's day. Campers at the resort, established at Medomak, Maine, will enjoy
Theefreitis it gratplasue hatI aveth pivieg an oporunty two weeks out of doors participating in informal field classes, and Therefogre ito is e wi th e re tyseasur ta I laetpivin es lee an oppotunity certificates describing the work covered will be awarded those who
of ayng riutetooneoftheciy'san sttes lvig prsnalie, a otstndng successfully complete the program. This is splendid action. pioneer of yesteryear, whose proven ability, vision, indomitable courage and ______accomplishments, along with his associates, made it possible for us to enjoy the Splendid Brochure
fruis ofthei labrs.Dr. Frank N. Freeman, Dean of the School of Education, UniverALICE W. CRAWFORD. sity of California, has contributed materially to the progress of educa-




6 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
7i e FLORIDA TEACHER tion through authorship of a splendid brochure on "Solving Handwriting Needs." He has been doing research work in handwriting
"Florida's Finest Monthly" since 1907 and his booklet is a valuable contribution for schools.
Copies of the brochure can be obtained for ten cents each from the LIFE MEMBER Zaner-Bloser Company, Columbus, Ohio.
, /...Progressive Thought
Every Florida school teacher should read an editorial in the
February issue of Woman's Home Companion which suggests Spanish
as a primary foreign language for American schools in the practical
interests of economic and cultural hemisphere solidarity. The editorial
is a contribution of progressive thought.
Fact Finding
Fundamental economic issues in national defense are discussed
by Harold G. Moulton in a booklet just published by the Brookings NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED STATES Institution, Washington, D. C., copies of which may be secured from
ALICE W. CRAWFORD, Publisher the Maurice and Laura Falk Foundation, Farmers Bank building,
ASSOCIATE AND CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Pittsburgh, Pa. For those interested in fact finding arguments, the
booklet is distinctly worth while.
ED. R. BENTLEY, Attorney VIVIAN YEISER LARAMORE
Editor, Florida Law Journal Poet Laureat of Florida
Lakeland MRS. W. BRUCE MacINTOSH Safety By Compulsion
MRS. GRACE BROWN President Miami Garden Club Massachusetts has taken the leadership in highway safety by
Publicity Director
Miami Beach Senior High School MAUDE KIMBALL MASSENGALE passage of a compulsory automobile liability insurance act, and other
GRACE DEXTER BRYAN Journalist states are falling in line with measures patterned after this bill,
Author and Lecturer
Coral Gables MANA-ZUCCA known as the Hampton Act. The American Association of Casualty
JOSEPH T. BURLEIGH, S. J. Composer and Surety Underwriters, New York, is actively engaged in sponsorPrincipal, Gesu School MRS. FRANCIS M. MILLER
Writer ing such legislation in all states. The association will gladly supply
L. GRADY BURTON information regarding such acts to members of the Florida Legislature.
State's Attorney MRS. T. V. MOORE
Wauchula National Safety Chairman,
Federation of Women's Clubs
DOYLE E. CARLTON, Attorney Milton Weiss
Ex-Governor of Florida GRACE MURRAY
Trustee Stetson University Past-Pres. Miami Music Club Milton Weiss, brilliant young lawyer, who received his high school
Tampa MRS. JOHN M. MURRELL education in Miami Beach schools, has been elected as a member of the
MRS. HENRY CARR Author and Attorney Dade County Board of Public Instruction. He is the youngest person
Past President, N. L. A. P. W. MRS. MARY NOEL MOODY
LESSIE 0. COLLINS President U. D. C. ever chosen for this office and, as a member, he will exert splendid
Radio Commentator, The Teacher Hour Plant City vigor in assisting in the advancement of Dade County education.
LAURA CUSHMAN MRS. ETTA V. MENDENHALL
Principal, The Cushman School President, W. C. T. U.
HATTIE CARPENTER Tampa Tourists and Conventions
Journalist MRS. EDWIN F. MONTGOMERY One of the prime needs of Miami Beach is a well-established,
MRS. CHARLES J. DOUGHERTY Pres. Florida Federation of Music Clubs well-financed Tourist and Convention Bureau to promote summer
Press. Miami Branch, Lake City
National League of American Pen NATHAN MAYO business, in addition to the great influx of winter-season visitors.
Women Commissioner of Agriculture A movement is afoot to establish such a bureau and it should be joined
MRS. RAYMOND EDWARDS Tallahassee by all hotels for an active campaign. One of the purposes of the orWriter MAX MEYER
D. NEIL FERGUSON, Attorney Professor of Psychology ganization should be the construction of a Miami Beach convention
Ocala Supervisor of Mod. Language
Instruction hall with sufficient seating capacity to handle a major meeting. The
BERTHA M. FOSTER University of Miami National Education Association's annual convention could be brought
Dean of the School of Music MRS. JOHN E. NORMAN
University of Miami Publicity Director, Miami Branch of to Miami Beach if such an institution were available. It is the hope
AGNES M. GLEASON the National League of Am. Pen of The Florida Teacher that progressive hotel managers and business
Supervisor of Music Women firms will join in this forward movement.
Cleveland, Ohio MRS. VINCENT HILLES OBER
MRS. J. IRA GORE Pres. National Federation of Music
Poet Clubs Suggested Improvement
MRS. J. AVERY GUYTON Norfolk, Virginia A cement walk, at least 60 feet wide, fronting the length of LumPast-Pres., Miami Women's Club DR. J. RIIS OWRE
Professor of Spanish mus Park-and properly floodlighted at night-would afford a wellPubliHer GORENesarsoFlid University of Miami
Publisher, Gore Newspapers of Florida illuminated, beautiful promenade which would attract thousands of
Ft. Lauderdale MRS. THOMAS J. PANCOAST
JOHN CLAYTON GIFFORD President, Miami Beach Woman's Club additional persons to Miami Beach. The City Council is welcome to
Professor Tropical Forestry MARIE TELLO PHILLIPS this suggestion.
University of Miami Poet, Novelist, Literary Editor
MRS. M. LEWIS HALL GRACE PORTERFIELD POLK
President of P. E. 0. Sisterhood State President, National League of Thomas J. Pancoast
MRS. WADE H. HARLEY American Pen Women Today's first citizen of Miami Beach undoubtedly is Thomas J.
Poet MRS. CHARLES K. QUACKENBUSH Pancoast, stalwart pioneer who has enjoyed the~pleasure of seeing a
MfRS. LEONARD W. HASKIN Dade county Tuberculosis Association mangrove swamp developed into the metropolis which stands on these
Dade County Health Unit MRS. WARREN QUILLIAN
SIMON HOCHBERGER Junior League of Miami shores today. The accomplishments of Thomas Pancoast are a monuInstructor of Journalism RUSSELL A. RASCO ment to his vision and his vigcr. He has been unrelentingly progresUniversity of Miami Dean University of Miami Law School sive, always laboring for a greater city. His charming wife and his
MRS. J. R. HOLT PAUL E. RAYMOND splendid sons have joined him in the traditional Pancoast zeal in
American Association, University Dean of the College of Law
Women Stetson University contributing to the betterment of the city. We warmly salute the
West Palm Beach DeLand Pancoast family.
DAVID HEFFERNAN PEARL SAFFORD
Judge, Civil Court of Record, Dade Musician, Composer
County MRS. FRANK SMATHERS Everglades National Park
U. J. HISS Y. W. C. A. Board National parks are good businesses to have around-especially in
Business Manager
University of Miami MRS. J. JULIEN SOUTHERLAND states that attract millions of tourists. During 1940, 16,741,855 men,
Past Director, Miami Beach Flower
GEORGE E. HOLT, Attorney Show women and children visited the national parks in these United States.
Member of Faculty
University of Miami MRS. T. T. STEVENS For many years past, there have been columns and columns of
Past-Pres. ade County
MRS. RICHARD L. HOXIE Federation of Women's Clubs publicity regarding the Everglades National Park, to be established
Founder, Miami Branch
National League of American Pen DR. LUDD M. SPIVEY in South Florida. It is the hope of The Florida Teacher that Governor
Women President, Florida Southern College Spessard Holland will be more active in promoting the establishment
Washington, D. C. MRS. SYDNEY WEINTRAUB of this park than was his predecessor. It is our hope that Mr. Holland
VERMAN KIMBROUGH Girl Scout Executive
President, Ringling School of Art LILLIE REED ZORTMAN will not make a political football of this park, but will have the aid
Sarasota Poetry and Feature Articles of competent men who will secure action to complete Everglades
Advisory Editors and the organization with which they are affiliated do not neces- National. We need real men who are worthy of good salaries for doing sarily endorse Pll the statements or opinions offered in this magazine or all claims made in advertisements. the worthwhile job.




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 7
The Mirdcle ofX
* .. .Midrol Pedch
by J. N. Lummus
A Pioneer Developer and First Mayor of Miami Beach
(COPYRIGHT, 1941)
Owing to circumstances over which we have no control, we
are unable to reproduce all of the photographs contained in the book of the original story, "The Miracle of Miami Beach," and
for that reason the following article is a condensation of the ....
original manuscript, with appropriate illustrations.-The Editor.
CARL G. FISHER Photo by Tooley-Myron
F or over one thousand years, since the early Norsemen, the vision persist- overboard, the men swimming with them to land. Lifeboats were then launched
ence, perseverance and money of man have been the important factors and provisions, workmen, tools, etc., were rowed to shore. Leaving the prospective
in the discovery, conquest and development of America. coconut planters to carry out their work of preparing the land in readiness for the
It is no different today than when Christopher Columbus used an egg to planting, the schooner sailed to the Island of Trinidad where a cargo of nuts get funds from Queen Isabella, to discover other lands. He had vision, persist- was purchased. ence and perseverance . but the Queen had the m o n e y.P a rt of the site selected for the initial coconut grove is now known as
It is no different today than in 1567, when Don Pedro Menendez dle Aviles, Lummus Park, the popular bathing and recreation beach made possible by the built a Spanish Mission on what is now Miami Beach, to Christianize the Indians, author of this book. establish a port of call for his ships and exploit this area for the benefit of the Having had no previous experience in clearing South Florida mangrove swamp Spanish Crown. He had vision and money . . but lacked the other essentials, lands, Osborn and Field soon realized they had undertaken a real job. To peneIt is no different today than in 1870 when Henry B. Lum and son, Charles trate the underbrush for only a few feet on the ocean front was impossible without H. Lum, landed on the ocean side of what is now Miami Beach, and seeing a the use of a machete, and they were harassed by millions of mosquitoes, sand flies, few coconut trees growing by the water's edge decided that here was a home rattlesnakes, moccasions, coral snakes, rabbits, coons, and other denizens of the with a future and a fortune. The Lums. had vision, persistence, perseverance and swamp.
...some money, so they returned to Red Bank, New Jersey, and interested a Assembling their portable house on the ocean edge, the coconut planters looked
few friends in their venture. around for some entrance into the swamp and soon found an old Indian trail
When Henry B. Lumn and his son, Charles H. Lum, returned to their Red which had been in use by the Tekesta tribe long before the Seminoles were here, Bank, New Jersey, home, following their visit to Miami Beach in 1870, their tales and by the Spanish Menendez when he built his mission in 1567. They used this of coconuts actually growing along the water's edge, fell upon fertile field, trail, after widening it, as a highway for their mules. Coconuts and "copra" were in great demand those days, and the Lums and their They had accomplished very little in preparing the land for coconut planting
friends could visualize enormous profits in a "coconut growing" enterprise in this when the schooner arrived with one hundred thousand nuts,-only to find that the area. landing was unsatisfactory. For a short time the sea was calm and the coconuts
The Lums purchased a large tract of beach land from the State of Florida for were rafted ashore in burlap bags, but a "squall" set up and this method could seventy-five cents per acre and Henry B. Lum homesteaded one hundred and sixty not be used, so the nuts were dumped overboard to let the wind and tide carry acres from the United States Government. Twelve years later, to be exact, in them landward. This meant that thousands of nuts drifted by the ocean current, 1882, the Lumns returned, after having interested Ezra Osborn and Elnathan T. fa0ot fMaiBah nytit-ih huado hscrowsalte
Field of Red B ank in their venture. .- -to Miami Beach, and the trouble of planting seemed insurmountable.
Osborn and Field made the trip from New Jersey to Miami Beach and were It was impossible to plant them in rows, because of the undergrowth of the
so well "sold" on the idea that they purchased a strip of land about sixty-five swamp, so they were planted willy-nilly in small holes with the tip of the nuts miles in length along the ocean extending from the Lumn holdings north to Jupiter. shwnhihsteuuamtodbtwtotaycnfrtystoieto.
It is no different today than in 1912, when my brother, J. E. Lummus, our By spring, the nuts were finally planted, a few baing planted on Cape Florida, associates and myself purchased the Lumn holdings and decided that the future and again the schooner arrived with another cargo, which came from Nicaragua. of Miami Beach did not lie in growing coconuts, but would eventually be a real They were floated ashore, and were planted along the Indian Trail on Miami "Paradise Under the Sun" for the sun seekers of the North. We had vision, Beach. persistence, perseverance and, . some money, but more of this will be told later. By fall, the job was finished, so the camp was moved to the Hillsboro House
judging from the prospects of coconut growing along the peninsula of Miami of Refuge above Boca Raton, where a third schooner load, brought from Cuba, Beach, as explained by Osborn and Field to friends in New jersey, the wealth to was planted along the shore in that section. This procedure was repeated during be gained was almost likened to the rubbing of an "Aladdin's Lamp". In fact, it the next two years and until a total of three hundred and thirty-four thousand was estimated by the potential coconut growers that each nut planted would coconuts had been planted along the Atlantic Ocean. become a tree and each tree upon reaching maturity would produce at least one The cost of buying the nuts, clearing the swamp and planting had been far good nut each week. So Osborn and Field, while in New Jersey, employed greater than anticipated, so that at the end of the third year, the finances of the
twenty-five men from a life-saving station, and acquired from the Government company had been virtually exhausted, so Field returned to New Jersey to seek aid. several ancient life boats which they reconditioned. To all "back home," Field told of the vast possibilities of coconut growing,
They bought some mules, wagons, tents, a portable house, tools and provisions, and what he, Osborn and Lum had already done on the Florida peninsula. and sailed on a Mallory Line boat for Key West, where they chartered a small Particularly did he tell of the venture to a friend, John S. Collins, a prominent schooner to transport their goods to Miami Beach. citizen of New Jersey, with the result that Collins advanced Field five thousand
When the schooner arrived off the coast of Miami Beach, it was found that dollars to carry the scheme as far as possible to a successful conclusion.
the water was too shallow to permit the boat to dock, so the mules were shoved In the meantime, the Lums had interested Henry Robinson, of New York




8 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
He finally purchased the share of Osborn, hut Field was reluctant to sell, so Collins became his partnet. Then came the question as to what they should plant on the lands. Collins, after considerable investigation, decided upon the avocado, but Field wanted to plant grapefruit.
The task of clearing the land was the greatest obstacle. A crew of negroes was hired to clear the mangrove swamp, but it was slow and expensive work, . .. . .costing about seventy dollars to three hundred dollars per acre. Later Collins purchased a sixteen ton thirty-five horse power tractor, built to his own design ;~-. ~'~.- .~ ~ ~with special knife-bladed wheels. When it arrived, it speeded up the work to
a marked degree, and the cost was reduced to less than thirty dollars per acre.
Finally, a suitable tract of land located west of Indian Creek at about the intersection of Pine Tree Drive and 40th Street, was cleared, and Collins began to A plant avocados. Field demurred, but during the summers of 1907 and 1908, a
total of two thousand, nine hundred and forty-five trees were planted, regardless of Field. Again Collins was up against the problem of protecting the young trees, and when Field came to see how things were going and realized the avocado venture was proving a failure, he sold out to Collins. Therefore, in 1909, Collins WASHINGTON AVENUE AT TWELFTH STREET became sole owner of sixteen hundred and seventy acres of land, running four and
Where the present City Hall now stands. one-half miles north on the Atlantic and fronting Biscayne Bay on the west.,
Thomas J. Pancoast, son-in-law of Collins, paid a visit to the property, City, in their part of the venture to the extent that they supplied the work and primarily to see for himself where all the family money was going, and if his he, the finances, father-in-law was not being fooled. However, when he arrived at the Miami
However, all was not rosy for the coconut "wizards." Nature has a peculiar Beach farm in 1911, he was surprised at the progress which had been made and way all her own. It takes at least seven years for a coconut palm to bear nuts, the quality of the produce being raised, and instead of remaining a skeptic, he This fact seemed to have been overlooked by the planters, unless they expected to became an enthusiast. wait "seven lean years" until they could begin to harvest for "seven fat years." Pnos npce h etl ce ffte-nlwClis n on h
Neither did they take into consideration that rabbits thrive on young coconut Red Bliss potatoes, planted by Collins, were most prolific and delightful to eatfronds, and coons are crazy about digging up the parent nut before it takes root animgenwIrspotesbnghvsedntewne!Heloswacs but heysoo fond ot. heydecded o gve he enizns f te samp of Cavendish bananas, other tropical fruits and garden vegetables growing with some real appetizing food, so they sent north and bought apples and corn which Z
they1 doe0ihsrcnn n ctee hogottesapi natmtt mangoes and avocados on the plantation.
theydosd wth tryhnie an sctteed hroghot th swmp n a atemp to When Collins mentioned the construction of a bridge connecting with the hold the rodents in check, but "Brer Rabbit' and his friends must have waxed f ast growing village of Miami across the bay, this was almost the "straw which fat on this type of diet for it did not have the desired effect. brok th ae'sbc.
After the final planting at Hillsboro, the portable bous~e was brought back to boetecmlsbc.
Miami Beach and became the home of Cap)tain Carney, supervisor of the planting, Bunvna eet-n er fae Clissodfrltersl en
and several other members of the party who wished to remain on the Beach. The thtPnos ruh Is iet im ecadh n iahri-a
Carney property was located where the White House Hotel now stands at the and brothers-in-law, Lester and Arthuir Collins, went to work in earnest on the north end of Lummus Park. bridg-e venture.
In 186,ChalesH. Lm, eelng he all f MamiBeah, bilta to-soryThe most likely route was surveyed and a franchise applied for, but was house with a roofed porch, and brought his bride there to live. This house was ored because fo them opston ofam teheadga Biscayne Naviatio Copn whc located on the present site of the Tides Hotel, fronting Lummus Park. According oertdbasfmMiito imiBahlnigaticanSretnte
to te rcors, enr B.Lumof ed ank Ne Jeseyfater f Carls1H Lummnus development.
bum fheromcom ounry lan was puRaed, ask thew firs y whither of settles nou Finally .after a unique ruse, the charter was granted, and work 'was presen frmiahmi Beach. This dedurcrded a hi s white mai of etpae 305,u started on the bridge. This bridge was to be built of wood, but engineers in peetMaiBah Thsdeisrecorddi ok2 of Dades County Floida charge realized thatI to sink piling in the Bay would soon mean that the woodCaptain Carney dismantled his house and moved it to Coconut Grove, where eaigtrdtol a h iln eo h ae' de necsiaigrpae
he staked out a one hundred and sixty acre homestead, and was followed by a ments very often. To offset this danger, the pilings were sunk in sheet iron number of others. Captain Carney still lives at Coconut Grove. caIgadcnrt ordit h aigaon h od
For several years, the Lums lived a happy and not altogether lonely life. While still half way across the Bay, the contracting company failed, and the
The ha plntyof ishandgam, rise chckes, imabeas, abbges bets, Collins crowd was faced with an almost insurmountable problem. With exhausted tomatoes, celery, bananas, and paw-paws. Later they moved back to New Jersey. crdtadvtulyncshteyadykew hih ayotr.
Although the coconut planting venture had proven a very definite failure, The coming of Carl Graham Fisher to Miami Beach, while considered an
primarily because of the inability to market even a small portion of the ripe nuts, accident, should be accredited to the vision of John H. Levi, a marine engineer, the faith of John S. Collins in the productivity of the soil of Miami Beach had who represented a firm of boat builders from whom Fisher had purchased several not lessened, so in the early nineties, he came down to look over the situation. yahs
After being convinced that with proper water, fertilization, and care, the land Carl G. Fisher, one of the most dynamic characters of the early days of could be made productive, of other fruits and vegetables than coconuts, he began automobile pioneering, was born on a farm in Indiana. 'At an early age, he to dicker with Osborn and Field for their holdings in the lands north of the bum showed much interest in athletics, especially in bicycling, and leaving the old holdings. The Lum land was just south of Lincoln Road as it is now located, homestead, he landed in Indianapolis, where he became a pal of Barney Oldfield. running from ocean to bay, and south to what is now Biscayne Street. -,<
H OTUAL OF VA JBROWN
BUILT I9I4'
FIFTH STREET AND ALTON ROAD--1912 THE FIRST HOTEL
Where the Chamber of Commerce Building is now located. Between First and Second Streets on Ocean Djrive




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 9
These two "'barnstormed" the country, attending country fairs where they raced the old wood burning engine, with its big bell top, was spouting smoke and the for the benefit of the public and the small purse they got for the exhibition. whistle and bell were going full tilt, and those Key Westers, who had never seen
At that time, the few automobiles in existence used oil lamps for lighting a steam engine thought the Devil was coming to town.
and by a co-incidence, Fisher and a friend, James A. Allison, of about the same In 1897, one year after the Florida East Coast entered Miami, I returned to age, met a man who claimed to have patented a metal cylinder to hold carbide the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad as Chief Train Dispatcher, of which job I gas under pressure, and which could be used for automobile headlights, have always been proud. I stayed with the railroad for another seven years and
Fisher and Allison bought a half interest in the patent for a few hundred in 1904 returned to Miami to make my future home. My brother J. E. Lummus, dollars and incorporated the company under the name of the Prest-O-Lite Com- had the commissary contract with the Florida East Coast on the extension of the pany of America. They built a small plant to make carbide gas, with which to road to Key West, with supply houses at each camp on the various islands. fill the cylinders under pressure. Their product was so well received by the I took the job of making a boat trip each week to the islands to check the
automobile industry that they were forced to build a dozen factories at strategic supplies and get the money. This lasted until 1908, when we sold the commissary points throughout the east, and money flowed in like water. business.
After a few years, Fisher and Allison were millionaires and they sold their My experience on the keys gave me the vision about building a city fronting holdings in the Prest-O-Lite Company to the Union Carbide Company, Fisher on the ocean, so in May 1912, I formed a company with my brother, J. E.
taking a real vacation by yachting, hunting and fishing. Lummus, and associates, and purchased the holdings of Charles H. Lum and
Edmund Wilson, of Red Bank, New Jersey approximating five hundred acres of swamp lands which are now a part of Miami Beach. In October 1912, we purchased eighty adjoining acres from Jennie H. Richardson, of Detroit, Michigan. We paid Lum and Wilson eighty thousand dolars, thirty thousand dollars in cash and the balance a few months later. John C. Gramling, Miami attorney, and Avery C. Smith, who owned a small wooden bath house south of Biscayne Street, represented the sellers. I have forgotten the amount we paid Mrs. Richardson for her eighty acres, but it was all swamp, mangrove and palmetto, and some of this land was under water at high tide.
The three companies to start the development of Miami Beach were The Ocean Beach Realty Company, otherwise known as the Lummus Development, The Miami Beach Improvement Company, otherwise known as the Collins Development, and The Alton Beach Realty Company which was known as the Fisher Development.
The Ocean Beach Realty Company, or Lummus Development, was the first S.to start developing a subdivision and filing its plat with Dade County. Collins was second and Fisher third. None of this territory was incorporated as a town or city at that time.
The Lummus crowd filed their first plat in Book No. 2 of Plats, Page 38, Records of Dade County, Florida, July 9, 1912, and we had sold over forty thousThe original wooden bridge, longest of its kind in the world at and dollars worth of lots before Collins filed his first plat on December 11, 1912,
the time. in Book No. 2 of Plats, Page 47. Fisher's first plat was filed on January 15, 1914,
On one of these leisurely yachting trips, John H. Levi, the marine engineer, Book No. 2, Page 77.
delivered a new yacht to Fisher, at Cairo, Illinois, where Fisher had invited several The Ocean Beach Realty Company had a cash capital of fifty thousand friends to meet him for a voyage down the Mississippi, around the Florida Penin- dollars, but we operated on borrowed money at eight per cent interest, and the sula and up the Atlantic Coast. He invited Levi also, money was loaned more on account of my brother and myself than upon the
A series of minor accidents on the way down the "Father of Waters," includ- security the company could give. Some of our associates who were of the geting some navigation troubles, caused Fisher to terminate the cruise at Mobile, rich-quick type wanted to sell and get out, so my brother and I bought the stock C, of the promoters and I resigned as President of the Southern Bank & Trust ComAlabama, and ship the boat by rail to Jacksonville. At the last minute, it was cf th prmtr and I resign s rein the Soheank I trus coine
pany in 1913, and sold my bank stock, realizing the big job ahead. I took active found that a bridge en route was too low to permit the yacht to pass, so Fisher arra',e wih Lvi o cntine te vyag vi waer.charge of our beach development after buying out the "promoters." From this arranged with Levi to continue the voyage via water. time on we owned practically all of the Ocean Beach Realty stock. My brother Being a stranger to Florida waters and the many difficulties to be endoijntered remained as President of the Bank of Bay Biscayne and Southern Bank & Trust in those days by shallows and reefs, Levi and party finally arrived at Miami to Company. rest and relax. Levi liked the place so well that he wired Fisher to join him in Miami instead of Jacksonville.
Fisher came to Miami and enjoyed a real vacation. Although having retired and with a fortune in the banks, he was not the type of man to sit idly and let a real opportunity slip by. The narrow strip of land called "the Peninsula," (now Miami Beach) intrigued h'm.
On several fishing trips to the Gulf Stream he had noticed some activity on'V the ocean front, which was being done by the Lummus interests, and also a half finished wooden bridge headed toward Miami Beach from the mainland at 15th Street. Upon making inquiry as'to the owner of the unfinished bridge, he was informed that it was John S. Collins.
When Collins'started the bridge and needed funds, as Pres'dent of the South- k
ern Bank & Trust Company, I loaned him ten thousand dollars and my brother, J. E. Lummus, President of the Bank of Bay Biscayne, loaned him fifteen thous- ..7
and dollars in order to make the bridge a reality. But the difficulties encountered proved that more funds were necessary and here is where Fisher became a real Santa Claus for Coll'ns. He loaned Collins fifty thousand dollars on the bridge
bonds and received, also, two hundred acres of land, a strip between eighteen 710
hundred feet wide from the ocean to the bay. The bridge was finally completed "
and became known as the world's longest wooden bridge, which was later torn r..
down and the right of way sold by Collins to the Venetian Causeway people who built islands along the road.
Clearing land at Ocean Drive and Twelfth Street in 1913. AS I have said before, it is vision, persistence, perseverance and money of man A. that has discovered, conquered and developed America. All the aforesaid Fisher said to me: "l see that you are clearing a great deal of land on the Peninmentioned men were in that class, and so was I, my brother J. E. Lummus, and sula. What are you going to do?' I told him that we were going to build a city those men who risked their money and future with us in developing Miami Beach. fronting on the ocean. He wanted to know the amount of land which we owned
Coming to Miami from Bronson, Levy County, Florida, in 1895, before the and I told him. "Well," said Fisher, "Why don't you do it all at one time?" Flagler Railroad was completed into the city, I saw that there was a great future Early in 1913, Carl G. Fisher came into my office and introduced himself. here. I remained in Miami until after the first train of the Florida East Coast Although he had been living in Miami, on Brickell Avenue (fronting the bay.) Railway puffed its way into the village over wobbly tracks, and observed the I told him we had a very good reason and that was the lack of funds. This converdelegation from Key West, who came up by boat to see its arrival. When they sation must have started something, for within six weeks after my brother and I saw the train, many of them ran for the hammocks and it was no wonder, because met Fisher. we had arranged to borrow one hundred and fifty thousand dollars




10 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
THOMAS J. PANCOAST
N. B. T. RONEY IRVING S. COLLINS
from him at eight per cent interest. But we also gave him one hundred and five thing to get a.mift. acres of land off the north end of our property as a bonus for the loan. We had To see "Doc" Dammers in action after the boats had brought the crowd to paid one hundred and fifty dollars per acre for the land we gave Fisher. This Miami Beach was worth the money. He would size up the people, and after deal, and this alone, started the big development on Miami Beach. It could not giving them a real sales-talk on the future possibilities of this "Ocean Heaven for have been done otherwise. After this was arranged, Fisher then loaned Collins the Sun Seekers," he would reach for the hat and draw out a number. As each the money to complete the Bridge. passenger on every boat had a number, someone drew something.
Fisher, later, used to jokingly say to his friends in my presence, "Get Lummus The Lummus Company bought chinaware by the carload and gave it away to give you some land and see if it does not break you to put it into shape .........at these auction sales, and the publicity spread to other sections of the country, but he was always with us and with the Collins crowd on anything that pointed resulting in a record crowd whenever we held a sale. We did not get the prices towards making Miami Beach what we hoped it would be . . and what it is we actually wanted for the lots, but we were satisfied. Later, Dammers staged today. auction sales for Fisher and Collins.
On the same day that we borrowed the one hundred fifty thousand dollars After we had put the land into good condition, north of Fifth Street, Glenn
from Fisher, we gave him a mortgage on all swamp lands lying west of Washington H. Curtis, who was training men (for the government) to fly in aeroplanes, Avenue, as recorded in Mortgage Book No. 39, Page 85, Records of Dade County, approached us for the use of a certain tract until 1915, and this was the first Florida. We kept lands East of Washington Avenue free and clear in order that aviation field in Dade County, and, I presume, in Florida. The Lummus Coinwe could give a clear title. pany did not charge Curtis any rent as we considered it good advertising. The
Now that we had the one hundred and fifty thousand dollars borrowed from noise of the planes in flying kept the Miami populace looking toward Miami Fisher, we proceeded to carry out our development of a "City By the Ocean." Beach. We bought the passenger boat "~Biscayne" and two others of similar size and ELLING LOTS in one section while clearing the swamps in another was
inaugurated a boat service from Twelfth Street, now Flagler Street, on the Miami J part of our work. We hauled kerosene to the Beach by the barge loads to side to Biscayne Street, Miami Beach, with fares for passengers at five cents burn the palmetto and mangrove. Only the small stuff would burn, so wc each way. chopped up the remainder and used the logs and stumps for reinforcing the
Of course, the five cent fare did not pay for the operation of the boats, but dredged materials as it was pumped in, until it was built up from three to the difference was made up in the sale of lots to the visitors. Everyone coming- twelve feet. to Miami wanted to know what was going on across the Bay, as it could be seen As this work was going on, we were bothered with rattlesnakes, hundreds of from the Miami side that something was being done. The traffic was also good cos huad frt n iloso oqios h atenkswr
for the Smith and Hardie Bath Houses, as the boats left each side every thirty dangerous, the coons a nuisance and the rats and mosquitoes were pests. Jim and minutes. The boat trip was so popular that some of the people rode back and Frank Hardee, who had charge of the clearing, disposed of the rattlesnakes. forth all day as it cost only ten cents per hour for the Bay trip. Incidentally, my My son, Thomas J. Lummus, with an old black dog named "Joe" (which I realestte aleman n te batsdid god bsinssowned) took care of the coons, some of which we tried to train into pets, but In the development of the west side of our properties, which included the they were such thieves . they even tried to hide my shoes. The rats and Fisher and Collins crowd to the north, we were forced to build a wooden bulk- mosquitoes we could not handle until I sent out an S.O.S. for cats-any kind of head to hold the silt pumped in from Biscayne Bay by the suction dredges. cats. It was not long before it looked as if everybody in Dade County had a Sometimes the water pressure would wash out hundreds of feet of this bulkhead, cat he did not need, and sent it to me. This was just what I wanted. I turned requiring entirely new wood work for the replacing, and this was very expensive, the cats loose on the beach and within a short time, the cats had eaten all the
Roy Wilson, engineer for the Lummus Company, with John H. Levi, in charge rats. I don't know what became of the cats.
of the Fisher work, and W. E. Brown, his engineer, cooperated to the fullest But ,. .we still had the sand flies and mosquitoes, so I took the matter up
extent-resulting in soundings being taken in the bay and on the land through the with our representative in Washington. Fisher and I offered to pay the Governpalmetto and mangrove swamp, to find out how much material we needed for the ment men to come here and teach us what to do about mosquitoes. The Govfill and whether that material was in the bay before striking rock. erment sent the men who had cleared the Panama Canal of mosquitoes, with no
Although the sale of lots to individuals brought over on our boats was expense to us except conveyance for these men and the assistants whom we sent rather regular, we needed a "speeding up" in order to be able to contin 'ue our with them. Thus we had the benefit of their knowledge. development, so we decided to hold a series of auction sales in the winter. The As we understood it, re-claiming or dredging in the bottom of the Bay to idea was' suggested to us by one E. E. (Doc) Dammers, who must have, been fill in swamp lands ,as something new in Florida, so Frank B. Shutts, attorney the world's premier auctioneer of lots, because he proved it. representing Carl Fisher and I representing the Lummus Company went to
Dammers had a partner named Gillett and of course, like all auctioneers, they Tallahassee to obtain a permit from the State of Florida. Park Trammell was had to have something to "attract" the public, or as they called it a "come-on," Governor at that time and he had to consult with the Attorney General and and in this case it was free dishes, sets of china, crockery, glassware and an assort- other members of the Internal Improvement Board, before we could get what we ment of other premiums. The 'free" part was that you did not have to buy any- wanted.




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 11
After much consultation and consideration, we finally secured the permit and On a barge, I sent a wagon drawn by a couple of mules, to meet the party they all wished us success in our new development, of men when they arrived from the Miami side and to bring them to the Beach,
But we were not through by any manner of means. After obtaining the but with the exception of Mr. McDonald, they all walked.
State's approval, we had to get the approval of the Federal Government. Crate When the Commissioners looked over what the Collins crowd, the Fisher D. Bowen, attorney, representing the Fisher interests, and I, representing the interests, and the Lummus Company were doing and planned to do, they agreed Lummus Company, made a trip to Washington to secure a government permit to accept a deed to the land where Collins Avenue is now located, and the road
for the dredge work. Our engineers had prepared the plans and all necessary along Collins Canal to the Bay to connect with Collins Bridge. data, and the original Clark Construction Company of Baltimore, Maryland, Dade County was to pay one-third of the cost of building these roads, the
was the best bidder. Lummus Company one-third, and Fisher one-third. It took ten men one week
According to the plans, we had to move six million cubic yards of bay bottom to cut a right-of-way from where Mr. Collins was then having the canal dug to on to the land. When I speak of "We," I mean Carl Fisher and the Lummus South Beach. I started cutting the right-of-way at South Beach and Fisher met
Company let the contract together and the work was done at a cost of ten cents me with his cutting at Fourteenth Lane, or midway on the Carney tract. This per cubic yard, or in other words six hundred thousand dollars for the dredging. was the first road suitable for automobiles, built on Miami Beach, and it was
Our (the Lummus Company's) part was three hundred and fifteen thousand completed in 1913.
dollars and Fisher's was two hundred and eighty-five thousand dollars. One of There is an old saying that "All is not gold that glitters"-well, who would the most interesting features of the Government permit was that it was Federal have thought when looking over the mass of mangrove swamp, underbrush, tall Permit No. 1, for work of this kind in the State of Florida. grass and vines, that it would be necessary to re-plant with grass the entire
Realizing that in any real estate development, sidewalks are a necessity, Mr. beach, or peninsula after we had filled in the land? But it so happened.
Bowen and 1, after having secured in Washington the essential permits for pump- After the dredge work was done, we looked over a wide area of sand and ing the bottom of the bay to fill in the mangrove swamp, decided to visit Atlantic muck and thought that after the silt settled, all we would have to do would be City, to look over that city's famous boardwalk. to survey our properties, and sell more lots to build a city by the ocean. This
After returning to Miami Beach, we immediately went to work on the con- was not the case. The filled-in land became dry, and the gentle breezes were no struction of sidewalks, but did not build them as wide as in Atlantic City. Our longer zephyrs. The winds actually blew up sand storms, so we had to plant sidewalks were only ten feet in width, and the first one was laid along Biscayne grass on our man-made ground. Street to the ocean, thence along Ocean Drive to Fifth Street. North of Fifth We decided upon Bermuda grass, and believe me, it was a real job. I emStreet, we built a walk ten feet wide of concrete. All of these walks were com- ployed school children on Saturdays, giving them free rides and paying them ten pleted long before Miami Beach was incorporated, and the streets south of Fifth cents per hour. The children had fun out of it, and many of them would run Street were paved by the Lummus Company. This company built many addition- over to the ocean for a brief dip and return to plant more grass seed., Believe it al sidewalks. or not, those little children really did good work, and as children usualy do,
Up to this time, development of Miami Beach had consisted of clearing the made play out of it.
swamp, dredging the Bay bottom, pumping in the material to fill in the land Early in 1914, Miami Beach had sidewalks, several streets, beautiful ocean
and constructing the bulkheads. The sale of lots on land already high and dry and bay frontage, a canal, and a wooden bridge, connecting it with Miami. had also been started. With the completion of the Collins Bridge, it was necessary However, the main thing lacking was the need of more houses. The Lummus to have a road built to South Beach, connecting it with these developments. Company had auctioned off lots and sold other lots. Fisher and Collins had
In 1913, after meeting Fisher and arranging to borrow the money, and after auctioned off lots and sold more lots, but the mere fact of owning a lot did not the dredge contract was let in July, 1913, my brother, J. E. Lummus, and I mean that the purchaser intended to build a house. arranged to have the county commissioners visit the development with us. In the So I decided to stimulate the home building program, by inserting a full party was John S. Collins, Carl G. Fisher and J. A. McDonald. page advertisement in each of the Miami newspapers. I offered to give away
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12 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
twentv-five lots on Collins Avenue a lot to ANYONE who would build a No, this was not "Shylocking"-but real business. He had the money. We
home. I specified the type of house and the lowest cost. Some of my friends needed it and were able to pay the premium he asked, because we were making said, 'Lummus, what if you don't get any answers ?" I replied, "Just wait." money with his money. It was a fair deal all around.
Within twenty-four hours, I had received telegrams and applications from Among our other creditors were Frank A. Furst and R. P. Clark, from whom
various sources, not only in Miami, but from other cities. In fact, a total of we borrowed one hundred and twenty thousand dollars. We also borrowed from seventy-five applications for free lots, upon which the applicant agreed to build B. F. Potter and others, thirty thousand dollars. I mentioned the names of these a home according to my specifications, were received. Instead of giving away men to show that we had friends who had money and that they were also good twenty-five lots, I gave away thirty-five, and that was the beginning of the build- sports. We did not borrow from the bank but kept that source in reserve in order in,- development on Miami Beach. that we could borrow from them to pay interest if necessary. I could almost hear
Of course, my specifications of a house were not anything like what they are that interest working day and night.
today. They were really typical beach houses, inexpensive yet modern at that In building homes, we were cognizant of the fact that we must have water
time; some of them of the bungalow type while others were two stories. Many for drinking purposes, as well as for washing, so we solved our fresh water probof these first houses erected on Miami Beach are still standing, having passed lem by sinking wells about fourteen feet deep, and the water was pumped by wind through the hurricanes and the boom days. mills which were placed in the alleys behind the houses. Each well served a five
To many of you reading this true story of "~THE MIRACLE OF MIAMI thousand gallon tank. The water was all right for house use but for drinking BEACH", and those of you who have never lived in this section, as well as many purposes, we had to catch rain water as the well water was brackish. Our sewer of you who have and do live here, the methods of financing the development of system was composed of septic tanks which served the purpose at that time. a mangrove swamp into what it is today, the most important winter playground In addition to water, a lighting system was needed. In the early days, of
in the world, may seem a bit fantastic. course, we used kerosene, etc., but as our houses began to increase in numbers, we',
You have read how both the Lummus Company and the Collins crowd found- attempted to get the old Miami Electric Company to run a line across the Bay to a financial angel in Carl G. Fisher, which permitted both companies to carry on Miami Beach, but the owners could not see it. Therefore, it was up to the Lumto a certain point. However, there were others from whom the Lummus Coin- mus Company, Fisher and Collins to do the job. We three paid for the running, pany also borrowed money and actually "paid through the nose" by giving a bonus. of wires across Biscayne Bay. When Collins ran out of cash, he would say: "I But if the money had not been available the development of Miami Beach would will live you some land." And I would say to Fisher: "You will have to take havebee retrde man yers.the land we are short of cash." In 1914, when the World War started, the Lummus Company owed over DU,~t have read of where I was made the first mayor of the Town of Miami
four hundred and sixty thousand dollars, and we were paying eight per cen y Beach, after its incorporation, but as the 'town continued to grow into a city, interest for the money. Miami was looked upon as merely a small and unde- we decided to change our charter accordingly. In 1917, we sent judge Mitchell
veloped town, and the jumping off place of the Everglades to the south. As far D. Price to Tallahassee, to get an Act passed by the Legislature, changing the name as Miami Beach was concerned, it was just a place where Miamians could enjoy a of the Town of Miami Beach to the City of Miami Beach. I was elected mayor swim in the ocean. (This was, of course, before Miami Beach was incorporated.) in .1915, and served through 1918.
Until the World War, the sale of lots by the Lummus Company had been It is rather amusing now, and in looking back to those happy days, I rememvery good, and houses were being erected on many lots which had been sold and ber that as the Town of Miami Beach had no money, my brother, J. E. Lummus. given away. We owed Carl G. Fisher one hundred and fifty thousand dollars and I paid the costs of incorporation, and also the cost of getting the Charter
and Mr. Edwin B. Lent also one hundred and fifty thousand. Mr. Lent, a former for the City of Miami Beach. After having served the young city as Mayor for resident of Peekskill, New York, was a firm believer in the future of Miami three terms, I was elected a member of the Council in 1918, but resigned and made Beach, so we owed him from fifty thousand dollars to one hundred and ffty a trip out West. thousand dollars practically all the time from 1913 to 1916. In addition to paying Early in 1Q15, it was decided by Fisher, Collins, and myself, that the sethim eight per cent interest, we paid him a bonus of ten thousand dollars every tlenwnt should he incorporated into a town. As eighty percent of the populatime we had to renew a loan, and he did not like to have the notes run for more tion in the area was living on the Lummus development, I suggested to Fisher than a year. Ini other words, we paid Mr. Lent in three years over thirty thous- and Collins that the town should be named "Miami Beach." So, on March and dollars bonus money, plus the eight per cent interest. 26, 1Q15, a mass meeting was held in the office of the Ocean Beach Realty ComnHere you get an airview of the midsection of Miami Beach along the ocean front, showing the miraculous progress in construction of new hotels.




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 13
pany, which was the Lummus Company, and it was agreed that the town should 1WStefrtmnt ugs htDd onybidara rcuea
be incorporated. I1 across Biscayne Bay from Miami to Miami Beach but as the major part of
Realizing that a recreational park and bathing beach of sufficient area, ex- the population was on the Miami side, the suggestion met with strong opposition tending along the ocean, was absolutely essential, the ocean Beach Realty Coin- at the start. pany offered to sell and deed to the Town of Miami Beach for park purposes The Ocean Beach Realty Company owned the land on the beach side for a
only, a tract of twenty acres and forty-one hundred and twenty feet in length lnig n o noto nteln o adn nteMaisd.Te
above the high water mark of the Atlantic Ocean, for the infinitesmal figure of ladnadIgtampino h ad o adn nteMaisd.Te
0my engineer, Roy Wilson, drew plans and the county secured the services of ten dollars per front foot. The land was worth at that time more than one Ishamn Randolph of Chicago to approve them and get the Government 'in Washhundred dollars per front foot. ntnt prv hm
Toda, te geatst ssetMiai Bachhasandeverwil hae i Lumus Sam A. Belcher was Chairman of the Dade County Commissioners at the
Park. It cannot be taken away from the public. It can't he used for hotels or time and worked faithfully with us on the plans, and the commissioners called an apartment houses and belongs to the public for recreation and bathing .. election to vote six hundred thousand dollars in bonds to build the causeway. every person in Dade County and the countless thousands of visitors who flock This was in 1916 and the population was small. Somebody bad to spend some to this "Paradise Under the Sun" each year realize that its tangible value for commrcil prpoes oul ru int milios o dolar. money to put the election over and convince the voters that a causeway to Miami comerc puroseold rute on io Mimiin ofch dollars. m ixh tre Beach would be of benefit to every person in Dade County, as well as to the
t he tor aet sldce to the ug T w e of e Mia i c B ah etendedar f r Sixt Sotee visitors coming here to enjoy the ocean beaches.
tto tFourtee nt Plac e Al oth g e seto the price a ten tdollar s ar n t o otar, Carl Fisher sent me two thousand dollars and our company spent four thes tta amont dellrve froth saleto te Towne whaFrty Thoand dolluas thousand dollars to acquaint the voters of the necessity of access to the ocean and or lss hanten ollrs er rontfoo. W graed he ark platedBeruda the election went over two to one. Fisher wrote me saying: "J. N., I don't think grass and coconut palms; built a ten foot concrete walk the full length and paid yucnd t"btIwsteatv apinmngradblee nwa
for the upkeep of the park until 1917. was toalkng aoitbutIwsteatv apinmngradblee nwa
John H. Levi, present mayor of Miami Beach, formerly of Charleston, W. In accordance with our agreement to the County Commission, the Lummus
Virginia, needs no introduction. Company gave Dade County ten of our long bay-front lots for the landing on
Upon my resignation and departure from the Beach in 1917 Mr. Levi took the Miami Beach end of the causeway. This piece of ground had a frontage of my place as vice-president of The Ocean View Company, of which he had been 500 feet on Alton Road, and 500 feet on Biscayne Bay with riparian rights. These
secretary-treasurer. He has held the position of vice president or president ever were Lots 43 to 52 inclusive in Block No. 111. since. In addition, he was and is still a director of the First National Bank of The property was conveyed to the Southern Bank & Trust Company as Miami Beach. Mr. Levi has been actively connected with the management of the Trustee and the following was the consideration for the deed which was filed city since the early days, which fact, alone, influenced many men of wealth to frrcr coe 8 96 eoddi edBo 5,a ae35
invet thre.The trustee herein named is hereby given full power and lawful authority to Among his many services in the development of the beach one of the most convey the title to the above described property to Dade County, Florida, at any important was that of interesting men of prominence in big finance, such as Carl time within five years from the date hereof upon said county having completed G. Fisher, James Allison, James H. and George Snowden, Henry McSweeney, the construction of a causeway, with bridges connecting same, between the Town
Harry Stutts, Arthur C. Newby, and many others, into becoming active investors, of Miami Beach and the City of Miami, said causeway to be built in accordance My brother and I appreciated his valuable business acumen, and in return, pre- with plans and specifications already passed upon and approved, subject to any sented him with $10,000 in stock of the Miami Ocean View Company, in 1916. amendments or alterations that may be deemed necessary by the engineers in
John Levi has used the best part of his life in the continued development charge of said work, or that may be required by the United States government. and improvement of Miami Beach and deserves full credit to his share in the In the event said causeway is not commenced within two years and is not compresent realization. pleted within five years from the date hereof, then, in such event, the Southern
At this point I must pay tribute to the one man who has been on the job Bank and Trust Company shall reconvey the property above designated to the continually during the past twenty years as city manager and one of the guiding Ocean Beach Realty Company. lights through the boom, hurricane, depression, and all-Claude Renshaw. He and Today, there are three causeways connecting Miami Beach with Miami:
the members of the several city councils have held the best interests of the beach the County Causeway, for which the Lummus interests are responsible, is now close to their hearts, which fact accounts for the excellent condition of Miami under supervision of the State Highway Department; the Venetian Causeway, Beach today. and the 7(9th Street causeway.
.
r0
This sectional airview shows a group of new hotels in the Twentieth Street area, just South of the famed Roney-Plaza, shown in the upper right foreground.




14 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
We need another causeway at 36th Street on the Miami side; let Miami in transferring his interests from Camden, N. J., and Miami across Biscayne Bay.
Beach decide on which street to land over there. This is urgently needed to take He first bought the interests of J. E. Lummus, my brother, and myself in the care of the traffic between the Hialeah and Tropical Parks (race track), Biscayne Ocean View Company and began his operations on the Beach. His first Miami Fronton Jai-alai, and the dog tracks. Beach building was begun in 1921, the site being the N. W. corner of Fifth Street
The city of Miami owns a string of islands south of, and parallel to, the 13th and Collins Avenue, which was formerly part of the Burroughs' estate. This Street causeway and ship channel up to Lummus Inland which is located in building still stands as a silent monument to his modest beginning and rapid rise
Miami Beach. to take his rightful place alongside those great pioneers of yesterday.
The engineers could, if they were given a chance, work out a plan there to His next building project was one that became the home of the Miami take care of the passenger boat business and yachts for the next one hundred Beach Bank & Trust Company, of which he was one of the founders and a large years. The freight traffic should be left where it is. stockholder. During this period he constructed a number of small buildings for
shops and stores in this vicinity, along Collins, between Fifth and Eighth Streets.
These islands could be landscaped and made into outstanding beauty spots He paid a total of $102,000 for four blocks in this territory. of Dade County. The city owns these islands for this very purpose, and they
cannot be used for anything else. A causeway should be run from 5th Street in Mr. Roney had become one of the largest individual operators on Miami
Miami in order to meet all contingencies. Beach. In 1924 he continued his selections along Collins Avenue, acquiring choice
The causeway to Virginia Key, for which we have just voted two million corners from 3rd to 23rd Streets.
dollars in bonds, is a very good move and will go a long way toward relieving Then came the "Spanish Village" in 1925. This grew out of the purchase of
the congestion in ocean bathing; it will also aid in the parking problem, and will ten blocks on Espanola Way. Mr. Robert Taylor, who was the architect on all give Miami and Dade County, as a whole, more access to the ocean. of Mr. Roney's properties, designed a group of six hotels (all corner locations),
Miami and Miami Beach have the tourist business and the housing accom- eight apartments, and four other buildings, to make up this section. Over six modations to take care of it, but we must make provisions to store more auto- millions were spent in making the village the show place on the Beach at that mobiles, even if we have to do as the Du Pont building did-run them up a few time. The Spanish style was carried throughout, with patios, balconies, casement stories. windows, musical fiestas, gay costumes', bright shawls, and everything in complete
S. A. BELCHER accord with old Spanish customs.
Mr. Belcher was one of the first men to build a home on Miami Beach. As In 1925 the Roney Plaza became a reality and its unique and magnificent
chairman of the Dade County Commissioners he was instrumental in putting over architecture completely overshadowed the Spanish Village or anything else of that the bond issue, in order to build the first county causeway at 13th Street Miami day. The Plaza immediately caught the fancy of the best patronage through the and 5th Street Miami Beach. He came to Miami in 1891; taking out a homestead publicity which was obtained by its being the first hotel in this country to have he developed small orange groves and sold them. Organizing the Art Stone "cabanas." Fashion shows and bathing beauties found this novel setting ideal for
Construction Co., he made the first concrete blocks in Dade County. He and his pictures and soon the northern papers were filled with them. The Roman Pools associates, S. M. Tatum and E. Ford Wells built houses of these blocks in 1914 and several blocks west of the Plaza were acquired at this time. at Miami Beach. The houses are still standing. He organized the Belcher Then, for several years thereafter, Mr. Roney was inactive in the construction
Asphalt Paving Co., in 1915 and was the first to introduce the oiling of roads, business, but, today, his latest architectural creations, including the Cromwell which was the proper treatment for our roadways as they were built of white Hotel, Town House, and Shore Club, receive favorable attention among the many coral rock, which was not only bard on the eyes, but was easily blown about by new structures of this rapidly growing beach resort. Mr. Roney is still an active the sea breezes. The original company was changed to the Belcher Oil Co., in 1927. personality and may be counted upon to continue his creative ability in adding to
Throughout his entire business career much of Mr. Belcher's time was devoted the show places on Miami Beach as long as there remains a demand for new sites. to developing good roads throughout Dade County. He was truly a great pioneer On August 11, 1919, more than four years after the Town of Miami Beach
and leaves many monuments in commemoration of his deeds. was incorporated and more than two years after it was made the City of Miami
No story of "THE MIRACLE OF MIAMI BEACH" would be complete Beach, the Miami Beach Bay Shore Company was formed by Carl G. Fisher,
without that of N. B. T. Roney and the part he played in the early development Thomas J. Pancoast, Irving A. Collins and others. This is recorded in Corporaof Miami Beach. tion Book 2 at page 472, records of Dade County, Florida, and on August 19th,
The writer is familiar with every step of Mr. Roney's progress and will try 1919 this company took over a lot of Collins Swamp north of Collins Canal. to give the high spots.of this almost unbelievable history without burdenin.- the This deed is recorded in Deed Book 201 at page 130, and on March 26th, 1920, reader with too many details. Incidentally, Mr. Roney's first purchase of real the same company took over some more of Collins Swamp. This deed is recorded estate on the Beach was from me, and, later, many more deals were made either in Deed Book 209 at page 245; and in 1923 the same company took over more from or through myself. and kept up the timber disposal, dredging, filling and bulk-heading similar to the
In 1918 Mr. Roney saw the possibilities of Miami Beach atid wasted no time work done by Lummus and Fisher in 1Q13-'14. This work was kept up by that
4
0
7
Tw
.... ... ........ .... ..
The palatial new Whitehouse Hotel, in which Pete and Louis Weiner operate one of America's finest drug stores, is shown on the ocean front in the left foreground, surrounded by other new hotels to the north, as shown from the air.




THE FLORIDA TEACHER
company until completed to the north line of the city limits and a lot of similar press-on. But it had something which other cities did not have; brave pioneers; work has been done since by other developers building islands along the Venetian optimistic developers with money; sunshine and ultra violet rays; ocean water Causeway. with extra iodine contents and summertime three hundred and sixty-five days
From the time that the Miami Beach Improvement Company was formed on of the year.
June 5th, 1912, Mr. Pancoast was the secretary -treasurer; he was also associated For several years, of course, I had been only an onlooker at the growth of with the Miami Beach Bay Shore Company, which was organized by its president, Miami Beach, but it was in part "My Baby." I was interested, so in 1923, when Carl G. Fisher. This company continued the development of the bayside of the things began to "spruce up" in South Florida real estate, and particularly in 1924, Beach and built some of the finest hotels. I said to myself: "Lummus, your dream has come true !" And so it had. I knew
Mr. Pancoast is not only recognized as one of the outstanding leaders in the then that I would live to see Miami Beach the city it is today.
development of Miami Beach but has held, or still holds, the following titles: In 1924, the prices of lots on Miami Beach greatly increased and considerable president of the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce, vice-president and director building was going on. Among the major structures were the Fleetwood Hotel, of the First National Bank of Miami Beach, and president of the Miami Beach Fisher's King Cole Hotel, and N. B. T. Roney's Roney-Plaza Hotel. The FleetGolf Club. This gives one a good idea of the high esteem in which he is held by wood installed a radio station called WMBF-WON-DERFUL MIAMI BEACH, thousands of residents of the Beach. FLORIDA. This idea was conceived by Jesse Jay, son of Webb Jay, inventor
Irving Collins came here from Moorestown, N. J., and was the son of of vacuum tanks for automobiles. The next broadcasting station was WIODJohn S. Collins. WONDERFUL ISLE OF DREAMS-located on Collins Island, opposite the
Mr. Collins became vice-president of the Miami Beach Improvement Coin- Nautilus Hotel. Today, WIOD is a part of the Miami Daily News Syndicate, pany from its inception on June 5th, 1912. He was also vice-president of the and WMBF is today WQAM, operated by the Miami Broadcasting Company. Miami Beach Bay Shore Development Company, of which Carl G. Fisher was the To try and describe the boom of the Greater Miami area in a few pages would
president. This company not only did all of the development work north of 23rd be useless and an attempt to describe it in one hundred pages would still be Street, or Collins Canal, on the bayside, but also the one which built the Nautilus, Although from 1922, through 1924, there was an unprecedented building King Cole, and Boulevard Hotels, the La Gorce and Bayshore Golf courses, the activity going on in Miami Beach, Miami and Coral Gables, the people living in Beach Boat Slips Corporation, and the Peninsular Terminal. Mr. Collins was a this vicinity were "too near the leaves to see the trees," until there was a rush director cf the First National Bank of Miami Beach and served as a member of of outside people with money seeking investments in this "Paradise Under The Sun."
The old order of supply and demand became a fact again, of course, and lots
one day worth five hundred dollars became worth twice that amount the next,
and so on until by 1925, the value of the property sold was not based upon
its earning capacity but only upon its resale price for a profit to the last buyer.
Hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of property changed hands monthy,
always with an upward trend. Of course, there was an unprecedented amount of
building also going on, and the influx of buyers and sellers was so great, and the
demand for housing so insistent that there was an embargo on all building
materials coming by rail into Miami. Then ships began to be used and the
Miami and Miami Beach water-fronts were filled with schooners, steamers, and
any kind of vessel that could carry building materials. In fact, they were so close
together that unloading was a problem.
Some of the erstwhile historians of the Greater Miami area, at the request of
their sponsors, do not mention the 1926 hurricane. They seem to fear that to
mention such a catasthrope, would do this area harm, yet in my opinion, a true
history must contain the bad along with the good.
In September 1926, while the "boom" was at its peak, something happened
to the weather. A small hurricane started somewhere in the Southeast, and
gathering intensity, converged upon the Bahamas and the Miami area. Without
the advantage of radio broadcast of such things, then, as we have today, the
hurricane caught us unawares. To give you an idea as to its intensity, I quote
the speical one-page edition of the Miami Daily News, printed the day after
Lincoln Road, in the process of clearing, looked like this. It was a the storm:
mosquito-infested swamp. Compared to current-day pictures, you are "Hurricane hits Miami. Tidal Wave Sweeps Bay Shore Drive, wrecking
able to vision the incredible progress of Miami Beach. boats. Fear felt for Miami Beach, pounded by heavy sea.
the Dade County Budget Commission for five years, prior to his death on May "Miami was laid waste Saturday by a raging hurricane attended by a gale of
22, 1938. more than one hundred and thirty miles per hour,
No community, however small, can expect the growth that is hoped for by "Miami Beach was isolated from the mainland and no word has been
it funes itou erai unamntlreuiits scha aChmbrofCon received as to the effect of the storm there. It is feared that a master tidal
merce or some similar organization. The first meeting was held under a Beach wv a ensetars h nieiln iy
umbrella at the corner of Fifth Street and Alton Road. On July 13th, 1921, "'Newspaper men called from Miami Beach at three a. in., with a story
about forty residents of Miami Beach met at Hardie's Casino and decided to of pounding surf, broken communication and distressed boats. It was the first organize a Chamber of Commerce. Later, meetings were held alternately between information to reach Miami-all boats on Miami water front except one, Hardie's Casino and Smith's Casino. ADVENTURE II, was sunk. The NOHAB, former yacht of Ex-Kaiser Wilhelm,
J. Arthur Pancoast was named President of the newly organized body. In was split in two."
December 1921, F. R. Hummage, a director and a Miami Beach business man, Well, from the hurricans in 1926, through 1930, the growth of the cities of
proposed a unique scheme by which the Chamber could obtain a permanent home. Greater Miami area, including Miami, Miami Beach, and Coral Gables, was on a He advocated raising the fund by $10.00 subscriptions bearing eight per cent firmer basis. Gamblers in real estate had taken their "licking" and quit, and interest to be paid back as soon as possible. The necessary amount of $3,200.00 property values in all communities were back on a substantial basis. The inflation was quickly raised, and today the Chamber of Commerce occupies its own home was a thing of the past. Then came the depression, during which time, buildi ng at the entrance of the County Causeway. as well as lot selling, was at a standstill. Vacant property coud hardly be given
Although I had gone west in 1920, 1 naturally had kept in close contact with away and development was stagnant.
my home town, reading of the things that were happening in real estate circles Miami Beach was the first community to react after the depression began to and the further development of Miami Beach. The 1920 census gave Miami decline. New money started to come in again. New people with ideals and
Beach a total population of 644, but five years later, the town had a population dreams of the future in the "Paradise Under The Sun", arrived to build homes, of over 15,000. These were permanent residents and the winter population was hotels, and apartment houses. Their confidence and their money attracted attenmore than thirty thousand. Its assessed valuation had increased from $224,000 tion until there did not seem sufficient room on Miami Beach for all, so others to $5,540,112 in five years. spread to Miami, Miami Shores, Hialeah, Miami Springs, Coral Gables, North
In 1921, the Beach had only five hotels in operation and twelve apartment Miami, North Miami Beach, Surfside and other localities, resulting today in the houses. Today Miami Beach has two hundred and seventy-six hotels and eight Greater Miami area. It is now the largest in population of any community in the hundred and seventy-nine apartment houses, and three thousand residences. The state, and is still growing by leaps and bounds. assessed valuation of Miami Beach in 1940 is $66,690,535, and the 1940 census Although I have not been actively identified with the real estate development
gives the city a population of 27,340, with a winter influx of 200,000 visitors, of this section for many years, I still will prophesy that the Greater Miami area This great development has occurred within the short period of twenty-eight by 1950 will show a permanent population of five hundred thousand. This will years, and the community has passed through a boom, a hurricane and a de- be quite an increase from July 1896 to 1950, covering a period of fifty-four years.




16 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
churches including the Riverside Presbyterian Church and Main Street Baptist Church in Jacksonville, the Congregational, the Riverside Baptist and Little River Baptist Churches of Miami. Mr. Fisher left the Ministry some years ago. T he S t ry o f"I did not feel," he said, "that my spiritual qualifications measured up to the demands of the Ministry. Rather than not give my very best to it, I diverged my interests to other channels."
It was during these years, that Fisher played and directed in the old Civic OPA NV LLE FSHEDTheatre: he, Norman Mackay, Joe Cotton (now of Broadway fame) and Howard
GRAHV LLE F SHERSouthigate (now a Hollywood director, were inseparable companions).
In1937, Mr. Fisher assumed the post of supervising director of the Federal Theatre in Miami, having been asked to take that position by the National Board "I am a part of all that I have met; of Directors. He is still closely identified with the theatre in the minds of most
Yet all experience is an arch wherethro' Miamians, having last winter, been a member of the Advisory Board of the
Gleams that untravelled world, whose margin fades Miami Players, and still later appeared with the Temple Players in several of
Forever and forever when I move." their offerings. He is, at time of writing, directing the Miami junior League
play, "Titian".
After he left the Ministry, Mr. Fisher returned to his first love-art-now, in addition to his work at the Surf Club, he does many portraits, and also a Wanderer, wrestler, cartoonist, sailor, hypnotist, world traveler, poet, actor, great deal of mural work. Interested in sculpture, he has done several busts, director, aviator, architect, sculptor, minister and artist . . such has been the mo-t notable among which is his one of General Lodeesen-Grevenck. amazing career of Granville Fisher, well known local man, who, for the past nine In the way of sculpture, however, Mr. Fisher is not the only talented mem-, years, in conjunction with Alfred Barton, has planned and designed the world ber of the family-his wife having done some lovely things along these lines. famous sets for Gala nights at the Surf Club. We asked -whether or not Mr. Fisher had been the guiding hand in' the developBlue eyed, with a frank and open countenance, an ingratiating smile and an ment of this talent? "Yes", said Mrs. Fisher. "No", said Mr. Fisher!
infecious laugh, Mr. Fisher, who is also one of Miami's well known sculptors and Last winter, Fisher desgned the sets for the "Gulliver's Travels" Premeire portrait painters, has a life story as colorful as anything from the pages of the Ball at the Roney Plaza, and later did the prize winning floats in the Christmas most imaginative fiction. Pageant of yachts at the Beach.
Seated one afternoon in his attractive Coconut Grove home in the Moorings, It is interesting to speculate on the future career of Granville Fisher; of one
in company with his charming young wife, we learned from Mr. Fisher some- thing to be assured, however, is that whatever Fate holds in store for him thing of the colorful prologue to the present story of the successful Surf Club it's a pretty safe wager that it won't he dull! artist.
Born in Nashville, Tennessee, he ran away from home at the age of fifteen,
thus writing the first chapter in his Horatio Alger-like biography. The "hegira" SHERWVIN-WI)VLLIAMS
of the young boy Fisher took him to the West, where he spent several years living on sheep and cattle ranches, mastering the fine art of broncho busting, "PAINT HEADQUARTERS"
working the wheat harvests from Texas to Nebraska, riding the rails-arriving The Oldest Paint Store still operating on the Beach
finally in Mexico, where he spent months absorbing every bit of local color and 509 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH DIAL 5-2648
native background that he could.
In the course of events, Granville Fisher returned to his Tennessee home;
there, he proceeded (in the manner of prodigal sons) to become a model student, _____________________________________finishing his three remaining years of high school in less than two years. It is interesting to note that one of h:s fellow students in that school was Hale McKeen, whom Miamians will -remember as being the director and guiding spirit of the popular "Theatre of the Fifteen" in Coral Gables last winter. T H E T U T T L E
Granville Fisher had always sketched and drawn, and while still in high school, he secured a job as a cartoonist with a nationally known magazine. His artistic career was to he interrupted, however, as sometime along then, he began to evince his first real interest in the theatre. From then on, for the next several years, the drama-in all its forms-was to become the absorbing passion of Fisher's life. It was he who organized the Community Players of Nashville, and the famous Community Theatre of Louisville, which had its first meeting in his studio. He played professional stock, also, with the Brown and National theatres in Louisville ...some of his fellow players there being Donald Cook, Muriel Kirkland, Lester Vail, and Nancy Welford.
Somewhere between his high school days and his career in the theatre, Fisher developed two utterly diverse interests. The first of these was wrestling; just how seriously he took this pursuit, may be judged by the fact, that before lfB
he was twenty, he had wrestled three world champions-Joe Stecker, "Strangler" Lewis, and Stanilaus Zibisco.
The second of these youthful interests of Mr. Fisher's, was the study of Hypnotism, a science in which he has an enormous belief, and which he feels has had a profound influence on his life. He is convinced that through its medium, many cures have been effected, and, in fact, advanced his theories on this subject, in detail, some years ago, when he lectured on Hypnosis at the University of Miami.
Meanwhile, during the course of years, Fisher had been studying architecture, and therefore, when he paid his first visit to South Florida during the prosperous days of the early twenties, he became interested in the general building and One of i ami's Finest M~odern H-otels
and development projects of that period. Coral Gables, in particular, aroused his with Rooms and Apartments
interest, and he designed many Gables homes of that period. Ec ihPiaeCmiainTbadSoe
When the bottom dropped out of things in 1926, little interest was evinced awth Pin e Spr bin attreses u tsindSoer
by anyone in architecture, and it was sometime along this time that Mr. Fisher Exposure and Tropical Doors
joined the Merchant Marine, "just for the heck of it," shipping out of Miami on Heat
the S. S. "Francis Weems". Beautiful Gardens bordering the Waterfront with
Shuffleboard and Croquet Courts
This voyage made a great impression on Granville Fisher; during the course Recreation Room, Solarium and Sun Deck on Roof
of it they ran into a hurricane, and he had opportunity to study still another Prominently located at the
phase of Nature. He began to ponder the age old problem of Man in his struggleFotoSuhEat irtAe e
with the elements . the problem took hold of him, and when he returned to Theebok fo SuhppingFiand Aueent e ne
Miami, Fisher had already decided to study for the Ministry. He entered the ELSIee WAlL Genera Mappnge TnA uelepn e2-5101
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, taking his degrfts in 1931.ELI WA D LGnrlM agrT epoe250
After his ordination, he occupied the pulpits of several of the. South's largest




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 17
Lincoln Road
The World's Most Beautiful Shopping jCenter
Secreta~~~~ry, clnRa7Ascito
ASTOD.OJAE7GBR
IA
By GUY WORTHINGTON ELLIS
Secretary, Lincoln Road Association
AS TOLD TO JANE EGBERT
Sparking like ribbon bejeweled and with exotic beauty-LIN- tions and exclusive designs on Lincoln Road for the first time. This
COLN ROAD wends its glamorous way through Miami Beach. is also true of ladies shoes and millinery. Lincoln Road also boasts
Extending from the shore of the Atlantic ocean westward to some of the finest stores selling men's wearing apparel, jewelry Biscayne Bay, with rows of coconut palms and carpets of green grass, stores, antique shops, art treasure and gift shops showing a most this thoroughfare of ultra-modern establishments is indeed "the most attractive line of merchandise from the four corners of the earth. beautiful retail shopping centre in the world." Carl Fisher's dream of what he wanted Miami Beach to be was
Within a period of about twenty years, from what was once but not an idle one. He not only believed that he could make Miami mangrove-covered acreage, Lincoln Road has become the nation's Beach one of the most beautiful resort communities, but with marked
leading style centre. This was accomplished only through careful aggressiveness set out to accomplish this purpose. The result accompforethought and intelligent planning. Each season finds the country's lished speaks eloquently of the wisdom of his vision and of the intellileaders of style in ladies wearing apparel showing their finest crea- gent effort he made to bring it all about.




18 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
He believed that Miami Beach was destined to be the mecca for people of wealth from all over this country and Europe as well, and to safeguard the interests of those who might want to come here and build beautiful homes certain restrictions were placed upon the residential property. Realizing at this time that when the residential section of Miami Beach was well built up- there would be a real place for a quality merchandising center, he planned for the future of Lincoln Road.
In laying out the first piece of property he ever had in Miami Beach Mr. Fisher made a road one hundred feet wide through the center of the tract running from the ocean to the bay. He believed that some day it would become a beautiful business thoroughfare. IF A number of the early investors, believing that he was right,
made every effort to attract to Lincoln Road the finest stores of the north. The result was the establishment on Lincoln Road of a number of large and very reputable northern stores and these formed the nucleus of what Lincoln Road is today. AA In 1921 the First National Bank building was erected on Lincoln
Road at Alton. Later the seven-story office and store building at Jefferson Avenue. August Geiger, well-known architect, was one of the first private individuals to erect a business building on Lincoln Road. This is known as 'The Maison Des Beaux Arts', located at Meridian Avenue. Many other attractive structures built during the years grace the street.
In 1925 Lincoln Road was widened to its present width-fortynine feet from curb to curb, with additional space for sidewalks, grass plots and landscaping,-making it a street of real beauty.
Investors in Lincoln Road property were called to join hands with the original developers in an effort to uphold the standards already set, and to this end, February 8, 1926, formed what is known as the Lincoln Road Association-composed of the owners of Lincoln Road property.
This Association was responsible, with the assistance of the City authorities, for the procurement of Zoning Restrictions which would protect the high-class merchants and forbid the introduction of the less desirable forms of retail business which might lower the standards of the street. Much was accomplished along these lines as Lincoln Road began to build up and its character and position assured.
The merchants on Lincoln Road also formed their own association, known as The Lincoln Road Merchants Association. Arrangements have been made by which the two Associations work together for the constant improvement of this attractive shopping center.
The exotic beauty of Lincoln Road has been given much attention. The grass plots in the sidewalks, the flowering shrubs, the flower plots and rows of tall majestic coconut palms enhance its beauty. The elimination of all projecting signs, the control of awnings, canopies and light displays are all designed to maintain the quiet dignity and
_59.50 beauty of the street to be consistent with the quality of the merchandise to be sold in its stores.
The fame of Lincoln Road has already extended far beyond Miami Beach,-as it is known throughout the country here and abroad for its
Enjoy Your Vacation Let Us Do Your Work
Secretaries furnished for your home or
- office. Social or Business Correspondence
An Assignment.. in good taste Parties Decorations Music
lmpe~ca~y failed ~'Reservations -Fishing Trips.
The perfect ensemble fashioned in Sheer You will find us Kay-Raff
Wool in luscious Cameo Rose and Sky cpbeo aig577
Blue.The ittedcrep-line jacet butonsthe place of your 577
snugly when wayward breezes blow .. or Secretary
reveals the slim perfection of the frock
when left casually open.
MthnStthdWool Hat in the
distinctive Minna Lee Mode. 18.50 RUSSELL -PAIGE, Inc.
9 AUTOMOBILE DEALERS
________________________________________ j 2020 Biscayne Blvd. Dial 3-8621




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 19
beautiful appearance, its marvelous merchandise and attractive shown,-styles which are the inspirations of the country's best destores. signers. During the winter months, created and shown for the first
It has become the nation's style center. Each year an increasing time, are styles in wearing apparel which will be shown in Northern number of Northern publications send their representatives to Lincoln stores the following Spring. Road the early part of the season to write up the new fashions being Undoubtedly one of the main reasons why Lincoln Road has the excellent reputation it now enjoys is because in no other city are HO_] there so many beautiful stores of distinction concentrated in so small
iA H-RLI a territory.
The Lincoln Road of today is an example of the result of a collective control and intelligent direction on the part of its owners and effective cooperation from its high-class merchants.
11 FJ I Sally-Phyllis Fashions
T1 There is a distinct air of smartness in this shop on Lincoln Road,
where custom made and ready to wear clothes are displayed against MO .......the dusty rose decorations of the store interior.
Miss Sally, for years dress designer and buyer both in Canada .....--_____. and the United States, has brought her style creations to Lincoln
Road. Ably assisted by Miss Phyllis she presents a glamorous collections of models in dresses and sportswear, which have been designed in perfect combination for chicness and practicability.
Well chosen styles in bags, sweaters, millinery and novelty jewelry "Overlooking the Ocean" are offered in wide selection for costume accessories.
As new as the 1941 season Sally-Phyllis Fashions strike a bright 1475 Collins Ave. Corner 15th St. note in the latest style trends.
MIAMI BEACH
LOW RATES EUROPEAN PLAN Fairyland
FEATURES Fine apparel for the well dressed child is the keynote at FairyFireproof. Ultra Modern. Central. Beach at door. Patio for dancing,
excellent cuisine. Private baths. Phone in room. Roof Solorium. land. Childrens' wear for boys and girls from infancy to sixteen is Recreation rooms. Also varied planned social activities, selected from no "run of the mill", but rather from the finest of
SAMUEL G. BAST, Mgr. domestic and imported goods.
From Belgium and Switzerland are the hand-embroidered and hand finished garments,-all so very sheer. From France the swiss and organdy creations provide perky silhouettes for the little girl. 7/e W HITEHART 1,/W From England are the woolen coats, varieties of knitwear and sweaters,-some of unbelieveable fineness, hand-made and daintily embroidered.
Po5e Brier 5hoppe
"The Children's Department Store"
A complete stock of distinctively, "- Kiddie's Wear "From Tots to
Teens."
A shop that is always brim- 4. .' .
ming over with everything
lovely and new.
Rose Brier's policy of "Exclu-
sive but not Expensive" makes
it the popular Kiddies Shop.
1OR BOYS AND GIRLS i\IIAMI BEACH'S
FINEST SALON OF PRIVATE BEACH CHILDREN'S SHOES
.o EXPERT FITTING
GIVE YOUR CHILD
SOLARIUM PRIVATE BATH{ CORRECT BODY BALANCE GUARANTEED
ROOM PHONE SHOWER
0
OPEN ALL YEAR ROUND 511 LINCOLN ROAD
THE WHITEHART Phone 5-6988
EUGENE DANN, Owner Management




20 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
Present war conditions have made this merchandise extremely hard to obtain.
The beautiful selection and complete stock of these importations at Fairyland is indeed a mecca for the discriminating shopper of childrens wear.
A Modern Host
John M. Duff, Jr. presides over The Cromwell Hotel at twentieth street and the ocean. His genial manner and efficient management make him one of the popular hotel men among "mine hosts" of Miami Beach.
Mr. Duff, a native of Philadephia and son of the late pioneer hat manufacturer, retired as head of an automobile agency in Philadelphia in 1933. In that year he came to Miami to supervise construction and manage the LeRoy Villas and Hotel, which he operated for some time.
Since he came to Miami Beach Mr. Duff has been active in civic work, the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce, the American Legion, and is now the vice-president of the Miami Beach Hotel Association.
Creators of Styles I HAND
EMBROIDERED
AJ L/A1LCRUISE WEAR
Designed for the Individuals
Phone 5-2224 DRESSES
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA SUITS CUSTOM HATS
by RIA
525 Lincoln Road ENSEMBLES
1148 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
Sole Agents in Florida for
Ii Idf RENEE THORNTON
For the Ultimate in Fine Apparel ... *Uui (DUCHESS CARAFA D'ANORIA)
INC. PREPARATIONS, INC.
COSMETICS PERFUMES
CHARLES MILLWARD HAND TURNED WOODWARE OF RARE WOODS
Rare items from World's Fair
IRAN DENMARK
ENGLAND LUXEMBOURG
IMPORTER SWEDEN CZECHO-SLOVAKIA
Sportswear Gowns
Furs Coats
729 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI BEACH
7 YEARS SAME LOCATION
It Costs Less to Shop at ANN'S 928 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 21
Mr. Duff became manager of the Cromwell Hotel in 1939. fir Directly on the ocean with one-tenth mile of private beach, this hotel
offers its guests wide enjoyment of solariums, a beautiful tiled swim-, ming pool, and two outdoor dance floors,-set in a grove of 100 year old palm trees.
A series of 40 cabanas, amid a picturesquely-landscaped tropical garden, are part of, and help to make up the well-known "Shore Club", where every guest of the hotel automatically becomes a member, entitled to all the privileges of the club. S Under the Duff management and with the advantages offered
",5A by The Cromwell this modern hotel has enjoyed increasing popularity.
A New Shoe Saloir
and The first Red Cross Shoe Salon was established in New York
City by the Jacobs Brothers about 25 years ago. Since that time many branches have been established throughout the United States. CO STU E JE ELPYFlorida's only exclusive Red Cross Shoe Salon, managed by Mr.
Joe Surance, is now established on Lincoln Road. This shop is furnished in the modernistic manner with flourescent lighting and wall decorations of pinkish rose, with carpet to match. Ample seating space and full length mirrors have been provided for customers A fine selection of hose, costume jewelry and bags may be purchased in this new shoe salon.
Here is offered a complete selection of the nationally advertised Red Cross Shoe, which has been designed for comfort-combining youth and beauty.
The Pelletiers
The new Mercantile Bank building, erected on the former site of one of our oldest hotels (the Lincoln, built in 1917), is receiving its share of well known tenants. One of the first to move in is Dr. George A. Pelletier perhaps our best known and most popular Pediatrist~ ~%~/Chiropodist. 4,21 Although the doctor has been in Miami only five years, Mrs.
Pelletier's family-the Christopher D. Yborra's-is one of our oldest ~9,9 pioneers, coming here over fifty years ago.
Mr. Yborra says that in those days the Florida East Coast Railroad [A went only as far as St. Augustine. Stern-wheelers plied between Day,/7.,. ~actona and Jacksonville, but the inland waterways were treacherous jand hard to navigate. Large pineapple groves flourished between Stewart and Fort Pierce. In Miami, the Brickell family owned most of the real estate, as well as the "fleet" of rowboats which were used to ferry to and from Cape Florida.
As the railroad advanced, Mr. Flagler kept building hotels to house the visitors, until finally the Royal Palm Hotel was built as the Florida East Coast came into Miami. Until that time, if you wanted to come to little-known Miami, you came by yacht. CORRY -BURNS Mrs. Pelletier herself, came down in 1919, and in 1924 established
her own decorating business, specializing in the decoration of yachts. Incorporated Many of our most familiar boats have had her supervision. The
"Sequoia"-now a Government ship-was the last commission Mrs. Pelletier undertook before returning to New York in 1930.
Dr. Pelletier, after fourteen years of practice in Flushing, N. Y., came down to Miami with his wife, and built up an enviable practice EXCLUSIVE SPORTSWEAR here. Always an outstanding athlete-at Worcester Academy and
Syracuse University (where he held various records in the broad and for M1/EN high jumps), the Doctor still finds time for his athletic hobbies-golf,
tennis, and fishing. Nor have his civic affiliations and professional Apparel of Distinction associations been neglected, for he is a member of the Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce and of the State and National Associations of
743 Lincoln RoadH0P Miami Beach UN1 D
Hyannis, Cape Cod
Distinctive Fashions
* for the Young
CORRY-BURNS, Inc. DRESSES SKIRTS
Anthonyr Correale, Pres. BAHWA AKT
Ha BrsSertayPLAY CLOTHES SWEATERS
Hal urn, ScrearyACCESSORIES BOYS' WEAR
509 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH




22 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
Podiatrists. During the World War, he served with the Trench Mortar -______________________________Battery Unit, and in Flushing, devoted a great deal of his free time to the American Legion work.
Right now, Dr. and Mrs. Pelletier and their adorable seventeenT HT OBX
on Bay Road and their suite of new offices, which by the way, are the "0Olmstead"
most completely equipped of their kind-having even the latest whirlpools. Doll House Furniture
Musician Turns Business Woman Dolls Books
One of the recently established shops during the 1940-41 season
is the Gladys Byrnes Shop on Lincoln Road. T y a e
Here may be found dresses, hats and hose for the discriminating T y a e
woman, together with a special featuring of slacks, play suits and accessories.
The selection of slacks, designed for style and action, and many 1132 BOARDWALK 727 LINCOLN ROAD
other attractive displays reflect the artistic temperament of Miss OCEAN CITY, N. J. MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
Byrnes. A concert pianist and professional musician Miss Byrnes has ________________________________given many concerts throughout Canada and the United States.
With her brown eyes, auburn hair and friendly attitude Miss Byrnes may be recognized at her shop as the versatile musician now concentrating on an already successful career in the business field.
Hortense MPORTEQS
HortenseCHILDREN'S WEAR INC.
An artist who places the greatest emphasis on the need of specially
designed apparel,-Hortense has created a distinct atmosphere of IMPORTERS
"clothes consciousness" in her shop at Alton Road. 8 43-845 LINCOLN ROAD
Here milady's wearing apparel is entirely custom made. Hortense
personally supervises the adaptation of clothes to each individual. F N P A E
Designs are first submitted with the intent purpose of ascertaining FN P A E
the need and use of clothes to be selected. The complexion, height, FOR THE
figure and social life of the individual are taken into consideration WELL DRESSED CHILD
to accent the particular personality.
Evening dresses, street dresses and sportswear are all designed BY N IL
with the same care. In fishing and golf clothes comfort is the keynote- BY N IL
for which Hortense has created "free action" sleeve. Strictly tailored INFANCY TO SIXTEEN
suits and coats are fashioned from English woolens imported from ________________________________Nassau.
With her vivacious and charming manner and intense interest in her profession, it is easy to understand this designer's 10 years of
IVORIES SEMI-PRECIOUS CURIOS
IVORY MINATURES GIFTS
47/wa~aa oj 4oioPHOTOGRAPHER
Bags Vanities Jewelry A nnounces
821 LINCOLN ROAD the Opening of
MIAMI BEACH
16 YEARS ON THE BEACH HIS NEW STUDIO
at
1142 Lincoln Road
Dresses MIAMI BEACH
Sportswear
Accessories Phone 2-3718
308 East Flagler Street
437 LINCOLN RO AD Miami, Florida
MIAMI BE AC H




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 23
continued success in Miami Beach,-where for 7 years she has been Juan, Inc.
in business for herself. Here is the shop distinctive-where one may purchase really
lovely out-of-the-ordinary things for gifts, or for one's self. Whether
Cherry's it be a small remembrance or an exquisite object of art, it may be
Mr. L. A. Cherry is the guiding personality who directs the policies found in this chic new shop on Lincoln Road.
and activities of Cherry's on Collins Avenue. For the past three sea- Here are most unusual and artistic articles, chosen with dissons he has owned apparel shops on Collins Avenue and Lincoln criminating and excellent taste from the World's Fair exhibits of Road,-having originated from Philadelphia, Pa., where he was asso- Luxembourg, Denmark, England, Czecho Slovakia, Sweden and Spain. ciated with Mr. De May, creator of fashions. Della Robbia and seventeenth century alabaster plaques are among
He has brought to Miami Beach all the wealth of experience from some rare antiques. Of especial interest is a Royal Persian bowl 20 years business in Asbury Park, New Jersey. He has created a shop with detailed pictorial history. which is attractive and stocked with the latest fashions,-specializing Here, too, is a choice selection of hand turned wood-ware of rare in spectator sports, beach wear, street and afternoon gowns, casual woods from the artistry of Charles Millward, the famous craftsman. and sport coats. Juan, Inc., is also the exclusive representative in Florida for the
well-known Renee Thornton Preparation, Inc. (The Duchess Carafa Hand Embroidered Fashions D'Andria) cosmetics and perfumes,-so handsomely displayed.
For over ten years in Miami Beach the Idamae Le Vine Shop This new shop, presided over by the easy-mannered Juan Cortez
now on Lincoln Road has functioned successfully with an air of Ayala, is a treasure-trove for admirers of art objects which reflect artistry and competence. the romantic interest of things rare and unique.
With Idamae Le Vine herself in charge, the most charming hand embroidered fashions are designed for the individual,-with hand embrodiery so exact in detail as to resemble a painting of the same 5-7070
subject.
After original sketches are drawn, whether for cruise wear,. Opal Lee Beauty Saho
dresses, suits or ensembles, the next study is of lines and correct Introducing new Creme Oil Permanents
figure. Here the ultimate object of the Idamae Le Vine creations is to make them seem "alive",-with lines to give grace and life to and
informal and formal wear. Feather-cut "hair do"
There is a friendly personal atmosphere is this show room and In Patio at
busy work shop.
In addition to the individually designed dresses and suits, match- 630 Lincoln Road MIAMI BEACH
ing bags are made to complete ensembles, and chic custom hats by Ria, assume an air both intriguing and different.
With its scope of design and color combinations and the personal
supervision given to individual detail this shop continues to enjoy the Multigraphing patronage of an appreciative clientele. Mimeographing
A Childrens Paradise PHONE 5-7770
The best way to enjoy The Toy Box on Lincoln Road with its LINCOLN ROAD LETTER SERVICE
countless items of attraction to children (and adults as well) is to 528 Lincoln Road
visit it with leisure enough to browse among its interesting displays.
It becomes at once a childrens' paradise where dolls . toys ... books .. reign supreme.
The variety of dolls and accessories which greet the visitor's HATS DESIGNED FOR THE INDIVIDUAL
eye make this a real "doll style centre." Especially complete is the doll house furniture,-items in miniature, to furnish every room of a LEYNA
modernly equipped "dolly home." CHAPEAUX
There are beautifully illustrated books for children at The Toy (Formerly 608 Lincoln Road)
Box, some purely educational, others for entertainment. -Now- MIAMI BEACH
The toys, however perhaps evoke the children's keenest interest. Of almost every type and description especially featured are the famous Holgate Toys. This group is educational,-their slogan being "Train as You Entertain." PHONE 5-3594 SALES RENTALS
Bags for children and knife and flash light sets, together with
many other novelties, have been particularly designed for childrens' EUGENIA P. GIBSON
use and delight. REG. REAL ESTATE BROKER
The Toy Box has a branch store in Ocean City, New Jersey, but
has been on Lincoln Road for 12 years in the same location, carrying 1000 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
loads of suggestions for tiny tots pleasure and education.
Speaking of Something New!
Our up to the minute creations in ladies beach wear
will simply take your breath away ....
"Exquisite" and "lovely" are fitting superlatives in describing our Infants' and Chil947 LINCOLN ROAD
% AT MICHIGAN dren's Wear. . Remember! A Gift
MIAMI BEACH from Salem's Means More .....
PHONE 5-3800




24 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
Anne Wrigley Beach wear and playclothes too, are featured,-with cute gay
One of the most brillant personalities who has adopted Miami hats and bags to match.
Beach as a home is Anne Wrigley, foremost decorator of the greater The latest styles makes this a real "fashion centre" for the
Miami area. Mrs. Wrigley is recognized as a creator of interiors which younger set. are both original and exclusive in their charm.
Since 1927 when Mrs. Wrigley established a Miami Beach Studio,Hee Ma
her achievements as a designer of smart interiors would make a listHenMa too long to record, but notable in the group of houses completely ap- Newly established on Lincoln Road Helen Mac offers exclusive gifts of dispointed by Mrs. Wrigley are homes of A. T. Eldredge, Charles Corby, tinction in de luxe assortments of tropical products. Oscar Webber, Robert Gifford, John D. Simmons, and John G. McRay. Tree-ripened citrus fruits of the choicest selection are carefully and attracMrs. Wrigley's generous spirit recently prompted her to one of the tively packed and boxed for shipment. Gift fruit baskets for any occasion are finest gestures reported in connection with British War Relief charity, made to order featuring pleasing presentations. Some are arranged in unusual When Alfred I. Barton and Leslie Buswell were searching for a suit- baskets, or in hampers-while others are presented in solid maple salad bowls, able place to establish headquarters for the Miami Beach section of the complete with fork and spoon . a most novel idea. British War Relief Society, she willingly offered half of her beautiful Beautiful gifts in solid maple . trays . nut bowls . ice cube studio, located at 925 West 41st Street, Miami Beach. The space was tubs and novelties for children as well as grown-ups are displayed in attractive accepted and has been declared the best workroom the society has in setting in this modern, distinctive shop. the United States. A special line of marmalades, conserves, jellies, honeys, and preservestogether with brandied peaches and pears, form a truly grand array of Helen The Augusta Shop Mac's tropical products.
One of the newcomers to Miami Beach is the shoD on Lincoln And to add further delight in the make up of gift baskets for family,'
Road known as 'Augusta,' carrying ready-to-wear resort fashions. relative, or friends are Sherry's candies, tropical crystallized fruit, shelled
A wide selection of daytime, afternoon and evening dresses is pecans and Hawaiian Macadamia nuts.
shown, and all types and kinds of coats and suits with or without fur From so tempting an assortment no gift will find a heartier welcome trim. Beach wear and sportswear, too, in the latest styles are offered. than a Helen Mac selection at 523 Lincoln Road. Phone 5-1989.
Resort shoppers find this shop a source of delight in both the ,0 ,, b ,el 0e ,
wide range of sizes (from junior Miss to larger women) and in thee well chosen variety of up-to-the-minute fashions. gT H E G EOR G IA N
Shopping Problems Solved
A visit to Salems, Importers will easily solve shopping problems. THE GEORGIAN a new and distinguished colonial
Their creations in ladies beach wear are new and different, and one I type hotel keynoting smart comfort amid gracious atmay make selections from most attractive displays. mosphere. Large enough to afford every modern conThe beach ensembles and accessories. ... robes. ... slack suits .. venience, yet not so large as to lose that personal conand play suits shown will delight the most fastidious shopper. Play tlat bEene guestiand ait ma am ea ht
clothes for "sun or sand," ...sport dresses ...and jackets, .and pes.Eeyn aiirwt a im ec
beauifulhan knited weaers re aso eatued.knows there is no finer address than "Directly on the !
There is also a lovely selection of infants and childrens wear,- ocean at Lincoln Road." Our guests find themselves
dainy cmplee otfis fo litle olk. ~right in the center of a gayly moving resort world. The latest of fashion creations and smart styles assure the popu- For your convenience a private beach, swimming
larity of this fashionable Lincoln Road Shop. I pool and cabana club are offered each cabana equipped
I with private dressing room and shower ... coffee shop Cook's Casino and a secluded patio where you may enjoy hours of j
Cook's Casino at Fifth Street and Washington Avenue,- Where j quite relaxation 'neath beautiful palms. Florida's finthe Causeway meets the Ocean, is one of Miami Beach's oldest and est bathing is at our door and guests may bathe directly
most popular bathing pavilions. It was established in 1925 by John I from their room. A. Cook who lived in Miami Beach at that time. I
The original, a small structure, was demolished by the 1926 T h I
hurricane. The next season, however, the casino was rebuilt and en- T i
larged. I ON THE OCEAN AT LINCOLN ROAD
It has enjoyed great popularity as an ocean front rendezvous, and 04 Distinguished New Hotel Directly on the Ocean
is conducted by Walter and John A. Cook, Jr.-the two sons of the original founder. *~ o.oO N O .o o u o e.o o f
"Fashions for Little Ladies" GREETINGS
One of the newest shops on Lincoln Road is The Junior Deb Shop
modern and cheerful. Here are displayed fashions for little folks from
from one year through junior sizes. Dresses, Skirts, Jackets, Sweaters, Suits,-everything to outfit the well-dressed little girl . as well as "mother and daughter" combinations designed alike in style and A FRIEN D
color.
BEVELY, ASS.When shopping on Lincoln Road,-Davison, Inc., in the new Albion Hotel block affords a most attractive display of ladies' and children's beach and sport wear. This is one of two stores operated by Davison, Inc.-the other located in Beverly, Massachusetts, and catering to the better trade in that northern resort.
U A U) c I C Mr. Davison, genial and dynamic acting head of the
I2VsvM W ~ N C.store, is ably assisted by a group of well trained salespeople EXCLUSIVE BEACH AND SPORTSWEAR from shops of New York City and Boston. And in order to
for supply their clientele with the very latest in fashions they
for make several trips to metropolitan centers throughout the
LADIES AND CHILDREN season for stock in the trend of advance styles.
The newest fashions . prices in line with quality sold 315LinolnRoa. Abin HtelBld., ..wide variety .. and attractive display .. all combine
315 incln oad Albon ote Blg.,to make Davison, Inc., one of the most attractive marts for MIAMI BEACH beach and sport wear on Lincoln Road.




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 25
HICKSON, INC.
THE NW With a record of 29 years in the fruit shipping business in the metropolitan
Miami area the firm of Hickson has achieved distinct recognition. S Excellence in quality selection, attractive display and reliability in shipping
d Chave awarded this firm with the recognition of being the largest shippers of gift
I NO W OPEN 1 fruit boxes in America. During the holiday season sixteen and one-third solid
N OPEN carloads of fruits and gifts were shipped North within a period of 8 days.
_____ Hickson, Inc. at 747 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach has maintained the same
g location for 5 years,--with other Hickson Stores at East Flagler Street, Miami and Si West Palm Beach. In their own packing plant at 178 S. W. 3rd Street, Miami, cus- tomers may drive in and see their own selecion of fruits packed for shipment.
0 i Here the volume is so large that an express office is maintained in their own plant.
I i Wide variety in displays for shipment is afforded in combinations of fruits,
! !~ marmalades and attractively boxed glaced fruits and nuts.
g A shipment by Hickson we'l represents "Florida's finest".
- =THE HOUSE OF ART
g Truly named . a real "treasure house" . this interesting shop houses I!
_!, some of the rarest and most interesting works of art. Located at 821 Lincoln
I g_ Road, The House of Art represents one of the oldest firms of its kind in this
i i area, starting business in Miami in 1926-and being 16 years in business in Miami
g g Beach.
g| 0 Here is featured the finest collection of semi-precious stones, ivory curios
- and art objects. Among the wealth of art objects is a rate collection of rose
- quartz, smoked crystal, and jade-ranging from spinach jade to apple green. I One piece of particular mention is the largest rose quartz elephant in existence,I a real museum piece.
| O Another outstanding work of art in rose quartz is a pair of complete scenes,
I exquisitely clear,-depicting the Chinese Goddess of Mercy, the sacred cow
- climbing the mountain side and the age-old cherry tree and birds. Each scene S Your feet will feel young enough when you slip them g is about 10xl0 inches in size with an elaborately carved teak wood stand.
Yont a p i ofperel y fitngh ecy l e A group of Limage vases on copper-both large and small,-bought from the
intoa pair of perfectly fitting perfectly lovely RED collection of a famous estate are reflective of the glamour of French scenes long
Cross Shoes. gone. Ivory birds, painted, and with life-like animation are grouped in one cabinet.
...... All the season's smartest fashion notes in a | Yet another contains a wealth of ivory plaques with their intricacy of workmanship.
j complete selection of STYLES and SIZES ....... Fascinating in detail and depicting an historical scene is one particular pair of
S Every pair at the nationally advertised and standardice- 6.50. plaques, where, carved in ivory, are 32 figures appearing in a space no larger than
I Sizes 4 to 11 Widths AAAA to EEE 2'/x8 inches. An interesting display of costume jewelry and a large selection of
445 LINCOLN ROADo beautiful bags are also displayed in this shop.
4 Countless other art pieces of beauty and rare design and chosen with the disMIAMI BEACH crimination of a real connoisseur are found in The House of Art ... Making this a
i .. o veritable treasure trove of distinctive art objects-rich in the glamour of romance.
"AND....
Extrd Moneg For".
When you find you're in need of "extra cash" . when emergencies arise that demand additional funds, the friendly officials of the Miami Industrial Bank want you to feel welcome to come in and "talk it over." Remember, the Miami Industrial has a special teacher's loan plan, at regular bank interest rates, with repayment terms designed particularly for
the teacher. Our friendly officials will be glad to explain the It has been a great privilege as the architect of the New
details of the Teacher's Loan Plan to you. Come in and
talk it over! Lincoln-Washington Buiding to perpetuate a worthy structure
We pay the highest interest of any bank and a landmark of Miami Beach, Florida.
in Miami on your savings. ALBERT ANIS.
OFFICERS
R. DEWITr KING J. T. OWENS
Chairman of the Board Exec. Vice-Pres. and Treas.
JOHN M. OGDEN, President Roy A. PERRY, Secretary
Wm. D. McKENzIE, Assistant Secretary
DIRECTORS
J. P. SIMMONS CURTIS H. DODSON
R. DEWITT KINo J.T. OWENS
JOHN M. OGDEN HUGH PURVIS
LEIAND HYZER THORNTON M. FINCHER
N D U PhR I A L
--MEMBE FED1)E R AL D E W- 9-1T 1 NSURNCE CORORAI-t
MIAMI BGAC14 BRANCH Phone 5-5129 Suite 217-1101 LINCOLN ROAD BLDG. Built in 1917




26 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
A Distinctive:Hotel......
.. For Discrimindting Per5ons
HEALTH PLEASURE RELAXATION
150 rooms ....... moderate cost
Macfadden Deauville, with the world's largest circular swimming pool, big private beach, unexcelled cabanas, and its world world famous health departA DISTINCTIVE CLUB.. ment is the most ideal vacation HEALTH BUILDING ....
For those of discriminating tastes,
the Macfadden Deauville Cabana spot in this glorious sunshine For those who prize their most
Club, with its wide and roomy 500- state for teachers, educators valuable possession-good healthfoot private beach and the world's Macfadden Deauville offers a comlargest circular salt. water swimming and school executives. Its atpooloffrs he ltimte n oeanplete body-building program, dietetic pool offers the ultimate in ocean mosphere is restful and whole- avcdiypyia utr xr
front recreation enjoyment and com- advice, daily physical culture exerfort. Prevailing moderately priced some. For vacation rates write cises, solaria, supervised hikes, hydroseason or yearly rates furnished upon to therapy, physiotherapy, electrorequest. Address inquiries directly therapy and massage at prices within
to Macfadden Deauville Cabana Club WARREN C. FREEMAN, reach of all.
or call 6-2521. Manager.
mdcfddden-deduville hotel
"OVERLOOKING THE SEA"
6701 COLLINS AVE. MIAMI BEACH




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 27
the Growth of
by Joe Copps
The phenominal progress of Miami Beach during the past decade is reflected While this great hotel building program was going on other types of strucin the city's building permit figures, its sound financial condition and in the tures such as apartment houses, homes and building places were being erected manner it has been governed through the good and bad years. and the entire geographical face of Miami Beach was being transformed from a
Since 1930 approximately $80,000,000 has been invested in Miami Beach for former mangrove swamp into a beautiful city of modernistic buildings, wider new construction alone, and it is estimated that an equal amount has been spent streets, parks and other attractive facilities needed for the advancement of the for land, furnishings and landscaping, bringing the total investment to approxi- entire community. mately $160,000,000 for the 10-year period. Since 1935 Miami Beach has been well near the top among all the larger
The first five years of the past decade, 1930 to 1935, saw little progress in cities of the United States in the amount of building permits issued each year. Miami Beach, as far as new construction was concerned, yet the city maintained For example, Miami Beach was exceeded by only 10 cities in the United States its enviable financial condition, continued its public improvements and met all in 1935; 12 in 1936; 14 in 1937; 26 in 1938; 18 in 1939, and 13 in 1940. obligations without a default in principal or interest. Compared to population with other cities of the nation Miami Beach can
Since 1935 approximately $67,000,000 worth of new buildings have been rightfully claim the distinction of being "America's fastest growing city."
constructed and a like amount has been spent for land, furnishings and land- With this vast amount of new construction going on in Miami Beach it might scaping. In that period the city has kept pace with private construction by im- be reasonably assumed that another real estate boom was in progress, but this proving its streets, installing a new sewer system, building a new golf course, is not the case and at no time during the heavy building program has there been two new fire stations, a new police station, installing additional water mains, any semblance of a boom. a water storage tank and providing every other improvement made necessary by Pioneer real estate developers and builders have often been quoted as saying
the rapid expansion of the entire city. that approximately three fourth of the property being sold is for cash and that
Miami Beach, a city entirely dependent upon the number of visitors which about the same percentage of all the new buildings are unmortgaged. This proves visit the city each year, has weathered many catastrophies during its short 25 conclusively that Miami Beach properties are being built, owned and operated by years of existence, and in that time managed to keep clear of many entanglements investors rather than speculators. experienced by other cities, and has always enjoyed a reputation of attractin One of the most interesting facts about the sound financial condition of
huge investors to its shores. Miami Beach is that in all of the 25 years since the city was incorporated there
Shortly after recovering from a disastrous hurricane in the late 1920's was less than $30,000 in outstanding taxes at the end of the last fiscal year, Miami Beach was enjoying a slight building "boom" when the stock market crash October 31, 1940. of 1929 descended upon the country, causing a sharp decline in travel, especially to Miami Beach which at that time was more or less known as a "millionaire's playground." BEACH PUBLICITY STORY
An example of progress during the first and second half of the 1930-1940
decade is shown by, building permits. From 1930 to 1935, there were but 36 By PETE CROSSLAND
new hotels construc ted in Miami Beach, but in the following year, 1936, permits Through the efforts of the city in establishing its own publicity department were issued for 38 hotels, and in the next four years an additional 127 more many years ago the name of Miami Beach has become so well known throughout hotels were built, bringing the 5-year total to 165, a record probably never the United States that practically every event and every Miami Beach happening equalled in any other city in the entire world. is now considered "news."
MIAMI BEACH
Leadership
The TOWN HOUSE -with its swimming pool, private bathing beach
cabanas superior service will make your Miami visit a memorable
one.
The..
TCWN I-cE Al
MILTON B. KILLE, Manager
'N FASHIONABLE COLLINS AVENUE AT 20TH STREET''




28 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
Leading newspapers and magazines all over the country depend upon the Miami Beach publicity department, known as the Miami Beach News Service, for much of their news stories and pictures, and in many instances send their own reporters, editors and photographers direct to the publicity department offices when in need of help on special assignments.0
The Miami Beach News Service was established in 1925 by Steve Hannagan, nationally known publicity and public relations counsel. At that time the department was operated from the Chamber of Commerce office, but in 1927 it was taken over by the city and all operations since that time have been conducted at the City Hall building.
Joe Copps, director of the Miami Beach Service, has been with the Steve Hannagan organization since 1925 and has been in charge of the Beach office since Hannagan moved his main office to New York in 1932.
At present there are 13 members on the publicity staff, headed by Copps.
Stuart Cameron, former sports editor of the United Press, is chief assistant
Cameron has been connected with the Beach publicity office for the past three winter seasons. Last summer he was with the publicity department at the New oE
York World's Fair. H
Pete Crossland, picture editor and summer director, has been with the publicity department six years. Before that he operated a weekly newspaper in Miami Beach, and was city editor of the Old Evansville (Indiana) journal before M
coming here 16 years ago.
Stan Baitz, with 10 years of varied newspaper experience in New York and
Washington, holds down the sports desk, is radio editor and feature writer in 411 OCEAN DRIVE
the Hannagan-Copps organization at Miami Beach. He is a member of bar of the District of Columbia and worked out of Steve Hannagan's New York The only complete modern fireproof hotel operating the
office prior to coming here. year around directly on the ocean at moderate prices
Jimmy Rend, who works with news reel men in staging the various "stunts and gags" which are shown throughout the country depicting Miami Beach bathing girls in action pictures, comes direct from New York where he worked TWO DINING ROOMS OPEN AIR DANCE PATIO
for several years in the same line for Paramount News. BEAUTIFUL COCKTAIL LOUNGE
Cynthia Powell, society and fashion editor, has been with the Beach publicity staff for two years. She was formerly with the Miami Herald, did publicity LARGE PRIVATE BATHING BEACH FULLY EQUIPPED
work for the Roney Plaza Hotel, and for several years did publicity work for MARINE GARDEN SOLARIUMS MASSAGE PARLORS
the Shoreham hotel in Washington, D. C. Society news and fashion pictures being prepared by her department this year reached many of the nation's largest newspapers and magazines. W ielctdi h er falatvte'h
Miss Powell's assistants include Emily Vance, May Lundgren and Kitty ~ W ielctdi h er falatvte h
Reddick. Miss Vance has had wide experience in the newspaper field and was Strath enjoys the seclusion of a private estate.
connected with the Surf Club at Miami Beach prior to joining the Hannagan -____________________________________organization.
Miss Lundgren, society reporter, was formerly with Lord and Thomas andthe Tower Magazine in New York, and more recently was employed by thd Gradon Bevis Advertising Agency in Miami.
Miss Reddick, who assists on both society and fashions, is from Frenc.
Lick Springs, Indiana. She has a background of travel, and has wide experience i.E A
on society news and fashions. R A H
Three photographers make up the photographic staff of the Beach office. James Hamilton, with 20 years background, joined the organization five years ago. He was with the Miami Herald several years and before that was a news reel cameraman, working out of Atlanta.
Johnny Sarno comes from the photographic staff of the New York journal
American. He is a brother of the famous Tony Sarno, society photographer for M IA M I B E A C H
International News Service.
Ollie C. Fitz, veteran of the photographic staff, has done all of the finishing work for Hannagan and Copps at Miami Beach for the past 12 winter seasons. He hails from upper New York State where he worked for International News
Photos. DAILY TROPICS
Jennie Sweeting, office secretary, has been a sort of "general manager" around the office for 12 years.
CARL G. FISHER-AS I KNEW HIM Miami Beach's Only
By STEVE HANNAGAN
Carl G. Fisher was the greatest showman in America-but he didn't want Daily lNe'wspaper
anyone to know about it.
When running his little bicycle shop in Indianapolis, selling the first automobiles on the market, conducting the business of the remarkable Prestolite plant in Indiana, developing Miami Beach, he always displayed a rare flair for promo- o e- w d
tion and not only avoided but dreaded personal publicity. l m Ow e
He was scruplously honest in his endeavors and whether it was bicycles,
automobiles, gas tanks or real estate, he always peddled honest values. Home-Edited
Looking back over the years, today I am amazed at his foresight in everything he handled. The Indianapolis Motor Speedway which he dreamed and built, Miami Beach which was his baby now grown to majestic manhood, and JOHN D. MONTGOMERY
his little-known sponsorship of both the Lincoln and the Dixie Highways are examples of his long-sighted genius.
Happily successful in his operation, with his partner Jim Allison, of the Editor and Publisher
Prestolite plant in Indianapolis, his dream of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and the annual 500-mile automobile race which will be run for a 29th time this May 30 is an outstanding example of his uncanny inspiration.
He conceived this gigantic track in 1909 and when short races on a macadam-




THE FLORIDA TEACHERS 29
track were not too successful in the first two years of the operation of this track 40 ,,f .,l ,)0 ,,, ,.,, o .
designed to be the great out-of-door laboratory of the automobile industry, in late 1910 he suggested ail accomplished the bricking of the two-and-a-half mile oval and proposed and inaugurated in 1911 the longest automobile race in the world-500-miles to gold and glory,
The Speedway at its inception, was not an easy track to drive. Fisher purposely designed it that way-with four quarter turns connected with two long straightaways and two short straightways. It could have been a bowl which, would have produced high speeds and records but Fisher wanted the boys to have a test even back in 1909. And the boys still have the same test today with I
the European drivers who came over last year proclaiming the Speedway, years later, still the most difficult and interesting automobile race course in the world. Such was Fisher's foresight.
Fisher always insisted that the 500-mile race be more than just etran
ment and he established a system, still in vogue, where the automotive engineers of America, along with officials of the American Automobile Association and officials of the Speedway, meet each year or so and draw up new racing rules which require mechanical preparation for the race which definitely contribute knowledge to the automobile industry. a
Fisher's introduction of the 1,000 piece band, composed of small bands from Indianapolis and nearby cities to start the automobile race remains one of the outstanding examples of showmanship in sports even today.
When Fisher came -to Miami Beach he had made his fortune and had announced his retirement. But he was a young man, slightly over 40, and he could have no more settled down to play than could Bill Knudson stop thinking of X
production lines. S h o
He visioned a play land here in the sun and immediately started his active T e I A
brain in the direction of producing it. The Leff School
Besides being a dreamer, a showman, a building dreamer and an optimist. I N R E Y -T E FH G A E R SD N n
Fisher was also one who would always take a chance to back his far-sighted judge- U S R W L T RA E..R SD N n
ment. demdDAY SCHOOL
He demdMiami Beach to its every hotel, business section and school outdoor Teaching Afternoon Recreation Regulation
house which today makes it the outstanding resort city of the world. As he walked Swimming Pool on Premises
about in the mud which his huge pumping machines were pumping in from DISTINCTIVE for its HIGH SCHOLASTIC
Biscayne Bay and literally making Miami Beach from mangrove swamps, heST N A D .CU UR LH M
pointed out the business and hotel section that were to be in years hence, and ST N A SCU UR LH M
today his dream has more than come true. ENVIRONMENT ... CAREFUL
He kept a tight check upon his property to see that it only got into the HEALTH SUPERVISION
hrer vnheandhedged t his t off s upse th t ty eofacetre t ha woul b ceDAi RseDirecto prer hvneand h t esignedite stuofrhosestetp facietr that wered to goA incran.etos LEAR, D r co
used. His foresight and his strict regulations are today responsible for the most 1 1010 West Avenue Miami Beach, Florida
modern and best built city in America. 0 0 0 C, Of Ie (~).n.O.).Ql.Of4,
Fisher interested the best people of America in his development hard by the Atlantic Ocean at Miami Beach in the early days. He laid the seed which have made Lincoln Road the most fashionable shopping street in the world. He built the best of hotels and persuaded his wealthy friends to raise palatial palaces in theE.D K EF R
sun on the ocean as well as the bay front. E .K E E
BAHOFCASRealtor *A pp raiser
Personal records at Miami Beach city hall indicate that the large "city family" EXPERT APPRAISALS
manages to get along with their "bosses" rather nicely, because on a faded page in the record book is a notation showing that City Clerk C. W. Tomlinson and Member American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers
Fire Chief J. S. Stephenson began their duties in 1920, just a little over 20 years Established in 1923
ago.
Ray Miller, tax assessor, is another 20-year man, having begun with the 1035 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
city in April of 1921.
C. A. Renshaw, city manager, will have completed 15 years in September of this year, and his secretary, Miss Elizabeth Doherty, has served in this position for 13 years.
H. H. Horn, superintendent of the city water department, has been engaged in his present occupation 18 years, and his assistant, J. D. Roth, joined up in 1924, 17 years ago. Florida's Finest
J. J. Farrey, city building inspector, ic. another 17-year man, and his chief
msiane Ed Hancock, has served for 12 years. M. N. Lipp, city engineer, has I c S Sea Food Dinners
been employed 14 years, as well as Ernie Wiess, life guard captain; Art Gleason,__________________mngrof the municipal golf course; Dave Cleary, chief accountant, and J. B. Lemon, director of recreation.
J. Harvey Robillard, city attorney, with the exception of one two-year term,
has acted in his present capacity for 13 years, and Police Chief H. V. Yocum Telephone6-1117
has been in that department for 12 years.
CITYOFFIIALSSTONE CRABS-GREEN TURTLE STEAKS
The voters and taxpayers of Miami Beach evidently are fairly well satisfied B OL DLV O S E
in the manner their elected officials have been running the city, because in most B OL D LV O SE
cases the councilmen asking for re-election win another term without a great deal of difficulty. Cocktail Lounge On the Ocean at Baker's Haulover
Mayor John H. Levi is the city's oldest employe, if he can be termed an employe. He was first elected to the city council in 1918, and has served on that body ever since. In 1920 he was re-elected for a four year term, and every four




30 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
years since that time has been re-elected. (Incidently, Mayor Levi has never publicly asked a citizen to vote for him.) Harry Hice is the second oldest councilman, in point of service. He has been continuously re-elected ever since 1924, rounding out 17 years on that body in June this year.
Baron de Hirsch Meyer entered Beach politics in 1930 by being elected tc the council for a two-year term. In 1932 he received a four-year term, and again in 1937 he was re-elected for another four years.
Robert W. Ralston was first elected in 1932, re-elected in 1934, and 1937,
__ and in 1939 he received a four year term which does not expire until 1943.
Val C. Cleary, in his first campaign for city councilman in 1934 was given a four-year term, and again in 1939 he was re-elected for four years more. Prior to his entrance into the councilmanic field, however, Mr. Cleary served as mayor from 1930 to 1932, and he was city tax assessor from 1922 to 1926.
Mitchell Wolfson and Herbert A. Frink are the other members of the sevenCentrally Located Planned Athletic and Social Activities man council. They were both elected for two-year terms in 1939, and with Levi,
Meyer and Hice must run again in June this year provided they choose to serve Hand Ball Courts Table Tennis Tropical Patio. further.
91ai J 91 tan W Nate Fisher's
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Operated by Electricity .. Just get on, turn the switch and
RELAX. The machine exercises you. Adjustable to four types- KINDERGARTEN TRAINING TUTORING
swimming, horseback riding, rowing, bicycling. A few minutes BOARDING BY DAY, WEEK OR MONTH
a day is enough and the exercise is so passive it is recommended even for invalids. Takes up no more room than an TRAINED DIETICIANS AND NURSE
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Fun to Use . yet it gets results fast! Hundreds of enthusiastic PRIVATE CABANA AT EXCLUSIVE
letters in our files from users prove it! POOL AND CABANA CLUB
EXERCYCLE CO., 1654 MERIDIAN. Ph. 5-7688 Miami Beach EXTENSIVE PLAYGROUND
Please send me your illustrated brochures telling about the If James Ave. at 19th St.
Exercycle.
your child needs MIAMI BEACH
this climate if you're 5-3849
going away, send your child to
ABRA M S HO TEL our "Corner" for comfort and play.
302 EUCLID AVE. MR. and MRS. HAROLD TAMARIN
MIAMI BEACH
MR. MORTIMER GARBER
All Dietary Laws Strictly Observed




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 31
The UNIVERSITY of MIAMI
MAIN B ILDIN
In Dcemer 940theUnivrsiy o Mimi eaced ahigly ignficnt n 197 aBoo Shwerwas eldat he ancastHote-ths ws te oigi
vrIi mes. his reonto n ist of Miami sresandard unieriy eve icntog fac havebee a Cokhmber ofs Comerce al their owa dt l his fitin that oiin
weritout endowmecnitnd adequate pas a glowngar triuertoits, ablen manage- 1928 Mrs. Thomas Pancoast was elected President and is still serving in that withut ndomen an adquat plntis glwin triuteto ts blemange- same capacity. Their annual Art Exhibits are a "must" on the visitors and residents ment, sound scholarship, stability, and rapidly expanding service to the community lists. Their Club house at 2401 Pine Tree Drive is one of the city's most attracand nation. tv n oeiepae.Terpr ntete lnigadpatdsrbto
As the University is clothed with its new honors, it is fitting to record that has had much to do with the beautification of Miami Beach. it was established by a group of public-spirited citizens in 1926; it is governed by a Board of Trustees of twenty-one public-spirited citizens; it is manned by a Among their Welfare activities are: Children's Home Society, Red Cross,
hard-working faculty and administrative staff; and it is attracting nearly sixteen Mississippi Flood Victims, Infantile Paralysis Drives and most all worthy local hundred students, not only from the Miami area but from almost every state in charities. Since 1928 a University Scholarship has been given a graduate student
the union. The University is in no sense a private enterprise. There is no stock of the Ida M. Fisher High School. and there are no stockholders. Its property is held in trust by the trustees for the The Miami Beach Woman's Club, through its welfare work, its aid in the benefit of the public. Its sole purpose is the promotion of human welfare,.omn fteUiest fMai roe htGetrMaii soewoe
Today the press, civic organizations, and leaders in countless fields salute each part, Miami, Miami Beach, Coral Gables, all working together for the the University of Miami for its high achievements in spite of unparalleled betterment of Dade County, where "to be" is "to Live."
financial handicaps. Today its acute limitations are those imposed by the lack of funds for plant, equipment, new departments, faculty, and student aid. ____________________________________Challenging opportunities are here and ahead. Literally hundreds of students are seeking training in fields in which the University has not had the funds and facilities to give instruction. The demand is immediate and urgent for courses in C lothes that .
home economics, engineering, architecture, and graduate work.
The University is fully alive to these and other potentialities, eager to M aike HFASlIEU N N MEI
speed the day of their realization.
Perhaps nowhere in America is there such an opportunity for fruitful return Our INew 1941 Collection. .
on the university dollar. To those about to write or re-write their wills, the "on -h-lc"Rsr ahos alwt
University of Miami offers unparalleled opportunity to weave their lives into "on-h-lc" Rsr ahosalwt
the lives of the youth of today and of tomorrow. From the local business men, that youthful gayety and simplicity
from those who come on occasional visits for health or pleasure, the University which have made ELEANOR'S
of Miami now asks boldly and earnestly for adequate funds with which to do a by-word among America's
its work in 1941 and thereafter. It has entirely proved its worth. Best Dressed Women.
Prices within
MIAMI BEACH WOMAN'S CLUB reach of all. 46k4WWO' Sd
In 1926 a group of civic minded women, under the leadership of Mrs. Clayton HOUSE OF FASHION
Sedgwick Cooper, formed the Miami Beach Woman's Club-for the purpose of Hnigo BulngCollins Ave. & 23rd St.
promoting friendliness between the visitors and the residents. From that original Hunt..int Bu, IldIngA I E C
group of some 325 members has grown one of the most progressive and outstand- 14S .1tS. IM IM EC
ing Clubs of Dade County.




32 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA
announces its membership in the
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and the membership of its School of Music in the National Association of Schools of Music
JOSEPH TESEI
An enviable record of progress has been made by a young man, Write or phone the Registrar for information regarding the who, almost penniless, came to Miami Beach in 1924 and started in the landscape business with a ramshackle Ford truck. He is Joseph Regular or Adult Education classes, and the Winter Institute Tesei and holds a contract to do all landscape hauling for the city of Miami Beach. of Literature. Phone 4-0801.
Mr. Tesei today is the proud owner of 22 trucks, with his own garage, and he employs 25 men to carry on his landscape business. It is men like Joseph Tesei who are the foundation of this country. Registration Second Division
REGULAR DIVISION, FEBRUARY 3-4
SEE OUR NEW 1941 MODELS ADULT DIVISION, FEBRUARY 8
BEFORE YOU BUY
Nolan-Peeler Motors I LI\ AV
Inc. Developing and Printing
Accessories & Supplies
CADILLAC LA SALLE PONTIAC TROPICAL
Sales and Service CAM ERA STORES
123 SECOND STREET, N. E. PHONE 2-1773
PHONE 3-5363
2044 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD MIAMI, FLORIDA
PHONE 5-6231
ALBURY & COMPANY T.L. O'CONNOR
Steamship Agents Realtor
Established 1921
Operating Regular Passenger and Freight
Steamship Service between T. D. O'CONNOR 444 FORTY-FIRST STREET
MIAMI NASSAU Associate Miami Beach, Florida
and
MIAMI HAVANA
TRAVEL BUREAU at CAUSEWAY TERMINAL PHONE 2-9202 Night Call 2-9389 AMOCO Products
East end County Causeway Phone 5-4544
HEAD OFFICE at PIER 1, MUNICIPAL DOCKS AMOCO SERVICE STATION
Phone 2-6564 Cable Address "ALBURY" ROAD SERVICE BATTERY SERVICE
MIAMI, FLORIDA LEON CROW, Mgr. 801 BISCAYNE BLVD. MIAMI, FLORIDA




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 33
* .Ddde Counig Persond lilies
L. 0 BrckerGrae Brwn harls Myer
Dr. Luher 0.Bricke is Flrida Cairmanof.tht.orgaizatio..For.our.yers,.Mr..Mur
As fr bak as192, Re. Dr Luher Brcker sa thegrea rel ha bee urgng rganzatins nd idiviualsin.loria.totak
Dr.. Brikran inteney intresin person hasle aiedmteialeLgiltue
of ~~ r teUinTelgcLuminr in NewcYork City heisunvrsl- Haaa aresntiv of the Wraiztold Woma' Poryary ofs Geneva
Aysnoted saan authr9ofthelogical.wrkstand a.a lecuer. Phral Sweland.ee urging theanpatiseverald yearsvsheuas bee wlritin ta ptenmt famous of Dr.m Brce's worioe ofd his e neweti poulrly mr neeti h are oenslwohssae erao
ktlnownas "eoga Altr" Oe ofhes prostandinguchieveets inr theea ptage, "awI Ysoio Liked t frTedFra teacher wmagacl e fteDor wase ths buidingl ofpchtre Church19, noAtlat Baor linbraie, Wyanoing Mrs.a urrp' trael ae carriedhe Gera, ksnown thgroughasouto the Unitd Saesnv asa eutfu othc ttsaogteelns r.Murl a pone himno
cratedra i of rea imoratae. Dr. rickeTre stlD csasnoriister herite to r w oo a corne of thes wotrd Sh e hasethied circle of this cr an wateseale, itrutg shrwd, busiess maaementy the globue.admd aytistruhu mrc n edn
into cleroth detomeit an copaoriely ort permiod.ar. rickae foreig cities. Shenwaseduted ItratihevyCaser Cunoreclege, brilith anin Tleandough eisary ew fond dily, in is bnieafl- Waahnn sresonnetaris, ofrae; Univermansiaty of yomnad
Sntedas n atho ofthelogcur wresn probles.uHer sympai wizeln.Drn the Unvrstafsim, thr seas aard he law deerein
study brngn himDcorwse abeastn of 1934.re Shch pnAlna Br nracsin, stateind, Fedral curtls rs Murre' horned
wholehartedlywthcivilianstho Uffter frote affectifu th c waroeeyno n cre ftewrdSehstrc ice
candhasledra oprman imorally. aD frinackrsiall Het as leitl timetisate 1500 glbrickmae ane oneiof tholdesutandrmostaexlusdive
spelan nd neprivaed clu buti maan embershdiy in thieufu nd resieisetion of Miami. here she fis timretohe la charmein
spen inpriate lub, bt mantans embeshi inthe urfand hostess to her numerous friends in social and professional circles. Indian Creek Clubs, Miami Beach.
ETHEL ERNEST MURREL
One of the most interesting personalities in Miami is Ethel Ernest
Murrell. Her accomplishments include writing of prose and poetry, author of law books, lecturer, columnist, radio commentator and political activities.
In her legal profession, Mrs. Murrell is recognized and honored as a successful practitioner of law, as well as being an authority on legal subjects. One of her books, "Law for Ladies," published in 1937, 4"
is used as a textbook at the Florida State College for Women. Another of her books, "Practical Law," a text book for junior colleges, is being used at Chevy Chase Junior College as a basis of the only law course of its kind in America.
Orlando High School and Ivenson Hall for Girls, Laramie, Wyomning, also are using this book. Mrs. Murrell conducted a Legal Forum over station WKAT and also worked as news commentator and lecturer over that station. Eight Florida newspapers carried her legal columns under the title, "Married Women's Law" over a twoyear period. Her lectures on legal subjects recently were made throughout the country and she was booked by A. H. Handley for a series of professional lectures in northeastern seaboard states.
Mrs. Murrell also has lectured widely under the auspices of the
National Woman's Party, with headquarters in Washington. She Mrs. Murrell




34 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
Pearl Safford George A. Brockway
If you should ask Pearl Safford what she has done in the musical GEORGE A. BROCKWAY, A MAN OF DEEDS
world of Miami, she would answer "Why, really nothing". Yet there In 1863, during the Civil War and just about the time the Battle is hardly another who has done more-in establishing the musical of Shiloh was being bitterly fought, there was born in Homer, New clubs of Florida. York, George A. Brockway, a name later to be indelibly impressed on
Possessor of the degree of Bachelor of Music, Mrs. Safford found- the business world.
ed the Miami College of Music and Oratory. For eight years she In 1880 he became associated with his father, William N. Brockdirected this, but patriotically gave it up to do war work in Washing- way, in the manufacture of high-grade, horse drawn pleasure carton, during the last war. rages and at his father's death in 1889, he continued the business.
When you read the "first" positions which she has held in the The Company known as William N. Brockway, Inc. manufactured as Florida Federation of Music Clubs, you will see why her name is such high as 4,500 vehicles per year. In the following years as horses were a factor in that organization. Founder of the Junior Miami Music replaced by motors, Mr. Brockway organized in 1912 the Brockway Club (the oldest Federated Junior Club in the state), she was their Motor Truck Co., of Cortland, New York, which soon took its place first State Chairman and is always anxious and willing to assist among the leading truck manufacturers. With the advent of this other clubs in getting their Junior groups started. She was the first Country into the World War, 1000 Liberty trucks were manufactured President of the Florida Federation of Music Clubs and has since by the Company and shipped abroad to be used by the A. E. F. Mr. served as Vice President, Historian and Legislation Chairman. She Brockway headed this successful organization from 1912 to 1929 when was the compiler of the first scrap book and was the first Settlement he retired, feeling that his ambition was fully realized and satisfied Chairman, also the first State Chairman of Music Contests. Mrs. that the Company could go on indefinitely making durable and deSafford now holds the title of Honorary Past President of the Florida pendable products. He became Chairman of the Board which posiMusic Clubs and is also the music editor of the Florida Teacher. tion he still holds. rd,
In the literary field, Mrs. Safford was co-founder, with Mrs. Mr. Brockway is President of the Cortland City Water Boa
Ruth Hoxie, of the Miami Branch of the National League of American President of the Board of Trustees of the Cortland Children's Home, Pen Women and is now an honorary member of it. She is International Vice-President and Director of the First National Bank of Cortland, Vice President of the Poetry Society of Great Britain and America, New York; Vice-President and Director of the Homer National Bank, Inc., chairman of membership of the Song Writing Group, Poetry Homer, N. Y., having been President of the Bank for fifteen years, Society, Inc., as well as being a life member of the Bookfellows of also President of the Board of Trustees of the Cortland County Home Chicago. for Aged Women, Homer, New York. Mr. Brockway was one of the
Mrs. Safford, an unassuming, extremely considerate person, ranks founders of the Cortland County Hospital, and still is Vice-Pres. and as one of our real leaders in the furtherment of musical interests in Trustee. Florida and any who are fortunate enough to know her have benefited He is an active member of the Surf Club, Miami Beach, Boca from her sterling character. Raton Club, Lotus Club of New York, Century Club, Syracuse, N. Y.,
Masonic Club and Cortland Country Club, Cortland, N. Y. Civic and
MR. CHARLES S. MEYERS charitable organizations have benefited from the personal interest and
material aid received from Mr. Brockway and especially those of his
Among the leading business and professional men of Miami, none own county, Courtland. In 1927 he incorporated the Brockway Foundais proving more worthy of recognition than Charles S. Myers, who tion of Homer, N. Y., his birthplace. The income from this Foundacame here 15 years ago. He has represented the Royal Typewriter tion is handled by a Board of Trustees and used for the benef it of Company since 1927, becoming exclusive sales agent five years ago needy and worthy people of his home town. and since then has held a preferred position for Royal in this area, as Although Mr. George A. Brockway is devotedly a native of Cortwell as for the Monarch Address and Fridon Calculating machines, land, New York, he proudly says that he has visited Miami Beach which he sponsors. many winters since 1899 and is equally proud of the fact that he is
Mr. Meyers has in his employ expert workmen who have spent a Miami Beach property owner, residing at 2054 North Bay Road. years in the repairing and rebuilding of these well known typewriters,
adding and calculating machines .... and so is able to render effi- Mrs. J. C. Brown
cient service at all times. The repair department maintained by his Mrs. J. C. Brown, who has been connected with the school system company insures prompt attention for all machines, either purchased of Dade County and is now head of the Foreign Language Department or rented. Even the smallest detail receives immediate personal at- of the Miami Beach Junior-Senior High School, needs no introduction tention. to the residents of Greater Miami. Her accomplishments in education
Mr. Meyers is a member of the Junior Chamber of Commerce and the literary world have made her one of the most highly respected
and is actively interested in all civic programs. He has built a reputa- personalities on the Beach. There she is teaching the French language. tion far and wide on his courtesy and ability and business concerns She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Florida Teacher in Miami are learning of the valuable service he is offering. monthly.




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 3
In addition to her regular duties Mrs. Brown has graciously directed language study in the Pan-American League's Language Study Institute which, for several years past, has provided night classes in conversational Spanish for adult students without cost to the pupil. She personally conducts a beginner's class in Spanish on Saturday evenings and this work is also free of costs to the student.
Each year Mrs. Brown takes several different groups of Spanish students to Cuba and has broadcast frequently over radio stations in Havana. Her broadcasts here, over a period of two years, was a series of "English Lessons for Spanish Listeners." This successful method of teaching English, with explanations entirely in the Spanish language, was broadcast to all of our neighbors to the south over short-wave station W4-XB. Mrs. Brown is enthusiastically interested in the furtherance of our relations with Spanish speaking countries through the medium of languages.
Mrs Brown's early education included courses at the Univei sity of Washington, in Seattle, and the Florida State College for Women. Since then she has studied at Sorbonne University, in Paris, and also attended two summer schools at Universidad Nacional de Mexico in Mexico City. Mrs. Brown confesses that her chief hobby is her life's work in the study and teaching of Latin, French, Spanish, German, and Italian languages. But she is also interested in literature and music and still hopes to learn to play her own pipe organ some day.
Bertha Foster
Even if you are not interested in music, you will know the name of Bertha Foster, Dean of the School of Music of the University of Miami. Born in Indiana, Miss Foster has lived in many places-from California to Miami, "the best of all." After graduating from the College of Music in Cincinnati, Miss Foster made her first trip abroadto Paris and London. It was in Paris that she first became interested in the musical education of the blind. Later, in Jacksonville, she founded her own school of music for these students. ..............Before coming to Miami in 1921, Miss Fostei was a member of
the faculty of the State College for Women at Tallahassee. She is one of the charter members of the Board of Regents of the University of Miami and has been their Dean of Music since the founding.
A personality brimful of enthusiasm, a mind keen as a whip, a talented musician and a grand friend-that-is Bertha Foster.
MRS. M. LEWIS HALL
Mrs. Hall was born in Elsberry, Missouri, the daughter of Judge and Mrs. F. L. Dawson. Perhaps her close companionship with her father, who served four terms in the Missouri Legislature, created her first desire to know and love people and enjoy public life. She was graduated from Christian College, Columbia, Mo., and holds an A. B. d Iegree from Missouri State University. A member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority, and past president of the Miami K. A. Q. alumnae club.
She married M. Lewis Hall, prominent Miami attorney, and moved to Fort Lauderdale 17 years ago. They have three sons, Lewis Hall, J., 16, a student at Riverside Military Academy; Frank Dawson Hall, 13, and Vincent Thomas Hall, eight. While living in Fort Lauderdale. Mrs. Hall was president of the 1919 Study Club. The family moved to Miami seven years ago and Mr. Hall established law offices in the Ingrahamn building. He was chairman of the Dade County "Holland for Governor" Club in the recent successful campaign of Spessard L. Holland for the chief executiveship of Florida.
Since coming to Miami, Mrs. Hall has been president of the Miami branch of the American Association of University women; president of Beta Chapter of Delphian; president of the Miami Children's Thea-LarnePid ter, Inc., and a member of the board of The Florida Teacher.Larcerdd
The growth and development of her children is paramount in her Lawrence Priddy, a native of Virginia, made his home in Montlife. For recreation, she most enjoys swimming and horseback riding, clair, N. J. until his retirement in 1940, when he selected Miami Beach which she pursues with her men folk on their ranch near Punta Gorda, as his permanent residence. Here he owns one of the most attractive Florida. Mrs. Hall has a flare for writing and needlepoint. The homes on Prairie Avenue-2350. former was recognized a few years ago, several plays were presented After his graduation from Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Mr. at "Farmer's Fair Week" at the University of Miami-and by visiting Priddy was responsible for the erection of two buildings there-one of her home, one can find much evidence of her excellent needlepoint. them for the Y. M. C. A., an organization in which he actively partiMrs. Hall and her husband belong to the Century Club, Miami cipated before engaging in the life insurance business. In this, his wife, Biltmore and Roney-Plaza Cabana Club and the Tatem Surf Club. the former Jane Laubscher, proved to be a real partner and aided him She is a member and regular attendant of the Miami First Christian in reaching the top in his profession. Church. Mr. Priddy started with the New York Life Insurance Company




36 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
and remained with them throughout his successful business career. here one can regain health and the life span be lengthened under Among his wealthy and important clients have been two former living conditions to be found nowhere else in the world.
United States' Presidents. Before Mr. Priddy's retirement, he sold To Mr. S. H. Tobin goes the credit of having completed, as the from one to five million dollars business for twenty-two consecutive pioneer broker, the first ninety-nine year lease in Dade County. years. With the Brokers in Wall Street-with all his clients-Mr. Today over fifty per cent of our new hotel structures are built on land Priddy has always been able to establish a feeling of real friendly under the ninety-nine year lease form of ownership. service. People have felt that they could implicitly follow his advice, and none have been sorry for doing so.
As Chairman of the Business Practice Committee, of which he was Chairman for nineteen consecutive years, he untiringly sought to raise the standard of salesmanship in his own business. He was instrumental in having the practice of rebating made unlawful and to have salesmen checked for any infringement.
As President of the National Association of Life Underwriters and the Life Underwriters Association of New York, he effected many important revisions in the profession.
Honorary membership in the Phi Kappa Phi fraternity was conferred upon him by his Alma Mater for his success and for loyalty to the institution.
Mr. Priddy, a great traveller, and a worthwhile friend, has always been interested in cultural subjects and is proud to be a Patron of the American Museum of Natural History, Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the National Geographic Society.
Walter E. V. Schulke
When one can retire from active business at the early age of thirty and devote one's time to social and charitable interests, the community in which such a person lives and the people who come into contact with him definitely benefit from the association. Such certainly is the case of Walter E. V. Schulke, who lives at 6020 North Bay Road, Miami Beach.
Mr. Schulke combines a keen mind and abundant energy for participation in his various activities. He always has an open mind and a willing ear for anything which may benefit humanity in general, and his community in particular. Specificially, for instance, he actively participates in the work of the Miami Salvation Army, Dade County Council of Boy Scouts, Miami Beach Committee of 100 (of which he is a Governor) and St. Francis Hospital. He has taken an important part in Pan-American work and is an active member of the Pan-American League, taking a leading role in the International Magna Charta Day Celebration Association. Other of his interests include Miami Aviation Balls and the Miami-Havana races and cruises. Mr. Schulke is an active member of the Indian Creek, Surf, and Rod and Reel Clubs, and also of Sigma Chi Fraternity and the University Club of St. Paul and Everglades Club of Palm Beach.
S. H. Tobin Mr. Schulke is the son of Adolph G. V. Schulke, who migrated
from his native Prussia in 1875. He first stopped in Canada where he A true sun lover who, in Florida, recaptured his health, is S. H. met and married Mary Graeme Irwin, Walter's mother, who is of Tobin, pioneer real estate broker in this area, direct Scotch and English lineage, and who was living in Toronto at
Advised by medical men in 1914 in his home town of Providence, the time. His father's meeting with James J. Hill, the great railway Rhode Island, that it would be necessary for him to go south during magnate of the day, was'largely responsible for the family moving the strenuous New England winters, Mr. Tobin went south. In those to Minnesota. The railroad was opening that territory and-believing days Aiken, South Carolina, was considered the far South. Spending in its future-the Schulkes Were among the first settlers of New Ulm, three winters in that resort town our New Englander heard rumors Minnesota. Here, Walter was born. of tropical South Florida. The following winter was spent in Jackson- Afegrdaigro thpulcsolM.Shukcmltd
ville, Florida, where he heard considerable talk about the future of a Afuter coaureatgfo the niveri ofscosinM. Hbea hispbusismall community known as Miami. The following year, 1916, Mr. nes cauryeer ino1923 as Assistnt-Manage of thesanon, ebgnrhi Dakota Tobin came to Miami, and, after a short stay, decided to move his nsoree f 1chu2k ad SositaMaaer ecame Vice-Presidethn Dikecfamily and take up permanent residence in the magic city. tor i h oe offc at New Ulms, Ind 1927r heae took-reovet wholDieal
In 1915 the real estate firm of Tobin and Tobin was founded, poromina hmanagfiemet ofw the. TIn City Mtor o.,r t St.lePaul, Charles S. Tobin, the son of S. H. Tobin, joined the firm in 1921, prminals manasPesietadtraue of the company MtrC.atS.Putl, establishing an insurance department to handle all forms of insurance iliuiation nd 1932 Prsin thn Mrsure's onl ahectiven buis coverage. During the twenty-four years of activity the firms which hs beenidthen maamn t of32 hiSarsincthnMr Minesotay adiNew Hamp-es were first established at what is now N. E. First Avenue and Fourth habentem ag etofisarsnMneoaadNwHmp
Street, were moved to the Seybold building, and, later, to Mim hr. anchuskenwsmred oEiabttiigsosh.p-amn Beach. The Beach office was established in 1933 and, following the ofrS. Paul anwas thred hildEn-Paulah Livingston Gremphlpsn, policies established at the firm's inception, this office has engaged in o t al n a he hlrnPuaLvnsoGam hls
real estate brokerage business only. It has had no part in sub- and Roxana Willard. division developments. During the period of 1923-26 branch offices were maintained at Daytona Beach and Sebring, Florida. Mr. Tobin, John W. Quinn
a true convert to the healing qualities of Florida sunshine feels the Soft-spoken, modest, quiet and unassuming, it is difficult to imstate of Florida is assured so long as the Gulf Stream flows off the agine that the charming and youthful-looking John W. Quinn, D. C. is coast of South Florida and the prevailing tropical breezes blow and not only a thoroughly versed doctor of Chiropractic, but is in addition that Dade County's progress must be ever forward, one of America's acknowledged experts in manipulative, or as it is
We have created a garden in which we have emphasized our sometimes called ''bloodless surgery."~
play and recreational activities. The greatest asset arises in our climate Fourteen years ago Doctor Quinn left England where he comand very little has been done to educate the people of the north that pleted his early education and came to America attending the Lincoln




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 37
Dr. John W. Quinn J. P. Simmons
College at Indianapolis, Indiana, and upon receiving his degree there the World War as First Lieutenant of Artillery in the 81st Division. graduated from the Palmer School of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa. He is a member of the Dade County Bar Association and the AmeriHe became a citizen of the United States and engaged in the practice can Bar Association. He is also Vice-president and director of the of chiropractic in the east. Miami Industrial Bank and his firm represents the First National
Manipulative surgery was attracting a great deal of attention Bank of Miami. Among his other business connections are President and because the study of this new science interested him, Doctor of Jupiter Sound Corporation; Secretary of Mekin Corporation; ViceQuinn gave up his practice and took post graduate courses and in- president of Corporation Company of Miami; Secretary of Bruce dulged in research work in dissection, pathology and X-ray. Realty, Farge Realty, and Roal Properties, Inc. He is on the Board
IFor three years following this he toured the United States as of Governors of the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce, and is a instructor in manipulative surgery and technician,-lecturing to those member of the famous Committee of One Hundred of M. B., Biscayne who wished advanced knowledge in this science. For the past two Yacht Club and Colony Clubs; his fraternal connections are Delta years his offices have been established at 1000 Lincoln Road, Miami Sigma Phi fraternity, American Legion and Military Order of the Beach, where Doctor Quinn's large practice is constantly augmented World War, Shriner and Masonic Lodge of Miami. by cases referred to him by other doctors.
In spite of his extensive duties professionally, he still finds time for his hobbies. A former amateur champion boxer, the doctor has loads of trophies, cups and medals and is an ardent fisherman. He is a most enthusiastic member of Miami Beach's famous Rod and Reel Club.
Quietly authoritative, Doctor Quinn attributes many of his successes to his close attention to the patient's abdomen. He said "nourishment for the entire body is manufactured in this mixing-bowl of nature,-hence should there be any difficulty or interference with these natural processes, it follows that the entire body will be affected in varying degrees. The relieving of nervous pressure from the spine, the readjustment of organs in the human body which have gone out of alignment without the use of a knife, and the restoring to health those who are nervous and upset to the point of becoming neurotics..... are gifts of chiropractic, which I am humbly proud to be able to offer."
J. P. Simmons
Mr. J. P. Simmons does not consider himself a pioneer but he was among the first to establish permanent residence in Miami Beach at 2318 Prairie Avenue. His family, including his wife, formerly Miss Rachel June Elliott, of DeLand, and three children, June Elizabeth, Margaret Elliott, and J. P. Simmons, Jr., is prominent in church, social, and civic activities in Miami and Miami Beach. They have been residents in this area since 1921.
Mr. Simmons is a graduate of Stetson University, as is also his
wife, and is a member of the law firm of Shutts, Bowen, Simmons, Walter Wilson
Prevatt, and Julian. This able firm took part in the early development of modern Miami Beach in representing the interests of Carl G. Born in Salisbury, Maryland, Mr. Wilson made his first visit to
Fisher and John S. Collins as well as the Miami Ocean View Company,MiminJeof12,adbc eapraetrsdntyLbr
all of whom were l argely responsible for the growth of the south end Mamii n of 1925, and-s bmpecmed wa ermantentreidentmbysLabr of the Beach. Mr. Simmons personally represented the company which Dyo htya-oipesdwsh ytetoia topee
built the Venetian Causeway and developed the islands in that area. A graduate of Wesleyan University, and of the New York Law He went to Tallahassee when it was necessary to purchase the bay School, Mr. Wilson spent the first fifteen years of his business career bottom in order to complete the bridge and islands. Since that time as Assistant General Manager of the Hoboken Land & Improvement Mr. Simmons has won the reputation of being one of the outstanding Company. For four years he was the Eastern Representative of the attorneys in real estate. U. S. Foil Co. (manufacturers of tin, lead and composition foils) with
Mr. Simmons is a native of Richmond, Kentucky, but has been a an office in New York.
resident of Florida since 1910 and has not left except for his service in Upon his arrival in Miami, Mr. Wilson entered the Real Estate




38 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
brokerage business, remaining in it until December of 1926 when he went to Miami Beach as Manager of L'Ecluse, Anderson & Co., Inc., real estate office. Three years later he took over the business of this firm and has kept his offices in the Hampton Arcade Building ever since. His property management and appraisals as well as his ability at sales and rentals, have made him one of the most popular of our real estate brokers.
In his thirty years of real estate experience, Mr. Wilson has held almost every office of importance in the various organizations con-, nected with the business. In 1929 he was made President of the Miami Beach Realty Bureau (then a branch of' the Miami Realty Board) and has held the same position with the Miami Beach and the Florida Association of Real Estate Boards. He has also been a Director of the National Association. An approved appraisor for the Federal Home Owners Loan Board of Atlanta, and for the U. S. Treasury Department, he has testified a number of times as expert witness on real estate values in this area-both before Federal and Circuit Courts.
Mr. Wilson's home at 5347 La Gorce Drive is one of the beach's most attractive-although with his varied civic activities, it is a wonder that he is able to find time to enjoy it. He is Chairman of the Dade County Chapter of the American Red Cross, President of the Y. M. C. A., Chairman of the Dade County Visiting Board. He is a Director of the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce, the Miami Beach Board of Realtors, the Chase Federal Savings and Loan Association (also Vice-president), the Lincoln Road Association (past President), the South Florida Children's Home, the South Florida Crippled Children's Society, and the South Florida Crippled Children's CalsS yod
Hospital, (in both of which he is also Secretary and Treasurer). Mr. CalsS yod
Wilson is Junior Warden of Trinity Episcopal Church, and is a member of the Committee of One Hundred. tion of industries, transportation and taxation; The Social or housing
__________and recreation. Specifically the solution would be limited to the five Charges S Symndsessential spheres of society comprising a community. These are GovMa free s Ck harlesa. Symond esiv ulti ci erment, or the agency of control, Consumer or the agency of proMan oreer eekstheIdel. vage, lusve ualiy, t ati- ductive absorption, Commerce or the clearing house for the distribuyates his supreme efforts to achieve. It is solely the result of an ob- tion of productive goods, Industry and Agriculture, or the agencies of jective state of mind, by which Man creates, out of the vast store of production. These spheres are necessarily interrelated, and this state resourcefulness and initiative that are his peculiar inheritances, of interrelation as it exists today is badly complicated and discarded.
Architecture, the wedded harmony of science and art, is Man's Here is the cause of maldistribution, poverty, discrimination, disease,
most powerful creation. It is, at once an inexorable and sensitive social unrest, and demoralization.
authority, conceived by Man to better himself. It commands, alike, his social, economic and moral destinies. It has the power of law and Planning is the essence of Architecture. Order is the result of a
more. Law says Man must or take the consequences. Architecture successful application of architectural principles. It is not logical to
says Man must because the forces of natural phenomena necessitate conclude, therefore, that if these evils of civilization have been lescontrol, and further as an art, it appeals to the sensibilities of Man- sened, and in some instances, eliminated in certain planned communito his mental and moral consciousness. Architecture is not a static ties, that these same principles of planning can be applied nationally quality. It is not a matter of masonry, steel, and concrete. It is in- with the same successful results? herently a vibrant, sensitive, and activating Force. It has all the at- The problem is not a small one. It is the most comprehensive tributes with which its human creator is endowed. It can be ugly in the world today, for it involves all of the intricate and highly comand beautiful, sad and gay, cruel and humane, indolent and dynamic. plex activities of a modern society.
Architecture is Order. Today, America seeks order and unity
in its national society. It seeks what has been termed the "good Thor S. White
life", the unobstructed flow of commerce, parity of economics, equal- The story of Thor S. White, talented and rising young artist, is the story
ity of opportunity, and a high standard of living commensurate with of one of Dade County's youngest pioneers. It is a story of success comparable a productive society. To attain perfection of this state, planning is to Miami's own colorful history. necessary. Planning does not imply socialistic regimentation. Oper- When one attempts to look hack upon Mr. White's career, a number of
ating within fixed limits, it provides channels for the ordered prog- pictures present themselves to the mind . the boy, Thor, living with his ress of society and its comprehensive activities. It is embraced by family on their plantation in South Miami, shooting bear and deer in what the contemporary concept of Democracy, which admits the necessity of is now the town proper . the youth, who took up professional boxing economic regulation by government, but fosters the maintenance of . the young man winning first prize in the Decorators Club's Annual Exhibit,
civil liberties, private enterprise, the equality of man, and which con- and painting his "SKYSCRAPER SCAPES" high above New York in his ceives of government as being no more than an administrative agency Radio City Studio . or, perhaps, ag-ain, we see the artist, fed up with the composed of people, controlled by the people, and created for the artificiality of city life, enlisting in the Merchant Marine, and shipping off
people. to sea . we follow his versatile career, but always, we like to remember
How can Architecture contribute to the perfection of such a that Thor White is Miami's own product, and we Miamians are proud of our
society? history, and of those men and women who helped to give her a place in
America must first be awakened to full cognizance of this mar- the Sun.
velos Frceit ommnds Byitsjudiiou aplictio I elive hat Reared in Miami, Thor White has many stories to tell of his early boyvelos Frceit ommnds Byitsjudiiou aplictio I elive hat hood days here .. days when he went to school in South Miami (then Larksociety can reap tremendous benefits. I believe that a Federal system ins) in the school house which is now the bicycle shed of the present school of planning should be incorporated into our democratic form of gov-daswethyundinhejglwiclybtenLrksad ernment. I believe that it should be national in scope, organized as a day whnte*utdi h uge hc a ewe akn n
highly selective research body, composed of technical experts in the Coconut Grove, a jungle where wild cat, bear, and deer roamed unmolested. various fields of planning, and endowed with statutory as well as He tells of excursions to Coco Plum Beach, on which trips a whole crowd
advisry poers.would start out in wagons draped with mosquito netting, taking the darkies along to cook chickens, and prepare the food for the picnic. Later the White By the creation of such a body, urban, rural, and regional planning family moved into Miami where they lived on Riverside Drive at what is would come into effective existence to tackle the tremendous problems now 12th and Flagler Street. There was a swamp there then where the Flagler of health, order, safety convenience, and the public welfare. At the Repair place now is. present time no such coordinated control exists in our form of gov- Still later the Whites moved to Akron, Ohio, and shortly after this
erment. Thor entered the Cleveland School of Design; from there he went to New
The basis of approach in the solution of these problems would York, where he attended the National School of Design, and the Beaux Arts
Involve the elements of community planning, the Physical, or the Institute. About this time he won a Scholarship for private instruction with
natural conditions of the site; the Economic, or land values, distribu- Naum Los; after studying with Los, Mr. White decided to go into mural




T HE FLORIDA TEACHER 39
Thor S. White Harry Watts
work. He assisted the famous Victor White (no relative) on the mirrors and eral years with the Federal Housing Administration and the Public Works Admosiacs for the Starlight Roof of the Waldorf Astoria, and the following ministration which built Liberty Square. These connections gave him added
year won first prize in the Annual Exhibit of the Decorator's Club. equipment for the responsible task of administering several millions of dollars
During his career in New York, Mr. White maintained a studio on the for the Miami Housing Authority which was expended in building three USHA
sixty second floor of Radio City, where in 1936, he started work on his aided projects, Edison Courts and two additions to Liberty Square, the last adfamos "kysrape Scpes, billint cens ofNewYor ashe osered hat dition being opened Aug. 15th. With a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical city from his studio in the clouds. Among these are "Dawn on Welfare Island", Engineering and with a pronounced interest in sociology he is fitted for both "Twilight in Central Park", "Rain Over Lower Manhattan", and others. the building and development of housing projects and for the solving of social
Stil inhistwetie, an onthethrshod o sucess Thr Witedid problems incident to his position as general manager of both of the local housing te inil hi n is an on hleth thll sholdodisgue s w ThNe York wanted developments. Born in Illinois and reared in Louisvile, Ky., Mr. Watts has felinreiwearyhan jaded, he gae uis stu. .diusand justh disappered andt lived in Dade County for a quarter of a century, and has the pioneer's pride in thlie ar amzm n of ed his N e or frins whudo, coud nost dpertad any.o the growth and development of this section of which he has been a part. His the mazmen ofhisNewYor frendswhocoud nt udertan anone first years were spent in the south end of the County, memories of which casting aside, even temporarily, so promising a career, he still cherishes. A life-long Democrat, Mr. Watts served the Dade County
But young Mr. White knew what he wanted, so he joined the Merchant Democratic Committee as secretary for two years and as chairman for two years
Marine, and went in the good old traditional way, to see the world, from 1928 to 1932 when he was a candidate for the State Senate. He is a memThe next thing we see of him, he has become a sort of "Gentleman ber of the Board of Directors of Woodlawn Park Cemetery Company and a
Beachcomber" on Vera Dero in Cuba; there he, and a group of other congenial member of Sigma Nu Fraternity. "derelicts" from Cuba's leading families, lived the lives of modern Robinson W ie m s f hs w r a eni h il f e -nei g a d d vlp Crusoes, living in their bathing suits, cooking on the sands, and even build- Whl0oto i okhsbe nth il fegneigaddvlp
in hi wnsakad aigter w untueteea'o h mm ment, he has been active in the growth and development 'of Dade County, and
bers" belonged to the Yacht Club, and on Saturday nites, the Beach Combers iti 0agl hog i blt n oeih htMaihssae oslnil
would go up to the dances, in the Public Housing program.
Our hero had about a year of this, and then he felt two calls . the ______call of respectability, and the call of . Miami. So three years ago Thor White returned to the scenes of his early youth, and took a studio (the John C. Frazure
one he now occupies) in Coconut Grove. When executive ability and business experience are reviewed as outstanding
The minute he returned, he said he knew that this was the place for qualities, the name of John C. Frazure is among the most prominent of real
which he had always been looking . the place he knew was the one for estate men in Miami Beach. him to paint in. His work is the testimony of this . no local artist has A native Floridian, Mr. Frazure has resided in Miami since 1905. This was
better captured the very spirit of South Florida native life than has Thor the year when only one building was to be seen on Miami Beach-the old coast White. In the three years that he has been back, he has done a noted assort- gurHosofRuaat7tan thocn.TeolwigyrSmh'
ment of murals for hotels, bars, and private dwellings in Miami and Mai Casino was built.
Beach . in all of these he has represented some form of South Florida flora and fauna, which fairly seem to breathe the spirit of the tropics. Mr. Frazure's first business association was with the D. P. Davis Realty
Mr. White is second Vice president of the Blue Dome Fellowship, and last year Company in Miami in December 1918, after service during the World War in the was chosen by the American Artists and Professional League to represent U. S. Navy.
Miami during National Art Week. In 1928, Mr. Frazure became an associate of Mr. Harry S. Bastian in Miami
At time of writing, he is hard at work on two Miami Beach hotel murals Beach at his present address on Lincoln Road. Since that time he has conducted a one the mural for the lobby of the Shelbourne, which is to depict the "Festival real estate business continuously from this address. It is interesting to note that of Venus at Cyprus", and the other, the mural for the tap room of the Mr. Frazure and associates enjoy the distinction of being the only firm in Miami
Raleigh, which gaily and charmingly portrays scenes from "As You Like Beach to conduct business from the same location since starting.
It",, with the background of the Forest of Arden. For five years, Mr. Frazure served in the best interests of Miami Beach as
Modest and unassuming, Mr. White has little to say on the subject of Director and Vice President of the Miami Beach Realty Board. In 1938, he
hisow acoplshmnt .. "or thn nyhig s," esi," iet became its president. During the past twelve years this progressive realtor has
try and recapture in my work, some form of native life, and no place offers handled some of the largest transactions in Miami Beach, particularly Lincoln me more in this way than Miami ..so, here I am! Road property and the better class water front homes.
With an eye toward the future, Mr. Frazure predicts that, because of its
present trend in building and expansion, Miami Beach will be built up solidly by Harry Watts 1950. Because of this city's close proximity to the majority of the population
EXECUTIVE director, Harry W. Watts of the Miami Housing Authority, is of the United States, its wide spread transportation facilities, its first-class accomE well fitted to fill this important post by education and his work in the modations and ideal climate, it is Mr. Frazure's opinion that Miami Beach will engineering and development field. Before he resigned as a member of the Miami continue to take an even greater place among the most desirable cities of our Housing Authority in 1938 to become the executive director, he had served sev- Nation.




40 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
tention on the state educational department, that he would personally see that the teachers, educators and seats of learning would receive adequate assistance, financially and morally. This he intends to do 'I because he is a man of his word. The teachers and educators of Florida should rejoice in having such an outstanding statesman as Spessard L. Holland in the governor's chair. Teacher Magazine joins them in wishing our No. 1 citizen the best of good fortune for a successful administration.
CHARLES H. SMALL.
FREDERICK J. WARD
Since leaving his native Newark, New Jersey, to establish law offices in Miami, Frederick J. Ward has developed a fine practice in his chosen profession. His early education was gained in St. Mary's and St. Benedict's parochial preparatory schools in Newark. He received his law course at Fordham University in New York City.
Following his graduation from Fordham, Mr. Ward returned to his home city and started practicing in civil courts, specializing in equity matters. He moved to Miami from Newark in 1925, and was admitted to the bar in Florida. After practicing here almost ten years, he moved back to Newark and last year again deserted the city of his birth to open law offices at 1000 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, where he is specializing in real estate legal matters.
Mr. Ward was wed to Miss Mary Margaret Schreiber in Newark MAUDE KIMBALL MASSENGALE and they have three attractive children, Mary Jane, Jacqueline and
Maude Kimball Massengale, described by WQAM's announcer as Frederick, Jr. All are members of the Catholic church, with Mr. and "Dade County's best known society editor", has more friends, per- Mrs. Ward both active in civic and charitable work. haps, than any other woman in Miami Beach. That's why the society pages she edits in the Miami Beach Daily Tropics are filled with numerous exclusive stories, appearing under her by-line before they reach any other newspaper.
Her column, "Social Sundial", records the gaieties of beach society, appearing as a daily feature of the Daily Tropics. Her bright, whimsical column "Peachtree on the Beach," appearing weekly in the Atlanta Constitution, widely publicizes Miami Beach as a winter resort and chronicles the happenings of interest to Atlanta and other society capitals.
Magazine writing and radio broadcasting have also claimed the time of this busy and popular journalist. Her radio program entitled "Society on the Air", was her first broadcasting venture. Later she conducted the program, "The Teacher Hour", sponsored by The Florida Teacher Magazine.
Mrs. Massengale is a member of the League of American Penwomen. Her poetic works include the favorites: "Love Song" and "Proud Possession". She belongs to Psi Psi Psi sorority, composed of mothers of Tni-Delta sorority girl.
Perhaps no mother was ever prouder of her daughters than Mrs. Massengale. Allyn, now Mrs. Benjamin Anthony of Greenville, S. C., attended Ogontz School. Vernon, who is Mrs. Raymond Edwards of Miami Beach, attended Duke and F. S. C. W. Mrs. Edwards is also a splendid newspaper woman. Both girls are members of the Junior League.
Mrs. Massengale's journalistic work started when she organized
a Parent-Teacher page for the Miami Daily News three days after ar- Gladys Krebaum
riving here from Atlanta, and within a year she was made head of Many men have been successful in the building supply business the woman's department. This position she held for twelve years. in the Miami area, but we know of only one lady who has been able to
Endowed with a keen sense of humor, an alert awareness of life, carry on in the face of adversity and emerge successfully and that and deep interest in other people's problems, she is one of the most one is Gladys Krebaum. interesting of personalities. And, with her big blue eyes, curly hair Miss Krebaum has headed the Krebaum Building Material Comand peppy manners, is certainly one of the most attractive. pany since 1933. She inaugurated the business herself and although
Reared in Atlanta, Mrs. Massengale regards that as "home", but conditions often appeared rough, she continued to fight on. Miss her ambitions and work are centered in Miami Beach and Miami. She Krebaum's work in the building supply business, has been equally has traveled widely and has friends in most states of the Union. They distributed throughout the Greater Miami area. She supplied materials affectionately call her "Billie" or "Maidie" but the best known by- for many outstanding hotels, residences, and stores in the area, not to line in Society journalism in Florida is-Maude Kimball Massengale. mention unique apartment houses, in Coral Gables and Southwest Miami.
The Krebaum Building Material Company supplied some of the: A FRIEND OF THE TEACHER materials for Kress' Store on Flagler Street as well as the beautiful
Florida's educational program is certain of expansion in the next Walgreen store on Flagler Street and Second Avenue, Miami. Mafour years. Spessard L. Holland, new chief executive of the sunshine terials for the Rendale and Netherlands Hotels, Miami Beach were state, is certainly a friend of the state's educational system. That is likewise furnished by the Krebaum Building Material Company. Miss not an idle thought. He has proved his friendship during his years Krebaum has gained the confidence of her clients and the general in the state legislature where he either sponsored or supported every public, because of her determination to be fair and just in all transacprogressive educational measure introduced during his tenure of office tions. Miss Krebaum was born in Illinois, has been in Miami since He made promises during his campaign that he would center his at- 1923 and resides in Coral Gables.




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 41
Mrs. Florence N. Blakely Winnie Moore
Take liberal portions of courage, ability anid honesty, and mix When visiting celebrities still continue to frequent a certain spot year them with an intelligent, charming personality and you have the after year something of interest and glamour must be there to attract them. formula for the successful civic and business leader-Mrs. Florence Such a place in Miami Beach is "Winnie's Waffle Shop" where for seven N. Blakely. years people from the theatrical world and all walks of life have congregated to
share the fun and congeniality of this interesting place.
Mrs. Blakely, a Registered Nurse, early perceived a need in Dade A former show girl, Miss Winnie Moore left her profession in the East County for what she now admits is her pet hobby, namely the Greater and started as a waitress in Miami Beach in 1931. Later she established her Miami Nurses Registry, which she founded a few years ago. It is a first "Winnie Waffle Shop" on 23rd Street, which has remained unchanged non-profit organization, chartered by the State of Florida, with mem- except for its growing popularity. 'Tis evidenced by the great number of bership open to all Florida State Registered Nurses, undergraduate- autographed pictures which literally line the walls from ceiling to floor. practical or trained child's nurses. A second "Winnie Waffle Shop" now located on 1445 Washington Avenue near the Cameo Theatre is also a favorite rendezvous, being conducted
"The purpose of the Registry is to further the efficient care of the with an interesting and unusual combination of vivaciousness and competent sick, to uphold the dignity of the nursing profession and to foster supervision. cordial relations among the nurses." Mrs. Blakely feels that her first Blonde-cheerful-personable-everybody knows Winnie and her famous duty is to the Dade County resident nurses, and she makes this one waffles. of the main obj ects of the Registry. All nurses sent out are thoroughly investigated-for Mrs. Blakely likes to fit the nurse to the indi- Hattie H. Carpenter
vidual case, the patient, and his immediate surroundings. The year of 1900 does not seem long ago but, when one stops to
realize that Miami only recently celebrated its fiftieth birthday,
Although Mrs. Blakely spends the better part of the day at her that date of arrival to take up residence here puts Miss Hattie Hi. office, she is still able to find time for her many worth while civic and Carpenter and her family in the pioneer class. She was born in political affiliations. The Historians of Dade County, of which she Columbus, Ohio, daughter of Stephen Van Rensselaer and Naomi J. is founder and President, has accomplished many things of note. They Carpenter. After her father's death, her mother brought the family, were pioneers in the "Get out the vote" campaign; and have cooperat- conisting of five daughters and one son, to Miami and built a home ed whole-heartedly in the Safety campaigns for school children, and on S. Bayshore Drive. The home is now at 59 S. E. 6th Street, Miami.
theymak wothwilechaitycass-esecillyof hilrena mjor Miss Carpenter's early education was received in the public the aewrhhlecaiycss-seilyo cide- ao schools of Columbus, and she studied at the Ohio State University.
Teaching in public schools was her first vocation and she holds a life
In 1938 Mrs. Blakely was appointed Chairman of the Womans state certificate for high school teaching in Florida. She was principal
Diviison of the National Infantile Paralysis Foundation Campaign and of Miami High School for five years, resigning this position in order strongly urged the building of a hospital for cripled children here. As to take up full time work as a newspaperwoman. Miss Carpenter was a Lieutenant on the Governor's staff, she made the trip to New York's in charge of the editorial page on the afternoon paper, then The World Fair with the official party, to participate in the celebrating Metropolis, for twelve years until it was sold and changed to the of Governors and Florida Days. Miami Daily News. Since then Miss Carpenter has been writing fiction
LastMay Mrs Blkel wasappintd a eleatefromthe4th and articles for papers, journals, and national magazines under various Conresionl Dstrct nd hil attheDemcraic onvntin, aspen names. She was also publisher of the Florida School Exponent Conessidonoay DStite ande whia at the eocaticna Convention-a for a number of years. electedoHnorarny Stat Vice Chran buo thet Nat ia onetion In closing this brief sketch, since Miss Carpenter will not talk an hnornotonl fo Mr. Bakey bu fo Soth lorda s wll, about herself, it is befitting to further establish her as pioneer both in
Because of her unselfish service in behalf of the citizenship and residence and education it is of great interest to learn that she was the problems which confront a growing metropolitan community, she the first women principal in a village of a few thousands and the was appointed a member of the Florida State Board of Examiners of only one in an undeveloped state. She laughs at the memory of the Nurses. She is extremely conscientious in this position and devotes school board refusing to consider her idea of putting the high school a grat ealof ime nd tud toit.on the banks of the river at 12th Avenue because it was too far out in the country.
As can be judged, Mrs. Blakely has that rare gift of being able Miss Carpenter has always been active in charity work and deto do a dozen things at once AND of doing them all well. She has voted much of her time and writing in impressing the importance of given unceasingly of her time, energy and money to the causes in early education. She was a member of the Woman's Club for twelve which she is interested. Somehow she still finds time to be a grac- years and has been a keen participant in politics. She is still mentally ious hostess, presiding over and entertaining in the beautiful home active and her many friends find her very delightful and entertaining which she and her husband, Judge Norman Blakely own in Miami. in conversation.




42 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
Mrs. Thomas T. Stevens affiliations. He is a Brother Elk, a 32nd degree Mason and a Shriner,
Mrs. Thomas T. Stevens has a natural liking and aptitude for of Miami, and a Life Member of the Blue Lodge, New York. working in organizations, inherited perhaps from her mother who was a prominent club woman. She began her club career as a young girl M rae' A O EB A T
in -Atlanta. She was Vice-president of the General Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy in her early 20's. Later she Realistic Permanent Waving
was President of the Atlanta Federation of Women's Clubs; one of the ZO0TO0S
founders of the Uncle Remus Memorial Association; member of the Executive Board of the Atlanta Chapter, Daughters of the American Machineless Permanent Waving
Revolution; President of the Atlanta Chapter U. D. C.; and is now a0 trustee of the Tallulah Falls Industrial School, with headquarters in TePre ehdHi n cl ramn
Atlanta. TePre ehdHi n cl ramn
An indefatigable worker in the cause of education, Mrs. Stevens Louey Venn of London, Facials
admits being "education-obsessed", believing that if a child is given Hot Oil Manicure and Pedicures
a spiritual and social background, supplied with the equipment to carve out his own destiny, nothing more can be done for him. He must make of his own life what he can and will. CALUMET BUILDING
Her interest in education brought her to club work in Miami. In 20 N. E. 3rd AVENUE PHONE 2-5796
1924 she came here to live primarily for her husband's health. She MIAMI, FLORIDA
had been an occasional visitor to Miami for many years. She took a I vacation from club work when she came, lasting almost four years. At until the Dade County Federation of Women's Clubs asked her help in a scholarship project-the one thing she could not refuse; this wasI ing 1928. She has been active in club and civic affairs ever since; President of Dade County Federation in 1930-32; Vice-president and later President of the Miami Woman's Club in 1933-34. She resigned to return to Atlanta at the request of the State Welfare Board to assist with the Georgia organization of the first New Deal project to create jobs for women. After five months, she returned to Miami when the I
set-up was completed. She was Vice-president of Section Eleven, Florida Federation of Women's Clubs and served from 1935 to 1937. She is a member of the Dade County Planning Council appointed by the Governor, and the Dade County Zoning Board, and is beginning her third term as Dade County Congressional Committeewonan from j the 4th District.
Mrs. Stevens believes women of the highest type should enter politics as a duty to their community. She is proud of her memberships in three major patriotic organizations: The Everglades Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution; Harvey Seeds Unit, American Legion Auxiliary; and the Atlanta and Southern Cross Chapters of United Daughters of the Confederacy. She also served as a member j from Florida of the National Advisory Committee on women's participation in the New York World's Fair.
Mrs. Stevens is interested in every phase of activity for com- IT HE SO0U TH E RN
munity betterment, and serves in the ranks as diligently as she does as a leader. She is a natural and convincing speaker on subjects in IAPoeri im ec
A Pineerin Mami eac
which she is interested, and she has unlimited poise and an unhurried manner in all that she does.
Louis Karlebach
Arriving in Miami Beach prior to the swift boom momentum, IGO0O0D FO0O0D
Louis Karlebach, accompanied by his good wife, saw ahead the phenomenal opportunity to apply his experienced knowledge of merchan- *
dising the finer meats and foodstuffs, and thereby take up his post of honest money-making in a spot which he foresaw was sure to IS U H R A E E I
become magic. S U H R A E E I
Grimly they pioneered, these inseparable two, Louis and Rose,
Business steadily grew from promising into boom proportions. Not I936 WASHINGTON one, but three Master Meat Markets were flourishing, when came the I356 EAST FLAGLERMI I
black-out of 1926. Like all of the rest, the business of Louis Karle- I bach was completely wiped out. But the Beach remained, and here was one believer who knew it was merely a matter of time, of new money, new pioneering. Looking back, he is not so sure he could have kept the faith, but for the sustaining courage and tireless shoulder-to-G A M B IT T A
shoulder cooperation of his faithful wife. Slowly they started over, steeling themselves to hardship, grateful for each forward step, sure The Shoe Doctor
in their hearts that they could come back-with Miami Beach.an H tRe w r
Today his New York Meat Market at 619 Washington Avenue is ad-a ee e
the oldest market at the Beach. None could question the principles Bs nteLn u
and standards which have held the faith of its patrons through the years. Many food stores, less standardized, less sincere, have flourished 221 N. E. SECOND AVENUE
and passed from the picture. MI M L R D
Loui Karlebach's market was the first to introduce to MiamiMIAMIFL0RIDA Beach and to Southern Florida, the real Hothouse baby lamb, famous Beach Nut Bacon, that finest Jones sausage, the new popular cube steak, and the meaning of a real filet mignon. Only strictly fresh-killed Specializing in
poultry, the finest and freshest of dairy products, local and shipped WATCH, CLOCK and JEWELRY REPAIRING
fruits and vegetables are offered for the public's complete assurance. IBAUER'S WVATCH SHOP
"Nothing short of the best-is safe, or fair, in food merchandising," IPHONE 2-5822 W. E. BAUER
is the conviction upon which this pioneer built for a sound future. 5 S E. FIRST ST. MIAMI, FLA.
Louis Karlebach is public-minded, public-spirited, in his varied




THE FLORIDA TEA C H E R 43
A BOTANICAL REUNION
EDITOR'S NOTE: Sr. de Bascon, essentially a cosmopolite, and having traveled extensively on several continents, writes of the love of mankind and Mother Nature. He writes mostly in fable form portraying emotions through life of plants and insects and the voice of Mother Nature. At one time he spent a year in solitude in the Mojave Desert collecting material for his writings, and concentrating on philosophical ways of thinking. Here we have one of Sr. de Bascon's
latest writings-a short fable entitled "A Botanical Reunion."
By SR. DE BACON
M ANY years ago there existed in 'remote parts of this earth, botanical
worlds of indescribable beauty. Flowers, trees, vegetables and plants of every living kind, daughters of nature, grew in quantities and without effort.
Such a world would seemingly radiate a spirit of joy. But-not this one! Arguments were violent, frequent and of long duration. In fact, they often lasted until Mother Earth, unable to further endure the constant woes reaching her ears, found it absolutely necessary to relax her trembling nerves. And this she did by proceeding to give her body a good, hard shake.
Each time these incidents occurred, the botanical family was frightened practically out of its wits. It instantly, and in one breath, declared that never again would a voice be raised in anger or in complaint. However, as is often trouble with you, my little one," and here the Pine tree lowered his voice, "is the case in such situations, the resolution was usually forgotten almost as soon that you know you are beautiful and delicate and you have a desire to be conas the excitement had abated. stantly seen, admired . I greatly fear," he concluded shaking his head, "that
It happened, therefore, one day that the Rosebush, forgetting her vows even yours is a case of-too much beauty, very little mind."
more quickly than the others, let go a great wail of lamentations to the skies Now all this time, a half-hidden mushroom has whistled in as disturbing a
. . and it also happened that the Vine, tired of hearing his tale of woe, did not tone as possible. And as soon as the Pine had ceased talking, it raised its caustiL hold his own tongue as he should have, and replied: "Why don't you stop voice and called: "God help me for what I'm going to say! but Rosebush, those
complaining of the way you have to live, my dear Rosebush, and try to do as I arguments of yours won't get you anywhere . Convince yourself, my dear do? . If you'll grow as I grow, then you can go where you please and do as hag, that it's your age that annoys you . For many years, your one joy here you please . See!" it explained, stretching to its utmost, "I climb to the has been to give a headache to all of us in this community." highest points where the sunlight plays and to the profound depths of precipices At this moment, Mother Earth herself found it necessary to intervene. "It . Now, my dear, you just stop complaining and try that, and your situation is enough! Enough of such arguments," she exclaimed. "I am the Mother of all mill improve." that exists. You, all of you, are my children and your words are without
This idea really pleased the Rosebush. She had, to be exact, even thought reason. I too have my sorrows, but you do not hear me complain of them. I of it herself. Having, however, already tried it in vain, she answered bitterly: carry in my body the weight of you all, in my veins, water that you may drink, "Yes, you! . you, my dear Vine, can well afford to ramble there and give me and in my breasts the roots that give you life. But you miscomprehend life and such advice! Every day you frolic, unencumbered, yet see that I must spend freedom. As you grow into independence, you-all of you-refuse advice and
my whole life here, forever pregnant with blossoms. And for what!" The hope- wisdom. Furthermore, you complain unceasingly, of the one thing for which lessness of her state proved entirely too much for the Rosebush and here her you are born-service. I grow tired listening to your empty thoughts, and this voice chocked miserably. "Why, in the Springtime when my children come out time, I must do something about it."
wishin- to see the light of day, the poor things are faced with hours of darkness!
L Then-Mother Earth, after a few moments of deep thought, said: "All of
That terrible, gigantic Pine tree, above, refuses to share part of the sunlight you, my children, must come to a family reunion where I can listen undisturbed with them! They can scarcely grow! You can see for yourself that they are to the joys and sorrows of each of you. After doing so, if necessary and if
small and of a pale color, and that their fragrance is insipid . Oh yes! my possible, I will improve your lives." b
proud Vine, if you had to carry a family, such as I have, on your shoulders, The proposed Botanical Reunion took place in the early part of the month
perhaps you would not go so far nor so high nor so low. And furthermore, you of May on a day When a winged song hung aloft in the skies. Delegates and would not be so boastful!" It was here that the trouble grew . representatives from every living green thing were there. The fruit trees chose
the Apple for their delegate. The trees of rich wood and general utility, the Pine. The creeping whips of the earth, the Ivy, and the vegetables, the lowly Cabbage, thinking thus, to particularly impress their misfortune upon the Assembly. The flowers, unhesitatingly sent a full-laden Rose . Alone, and far removed from the others, the Poison Oak took its place and awaited its turn to speak.
Upon their arrival, Mother Earth silently looked at her children for a while, admiring first the beauty of one and amending the ugliness of another. "Gracious me!" she concluded, after a thorough inspection. "I never before realized how fully the evolution of life has refined some of my children and completely corrupted others!"
Almost an hour elapsed before the Reunion was called to order. The purpose of the day was then revealed to all. "I want to know, in full, the joys and the trials of each of you here today," Mother Earth assured them in a tone of quiet compassion. "Let's see if we can come to some agreement whereby we end all such arguments which should not exist among our family."
The Apple tree spoke first. Clearing its throat several times, it addressed the Assembly thus: "Mother Earth, I represent all the fruit trees, we, your devoted children. Our life is long, but once our offsprings are in their prime, they are pulled forcibly from our body to be eaten." At this a shocked groan Pine Rose lan through the delegates present. The Apple tree waited until it died, then
The Pine tree heard what was going on. True, his head was cloud-high, stated: "The worst part of it all is, that often we are crushed and our blood is
far above the reach of casual or even angry words. But, a wind carried them drunk. We are put into form to make alcohol and when in that state, often to him, and hoping to adjust matters to some extent, he made the mistake of find ourselves intoxicated But!" and the Apple tree's voice became somebending low and saying: "Precious Rosebush, I am sorry to hear your com- what elated, "we often get our revenge for when others drink our blood, they
plaints. It is true, I take the sunlight from you part of the day, but-although too become intoxicated . You see, Mother earth, that even if we are happy you have not mentioned it-it is also true that from early morning until late part of the time, we of aged years suffer for what befalls our children." afternoon, I suffer the intense rays of the sun in order to protect you. And who, Then the Pine spoke. In a deep, bass voice, it said: "Mother Earth, I'm may I ask, offers to protect me? No one! . Not only this -there are other the delegate from your children, the rich and useful woods. We live a long, things that I must bear; when the sun has descended, there is often a full moon long time, but for the simple reason that we are taken good care of in order that disturbs my sleep while you are in deep slumber. Then, there is the wind, for us to grow fat and high. Once, however, we are in full growth, we are cut the fury of which you do not feel, and the rain-it is I who is hit by it - The down at our base and our woods are made into many things, From some of




44 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
the things into which we are made, we see things that I don't even want to talk about . You can see now, Mother Earth, that when we stop growing and begin to enjoy life, our life is taken from us ..Knowing this inevitable fate, we have a lot of headaches while awaiting it." am
The Rosebush, after being sure that all were listening, attentively, expressed herself in this manner: "Mother Earth, I'm the delegate of all the flowers. We are endowed with much beauty, but we are sold like slaves. And we, too, are Wishes to announce the reopening of
crushed, even as the Apples are, but for another purpose. The Oil in our veins being made into perfume to satisfy the vanity of mankind. .You can well see, T eM a iB a hS o
Mother Earth, that although perhaps we experience happiness to some extent, 929, L incoln Road
our happiness is never complete."grdtal in
The Cabbage, being uneducated, expressed himself in very "bad English. high g a eladiestalrn
"Mother Earth," it moaned, "I'm the member sent by your children, the vege- sport and street apparel, also riding suits
tables. We can say without argument about the matter that our life is no life at all. We spend our infancy in your body and when we stick our nose outside and jodhpurs.
of you, we are taken immediately to our death . You can see, Mother Earth, Perfect fitting guaranteed
that we might as well be dead to begin with."
The Ivy then crawled forward and said: "Mother Earth, Ii represent your also high grade
children of the creeping whips. We are usually happy because we can go wherever me tiorn
we wish. Sometimes, however, we get into places where we're not wanted andme stalrn
then trouble begins. We are cut! And oh!1 the pain . Now, if you'll give us Summer a lot more mind, Mother Earth, we can save ourselves from stupid paths and LEXINGTON AVE. 929 LINCOLN ROAD
can be happy." MAGNOLIA, MASS. MIAMI BEACH, FLA.
At last, the Poison Oak saw that his chance had come. "Mother Earth," he prounced, moving as close to the group as he dared, "I am a delegate of myself. I have no sorrows, but neither do I have joys. In fact, I'm neither here OFFICE FURNITURE'- Desks, Chairs, Filing Cabinets
nor there, so to speak, and who wants to live in this Limbo ?" Desk
And with this, the complaints were ended. Safes
Mother Earth could scarcely believe her own ears. Not one sincere word Lights Card
of gratitude had been spoken. Not one joyous tone in a voice. "Your com- Desk
plaints are entirely without reason," she said decidedly. "Not one of you seem Files
to appreciate that you are here for the purpose of service. The length of one's PadsPotr
life is of no importance, whatsoever. The question is,-what do you accomplish Smoking
while you're here? . Well, not much as far as I can see from today's ex- Stand Chairs
perience .. But I, alone, am not your Creator. It is now necessary for me to commune with Him who has seen and heard all on this occasion . Children," LEATHER CLUB CHAIRS AND SETTEES
she ended, sadly, "go in peace to your places. I will await the decision of your HARDIN OFFICE EQUJIPiMENTr CO.
Creator . Everything is relative in life, you know-happiness brings sorrow 209 S. Miami Ave. Op. Miami Herald Phone 2-6390
and sorrow brings happiness. This should have been kept in your hearts from the day of your birth." 4 4 ,f f( I I )Ufe fO A
So, saying goodbye to one another, the botanical family each took its own FOR YOUR HEALTH AND BEAUTY
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bling sounds, at first distant, then nearer, broke the tranquility of the universe. j yrgsee ussPerfluous hrescintfialyreovd Heavy winds, traveling at great velocity, hurried over the earth, while from the Praetrsls
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sand where once the botanical world of such indescribable beauty had been. The Phone 2-2387. Miami, Florida
place was then entirely deserted. That is why today we have worlds of desert in remote parts of the earth, where flowers, trees, vegetables and plants of every living kind, daughters of nature once grew in quantities and without effort.
Accept life with its inconveniences and life will accept you with your faults. EDIDIE'S INEWS & STUFF
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Famous for its Tender and Delicious STEAKS, CHOPS and C11 414E 14011ATNIG3SEA FOODS OPRGESBEERS WINES Phone 2-9516
It is a powerful and constructive Program for the State of Florida
WATCH FOR THIS SPECIAL EDITION Ll oe lwrSop
THE FLORIDA CENTENNIAL ASSOCIATION Flowers for All Occasions
A Non-Profit Corporation Duly Organized Special Delivery Cut Flowers Potted Plants
326 EAST FLAGLER STREET MIAMI Corsages Funeral Designs Wedding Parties
Write for Advance Information 1910 S. W. 8th Street Phone 2-5790




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 4
WILLIAM CAREY COFFIN donor of trophies for extra-curriculum work of members of fraternities
and sororities.
William Carey Coffin was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on His activities at Miami Beach include active membership of the September 7, 1862, just at the time when the Civil War was beginning Committee of One Hundred and founder-member of the Bath Club. to flame into the final blast of the melting pot of this great nation. He is also an active Mason of thirty-two degrees standing. Dr. His father, also William Carey, was a direct descendant in the genera- Coffin's, residence on the Beach is at 3591 Flamingo Drive. tion of Tristam Coffin who settled in Newbury, Massachusetts, in 1642. This man of family was not a proverbial 'Pilgrim Father', but was a Royalist in old England, and, when he foresaw that Cromwell was destined to win, he migrated to North American shores, rather than be ruled by the 'Roundheads'. PIEhHT A CA P~
The mother of Dr. Coffin was Jane McCormick Osborne, of
Scotch-Irish Covenanter clan, who landed in Pennsylvania during fo
George Washington's administration,.ro
Graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a degree of civil engineer. Later, this institution conferred upon him the honorary
building of blast furnaces, steel plants, and oil refineries. He has the J .IIY [,~
distinction of being the first graduate under Doctor Carhart in 1883. P retC r efc evc
In the same year he began his notable career as Chief Engineer of PretC r efc evc
the Fort Pitt Boiler Works.
Dr. Coffin remained with this company only two years. He then Best Mileage Rate
started a series of changes in firms which finally took him to the chair of Vice-presidency of the Blaw Knox Company in 1915 until 1923 1520 ALTON ROAD PHONE 5-5655
and to many important countries all over the globe. His next position was Chief Engineer of Riter and Conley Company which was followed _____________________________by the position of Vice-president of this company. In 1908 he joined with the Jones and Laughlin Steel Company as their contracting engineer and remained with them until he accepted the Vice-presi- j t&~. .. C ER '
dency of his last connection with the Blaw Knox Company. Then he j. .
came to Miami Beach in 1923 and, until his retirement in 1927, he had ie n
his own office as an engineer and architect on the Beach.~ Exclusive
One of his latest works before coming to Miami Beach and retire- Dresses
ment was the designing and constructing of eight blast furnaces at Spectator
one time and in a new territory, Gary, Indiana, for the Illinois Steel ~Sotwa
Company. This was the largest group construction in the world at I
that time. Another one of his late constructions was the first large gBeach wear oil refinery in the Beaumont, Texas, oil field, famous for the discovery Cot
of a new source of petroleum. This field is familiarly known asCot "Spidle-op.". g1906 Collins Avenue
In addition to Dr. Coffin's outstanding achievements as a struc- -MIAMI BEACH
tural engineer in this, the greatest of all industrial nations, his ability ~,.,ooo~n~~~~.ooooO o oo..
and the confidence of his associates is proven by the following big jobs of which he was the head in other parts of the world: he designed and built the steel frame power houses in Dublin, Ireland; Glasgow, Scotland; Bristol, England for Great Britain; he designed, the water S a I a A 0 U I A 1 3 U I I S I PJ
works towers for one hundred cities in the United States, Merida, Yucatan, Tsin-Tsin, China, and Shanghai, China; he designed, advocated, and finally introduced the 55,000 barrel oil tank which eventu-
ally became the national standard oil tank; he also made several extensive trips to Europe to study and report on gas engines, welding Te sie Zinn Gift Shops C4Q~
by both oxy-acetylene and blue gas hammer, and received credit for the introduction of the latter method of welding into the United States; in 1913 he was made chairman of the "Business Conditions Committee of the National Structural Fabricators Society" and filed a report, "Monograph on Governmental Regulation of Co-operation in Trade," which was sent by the society to every Congressman and BRNHE .77LNOLJ D
left a strong impression on the congressional action in the formation B A C E CL D
of the Federal Trade Commission. Its adoption at that time would have SHE LBORN E HOTEL N EXT TO LI NCOLN
established fair trades practices and fair trades as early as 19.13. AND T HEAT RE
He is a life member of the Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburgh. SEA ISLE'H-OTEL MIAMII BEACH FLORIDA
He is a member of Council, National Civil Service Reform Association;MIAIlBACHPON 5..2 4
Director and Delegate of National Structural Steel Fabricators Society; the American Society of Civil Engineers; the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers; the American Society of Mechanical Engineers; the American Iron and Steel Institute, En -_______________________________gineers Society of Pennsylvania; and the American Association for Advancement of Science. A'EJA ~
This :famous engineer relates that his most valuable experiences in N C L A % y N S Ct i ij L
life were due to his membership on the Council of the National Civil Service Reform Association from 1908 until 1918. Dr. Charles Elliot A Private Boarding and Day School
of Harvard University was Chairman, and among the presidents were For Boys and Girls
Hon. Joseph Choate, Ambassador to Great Britain when the Alabama claims and the final boundaries of Alaska were settled. Another was KINDERGARTEN THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL Hon. Charles Bonaparte of Baltimore, who was Attorney-General LEO HUBERMAN (Harvard) Headmaster
in Theodore Roosevelt's cabinet.
The 'University of Miami is fortunate in Dr. Coffin's selection of 1021 Biarritz Drive Phone 6-1061 Miami Beach this section for his home of retirement. He succeeded Dr. Fairchild Local Transportation Provided Without Charge
as Chairman of the Board of Trustees seven years ago, and has taken
a very active part in the rapid growth of this fine school. He is the _________________________________




46 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
Miami Beach Has Own Daily Newspaper Under its masthead, The Daily -Tropics publishes each day this
___________statement:
When Horace Greeley said, "Go west, young man," it was very "Owned, edited and published in Miami Beach, a city with an
apt, for that injunction to the youth of the land was offered when the assessed valuation of $70,000,000 and real and personal property of a regions to the west offered much promise to those with initiative and full sale value of $150,000,000 with 279 hotels,, 893 apartment houses courage. and 3,352 private residences-housing accommodations for threeBut in 1925, the famous Greeley suggestion was outmoded, for quarters of million visitors during a six-months season-the nations America had discovered a new frontier-southern Florida, and if fastest growing city (1940 census_"' Greeley had lived in that year of magic improbabilities, doubtless he would have pointed southward. Even without a Greeley to guide him, MreTloPilp
a western journalist, a young Kansan named John Montgomery, saw MreTloPilp
things were happening here, and he came and established The Coral Perhaps one of the most sought after celebrites in Miami is Marie Gables Riviera. Tello Phillips (Mrs. Charles J. Yaegle). Born in Toronto, Canada,
Now he is publisher and editor of The Miami Beach Daily Tropics, Miss Phillips spent her childhood in Louisville, Ky., where her father
Miam Bech'soneandonlydaiy nespaer.was a member of the Bar. She received her B. A. Degree from Miam Bech'soneandonlydaiy nespaer.Ursurline College in Nottingham, Ohio, and later taught in the public
Back in 1929, when the Miami Beach population was only 6,800, schools in Cleveland. She also acted as Assistant Principal of the Mr. Montgomery established The Miami Beach Tropics, as a slick- North Doan school until her marriage to the later Watson P. Phillips. paper society weekly.
But n 140,thecenus dsclsedMiai Bach ad 8,02 yar- Miss Phillips' family history is one of the most colorful imaginable Butin 940 th cesusdislosd MamiBeah hd 2,01 yer- -dating back to Christopher Columbus, and including such well, round residents, and, realizing that a daily newspaper in such a fast- known people as Gov. A. C. Scales, Rear-Admiral Scales, and Admiral growing city was inevitable, The Tropics enlarged its plant facilities Bartholomew de Perestrello. its staff, contracted for the International News Service, and entered fo e ahr al .Tlo nal rtr
the afternoon daily field. Perhaps it was fo e ahr al .Tlo nal rtr
The Coral Gables Riviera is still owned by Mr. Montgomery, editor and published, that Miss Phillips inherited her literary ability.
unde maagemnt f Jaes Morebut he ailyTroicsIi Among her best known novels are "There's A Divinity", "Bound in unde maageentof ame B.Mooe, ut he ail Trpic ishisShallows", and "Stella Marvin"; of her poems-"Mary of Scotland", first love and it is at the Tropics office where this young dynamo "Honeysuckle and the Rose", "Ten Thousand Candles", and "A Voice makes his headquarters, giving personal supervision to all depart- from the Stars". Her book of essays-"More Truth Than Poetry" is ments. regarded as one of the best produced by modern writers.
In less than two months of daily operation, The Daily Tropics has How Miss Phillips finds time to write and to be as active in the made rapid week-by-week gains, both in circulation and in advertis- various clubs she belongs to, is a wonder. The honors bestowed upon ing. More than 40 first-class hotels purchase copies for all their guests her are almost unbelievable: Poet Laureate of the Bookfellows Library each day, however, principal outlets consist of carrier routes, news- Guild and the Poetry Society of Pittsburgh; holder of the Diamond boys and newstands. A final sporting extra after 5:30 p. m. reaches Torch, tenth Degree, of Sigma Tau Delta (the English Professional the Miami Beach streets usually 20 to 25 minutes ahead of any other Society for literary distinction). The National League of Pen Women sports edition. (of which she was the founder and the first President of the Pittsburgh
C. Marlin Lundry is managing editor and Parks Rusk is advertis- and Miami branches) has also bestowed several awards-as has the ing manager. Society of Arts and Letters.
839 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH,
Le~ie COPet 5udioFLORIDA PHONE 5-4911
CORSETS and SURGICAL BELTS
...........Made for the Individual
FITTINGS GIVEN BEFORE GARMENT
IS COMPLETED
Correctly Corseted
PERFECT FIGURE CONTROL AND
COMFORT ASSURED
COMPLETE ABDOMINAL UPLIFT
307 POSTAL BUILDING 327 N. E. FIRST AVE.
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Lucile Stephenson
PHONE 2-5368
Incorrectly Corseted




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 47
4 lm sia
Modern Trend In School Architecture
By AUGUST GEIGER
Present day school design is very different today from what it schools due to their being located along busy streets with heavy was in the so called "good old days" in Dade County. Today we have traffic. However, in many cases these conditions have developed since associations to study thi -various problems incurred in designing the schools were built. Take the case of the Orange Glade School as schools so that they will be as nearly perfect as possible with respect an instance. When this school was built it was out in the country to safety, perfect lighting, proper ventilation, and limiting the capacity surrounded by pine woods and orange groves, a typical country school of rooms to number of pupils which the teacher can most efficiently and it is a question whether the wildest optimists of the time could handle. In fact school design has now developed into a highly have visualized this school in the center of the busy business section specialized profession and most states including Florida now have which has grown up here. Codes which go into great detail specifying how our schools are to be built, and in this way there is a certain uniformity in recently built schools.
But in the "good old days" there were no such Codes, Associations CLOTHES arnoon Dresses
or Commissions for studying school problems and the architects who OF Redingotes and Jacket
designed the early schools generally followed their own ideas of UYI S CAMEeigadDe Dresses
what~~~~~~~~HR Evnn andoo Dinner Dressesthster a ltl uiomiyi
the design of these schools. Most of the older schools were built in SUITS-Tailored and Dressmaker Types. COATS for every occasion. a more or less rectangular shape with center halls with hooms opening Fur Trimmed Coats Fur Jackets Beachwear Slack Suits and out of these inside halls. Doors from classrooms generally opened Playclothes Millinery and Accessories
inward because many teachers thought this made it easier to controlCONRFS.EFITSRETAD.E.ISTVNU the pupils but forgetting the great danger in case of fire. For the same MAI LRD
reason the classrooms of the earlier schools generally had only one door while today two doors are required which must open outward.
While at present all newly built classrooms must be equipped
with hardware which cannot be locked against anyone inside of a room .4 trying to open the doors, any kind of hardware was allowed in the 9 Phone 7-6273 FACIALS
olden buildings. Many of the floors of the halls were of wood and the DANITA BEAUTY SALON
rooms faced in all directions. There was no regulation as to the size 9A COMPLETE BEAUTY SERVICE of the windows, the ceiling heights or any of the other matters which jParker Herbex Method Scalp Treatments are at present considered so important in a properly designed class- 9534 N. E. Second Avenue Miami. F lorida
room. ----The first schools were of wooden construction. The first school
built here along modern lines was the Neva King Cooper School at1.R S N A TE
Homestead which was built about 1912, and was considered quite a I O E G R E
model school. Later, Mr. Fisher, who was then Superintendent, decided that it was desirable to set up standards for school design based on the best practice of the time and employed Mr. Ray Hamon who made > h1BZ(D1T. a study of the latest practice of the time and standardized the construction of school buildings in the County.
Since that time the rapid inmiprovements which have been made "Miami's Pioneer Furrier"
in chol esin nd ontrutin cn b sen y omprig te ariusIN OUR NEW AND SPACIOUS STORE in chol dsin ad cnstucioncanbe ee bycomarig he arius118 SOUTH MIAMI AVENUE schools which have been built during the last fifteen years. It is a far WE SPECIALIZE IN FUR AND COSTLY RUG COLD STORAGE cry from schools like the old Central School (where the post office is Reoeig100% Insurance on All Articles Remdelng- Moth Proofing Cleaning Glazing
now located) or the original Orange Glade School with their inside TELEPHONE 3-4591 118 SOUTH MIAMI AVENUE
halls, plaster ceilings, etc. to such buildings as the Miami Beach Senior High School or the new Miami Beach Elementary schools. These have *, ,, b,, e, (f)fl
their rooms all facing east or south so as to get proper ventilation, all classrooms opening onto fireproof corridors, and with all classrooms COMPLIMENTS
equipped with accoustical ceilings. In addition there are now clinics j and cafeterias and the various rooms are also equipped with public I.E HILN
address systems, inter-communicating telephones, fire alarm System s, I .S ILN
etc. which are operated from the Principal's office in the Miami Beach MR. COFFEEN
schools previously mentioned. All the other improvements which are considered essential in the modern system of education, have been 1818 PURDY AVENUE MIAMI BEACH
incorporated in the designs.
Sometimes we hear criticisms of the locations of some of the




14 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
lands and countries, the home was developed to fit the needs and requirements of these individual peoples. The American people being D evelopm ent of of creative ability and highly imaginative, have not been able to settle
on any one style, but have developed a mode of living which is typically American. Today, although our homes are of many styles and designs, the old idea of home still prevails; but, with our modern the H o m e .. 0 0Mode of living, a more efficient arrangement of rooms and equipment
By J.EDWI PETRSENhas been devised to fit the need.
From time immemorable it has been man's desire to create a A T U E E
somie; and as time advanced, and modern improvements were devisedARTH U R BEREL
and invented, the development of this home went through many 6 ATFALRSRE
changes. 6 ATFALRSRE
Our first notice of the family home was back in the pre-historic MIAMI, FLORIDA
-days when man built his home in caves on the hillstides, and under ___________________________________projecting rock ledges. Today, in many places all over the world, the very same home that was used thousands of years ago is still beingused. For instance, in the State of New Mexico, we still find the Indians living in the sides of the cliffs. Then, along the Loire River THE
Valley just outside the City of Tours, we find a whole community DEPENDABLE
of cliffdwellers. It is very interesting to drive along the road and see HEDDEN METAL LOCATOR these peculiar little dwellings spotting the abrupt hillsides,-some with DETE TE nTdLOAE glass windows and framed doorways, and others with nothing but a ALL METALS
piece of cloth hanging over the openings; then the funny looking THROUGH ANY SUBSTANCE
chimneys corbled out and zig-zagging up the perpendicular side of INCLUDING WATER
the cliff. MODELS
The next step was the development of a home built of materials FOR
such as rock, timbers and mud, which were thrown together in a hap- PLUMBERS and
hazard fashin, but proved to be nothing more than shelters. As civili- ELECTRICIANS
zation progressed, and as man became more conscious of his artistic and for TREASURE HUNTING
intnthis desire for a more refined mode of living brought forth MANUFACTURED BETWEII ENTIT
the idea of a multi-room home. We find some very good examples of ANTIBD MGEI
these early dwellings in the excavations at Pompeii, Italy. Of course, BY AND
the multi-roomed house was used in many other parts of the worldT1~11. NON-MAGNETIC
and perhaps long before the building of the City of Pompeii, but lte E D NMETALS
or no records are left for us to study. Therefore, this City with its MVETA.L well preserved ruins offers us a good record of the mode of living LOCATORS,
of ancient times. These homes consisted of a large colonnaded court I C
semi-outdoor, where the general entertaining and living was done. I C
This space also acted as a connecting link between the other rooms of
-the dwellings which were rooms for dining and preparing of foods, and small cubicles which were used as chambers.
The next point of interest in regard to !he home was the decora- 6230 N. W. SECOND
tion of the interiors, and the profound simplicity and bareness of the AEU
exteriors. Man's first instincts were toward the beautification of him- AEU
self. Along with the realization of a more formulated mode of living, man's thoughts were for creating a setting to exemplify the beautifi- MIAMI, :: FLORIDA
-cation of himself; therefore, the use of decoration and color was brought forth in the homes. All great periods of the history of Art have coincided, with rare exceptions, with the fashions and prosperity Cable Address: HEDMETALOC MIAMIFLA
of the nations and the home developed very rapidly, and to a high _____________________________degree of efficiency in the more prosperous countries.
It is perhaps with interest that we consider the lack of development of the homes in countries which have been unable to develop, due to ignorance, or oppression by church and government. In the rural sections of Mexico we find homes similar to the type which The LI&G lTHI 0 US [
weethroughout Europe in its very early days. The home consisted "On the Beach"
,of a barricative fence surrounding an area of approximately one hun,dred feet on each side, with a little thatched roof hut in one corner Superb in Sea Foods
-for sleeping, and in the Opposite corner a similar thatched roof hut BAKER'S HAULOVER-N. MIAMI BEACH
-for cooking and eating. This is perhaps the method by which these Always Open
people have lived for hundreds of years, with little or no improvements. In speaking of this little thatched or barricative fence, another Oysters and Clams on Half Shell
point of great importance in the development of the home is broughtFrgL s
out, that being the desire and need of protection. This little MexicanFrgL s
dwelling must be protected against the wild animals of the surround- Live Stone Crabs
ing country, and so our earliest forms of dwelling were likewise. The Soft Shell Crabs
-next step was to build a home which would withstand the attacks or Sutffed Deviled Crabs
invasions of tribes and bandits. That gives us one of the explanations Pompano
as to why the home was decorated on the interior and little thought Florida Lobsters
-given to the exterior, and the outside gave the appearance of a for- GenTrl ta
tress. Inborn in man, along with his desire for a home, is the instinct GenTrl ta
for socialized and community life. It was then that man realized mutual benefits for protection could be had by group communities COCKTAIL BAR-PACKAGE STORE
,or cities which could be fortified. This general fortification relieved the tension for individual protection, and allowed them freedom and STEAKS CHOPS CHICKEN
thought for beautification of the exterior of the home, as well as its Prime Beef Used Exclusively
surroundings. Many examples of ancient walled cities may be found today, such as Paris, Provin, Rome, Luca, etc. PHONE 6-1723 S. D. MACRIS, Manager
With many changes and adjustments familiar to their individual _______________________________




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 49
St. Frdncis Mospildi Midrol bedch, Floridd
In a neighboring town of the City of Indianapolis a man lay ill To this end the Sisters of St. Francis have been doing Hospital work in a small room of a little hospital. One day he remarked that he in the northern states for many years, but it was not until 1927 that was gonig to build a hospital where the patients could have the com- this work brought them as far south as Florida. Since that time, they forts of home, and a view that would interest them when they looked have unceasingly bent their efforts to the care of the sick. out of the window. In 1925, Mr. James Allison of Indianapolis and The improvement of the facilities to combat disease and sickness
Miami Beach built a fifty bed hospital in Miami Beach and named here at Miami Beach has been their major aim. Since the Sisters it "Allison Hospital." In 1927, Mr. Allison requested that an Order assumed full control of Allison Hospital and re-named it St. Francis of Sisters conduct his hospital; and learning of the good work ac- Hospital, under the patronage of the Patron Saint of their Order, the complished by the Sisters of St. Francis of Allegany, New York, he City of Miami Beach has grown rapidly. Additions to the Hospital as invited the Sisters to inspect the institution. After making the neces- well as new equipment have been necessary to maintain a fitting sary negotiations, the Sisters assumed charge of the Hospital in 1927. standard of hospital facilities for such a growing city. Such expansion A year later, Mr. Allison passed to his eternal reward, and in 1929, the is in perfect accord with the ideals and practices of the Sisters of Hospital was purchased from his estate, and became known as the St. Saint Francis. The management and most of the administrative Francis Hospital. This Hospital, approved by the American College -of positions, which in other institutions are held by high salaried execuSurgeons, is a complete modern hospital, equipped to administer to tives, are at St. Francis Hospital filled by the Sisters. This permits a medical and surgical patients. Located on Allison Island, in suh- large portion of the income, which usually is absorbed by an executive tropical splendor, it affords comforts unequalled in hospital accomn- payroll, to be turned back to' the hospital maintenance in a true modations. The Staff, composed of approximately sixty-five physicians, "non-profit" sense. members of the American College of Physicians and the American The very nature of the Religious Life which the Sisters have
College of Surgeons, has three divisions, namely: the Active, the chosen to follow includes a great amount of charity work. In the Visiting and the Courtesy Staff. spirit of true charity these cases are not given prominence, but they
In 1936, in order to care for the growing population of Miami are cared for with the same attention and consideration as all other Beach, an east wing was added, which increased the original accom- cases. They go unnoticed by those who but casually observe the work modations from fifty to one hundred patients. of the Sisters conducting St. Francis Hospital, but such cases are not
Although a comparatively short time has elapsed since the infrequent, and the expense entailed in caring for them amounts to a
capacity of the hospital was doubled, by the addition of the east wing, large sum. the need for more beds was so apparent during the past season that In the past there have been times when the capacity of the Hosanother wing has been added to the west side of the Hospital. The pital has been taxed to its utmost by an unexpected number of people possible necessity of another addition was recognized when the eastreuinhoptlzin.Hwvatotmeashetesbeno
wingwasplanedandconideatio wa mae fr achiectralgreat that anyone in need of care was turned away. With the addition symnetry of the hospital buildings so that the new addition completely of a west wing, which makes the hospital's total capacity one hundred balances the plan. The original building faces south and the wings seventy-five, another step has been taken toward keeping the hospital extending north from the east and west ends of this building complete facilities up to the need of this growing city. This most recent addition an inverted "U" formation. manifests the definite desire of the Sisters at St. Francis to furnish
The popularity of the various clinics made it mandatory to assign the best possible hospital service for the people of this vicinity. more space to this branch of the hospital's service; therefore practically the whole first floor is being utilized by the emergency ward and -_______________________________the clinics. The second floor of the building is divided into wards to
accommodate men, women and children who prefer this kind of hos- Announcing the Opening of..
pitalization. The third floor is composed entirely of private rooms,
and these are in great demand during the winter months. The entire 3~ a~ r~
fourth floor of the new wing is devoted to surgery. This department
is completely air-conditioned, and is the last word in modern surgical
equpmet.Camera StrInc.
The Sisters of. St. Francis who operate and manage the St. Francis Hospital are members of the community founded in Allegany,
New York, in 1865. Copying the example of the St. Francis of Assisi, 70 WEST FLAGLER STREET
the Siste rs of the community renounce all personal claim to worldlyPHN 2-81MAIFLRD
riches and renown; following the rule of St. Francis, these SistersPHN 2-81MAIFLRD
dedicate their lives to the service of God in the benefit of mankind.- _________________________________




50 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
Miami Beach Public Schools Show Definite Program girl with enough of "what it takes" to face life and to cope, with some reasonFor hil Deelop entandCom unit Usfuless able degree of success, with its varied problems, even in a world apparently
For hil Deelop entandCom unit Usfuless threatened with chaos. He believes the school must help the boy and girl find
some degree of security in his or her niche in the economic and social scheme of By MRS. .1. C. BROWN. Head of Foreign Language Department of the Miami things in wbich his or her life is to be cast, and to find some considerable amount
Beach junior-Senior High School of personal satisfaction and social usefulness in that niche. For the realization
of this ideal of service which must ever be paramount with the school, the whole "Your child's school is your ally. Every day it does something for program of the Miami Beach Public School system has assumed a definitely
your child. A sound schooling is the richest legacy you can leave him." socialized trend, and both classroom and extra- curricular activities are being planned and interpreted with less regard to theory or text book formula and The casual tourist or the permanent citizen who places his child in the more in terms of life as the boy and girl of today will have to live it when once public schools of Miami Beach can do so with the full assurance that no stone they are outside the portals and the shelter tbe school has afforded. For the will be left unturned to give that child the best schooling obtainable. A full carrying out of such a program, Supervising Principal Ellison has realized that program characterized by long range planning to cover courses from the kinder- comlt coprto ofsuetfcly colamiitaosadsho arn
garten through the twelfth grade is a feature of the several schools making up must be a "sine qua non" in the process. An interesting and worth-while bythe Miami Beach Public School System, and graduates of the school are more product of such a program has been the building of an unusually fine and harand more attesting its value through acquitting themselves creditably in their monious relation between the local public and the Beach schools.k chosn filds.Each of the three elementary and the high school has its own organization of Visiting specialists in the field of education have frequently commented on Parent-Teachers, working in pleasant and useful harmony among themselves and the variety of problems confronting the Beach schools which draw pupils from with the school system as a whole. all states of the union and from many foreign countries to meet here in a real The City of Miami Beach finances and the school plant houses a program
meltingg pot" of pupil personnel. In addition to a large permanent population of student health check-up that is probably without an equal in any other city. depending on the public schools, each year sees an increasing number of visitors A clinic, staffed by competent nurses, makes daily and minute check-up on all to Miami Beach and for these students coming from all types of schools, with in-coming students, with adequate follow-up work and the maintenance of a every conceivable degree of background and preparation, the school's unending complete card case-history of each pupil. task is to pick up the loose ends of the pupils educational pattern, link them Each of the schools in the system has a well-equipped cafeteria, operated
with our own curricular and extra-curricular design, and, without, lowering our by the PTA, giving meals-at-cost to pupils and teachers. own high academic standards, return the tourist pupil to his home school without An adequate system of bus operation handles the student transportation handicap resulting from the change. The Miami Beach public school enroll- problem. A Custodians' Club, made up of alert, efficient workers keeps the
ment rises some two hundred and fifty percent as the "season" moves toward its various buildings of the big plant functioning smoothly and the grounds well "peak". Fortunately, more and more of our visitors are realizing the advantages cared for and beautified. The beauty of the high school patios has been a source of remaining here until the close of the school term in the early part of June. of much admiration among the countless visitors who see them each year.
The Miami Beach Public Schools function as a unit under a supervising All buildings in the various schools are equipped with two-way radio systems,
principal. The original nucleus of that system was a portion of what is now the electric bell and clock apparatus, and are planned to give the maximum benefits Miami Beach Central Elementary School. In 1920 that school opened with an for lighting, ventilation and safety.
auditorium and six classrooms, covering grades one through eight. In 1925-1926 M.Elsni byasse ytehaso h he lmnayshos
the 9th grade was added, and in 1926 work was begun on the Ida M. Fisher High Miss Katie Dean is principal of the Miami Beach Central Elementary School. School building. Some five years ago that structure was taken over exclusively Among the improvements listed at that school during the present year are an for junior high work as our PWA building program was nearing completion. enlarged library, a full-time librarian and the purchase of some excellent visual This federal project included a new senior high school, a new high school gym- education equipment. Similar equipment has been secured for the North Beach nasium, an elementary school on South Beach, one on North Beach, and many Elementary School where Miss Mabel Tucker directs the activities of several
improvements and additions to the existing Central Beach Elementary School. hundred pupils. Rinalden Saunders is at the head of the South Beach Elementary The Miami Beach Senior High School opened for classes in September of 1936, School where an outstanding program in character education has been worked out and in most Welcome relief to the almost intolerable, over-crowded conditions by the faculty. Through many phases of daily routine and activity pupils are prevailing the year before. But so spectacular has been the growth of the taught the value of such qualities as humility, respect, reverence and responsibility. population of the city that already extensive plans are underway for enlargements For the upper grades there are two large buildings, the Ida M. Fisher junior and ew truturs tomee ne neds.High and the Miami Beach Senior High schools, connected by a series of corridors The Beach public schools have been exceptionally fortunate in the quality and both built cloister style around beautiful patios. These buildings occupy the of leadership in the members of its Board of Trustees. The present personnel of greater part of two city squares and are located in the center of the city of Miami that Board is as follows: Messrs. Van C. Kussrow, chairman; Hugh Larrick Beach, about three blocks from the ocean and a few blocks from Biscayne Bay.
an RbetTalo.Caabe e a sprvsig rncpasha benaotero Like the other structures, these are built on a style fitting to the sub-tropics,
our strokes of good fortune. Dr. C. C. Carson first held this post, beginning in embody the latest and most approved structural features and are equipped for the 1926. From 1930 to 1936 Mr. James T. Wilson served in this capacity, and _______________________________________when he was elected County Superintendent of Public Instruction for Dade County the present Supervising Principal, Sidney H. Ellison, took the post.
Financially the Beach public school system has been kept in the soundestSl e
condition. Through the wise planning and good business judgment of men at the head of this vast enterprise, the system has gone steadily forward, through "fat" years and "lean". Supported by a 10-mill levy in its own district (the Proudly, we salute the Pioneers of Miami Beach and also the
school district and the city limits coincide) the Beach has not had to depend on peetdylaeso hsgoiu iy
outside funds in order to keep its schools in unimpaired operation. During those CARL AULT, EUCILD HOTEL,
most difficult years when school all over the country were closing for lack of Mayor of Hialeah 320 Euclid Ave.
AGNES BEAUTY SALON, MIAMI BEACH OTEL,
funds, the Beach public schools went forward with the slogan of "Full steam 2916 N. E. 2nd Avenue 520 Ocean Drive
saareshae evr ee hldup ad vey pprtniy nd BRICKELL GRILL, J. K. DORN,
ahead". Teachers' slrehaenvrbeheduadeeyoptniynd 143 S. E. 8th Street Miami, Florida
encouragement has been given faculty members for professional improvement. BLUE DERBY, JACK GREESON,
S. W. 8th at 7th Avenue 304 S. W. 8th Ave.
No teacher in the Beach schools holds less than an A. B. degree. Many hold an LITTLE BOHEMIA CAFE, MAX GROGER,
930 N. E. 2nd Avenue 1103 S. W. 2nd Ave.
M. A. and have long years of teaching experience to their credit. A single salary W. D. BIEVER, AL HICKLAND,
schedule prevailing in all grades has made each teacher realize the importance of 112th St. at Biscayne Blvd. 4660 S. W. 13th St.
MISS COLEEN CHAPMAN, HARRY HIGGINS,
his job in contributing to the progress of the system as a whole. The faculty 159 N. E. 11th Terrace 1333 S. W. 8th St.
JOHN M. COGAN, AL LABER,
members have come from outstanding institutions from all sections of the country. Hermitage Hotel Barclay Plaza
Th Bac pblc coos rethroglyacreitd ndhvehih atng. C. E. CASEY, CHARLES M. MOORE,
TheBechpulicscoos rethoouhl acreitd ndhae hghrains. 1688 Coral Way Tropical Cottages
An unusually large percentage of students from our high school go to colleges and DEXTER SKATING RINK, JAKE MILES,
T. FIERE, N. E. 2nd Ave. at 24th St.
universities and graduates are admitted to the most conservative institutions on N. E. 2nd Ave. at 63rd St. MIAMI HEALTH INSTITUTE,
parwih rauaesfrm nyoterhih chol B man o sanarizd nd JOHN J. FRITZ, 7613 Biscayne Blvd.
parwih radats roman oherhih chol.Bymens f tadarizd nd3121 N. W. 27th Ave. MIAMI ART SCHOOL,
other tests given at regular intervals, the Miami Beach public school pupils have H. W. FLYYN, 111 N. E. 2nd Ave.
Brownly's Candy Store, MAGIC CITY PARK,
been shown to have a high grade of accomplishment in all the regular academic 247 E. Flagler 6005 N. E. 2nd Ave.
GREEN CANDLE TEA ROOM, RHODES VACUUM CLEANER,
fields. Coral Gables 1312 N. E. 2nd Ave.
SUN RAY PARK RELIABLE SOUTHERN SERVICE,
But it is not simply to prepare students for college that the Beach schools M. F. SCOTT News Tower
operate. Mr. Ellison, the supervising principal, has some well-defined notions WINCRICHE STATION, MRS. A. B. BRICKER
1129 Grand Avenue WEAVER'S SERVICE STATION,
as to what twelve years in a public school should do for a boy or girl. He knows 7603 N. E. 2nd Ave.
that any school has failed which does not-in those twelve years--equip a boy or-




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 51
maximum in comfort, beauty and achievement. Across the street from the senior high is still another large modern building, the gymnasium. On the same groundsLaetMdlCrToRn with junior and senior high are the "annex", housing the Home Economics and the-LaetMdlCrToRn
Manual Arts departments. The most recent structure on the grounds is a spacious BY MILE, DAY, WEEK OR SEASON
air-conditioned, sound-proof band rehearsal hail, said to be one of the few of its kind in the country and the only one in the state. The public schools of the j- Q N T CA
Beach have the full use of all of the varied facilities offered by the City of Miami A E AA
Beach in its 33-acre sports and recreation center, Flamingo Park, about two DDPIVE IT YOLISELF
blocks from the high school.
Doing effective work in the high school is a group of well-trained faculty
members serving as counselers for students to avoid the hit-and-miss tragediesCO T R M T R C RP
of poor planning in the matter of subject selection and courses, particularly in 825 FIFTH STREET
grades 10, 11 and 12. PHONE 5-5811 MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
In a large number of homeroom and extra curricular activities, pupils in the
Miami Beach Public Schools are learning to "stand on their own feet", to think Couture's Motor Corporation is the oldest drive-yourself clearly and express themselves effectively, to practice the actual operation of company in the Greater Miami area. The company was estabdemocratic government and to become acquainted with adult leaders in the worldlihdoe15yasgondmntnshearstfetf outside the school room. Developing students in self-reliance and in a sense of lihdoe15yasgo ndmntnshearstfetf
responsibility by giving them an opportunity for participation in life situations is late model cars of several makes and types. Dependable another "must" in Supervising Principal Ellison's educational creed. Teachers, chauffeurs can be furnished. students and parents cooperate gladly in his wise leadership in recognizing that "What the School is today, Democracy will be tomorrow !"
The Miami Beach Public School System is pledged and dedicated to a program _____________________________________planned for the normal, healthy and happy growth and development of the whole child, to help him find his place in the world and in his usefulness to that world U K MM OR C M P N
and to the day in which he lives. It subscribes wholeheartedly to that admirable tenet set forth by the National Education Association: ...Ford Dealer
"Let us set the child in our midst as our greatest wealth and our most
challenging responsibility. Let us exalt him above industry, above busi- CORAL GABLES, FLA. PHONE 4-2566
ness, above politics, above all the petty and selfish things that weaken and destroy a people. Let us know that the race moves forward thru its children, and, by the grace of Almighty God, setting our faces toward the
morning, dedicate ourselves anew to the welfare of CHILDHOOD !" M a i C n e v t r
RUSSELL F. HAND, Inc. MaiCnevtr
INSURANCE FOR EVERYTHING
Member of Greater Miami Insurance Board, Inc. of M usic
Seybold Building Phone 3-4751
M I A M I F L 0 R I D A Here pupils may have the advantages of individual instruction
__________________________________________________ under Leading Teachers, as well as group and class instruction.
Going Places ? ? ? ? Get the Most for Your Money DANCING VOICE VIOLIN PIANO
V I SIT
The Ocean Hi-Way Travel Bureau 1737 N. Bayshore Drive
44 Biscayne Boulevard Poe253
MIAMI, FLORIDAPhn 2-85
Reservations Made and Tickets Sold. Hotels Recommended 138 Minorca Ave. 1122 S. W. 21st Ave. 431 41st St.
__________________________________________ -Coral Gables Miami Miami Beach
NANCY'S HAT SHOP
212 HALCYON ARCADE_______________ _______M I A M I F L 0 R I D A FEATURING "THE REVERSA TIE"
Smart Hats, Reasonable Mildred M. New
Miss Nancy Beery House of 1000 Ties
___________________________________227 HALCYON ARCADE
KINSMAN'S PHONE MIAMI, FLORIDA
LANDSCAPE SERVICE
ISLE OF NORMANDY SronSekDne 15
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA Sirloin Steak Dinner frT O$1.75
6-1677 -PHONE 6-1678 L 0 U I S MINUTE STEAK $25
________________________________GRILL FrNNE 1hwBe
Complete With cocktail and Soup, 2 Vege731 LINCOLN ROAD tables, Avocado Pear Salad, Dessert and
PHONE 5-9933 Beverage
CONSCIENTIOUS BEAUTY SERVICE 12 Years on Miami Beach 10 SELECTIONS ON $1.00 DINNER
In the Southwest: in the Northeast:_____________________________THE VOGUE BEAUTY THE MARTHA LEE TRU FRUIT
SALON BEAUTY SALON "It's Refreshing"
311 W 12h Aenu 621 Bicaye BuleardMADE FRESH DAILY
311 W 12h Aenu 621 Bicaye Buleard"Florida's Finest Fresh Fruit Drink" Dial 3-1619 Dial 7-5472 TRU FRUITS PRODUCTS, Inc.
Esther Taylor Kunkler 207 N. E. 39th Street Phone 2-9417




52 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
PHONE 5-3355 Visit Florida's Most Beautiful
COMPLIMENTS OF DINING ROOM
ICC1 I 9fU rnZI W Arrange to meet your friends here ... The
food is delicious, and the tariff is always modest. A la carte service at all times. RUSSELL A. NICELY 1236 WASHINGTON AVE
Resident Manager MIAMI BEACH Nightly music and entertainment-no couvert
or minimum at any time.
BEST SERVICE MODERATE PRICES
THERESA'S BEAUTY SALON00
FREE: with this ad, one shampoo with anly paid item.
SPECIAL: $2 off on any PERMANENT WAVE-Hours Daily 9:00 to 6:00
P. M. -Open till 9 P. M. Tuesdays-Fridays
Halcyon Arcade, 145 East Flagler Street, 2nd Floor, Room 252 Phone 2-9819
3651 S. W. EIGHTH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA
LARISON FRUIT SHOP
PANCOAST HOTEL
FANCY GIFT BOXES-INDIAN RIVER FRUIT
Flowers for any occasion Phone 5-1151 Miami Beach 3
HOUR
LAUNDRY
EDWARD'S LAUNDRY DRY CLEANING
Complete in 3 Hours
LUBRICATING CO. Phone 2-7738
PHONE 3-1661 1101 N. E. 1st Ave. MIAMI, FLA 433 N. E. 1st Avenue
MIAMI, FLA.
Gasoline, Oil, Lubrication, Wash, Polish,
Batteries, Tires and Accessories
M. & M. Dredging & Construction Co.
Engineering Contractors
''QUALITY IN EVERY DETAIL'' POSTAL BUILDING
LA FRAN CE CLEANERS MIAMI, FLORIDA
PHONES 2-1034-5-1733 MIAMI, FLORIDA Dredging-Seawalls-Hydraulic Fills-Bridges
Garment Dyeing a Specialty-Also Cleaning of Rugs,
Drapes and Upholstered Furniture
QUALITY DRY CLEANING AND LAUNDRY SERVICE AT LOWEST PRICES
REUBEN'S RESTAURANT FRENCH BENZOL CLEANERS AND LAUNDRY
of New York Laundry Plant: 99 S. W. 7th St. Dry Cleaning Plant: 1420 S. W. 8th St.
23rd Street Near Collins Avenue 25 Branch Stores for Your Convenience
M I A M I B E A C H Phone 2-5901 for Your Nearest Store
MR. FOSTER'S STORE
HOLLEMAN'S RESTAURANT (Air Conditioned)
Patrons of HOLLEMAN'S RESTAURANT on Miami Beach OFFICE SUPPLIES STATIONERY
will be pleased to greet again the jovial proprietors, Mr. and OFFICE FURNITURE ENGRAVING
Mrs. Holleman, whose popular rendezvous remains popular GREETING CARDS
always. The place itself is attractive and intimate . a big 33 N. E. 1st Avenue Miami Dial 3-7694
feature is the attractive patio where guests may lunch or dine enjoying the ocean breezes . it is justly famous for the menu offers a variety of quality food at moderate prices.
* Always a Good Show atBATHERS WELCOME
0 THE TOWERS
HOLLEMAN'S RESTAURANT 1508 S. W. 8th Street Miami, Fla.
WASHINGTON AT 14th MIAMI BEACH




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 53
MIAMI BEACH HOTEL ASSOCIATION
By ALFRED STONE, Past President. The Miami Beach Hotel Assocation, organized at a meeting held at the Hotel Alamo, Miami Beach, on November 10, 1936, with an attendance of some fifty Miami Beach Hotel owners, has since grown into a powerful governing body of closely-knit hotel managers and HO AR OH SO Sdirectors.
Under the guiding hand of community and civic leaders associated with the hotel business, the organization has become a driving wedge, safeguardiing every principle on which this $100,000,000 busICE CREAM SHOPPES iness has been founded. The first president, J. S. Saeger, and his
original seven directors, N. Bernkoph, John Duff, Irving Evans, Al Jacobs, Harry Sirkin, Alfred Stone, and Bruno Weil, have been materially added to and strengthened from time to time. It is in* teresting to note that, of the eight original directors, six are still
holding office.
One of the many forms of legislation, conceived and executed by the association, was the fight originated against the payment of 1100 Biscayne Boulevard 1631 West Flagler Street "Turkey money" to taxicab drivers. This form of maliciaus diverting
of guests from hotels of their own choice had become a major problem and in November 1937 an ordinance was passed in Miami and Miami Beach prohibiting the soliciting and diverting by taxicab drivDedicated to Cordial Located in the Center
Hospitality of all Activities ers of guests from their chosen hotel. In this connection, the Miami
THE FRIENDLY Beach Hotel Association has been able to secure the co-operation of
CAVALIER HOTEL the Florida State Hotel Association in submitting a bill destined to
SUPERBLY LOCATED ON THE OCEAN FRONT eliminate distribution of circulars on highways. Other worthy bills,
On the Ocean Between 13th and 14th Sts. submitted by the Hotel Association, include the "Blue Sky" law
All Rooms with Bath, New, Ultra Modern, which combats the unauthorized solicitation of funds for various
Shower and Phone Individual Solariums questionable projects.
Plans are now under way for the construction of a convention hall and the plans have been presented to the Miami Beach City Council through William T. Law, its capable and energetic secretary.
The Miami Beach Hotel Association, representing, as it does, O othe largest business in Greater Miami, is now prepared to welcome the greatest influx of visitors in the history of this world's resort. Oil Paintings -Color Portraits The roster of present officers and directors includes, in addition
to the active secretary, Wm. T. Law, Fred Rossner, Pres., John Duff, "Catering to a Fastidious Clientele" Harry Sirkin, Edwin Mead, V-presidents, Norman Pancoast, Chairman
Columbus Hotel-320 N. E. First St. of the Board, Directors Jack Beber, Abraham Halperin, Stuart Moore,
124 Archie Greenberg, E. L. O'Leary, Irving Evans, Mrs. Jennie GrossaW 144 &-a singer, J. Sugarman, Saul Resnick, and Neal Kars; Alfred Stone is
Phones 3-4613-3-4614 Miami, Florida Treasurer and Arthur Adler is honorary secretary.
'Garner's Luncheonette & Sundry Shop Phone 2-4613 HAIR STYLING By HOME COOKING
Special Club Breakfast-Luncheon-and lrymmn i 'Wrauty 45,ihp Full Course Dinner Reasonably Priced
For Smart Appearance Experts in Styling 1443 COLLINS AVENUE PHONE 5-9325
For Discriminating Ladies
M. HEYSER 68 N. E. 2nd STREET
$ Alyce Mayne Distinctive Jewelry
I importer Had Baws Hosiery i
I 629 Lincoln Road Accessories
CROMER WHOLESALE CORP. g Miami Beach g
Agency
* I for !
Hotel and Apartment House ./ede2e4 i
of Paris, Inc. .
Furnishings Fifth Avenue New York
C.... .C.CCC C.CC CC C OC
HOFFMAN'S CAFETERIA
12-14 N. E. THIRD STREET
MIAMI, FLORIDA Mr. Samuel Ritter and Mr. Julius Hader operated the
PHONE 25559 largest cafe in Brooklyn, N. Y., for seventeen years. They
also had ballrooms for catering and service restaurant. They
- sold the cafe and property for $350,000 along with their
homes. Then they and their families settled here. While they were looking for a hotel to buy, which was their intention INFANTS AND CHILDREN'S APPAREL upon coming here, they decided what this town needed was
BLANCHE CORSET SHOP a good restaurant, and thus the opening ofEXPERT CORSETIER
Corsets - - Lingerie HOFFMAN'S CAFETERIA
28 N. MIAMI AVENUE MIAMI, FLORIDA




54 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
The Contribution of the Dade County Federation of
Women's Clubs to the Civic and Cultural
Life of Dade County G r e e t i n g s
By Mrs. Sidney L. Weintraub, President
Our Friends of the Dade County and Miami Schools ~MACHINE-LESS WAVES '~HERBEX METHOD
* REALISTIC PERMANENTS HAIR AND SCALP FOR
* RAIN WATER ECLUSIVELY BOTH WOMEN AND MEN
LOUEY VENN of LONDON FACIALS
-Expert Hair Stylist20 N. E. 3rd AVENUE PHONE 2-5796
TheriqueComplete Beauty Service
Permanent
Waving
Our Phone 7-3223
Specialty
ROCKMOOR BEAUTY SALON
5857 N. E. Second Avenue, Miami, Fla.
I. F. RUSSELL, Owner
Clarice Enders Margaret Sensiba
#6 Culturist Beautician
Claire Weintraub
The Dade County Federation of Women's Clubs has always been an i,,Aff E fT
integral part of the life of our communities, of our state and nation. Its membership includes, to date, fifty-six women's organizations. The object of the Dade County Federation of Women's Clubs is to bring into closer cooper- OPTICAL SERVICE
ation the various women's clubs of Dade County, to the end that they may become mutually helpful and through united effort become a factor in all humanitarian, educational, social and civic work. The Dade County Federation Optometrists Opticians
is non-political and non-sectatrian. SEy
The most outstanding project in the County Federation is its scholarship Scientific Examinations of the Eyes
work. There are two scholarship funds, the general revolving fund and the Accurate Lenses Stylish Mountings
Memorial Fund. The Memorial scholarship is awarded to a student of high- Any Lens Duplicated Expert Adjustments
,est attainment in honor of the memory of a past president of the Dade County Federation, Vera M. Simmons. Seventeen scholarships have been 103 N. E. 1st Avenue Phone 3-3434
awarded this year. Young men as well as young women are eligible for these scholarships which are made possible through the excellent contributions of the individual clubs in the County Federation and through the funds raised by the "Annual Fiesta of Stars" held in the Royal Palm Club. Through the courtesy of Mr. Arthur Childers the Royal Palm Club contributes
its complete show for the afternoon's entertainment. The entire proceeds M cARTHUR
are used for scholarships.
The Health program of the Dade County Federation is extensive. This or- JERSEY FAR DAIRY, Inc.
ganization was instrumental in establishing a county health unit. Resolutions were adopted providing for petitioning the City of Miami to add two white and two colored nurses to the City Health Department and petitioning the Producer and Distributor of
city and county commissions to cooperate in establishing a tuberculosis sanitorium. A resolution was also adopted to promote a uniform health card for domestics and provide a place where these health cards may be obtained. P U R E J E R S E Y M I L K
.A telephone brigade will be appointed to contact every housewife by telephone urging her cooperation in seeing that her servant has a health card. Resolutions were also adopted endorsing the principles of the pre-natal and pre- 169 Northeast 62nd Street
marital laws and the law requiring the use of silver nitrate in newborn infants' eyes. Phone 7-1017 Miami, Florida
The library department of the County Federation this last year has contributed fifty works to the library of the University of Miami.
The Dade County Federation of Women's Clubs has always taken an active part in the welfare of the colored race and of the Indians of our
-county. A special Inter-racial Committee has been appointed and problems PRINTING ENGRAVING MULTIGRAPHING
:pertaining to the negro have been discussed and active work done in the MIMEOGRAPHING LETTER SERVICE
colored communities. As to the welfare of the Indians, effort has been made R H O D ES PR ESS
to know the Indian better, to become better acquainted with the conditions f0me r ES
and problems of the Seminole. formerly
The scope of the work of the Dade County Federation of Women's Clubs MIAMI OFFICE SERVICE
is wide and varied. The members of the Dade County Federation are united EDW. H. RHODES, Mgr.
in effort and purpose and because they are united, they constitute a tremendous Telephone 2-7164
civic force. The urgency of living and working for our great nation, our state 155 North East Second Street Miami, Florida
and our community inspires us onward on our march of achievement.




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 55
FISH AND THE FLEET SIGHTSEEING
THAT GETS 'EM
By JANE EGRERT
Each year the number of angler enthusiasts in Florida increases. Old and young, rich and poor, alike, answer the lure to display their Waltonian skill.
Miami Beach has become the mecca for game fishermen. It is ideally located near that "fisherman's paradise" the Gulf Stream. That great ocean river flows from the Florida Straits to within 3 miles of the Miami Beach shore.
,"LAKE PANCOAST"
Many record catches have been weighed in by these
_ _Miami Beach captains. Each year many classes in the Metropolitan Miami Fishing Tournament are won by fishermen who have been guided by members of this nationally "HAZEL MACK" famous group of skippers.
A MODERN CHARTER BOAT
Over 600 varieties of the finny tribe are found in Gulf \V\.4 '
Stream waters. :
This great attraction sends fishing fleets sailing out of Government cut each day bound for marine game.
There are several groups of fishing craft in Miami Peach waters. But at the east end of the County causeway is docked one of the finest fleets in the world. Modern craft, many equipped with ship-to-shore radio telephones, T
can be chartered with excellent guides-captains who are experienced and noted for their skill in luring "the big ones."
The most sought after salt water game fish are marlin, sailfish, blue marlin, tuna, kingfish, barracuda, and species of the shark family as well as the smaller dolphin .E P and wahoo. .
"NEW RIVER"
N ikko ............. R oney Plaza Y acht B asin
Captain George Stevns-----------------------"New River"
a C. of C. Dock
Captain 0. H. Curtis --------------- Bay Queen"
Captain Earl Crosby ---------------------"Lake Pancoast"
____: ..Roney Plaza Yacht Basin
"BEACHCOMBER"
A TYPICAL GULF STREAM FISHING CRAFT AL-fU fUCATOROF
CREATOR OF
CAPTAINS: rtistic Lifelike Taxidermy
Who know where to catch the big ones.
CHAMEBER OF COMMERCE DOCK
Dockmaster, Captain Herbert Carey.
C ap tain R ay S av ary -------- ..............--- - - P an acea
Captain W. W. Howd --------------------------- Dawn
Captain 0. L. Schubert .-------- Serenade
Captain Art Wills ------------------------ Sea Queen
C a p ta in C H M a c k ...... ...... ...-- - - H a z e l M a c k
Captain Harold (Crunch) Schmidt, Neptune Captain George Fizell------Beachcomber
Captain Larry Bagby --------Three Rings Est.
Captain Lloyd McNeil ------------------------ Miamian 1918
GULF DOCK
Docmaster, Captain 0. H. Curtis.
Captain 0. H. Curtis -------------.......Bay Queen Individual Mountings Portraying Life and Action
Captain Hinson --- ...------------------ Speed Boat SCHMIDT TAXIDERMY STUDIO
Captain Jim Albright ------------------- Jambar
Curtis Enterprizes ------------------------ Sea King 533 WEST AVE. Phone 5-6378 MIAMI BEACH




56 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
The Value of the Church to the Community
DODGE PLYMOUTH
By JAMES V. JOHNSON, Westminster Presbyterian Church
How many people stop to consider the value of the Church to the PHONE 4-7641
Community? For the Church is not an obtrusive feature of our Civic Life. It goes quietly about its business; there is no blare and garishness about it or its program. It does not bedazzle the eye at night with T T N M T R
colored Neon Signs, nor does it scream at you when you pass. T T N MT R
In Miami its buildings are for the most part of modest architec-Saean Srvc
ture, and its leadership is men and women of modesty, sincerity andSae an Srvc
earnestness. As we consider the place of the Church in the Community, two questions at once assail us: First. What is the program of 216 MINOR CA AVE. CORAL GABLES
the Church, and Second-Suppose there were no churches in Miami at all?
First then, What is the program of the Church? If the Bible is EA.. true, men and women stand vastly in need of knowing God, and about EA .. God, and getting in step with His plans for His world. The Bible is TOM'S TOASTED PEANUTS
true, therefore this necessity exists. The Church will introduce you to God; it will tell you about God, and of His plans for the redemption Clark R. Parker, Dist.
of men and women who have broken His commandments, and who 1214 S. W. 2nd Street Phone 2-5497
live lives of sinfulness. The Church will teach you how to live in peace with your fellow men; it encourages honesty and industry in social, business and domestic relationships. It will show you how to live and how to die, how to overcome sin, and how to face temptation without falling a victim to it. It makes better and law-abiding citizens If It'sof those of us who attend it, and it prepares a man to meet his God.
Second: Suppose the Churches were bodily lifted out of Miami, and taken completely away? The Churches are the greatest force we know for righteousness in the land. We do not look to our secular Boards and Commissions to lead us in moral things. Some think they are not qualified so to do anyway: the Church alone offers that'9"EM L N9IM Z-Li
leadership. Were it withdrawn, there would be no moral leadership in the community. The Churc 'hes are an ally of the Police, in that they are a verile restraint upon lawlessness and crime. Take the Church -It's Delicious
away, and there would be no organized force working for the inclucation of law abiding principles in the city. The schools are handicapped etr n e okC t fB e
in teaching morality. Morality is a by-product of our school system,Wetr an N wYokC sofB f
whereas it is the prime function of the Church to teach it. Without Domestic and Imported Groceries
the Church, the morals of the community would be at a low ebb, ineed.
________________________________________________- 411 41st Street ..Miami Beach ... 325 71st Street
The Witter Construction Co. MANDELL AND CO.
RUGS
AND
MIAMI BEACH M IA MI CARPETS
Washington Avenue 1745 S. W. 6th Street WHOLESALE RETAIL
Phone 5-7469 Phone 2-1755 MADE TO ORDER
DOMESTICS
MISS TODD'S SCHOOL COMPLETE SELECTION OF PATTERNS
AND PLAIN COLORS
Distinctive for its High Scholastic Standards, Cultural 12 E N Y V N AA E U
Home Environment, and Careful Health Superviison . . 12 E N Y V NA A E U
Where the high scholastic siandards and careful MIAMI BEACH
supervision of health and moral habits have attracted ________________children from France-Switzerland--Cuba-anama
-as wel1 as from all parts of the U. S. DIAL 5-7189A\tJ oi
47 Alhambra Circle GORAL GABLES Phone 4-0718q& 41" ":)"pREOTFSIN
SLACKS-PLAY SUITS --ext Door to Beach Theatre
_____________________________________________________________Telephone 5-0871 612 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach 434 Lincoln Road Miami Beach
PHONE 2-5843 DELIVERY SERVICE _______________________________________________MODERN CLEANERS, INC. SALES SERVICE RENTALS SUPPLIES
Dry Cleaning and Laundry CHAS. S. MYERS
BRANCHES: TY P EW RI T ERS
MAIN OFFICE 7811 BISCAYNE BLVD. Exclusive Representative ROYAL STANDARD Typewriters
47 Alhambra Circle CORAL GABLES Phone 4-0718 120 N. E. FIRST ST. C. S. MEYERS, Mgr. Phone 3-3159




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 57
Atlanta and Bostwick, Georgia. Mrs. Butler has done various Fashion Academy work, has been head designer in one of the leading French Shops and also has had her own Salon in Georgia. ... ..... ...hForseeing the difficulty that the war would cause in the importation of materials from abroad, these partners laid in a beautiful .... .stock of English tweeds and woolens-French crepes and rare laces, ............. so that, in this shop, you will have no difficulty in finding just the
...... fabric you desire.
Turzels, by the way, is the only completely custom made gown shop in Greater Miami. All the models are created for the particular individual. It is a place where the combination of color-style--and wearability of fine fabrics is a true Art-conscientiously practiced.
These two energetic creators predict that Miami will shortly be recognized as the advance style center of the world, and we, in turn, predict that Turzels will take the foremost place in the creating of these styles.
MONROE TOWERS DINING ROOM Morris Brothers Department Store
February 1, 1941 was the fifth birthday of Morris Brothers. Dine in Luxurious Surroundings Unexcelled Cuisine
Those who have followed its growth will recall kaleidoscopic changes DINNERS FROM $1 UP
-a modern five and ten cent store grow into a beautiful drug and merchandising store and finally evolve into a modern streamlined com- COLLINS AVENUE at 30th STREET
plete department store, carrying the last word in style to supply the DIAL 5-7351 FOR RESERVATIONS
demands of this great vacation land.
Morris Brothers has been operating successfully from its inception, because it kept pace with the rapid growth of Miami Beach and with the exacting demands of the Miami Beach public.
It has operated on the principle that it must not only serve the COOK'S
public with its needs but must also be an integral part of the life FIFTH STREET and OCEAN DRIVE
and growth of the community and share in its social and welfare MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
problems. It is an all year round institution, right in the heart of Miami Bathing Sun Baths Private Beach Restaurant Beach, near the City Hall and Main Post Office.
To make this institution and shopping center complete, its owners Rubber Caps and Toys Sports Wear Beach Chairs and Umbrellas have themselves developed the neighboring property. On the same JANTZEN HEADQUARTERS
block, they built one of the most beautiful theatres in the South, the Cinema Casino, which exhibits the latest and finest pictures. Also on this block is the famous STRAND PRIME RIB restaurant. One of the most progressive shoe chains in the South, Butler Shoes, have just completed their salon in this mid-town shopping center.
On this same block is a smart dress shop, a millinery shop and men's shoe store. There are plans for completeing this block this coming year with one of the finest chain stores in the country.
With this development, Morris Brothers, the largest department store on Miami Beach, will be part of the most complete shopping center of this city where every possible need of the shopper can be satisfied.
Morris Brothers looks ahead with faith in this wonderful city, resolved to serve and grow with it.
La Favorite Barber Shop
Mr. Karl Dodtenhoff, one of the two genial owners of La Favorite Barber Shop on Alton Road near Lincoln, has indeed seen the miraculous growth of Miami Beach.
Having been a resident of Miami for 27 years Mr. Dodtenhoff can remember "way back" when there were very few houses in Miami Beach, and when even Lincoln Road was yet but Carl Fisher's dream.
Twelve years ago Mr. Dodtenhoff started in business in Miami Beach with Mr. Harry Eckhardt, a graduate barber, with several diplomas to his credit. With their latest type of hair growing ma- S U P E R I 0 R I T Y
chines and real scientific barber serve their shop "La Favorite" as it is The Pancoast combined all the facknown, became a real rendezvous for Beach peronalities. Carl Fisher, tors-private beach, cabanas, veranknown became ad aealbe h dahs, gardens, tennis courts-a traUncle Ed Thomas, Mr. Winton and George Ade have all been thedtional superiority of cuisine and clients, and likewise the friends of "Karl and Harry." service a congenial clientelE
everything to make it the one entireTURZEL'S ly correct place for YOUR Miami
DTDOW might well be added to the name of Turzel, for these Beach vacation.
two young partners have designed several gowns for the Duchess of WR iTE for etail.
booklet, giving full details.
Windsor.
It is interesting to note how Miss Turley and Mrs. Butler work. First an intensive study is made of the clients' personality, her
measurements are carefully taken and, in most instances, several Arthur Pancoast O' OP E N A LL Y E A
photographs are made. With this knowledge, they are able to elim- President American Plan in Winter
inate these tiresome fittings. Manager
These partners work as one, in complete harmony and that, *New illustrated booklet with scenes of the
perhaps, is the secret of their harmonious designs. Miss Turley, a Pancoast and Miami Beach will be sent on
graduate of the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts, where she showed request.
.exceptional ability, came here from Chicago. Mrs. Butler from




38 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
The Hollywood-British School of the Theatre to remember that most of his audience are not trained musicians but
The Hollywood-British School of the Theatre is the first and only school of just people of ordinary experience. He tries to awaken an interest in
its kind in the United States. It was founded by Lady Louis Mountbatten, the his subject without going too deeply into the science of music. He Duchess of Hamilton, and Carmen Balfour, which name disguises the identiy of makes the lives of the composers real and human-and the music Margaret Gibbons MacGill, who is the wife of the famous Irish poet, novelist something that has interest for everyone-something vital and real,
and dramatist, who was also at one time in the Chapter Library, Windsor Castle. not something obtainable by those of special training alone.
In Great Britain, France, Spain, Russia, India, and even in far-off Iceland the
name of Patrick MacGill is revered as one of the greatest sociological novelists A HAROLD R. DAVIS
of all time. His name is included in the list compiled by Webster's Dictionary Harold R. Davis, head of the Davis-Merrill Publishing Co., and
of the 3,000 greatest living men. Mrs. MacGill is also herself a novelist with President of Harold R. Davis and Associates, Realtors, Inc., is president seventeen novels to her credit. They are of the popular variety and include such of the Miami Beach Board of Realtors, having recently been elected titles as "Hollywood Madness", "Painted Butterflies", "The Ukekele Girl," "Hid- to serve a second term, an unusual proceeding as the board usually den Fires", etc. All have been made into motion pictures. The MacGills have elects a president for one year only. Mr. Davis, came to Miami Beach have been made into motion pictures. The MacGills have three children of from Tennessee several years ago, and has been active in the real
whom two are twin girls. estate business. His firm publishes the Florida and West Indies Year
The Hollywood-British School of the Theatre was founded for the benefit Book of Hotels, a publication whose illustrations have won wide of the many young screen aspirants from England who come all the year round acclaim. During the first World War, Mr. Davis was an aviator in seeking work in the motion picture industry. They are always, unaware of the the forces of the United States, having been commissioned a lieumany pitfalls that lie in wait for the stranger to Hollywood who is also a for- tenant. eigner, and invariably are made the prey of the many unscruplous "sharks" and bogus schools that abound in th film capital. Eventually they are sent home DATES TO BE REMEMBERED
by the Immigration authorities as "undesirable aliens" when they become charge- February 13-15, 1941-American Camping Association to meet in Washington, able to the public. It was when she was in the office of the British Consul in D. C. Write to Ross L. Allen, 330 South State St., Ann Arbor, Michigan. Los Angeles that Mrs. MacGill conceived the idea of opening a school where February 22-27, 1941-American Association of School Administrators to meet
the young aspirants could not only be trained for a reasonable, fixed sum, but in Atlantic City. where an effort would be made to interest those whose work consists of scouting February 27-March 1, 1941-Meeting of the Ameritan Association of junior for and booking talent. Mrs. MacGill was well qualified for such an undertaking. Colleges, to be held in Chicago. Write to 730 Jackson Place, Washington, D. C. Her education had included the full Course of the famous Royal Academy of April 30-May 3, 1941-NEA Department of Health, Physical Education, and
Dramatic Art in London from which she graduated with honours that enabled her o bcom a ramticrecterandlectrerallove th wold.In oumnia Recreation to meet in Atlantic City. Write to the Department at 1201 Sixteenth herto ecme damaicrecteran letuer llove th wrld I RomIa Street, Northwest, Washington, D. C. she was the favorite reader of the late Queen Marie, in Sweden the Crown Prince bought out a whole lecture tour so that his children could be taught to June 29-July 3, 1941-National Education Association to meet in Boston.
speak English in exactly the same way as Mrs. MacGill speaks it. The Holly- July 8-12, 1941-Meeting of the Association for Childhood Education in
wood-British School of the Theatre, which was opened on June 1st, 1937, has Oakland, California. Address the ACE at 1201 Sixteenth Street Northwest, made an overwhelming success. Naturally, a British school, run by an English Washington, D. C. novelist, with such an object and such famous sponsors, could not fail to attract a great deal of attention in Hollywood, especially when the intention was declared BIGGER AND BETTER THAN EVER!
to teach diction by means of the Bible. However, after the first show, major "The Original"
companies like Warner Bros. and Twentieth Century Fox were asking to be kept FA..N A N D B IL L 'S
informed of their activities that they might be sure to have the performances F M U L N TA O S
covered. Some outstanding students have been Victor Maurice, who went F M U L N TA O S
straight from the School theatre to the stage of the Los Angeles Biltmore, where Something New
he played the lead in "Sejanus", and adaptation of a Ben Jonson play. Return- Now Serving BREAKFAST
ing thence to London, he writes later to say that as a result of his American LUNCHEON DINNER SUPPER
stage success, he has not been out of work for a single week in a year. Clyde Collins Ave. at 21st St. Miami Beach
Willson, the child actor who has played with Mickey Rooney, Carole Lombard, _____________________________________and many other famous stars, and who has been in eight pictures this year, is proof that school specializes in developing clever children. Within three years, F RBED EBR I C KI S M A1 .R K ET'
the school has moved from the downtown theatre, which housed its early efforts, to a beautifully appointed theatre of its own, in the best part of exclusive Beverly GROCERIES MEATS VEGETABLES
Boulevard. As well as the finest training ground for an approach to stage, motion SrigteFs-rwn otws eto
pictures or radio, the school is regarded as akin to a select finishing school for SrigteFs-rwn otws eto
those whose future activities will require beauty of speech, poise, and absolute 680 N. W. 62nd Street Phone 7-2377
control.
Perhaps the greatest compliment that the school has yet received has come T H E E L Y AG EN C Y
from Mr. George A. Hirliman, who, as a motion picture producer in Florida wishing to develop local talent for his pictures, has engaged the school to open Fire Genera LiabilityNC
branch on his studio lot, so that, as the talent, by reason of training, becomes Windstorm Plate Glass
Automobile Bonds of All Kinds
available for use, it may be called to his attention. Burglary AcdnadHelhWorkmen's Compensation
"I am only too glad to add my name to the list of sponsors of the Holly- Accid3%Svigsfr oen awndr Healt H..Hzr nuac
wood-British School, and it is my sincere hope that you may be able to develop 127 Giralda Avenue Phone 4-6915 coral Gables, Florid
me some talent which will eventually attain stardom" were the words which accompanied Mr. Hirliman's ready consent to act as one of the school's sponsors.
This unique school is now located at 137 Coral Way, in Coral Gables, Fla.-M H NE
The Colonnade Building. RING, M H N Yand ARNER
DR. EDWARD CLARKE (ACCOUNTANTS)
Dr. Edward Clarke began his talks for musicians at the American duPont Bldg. Phone 3-5523
Conservatory in Chicago where he was a member of the vocal faculty. These popular lectures attracted so much attention that he was in demand for various schools, colleges and clubs and finally was engaged by the University of Chicago Extension division to give a series on M R" E TL A
various courses in the city of Chicago. These continued for several years until extended concert tours took him abroad to foreign lands. 47 W. Flagler St. MIAMI, FLORIDA Phone 3-4981
Several years ago Dr. Clarke settled in Miami and joined the fac- -ainllderieBad
ulty of the music school of the University of Miami. Again he began I I Aof
his talks for the musicians and now his course at the Miami Woman'sLU GEL AT RGO D
Club is in its fifth year and each season draws more and more music for every Fitted Cases Wallets
lvr.mode of TRAVEL Wardrobe Trunks
His success as a popular lecturer is due to the fact that he tries Lugg-o i rMtrTae




THE FLORIDA TEA C H E R 5 59
He was a bad stammerer and in her effort to help him, Mrs. Harned, a graduate of Emerson College, began studying at Columbia. Then followed Germany, Denmark, London, back to America and to Syracuse University, and then to New York for study in psychology and psychiatry. She also has worked in the speech clinic of the Massachusetts General Hospital with Samuel D. Robbins, the founder of the American Spgech Correction Association. Ever on the alert for new and interesting discoveries in her field of work, Mrs. Harned should go far in her profession down here.
She pays Miami's climate a high tribute-"nearlv as perfect as the Riviera", and thinks it ideal for the European type of school.
MANNHEIMER PRIVATE OUTDOOR SCHOOL
Beautiful and extensive facilities for outdoor and indoor instruction ...Kindergarten through high school grades.
Experienced teachers ...small classes .individual attention.
1054 Pennsylvania Avenue Phone 5-1312 Miami Beach, Fla.
FLORIDA TRANSPORTATION CO., INC.
FIFTH STREET at BISCAYNE BOULEVARD Sightseeing MIAMI, FLORIDA Phone 2-5372
And Charter Buses (At the Aquarium)
ESTHER HARNED
One of the most interesting and instructive mornings I have had in a long
while, was when I interviewed Mrs. Esther Harnied, a fairly newcomer to our E E G A E IXC JSl I
midst, in her home in Coral Gables. Mrs. Harned does speech correction work E E G A E X U S O
and told me of the work being done in other countries. CmiainRvradByTi oMs seIda ilg
In Germany, the correction of speech has been a science for 60 years, in "YACHT SEMINOLE QUEEN" (Under U. S. Steamship Inspection)
Denmark for 42, in Italy about 30, and in the United States-only since 1919. if your stay is of short duration, this is the only and logical way to
Stamerig, rs. arnd sys, s cuse byenvionmnt;is a seiou as study and see this wonderful, gay, and captivating city. You have no Stamerig, rs. arnd sys, s cuse byenvionmnt;is a seiou as conception of the beauty and marvelous scenery until you have made a being crippled, and should be treated as such. The emotions and the mentality are circuit of the Magic City aboard the "Seminole Queen" via the Miami Rivers, Canals and Inland Waterways. You can gain a comprehensive both involved, causing inferiority complexes, and-in the case of adolescent boys- idea of this great trip only by utilizing the "Seminole Scenic Route,"
chilren houd beremved romwhich will enable you to visualize clearly the attractions of Miami and often will lead to suicide. To treat it properly, cideshudbrmodfomits environments. Three-hour Boat Trip, Departs 2 p.m. Round Trip $1.00 their homes and schools, and placed in a special school where their speech defectsLevsPr6,CtYahBsi can be concentrated on.
In Denmark, for instance, the Government corrects every speech defect, and has two schools-one in Copenhagen and one in Aarhus. Dr. Svend Smith, in the Copenhagen school, has evolved his own method which he claims brings ____100 percent results in two months time. He takes adolescent boys from thirteen I to twenty years of age in groups of ten. For the first two weeks a boy is not allowed to speak; the second two weeks he works on breathing and exercises; at the end of the month he is allowed to read aloud, and Dr. Smith claims he never falters. He keeps the children in his school for two months and being a psychologist (as are all good speech correction teachers) he shows them the cause behind the stammering and teaches the normal reactions to the things which had previously annoyed them. He adjusts them mentally as well as physically.
Mrs. Harned spent several weeks in the state schools studying the technique and methods carefully and watching the amazing progress of the children. Those who have "graduated" keep in constant communication with the factors and none have "gone back".
In Germany during the last war, Dr. Calzia, working under the government, corrected the speech defects of the soldiers, using a method so advanced (that of applying electric current) that we here today don't even know its details. Dr. Calzia found that war caused the soldiers' stammering, and that even after correction and when the men were home on furlough, the arrival of the pink slip ordering them back to active service, would cause a relapse. However, in the schools and private classes, stammering can be brought to a state of permanent latency. The patient can be taught how to help himself, so that, should he be i e m n Pd k H 5 l l
under any severe emotional strain which causes a tendency to a relapse, he can I~ v r o t I~ r l s id
bring himself back to normalcy. AND SANITARIUM
In Italy, at Milan, the Municipal School had over 500 children for speech
correction. In England, there are many schools for training, best known perhaps, 1389 N. W. 7th Street Miami, Florida Phone 3-7301
being the Training School for Teachers at the West End Hospital. At the Institute held there, Mrs. Harried and a teacher from New York were the only A new hospital became a reality in Miami because of Nazi brutality. Dr.
Samuel Beer was the victim and fled his beloved Vienna, where he was once Americans. Twenty-seven different countries were represented and all got along chief of staff of one of the largest hospitals, and became a political refugee.
Dr. Beer arrived in New York and lost no time in returning to his unfinished as one happy family. task of aiding humanity and his life's work of using his great store of medical
In New York, Columbia University and the New School of Social Research knowledge and famous skill in the pursuance of his practice. He and Dr. 1. S.
Klieger, a well known physician of New York City, decided to establish a sanahave lately acquired many of the famous German Professors-refugees now, tarium for the treatment and cure of chronic ailments. A careful study was
In Hmbug, ermny, he eadof he honeica Deartent whois talan) made for a site which would meet the requirements as nearly perfect as possible. In Hmbug, ermnytheheadof he honticl Dpartent(wh isItaan) This section possessed most of the advantages for which they sought and thus bemoans the fact that so many of his colleagues have gone, leaving him only his Miami became the home of another fine medical institution. own trained students for helpers. We Americans, have gained the services of Rivermont Park Hospital and Sanatorium took its place among the other
many of these great men, and can look forward to a steady advancement along health-restoring resorts in this land of longevity The sanatarium was opened in 1941 on the banks of the Miami River at 1389 N. W. '7th Street, Miami. It is the lines of speech correction. only five minutes to the heart of the city and yet, due to its setting in the midst
I asked Mrs. Harried what started her in this work. It was her youngest of six acres of flowers, shrubbery, and trees, it is far enough from noise and disturbances to make it as restful and quiet as the open country. Here under child (she has four children-one in the University, two in High School, and one the skillful care and proper guidance Dr. Beer and his capable assistants many seekers of health will be restored to a normal life in this beautiful hospital and in Elementary-all of whom have accompanied her on her journeys abroad) I sanatarium in Florida's incimparable sunshine and climate.




60 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
Edison Courts
Miami may well be proud of its new local housing proj ect- 22 Years of Satisfactory Service
Edison Court-and its own local architects, Harold D. Steward and0BETRMaisOl Associates, who designed this project. Under the direction of Harold LBT CTER N NRA Miami'st OnlyG D. S 'teward, chief architect, Edison Courts developed into a widely WREComleeKERiii recognized model housing project of modern construction and beauty. SEWRECER" COMPLETE Garage
Situated on a site slightly under 25 acres, Edison Courts has a BEST BRAE 2 HRService, Wrecker Service
total number of 89 buildings, comprising 345 apartments ranging from S ES R K E anywhere-anytime
two and a half to 5 and a half rooms each. The units are one andSEVC two story structures and combinations thereof,-and vary in size from 0 EVERY REPAIR Wheel Alignment
two apartments to nine apartments each. FOR EVERY CAR Specialists
The Administration Building was planned for general public 0 STORAGE
use and enjoyment. Beside housing the offices of the Miami Housing 53 N. E. 8th St. MIAMI 3-5568
Authority, it has an auditorium, nursery, kitchen repair shop, toiletsand store room.
The most modern features known to hurricane proof construction
were incorporated in Mr. Steward's design of this Edison Court hous- NATURAL HEALTH FOOD STORE
project. These features include concrete block stucco walls, gyp- 119 SOUTH MIAMI AVENUE
sum roof on steel trusses, tile roofs, steel casement windows and metal MAI LRD
pipe porch posts. For permanent interiors floors are of suspended con- Free Health Lectures Every Wednesday-8:00 P. M.
crete slab design, covered by asphalt tile,-with concrete block interior PHONE 3-7249 MAE OWENS
partitions, gypsum plaster walls with Keene cement plaster in baths ________________________________and kitchens and gypsum lath on ceilings throughout. Among the features of convenience are solar hot water heaters, electric ranges and BRIDGE
refrigerators. Paved streets line the houses with concrete sidewalks Lcue esn uevsdPa
attefotand rear. Parking areas are provided for the tenants cars, L Ctures u-esn -y Servise Play
and play areas provide many happy hours for the children.
This group of housing units designed by Mr. Steward standing 127 N. E. First Avenue Telephone 2-7545
white and gleaming in the Miami sun, is a credit to the metropolitan area and has evoked the admiration of local residents and visitors alike. I. D. PADORR PHONE 3-5822
TE"Serving Better Food" hltn H T E V C
TEMAXWELL HOUSE DINING ROOM COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS
I invites the Teachers to meet their Dade County friends SHI-TONE PHOTO PRINTS
"Godtoof the profession for Special Dinners. IGuaranteed Photo Finishing
Goo t the Last Bite." Breakfast Luncheon Dinner
I PHONE 2-5922 2147 S. W. EIGHTH STREET 5 704-6 N. E. SECOND AVENUE MIAMI, FLORIDA
5 Your staiv in Miami is not complete unless you visitS ~THE MAXWELL HOUSE-__________ ________For Sightseeing .. Shopping.. To and From the Races You Can Always Depend On
New Royal Portable TypewritersLaest Models STANLEY DE LUXE TAXI and
B. W. THACKER Agency SIGHTSEEING TOURS
ROYAL PORTABLE DEALERS "Florida's Most Colorful Tours"
Office: Office:
Discount to Teachers 14th & Collins IAIB CHFA. 12th & Collins
123 N. E. 1st St. Miami. Fla. Phone 2-0115 Phone 5-6266 MAIBAH L. Poe561
- A FOUR-HOLR TRIP .. TWICE DAILY ... 10 A. M. and 2 P. M,
PHONE 7-9368 EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT METROPOLITAN
HELEN' S BEAUTY SHOP
DISTINCTIVE BEAUTY SERVICE cleaners
Shampoo, Set, Rinse and Neck Trim all foran
Twenty-five Cents dyers
Permanents $1.95 up 1085 N. W. 62nd STREET PHONE 7-1654
2178 N. W. 54th STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA
DIAMN ND JEWELRY
MIAMI BEACH ABSTRACT AND TITLE COMPANY INationally A vrie
ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE A vrie
Complete Title Service covering Miami Beach Properties
MIAMI BEACH FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING WATCHES
The Only Abstract Plant in Miami Beach Easy Weekly Payments
No Carrying Charge
TELEPHONE 3-4028 DELIVERY SERVICE Every Purchaser a Satisfied Customer!
KATHRYN ERB
INVISIBLE WEAVING-FINE MENDING-BURNS-TEARS
MOTH HOLES RE-WOVEN LIKE NEWDIM NJELR CO
Moderate PricesDIM N JE LR CO
718 CONGRESS BUILDING MIAMI, FLORIDA 20 WEST FLAGLER STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 61
PUDFUM[S
.... ..... ...Presenting
"SHANGRI-LA"
This glamorous perfume is the last one of the light Orientals that caime out of France before the war stopped further exportation. Due to severe financial conditions French perfumers sacrificed this particular essence which was to sell for $18.50 an ounce. We are fortunate in having a limited quantity which we can retail at $7.50 an ounce, or $1.00 per dram.
Hundreds of Other Selections
"SWEET TOBACCO BLOSSOM"
(NICOTIANA)
One of The World's Finest Floral Bouquets
Sometimes called -The Evening Star"
A glorified Replica of a Fragrant American Garden Favorite What Memories!
Blossoms in an Old-Fashioned Garden at Sundown
Coburn Country Day School From $1.00 Up
Established in 1926, the Coburn Country Day School is located LLOYD W. MOORE
right on Biscayne Bay, with an inspiring view of Miami, Allison PRUE
Island, Indian Creek and the great Atlantic. Here the children have COLUMBUS HOTEL ARCADE OPEN EVENINGS
their own fleet of small and safe sailcraft and the School maintains MIAMI, FLORIDA
membership in the International Snips Assoociation as well as the National Association (Junior Division), for their pleasure.
Horeback riding, baseball, football, archery and dramatics are but -_______________________________a few of the other student activities.Tephn2-96Etbied17
School starts at 8:20 and ends at 12:45, with the children returning
after lunch for their extra-curriculum work. Classes are kept small in Sal/cm jeweAV~ (?a.
order that each pupil may have as much individual attention as U
possible-yet the group spirit among the children is strong. MaisOds eer tr
A wide variety of subjects is offered, compatible with the better MaisOds eer tr
elementary and college preparatory schools throughout the country. DIAMONDS WATCHES SILVERWARE
Foreign languages, mechanical and architectural drawing, journalismJE LR anNO LTS
and dress design are among the elective subjects. Through an arrange-JE LR anNO LTS
ment with the School of Music of the University of Miami, private Club payment plan weekly and
lessons may be taken at the school. monthly terms, no carrying charge
Parents coming to Miami for short vacations, may enroll their 132 E. FLAGLER ST. MIAMI, FLORIDA
children for just the duration of their stay and the pupils will be -_______________________________aided in following the assignments from their home schools. In this way, it is not necessary for a child to lose any work while on a vaca -_______________________________tion with his parents.HA V Y R P YN
In order to maintain the highest possible standards of education,HARVEY R.P YN E
the school has always associated to itself a faculty of very superior HAS CONSCIENTIOUSLY SERVED THE LIFE INSURANCE PUBLIC order. Graduates from the leading American Universities are members OF DADE COUNTY FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS
of their teaching staff. A college preparatory course is offered and DUPONT BUILDING --P. 0. DRAWER 1269
many of the students have entered college on certificate and diploma MIAMI, FLORIDA
from this school.
The main building, of modernistic design, was planned with a view to maximum utility and contains, beside the office, a science laboratory, auditorium with stage and twelve large, light and airy class- DRF.C NEOIVTSYU OHS
rooms. The roof has been designed for use as outdoor classrooms DRF.C NEOIVTSYU OHS
and special activities. HEALTH RENDEZVOUS
The Coburns have rightly named this school the COUNTRY Day 19N .FrtSre raePto-Mai lrd
School. With its splendid location, its careful supervision of health,12NE.FrtSet-AraePio-Mm.Flid and its excellent faculty, it is an ideal place for your child to receive This RESTAURANT has several UNIQUE FEATURES: (1) The food is selected and prepared under Scientific Supervision by a food and mediher or his education. cal specialist. (2) The meus consist of pure, fresh vegetables. VITAL
_________________________________________________________ items of human nutrition, in tasty, appetizing form. (3) All the PRICES Open 'Til Midightare ECONOMICAL. (4) It supplies mental food as well as bodily health. REPAIRS Cpen. 'TLlR Mnigh HEALTH LECTURES are given Tuesdays and Thursdays-7:30 P. M.
GAOIE234 Minorca Ave._________________ ______STORAE COAL GBLESWindow Cleaning Service Personalized Service 4-5450 H. S. HAHN, Mgr.
________________________________________1665 Michigan Avenue
MIAMII BEACH, FLORIDA
CORAL GABLES GROCERY PHONE 550
JOE'S GROCERY AND MARKET
2012 Ponce De Leon Boulevard JES OG aae
CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA 1201 N. W. 1st Place MIAMI, FLORIDA




62 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
If You Are Interested in Antiques The 1941 guidebook lists names of more than 15,000 school offiOne of the most famous TURNER-WEDGEWOOD collections is cials, 1,700 colleges and universities of all types, and 1,500 educational
right here in Miami! Started by Mr. and Mrs. W. Oakley Raymond associations.
(from two old family pieces) this collection, through the years, has ________________________________grown to over 30. Diligently, this well known Miami couple have searched from California to Massachusetts for these additional pieces.
Another collection well worth viewing is the one of EARLYW ila r u I lt t
AMERICAN FLASKS. A blue George Washington and two De Witt 722 Washington Ave.
Cintons-as well as others of rare shapes and patterns-are in this collection of over 50. Miami Beach
Just run up to 7766 Biscayne Boulevard (next to the Boulevard
Centrally Located
V. J. Hoecheri
Over a period of time we have heard some funny tales about, OPEN ALL YEAR
pioneering in Florida, but one of the most unbelievable ones is of a man who started from Chicago for Miami-but was slightly detoured American and European Plans
en route.
The year was 1924-and V. J. Hoecherl, Journeyman Painter of SOLARIUM PATIO ELEVATORS
Chicago-the man. On November 6th of that year, Mr. Hoecherl arrived in Jacksonville to find himself in the wake of two solid weeks of rain which had inundated the entire state. Determined to reach Miami (his avowed destination) in spite of "high water," Hoecherl got as far as St. Augustine, but found that floods and washouts made twF4~4AF
further progress toward Miami impossible. There followed a restive waiting period of two weeks in St. Augustine, but wishful thinking Dining Room of
did little to cause the high water to abate. Finally, Mr. Hoecherl decided that if he had to cross any water, he'd made the crossing a good WILLIAM PENN HOTEL
one-so while waiting for Florida roads (vintage of 1924) to become passable again, he decided to cross the Atlantic Ocean (which he -A Pioneer of Sixteen Years in Miami Beach with an
did), and took a two month's vacation in Europe. Upon his return to Eval eoda uvyro ihQaiyFos
the United States, he again headed for Miami, and even after two Eval eoda uvyro ihQaiyFos
months, found that some highways still had six inches of water over ..The Finest of Coffee..
them. This time, however, he got to Miami, and-believe it or not, he has been here ever since-the oft repeated story of the "visitor" "WHERE QUALITY REIGNS HIGHER THAN PRICE"
who gets "sand in his shoes" and stays on, and on, and on .. ! 722 Washington Ave.
In 1925, Mr. Hoecherl started in business for himself in Miami-as
a painting and decorating contractor. Contrary to so many business The Heart of Miami Beach
stories of these boom days, Hoecherl did not find immediate dazzling ________________________________prosperity. His company did, however, use this period to get its roots deep into Florida's business soil, with the result that its progress has been steady, its volume substantial, and its reputation increasingly enviable. Today-he operates all over Florida.
Very affable, extremely courteous, and surprisingly young looking (for one who has accomplished so much), Mr. Hoecherl says that Miami has him so enmeshed that he can't even resent the fact he's been too busy to get away from the city on a vacation for over three Your Fuel Oil requirements ir
years.
Among his decorting and painting jobs, Mr. Hoecherl mentions the
Huntington Building, the Broward County Court House, the Hotelthsae wilb hnd dtoy u
Roosevelt, and quite a few private homes in Palm Beach, including this___area__will__behandled___to__your
that of Joseph M. Schenck (the movie magnate).
Last summer he did considerable work for the Government at
the Key West Naval Training Station, and is now working on white entire satisfaction by a company
and negro housing projects in that city.
In the spring of 1925, Mr. Hoecherl married Alma Totten, of Miami. They have one daughter, June Olive. He is a member of the Rod and Reel Club, B. P. 0. E., K. of C., Executive Association of that has been in business since
Miami, Optimist Club of Miami Shores, and the Junior Chamber of Commerce.
Mr. Hoecherl is owner of the V. J. Hoecherl Co., painting and
decorating contractors. He is a member of the Painting and Decorating the year 1915.
Contractors of America, and is President of the Local Chapter in Dade County. In 1938-39, Mr. Hoecherl was also President of the Florida State Association of Painting and Decorating Contractors, and is currently a Director of that Association.
Nation's School Officials Listed in 1941 0
Educational Directory
American education's annual directory of school officials, colleges and universities, and educational associations is in preparation by the U. S. Office of Education, Federal Security Agency.
HAR N ICORPRATD IBELCHER OIL COMPANY
I MIAMI MIAMI BEACH FORT LAUDERDALE
- 1455 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH, FLA.




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 63
STANLEY TOURS
The Stanley De Luxe Tours are the joint efforts of Mr. Stanley Yasner, BLUIVENFIELD'S
familiarly known as "Mr. Stanley", and Mr. Bernard Chauncey, known as "Ben".
Mr. Yasner is a native of Brooklyn, and, at one time, studied at the Brook- MIAMI PIONEER VEGETARIAN FISH DAIRY
lyn Law School, but left his career when he became a pilot and aerial photo- RESTAURANT
grapher in the U. S. Air Corps. He left the service and came to Miami Beach in V-532, and worked for Mr. Chauncey, who was conducting sightseeing tours and 668 Collins Avenue Miami Beach
taxi service.
Mr. Chauncey had been a student at Harvard University and returned later
to receive his degree in medicine. He decided not to practice and was engaged in COMMERCIALIZE ON YOUVR IDEAS
the brokerage business on State street, Boston's financial center, If you have imagination, I can QUICKLY help you turn
In 1926 Mr. Chauncey came to Miami Beach and engaged in the tour business rejection slips into PAY CHECKS.
andthse woamitiusme wee riedl cmpeitrsuntil 1940 when they Write for VALUABLE INFORMATION.
and hes tw amitius en wre riedlycometiorsNATALIE NEWELL decided to become partners and expand their service. Now their equipment Sui,31 onlaDie oou rvFoia
includes one of the largest and latest model sightseeing bus, ten seven-passenger -(Not a school or sales agency) cars, and eight cabs. Every driver is carefully selected for ability and courtesy and Science and Philosophy of Creative Writing. is expertly trained in order to insure the highest type of service for their patrons. The Tours include every point of interest in the Greater Miami section, requiring _________________________________________four hours, and providing delightful entertainment. The Tours are run twice for HEALTH PLEASURE!
daily and leave from two convenient offices on the Beach. R D O S B C
Underweight? Gain The Pleasure Way...
ALL TATS CA D CUB, NC.Separate classes for children age 5 or over ALL TATS CA D CUB, NC."Moonlight rides over winding trails" The All States Card Club, Inc., was organized in 1924 to promote friendli- Instruction of all kinds Horses boarded and trained
ness not only among visitors but also among permanent residents. ED. MAYNARD, Riding Master
During its sixteen years it has continuously contributed to all worthy chari- MI L LE R B ROS. RA NC H
ties as well as contributing to those of the Dade County Federation of Women's O idRa,2MlsWs fToia ak-Poe463
Clubs. It maintains its own scholarship fund and has financed a talented blind O idRa,2MlsWs fToia ak-Poe463
musician through four years at Gainesville and two years at the Boston Conservatory of Music. Hundreds of baskets of food are supplied annually to Miami's Phone 20286; es.0 (0 0 e 0eo 7-34
needy families. In the hurricane years the club officers distributed truck loads Pon2~08Re.734 of staple supplies directly to victims in counties north of Miami. Hospitalization PEAiRL'S BEAUJT'Y SALOIN
and operations have also been arranged for patients who were unable to pay. gA Complete Beauty Service g
Weekly meetings are on Mondays at 2 p. m. at the Civic Center, where 14 N. E. First Avenue 20-- one uligMiami, Florida
members and friends may enjoy an afternoon of card playing, or just visiting. ZOTOS and ALL METHODS PERMANENT WAVING
The monthly bridge luncheons have attracted as many as 387 guests at one time. Pake Hee IniiulHi tlnCehdSapTetet
Meetings and memberships are open to both visitors and residents, and every state in the Union and a number of foreign countries are repreesented in themembership of the Club.
This year's President is Mrs. Nellie Gramenstetter, 131 N. W. 31st Street. SR LIEA IT BS -cnedarudtegam
The Contact Chairman, Mrs. H. J. Lehfeldt, 2341 S. W. 16th Terrace, telephone ing ESORte IFE ad te BET-entere arlouind tenglem4-1048. inwiesnsadtegetybloigoentm
_________________pered to an average seventy degrees by the proximity of the warm waters of the Gulf Stream-beckons to you, bids DEDICATION OF BARRY COLLEGEyo hatntth ladosu-rced asadmlow
An invitation which this publication just received is of momentous interest yo hatnotelnd fsu-rced asadmlow
to many of our subscribers and thousands of Catholics throughout the state. lit nights. Brand new, but with a management long experiThe Board of Trustees and the faculty of Barry College, Miami, cordially invite enced in Miami Beach hotel operation, offering all the imus to attend the dedication of this fine institution by His Excellency, The Most poeet hc ohn nhn ih14 iig eui
Reverend Amleto Giovanni Cicognani, D.D.J.U.D., who is the Apostolic Delegate provements wichte goohndim h with 4 liv ueruin owati
to the United States. flyul eoae om ihlreadnmru idw
The dedication services are to be held in Cor Jesu Chapel on Tuesday (most have ocean view), colorful yet subdued appointments,
morning, February 4, 1941. An academic program will follow in t'he afternoon mdrtl rcdmasi natatvitmtl-lne
of the same day at the conclusion of which the Pontifical Benediction of the mdrtl rcdmasi natatvitmtl-lne
Blessed Sacrament will be rendered by The Most Reverend Joseph P. Hurley, dining room, spacious comfortable lobby, fully-equipped soD.D., who is Bishop of St. Augustine. larium, game room-everything, in fact to make your visit
to Miami Beach one to be long remembered and oft-repeated. Situated in the heart of the exclusive North Beach Section, near theatres, shopping centers and golf clubs, THE COPLEY Td~k of the Towun PLAZA, with its wide, sun-flooded porches, private beach,
modern appointments, unobtrusively friendly atmosphere and
thoughtfully planned services, offers its guests the ultimate in
WE HAVE "STEAKED" A NEW FRONT fine living-a truly luxurious home away from home.
(STAINLESS STEEL)
RATE SCHEDULE ON REQUEST
ALSO MODERNIZED AND ENLARGED INSIDE TO HRYR AH aae
BETTER SERVE YOUTh
OUR FAMOUS
CHARCOAL BROILED PLANKED STEAKS 39th and Collins Miami Beach




64 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
- THE PINE TREE RESTAURANT
and Delicatessen, Inc.
-21 23rd. STatCLLN
/ ~~~PHONE 5-9763 217-292i T.a OLN MIAMI BEACH, FLA..
DIABETIC FOOD SANDWICHES ON HEALTH BREAD
MIAMI BEACH HEALTH FOOD SHOP
Royal Salon of Beauty 534 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
Specializing in NATIONALLY KNOWN HEALTH FOOD PRODUCTS The art of beauty culture has achieved a new and higher plane. Fresh Made Vegetable Juices
In this ultra-modern era women expect from the beauty culturists a HEALTH MENUS PHONE 5-7165
greater degree of privacy and professionalism no less proficient than that received in the offices and clinics of other professions.
The Royal Salon of eBauty has spared no expense or effort in
order to be among the first to initiate the novel methods and to 'WASHINGTON STORAGE
pioneer the reparture from the conventional type of operating booths.1 The salons in this most modern of parlors are suites of the latest type CO., Inlc.
and are air-conditioned throughout. A group of highly trained beau- ESTABLISHED 1927
ticians who are expertly skilled in the art of creating beauty.
The Royal Salon is in a colonial type building, located in the
new section of Biscayne Boulevard, at 71st Street, and is easily101-09WAHNTN VEU
accessible an dhas ample parking facilities and freedom from traffic.101-09WAHNTN VEU
One of the nicest surprises awaiting visitors to this charming and M IA MI B EA CH, F LOR I DA
attractive salon is price list which is very reasonable.
Consultations are invited-diagnosis is made. _______________________________FREDERICH'S MARKET PALM TYPEWRITER COMPANY
Largest Stock of Office Machines in the State
GROCERIES-MEATS-VEGETABLES Sales Department Service Department
17.- N. E. 2nd Ave., Phone 2-05-4 171 N. E. 2nd St., Phone 2-1555
Serving the Fast-growing Northwest Section Special Concessions to Teachers and Students
608 N. W. 62nd Street Phone 7-2377 MIAMI, FLORIDA
OPEN 'TILL MIDNIGHT 1627 ALTON ROAD PHONE 5-1416 MIAMI BEACH, FLA.
REPAIRS
GASOLINEC. H. OEHLER MOTORS ;~l
STORAGE 234 Minorca Avenue
LADIES WEARING APPAREL
PERSONALIZED SERVICE CORAL GABLES 4-5450 Costum Made
PHONE 4-2350 B. F. HOLLAND, Manager MIAMI'S LEADING SCHOOL OF music
CORA GALESTRASFERANDSTOAGESTUDIO LOCATIONS COA ABE RNSE N SOAE138 Minorca Ave. 1122 S. W. 21st Ave. 429 -41st St.
BAGGAGE MOVING, CRATING and STORAGE Coral Gables Miami Miami Beach
HAULING OF ALL KINDS MIAMI CONSERVATORY
310 CORAL WAY 1737 N. Bayshore Drive Phone 2-5835
SWISS WATCH REPAIRS A SPECIALTY
J. FOWLER HARRISON'S GARAGE
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER BUICK AND HUPMOBILE
FINE WATCH, CLOCK AND JEWELRY REPAIRING ON THE BODY FENDER PAINTING SEAT COVERS
PREMISES
Est. 1927 MIAMI, FLA. 115 South Miami Ave. 166-168 N. W. FIRST STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA
PHONE 2-2462
EAT
50 PERCENT OFF ON ANY PICTURE ORDERED THROUGH THE TO TOASTED PEANUTS
WILSON PICTURE FRAME SHOP _.WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER ORDERS CLAUDE R. PARKER, Distributor
172 N. W. First Street Miami, Florida 1214 S. W. 2nd Street MIAMI
KOOLMOTOR GASOLENE and OILS ACME TIRES
CITIES SERVICE MIAMI PRODUCTS Hand Bags Costume Jewelry
ORANGE STATE OIL COMPANY, Sylverns
Distributors 527 Lincoln Road Miami Beach, Fla.




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 65
HAWKINS RUG CLEANERS AND DYERS
Our ECONOMY is Outstanding
Our QUALITY is Equal
CALL US!
Phone 7-6398 69 N. E. 39th Street
PURITY FOOD PRODUCTS
Manufacturers of Mayonnaise
2426 N. W. 7th Avenue MIAMI Dial 3-2721
GEOiRGE T. GKREEIR .,,.,..oe eo..nob o O~ oo~ n
One of the first favorable and striking impressions a newcomer to Miami and AlpertsRetu a t nd D lc es n
the Beach receives is the unusually attractive and effective use of cement garden 6 Resau an aDr D liatssne
furniture on the lawns of the beautiful residences, estates, hotels, and apartment 6OcaDrv
buildings. A large part of this ornamental display of cement and pottery 5 6 years in the same location under the same management decorations is due to the knowledge and workmanship of George Greer. IQUALITY FOOD
Mr. Greer probably does nzt class himself as an artist and yet he and his associates create, design, and manufacture this artistic cement furniture for gardensTH MASCUE SPR ETIE S'NIn
and lawns in their own plant at 4119 N. W. 2nd Avenue, in Miami. Mr. GreerTH MASCUE SPR ETIEA 'N In
established this unique business nine years ago and, from a modest beginning, he THE PAUL REVERE LIFE INSURANCE CO.
has developed one of the best and largest plants of its kind in the world. Here W. D. CHRISTMAS, General Agent
he and his capable assistants do all of their work and it is quite interesting toNo -a cl b e A ci nt nd H lh i su n e watch them at their work. First the molds must be made from the designs and Nn aclal cietadHat nuac
from these molds the cement furniture is made. He started his business with only 901-02-03 duPont Building Phone 3-1633
twenty molds and now the last count was two hundred and fifty-four which gives one a fair idea as to his popularity in this area. His creations include benches of all types, tables, sun dials, glazing globes, bird baths, flower boxes, urns, flamingoes, cranes, ducks, and other appropriate designs. Mr. Greer has T j# ,~ 0 4 e
specialized in beautiful Grecian, Roman, and Spanish urns for which he has estab. A NEW MODERN HOTEL
lished an enviable reputation. His novelties have also won the approbation of Centrally Located Offering All the Comforts For a Pleasant and Restful the artistically inclined purchasers. In addition to the manufacture of their Vacatinue D epive Booklet Mnagequst
own products out of cement Mr. Greer also sells the best and most beautiful Collins Avenue at 8th street Miami Beach, Florida
pottery in the country. They represent Haeger's Pottery, of Dundee, Indiana, which is recognized as an outstanding leader in this field. There is nothing in _____________________________________fine quality and artistic design which this famous and popular pottery maker cannot create. Wherever you may see an unusually attractive piece of pottery on FAUTH FURNITURE CO.
a building or lawn the chances are that it is a creation by Haeger and placed in a E X C L U S I V E FURUN I TUR E
proper and lovely setting by Mr. Greer and his assistants.INE ORDC AT S
Mr. Greer also carries a line of Monmouth pottery as well as the Haeger Biscayne Boulevard at Fourteenth Terrace
line. So, between these two well known and popular manufacturers of pottery MIAMI, FLORIDA
it is almost impossible for the most exacting landscape artist or the most discrim -_________________________________________inating purchaser to be unable to select exactly the proper piece for any setting. They are also assured that each piece will be given expert and careful emplacement if done by the Greer organization. A rtis tic M illinery
Mr. Greer is very unassuming in his part of this business' great success but Ex lsv '- S o
he loves to talk about his work. You are cordially invited to visit his plant at M rs. Seiuerman's Ex luiv kat ho
any time and see for yourself just how this type of creative work is done. 27N im vneMai lrd
THE
MIAMI AQUARIUM .BILTMORE CLEANERS & DYERS
BISCAYNE BOULEVARD AT FIFTH STREET"KonfrQaiy
Open 8 A. M. until Midnight Office and Plant: Miami Beach Store:
43 N. E. 38th ST., MIAMI 1686 ALTON RD.
PLENTY OF PARKING SPACE Dial 7-1276 Dial 5-7513
Admission 30c : : : Children 15c
LET'S Go To THE AQUARIUM PHONES 5-4778 RENTALS, SALES
________________________________--5-4779 AND MORTGAGES
Strong and Dependable TOBIN & TOBIN
Cocout GoveExchnge ankREALTY ASSOCIATES, Inc.
Cocout GoveExchnge ankEstablished 1916 Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
SAFETY SERVICE COURTESY 665 Washington Ave.
COCONUT GROVE PHONE 4-2544 MIAMI, FLORIDA MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA




66 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
TI- E I LAYM UD Ir IIDrL
is on the Ocean
Promenade in fashionable North Beach
section of Miami
Beach. Located directly on the ocean
at Lake Pancoast,
nearly every room
o f t he Traymore
overlooks water. The Florida Transportation Company originated in 1933. They specialThis hotel operates ize only in Sightseeing and give a four-hour, fifty-mile trip around the on the European
plan. Delicious Miami area. The busses used were specially designed for sightseeing and
meals are served in
the Continental Din- were so successful at the World's Fair in Chicago that the equipment was ing Room; break- duplicated in Miami.
fast and luncheon
are also served on
the Ocean Patio ad- THE NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
joining the private
beach. Rooms may
be had either with
twin beds or studio Since its organization in 1857, the National Education Association has been
living room arr a n g e m e n t. fighting the battles of public education for American youth throughout the+ The smart cocktail
lounge and famous nation. Although the Association has suffered defeat after defeat, and progress.
shops and n i g h t has been slow, the success of its efforts is marvelous. Among major efforts and clubs on Twentythird Street, but a accomplishments in which the N. E. A. led the fight on a national scale or
block away, p r o
vide diversion and furnished material support to the educational systems of the respective states are: a d d d t i o n a 1 The conversion of a national sharply divided on the principle of universal educaenjoyment for the
Traymore's guests. tion to one solidly in support of that principle; molding and crystalizing popular opinion in favor of public support of education; establishment of teacher welfare programs including adequate salaries, tenure in employment, retirement systems,. group insurance, high standards of professional ethics, desirable certification and leave of absence laws; and improved professional standards through dissemination The location a n d of knowledge relating to improved methods and means of education, philosophies luxurious appointments of the Tray- of education, reports of progress, and numerous other pertinent and significant more attract a refined clientele and facts of interest to education. its name has be- The potential strength of the National Educational Association consists of
come an address of
prestige. Address more than a million persons employed in educational service in the United States. the Traymore Hotel,
Ocean at Twentyfourth Street, Mi- ARCHITECTS
ami Beach, Florida.
Robert B. H y a t t, Who Have Made Dreams Come True.
Manager. The story of Henry Hohauser, progressive Miami Beach architect, is a
i~1 record of multiple achievement.
Born in New York City, Mr. Hohauser attended its public schools, graduating in Architecture from Pratt Institute in 1915 . from there he went to New York University where he took extension courses for a year. From 1916-1917, he was employed as a Junior Draftsman . a position he aban-Miami Daily News Photo. doned to enlist in the United States Army, where he served for over two
years . seeing service for eleven months in France and England as Top
MRS. R. L. MILLIKEN Sergeant with the Ambulance Corps.
On returning from the war, he was, in turn Draftsman, Senior Draftsman, By Helen James and Chief Draftsman with a New England firm which specialized in instiOne of the most interesting women it has been my pleasure to meet In tutional buildings. Leaving this firm in 1925, Mr. Hohauser went to New
Miami-is Mrs. Milliken, better known to the old Pioneers as the "Little Colonel". York where he entered into business for himself, designing and supervising To hear her tell the story of her first visit to Miami, with her husband in 1919, skyscrapers up to twenty six stories, including hotels, apartment and office and of her subsequent activities-is to visualize, not only the physical but also the buildings and commercial structures. cultural growth of Miami Beach. Ten years later . in 1935 . Henry Hohauser came to Miami Beach,
Their first visit was made in the days when one had to take a little terry where he inaugurated the modern in design . of some of the outstanding across from the mainland. So impressed was Mrs. Milliken both by the beauty examples of his achievements in this direction, are, among hotels, the Demseyand the future possibilities of this Island, that she urged her husband to buy Vanderbilt, the Collins Park, the Governor and the Park Central Essex House some water front property. His reply was-"You're too old to play with sand as well as numerous others.
now". However, in 1920 when they returned from their home in Chicago, Mrs. Associated with Mr. Hohauser in his firm are Mr. Frederick A. Gibbs,
Milliken immediately started buying property. SHE BUILT THE FIRST Mr. Sidney Lehrer, and Miss Kathryn McCready.
APARTMENT HOUSE on Miami Beach, at 8th and Collins. In the past five years, this firm has designed, in all, forty three hotels,
seventy two residences, ninety five apartment houses, forty five alterations and Mrs. Milliken's interest in civic affairs goes back to the days when the additions, and twenty seven miscellaneous and institutional buildings.
Chamber of Commerce held forth under an umbrella, at the corner of 5th and Among the many hotels of distinction on Miami Beach, which the firm
Washington Avenues. Aside from Mrs. Thomas Pancoast, the wife of the of Henry Hohauser has designed are . the Liberty Arms, the Shorcham,
president, Mrs. Milliken was the first woman member of the Chamber of Coin- th2 Cardoza, the Greystone and the Greenview.
merce. She was a charter member of the Miami Beach Woman's Club, having Notable among the attractive apartment houses which he has designed
given, untiringly, of her time and money, towards the completion of their present are the Castle, the Cameo, the Weissman Studio Apartments and the Parc spacious quarters. The Community Church and The Players as well as many Vendome.
other organizations, have relied on her for her foresighted advice and splendid co- Such outstanding and well known public buildings as the Beth Jacob operation. She is greatly interested in music and attends the many worthwhile Synagogue, Walgreen's Drugstore, the Carrousel and the Mammys, Pappys, concerts and musicals, given here. One can easily recognize her by her sweet Roadside Rest are also numbered among the achievements of the firm of
mischevous smile and her buoyant personality. Hohauser.
Over a period of years, Mrs. Milliken's holdings grew and she laughingly It is interesting to contemplate the professional future of this Architect,
tells of a card that was printed: "The three big Real Estate operators-Roney, who, although still a young man, has already revolutionized forms of building Fisher and Milliken". After the crash, friends urged her to sell and salvage what design, and thus occupies a very definite place among the men who have conshe could, but her faith in the Beach was too strong. She fought hard, weathered tribtted to the phenomenal growth of Miami Beach. the storm, losing none of her properties and lives now to see her faith in Miami Henry Hohauser, a man of vision, undoubtedly rates as a Pioneer of
Beach justified. today . and . tomorrow!




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 67
The Value of Public Housing to Miami The welfare and social program for the project is well under way with mothers'
dlubs, cooking and sewing classes and self improvement classes conducted by the
MRS. T. T. STEVENS tenants. Liberty Square for negroes is built on a 63 acre tract and is a three
Associate Editor, The Florida Teacher unit project which makes it the largest negro project in the South and sixth
Public Housing is no longer a theory in Miami, the experiment stage is largest___inAmerica.-passed and the community has settled down to the acmoplished fact that here INDIVIDUAL TEACHING
;as in 140 other cities in the United States, low-rent dwellings for low-income The average boy under normal conditions can carry his easy course of study families have been buit and are being occupied through the aid of the United successfully under existing standards, without more personal help from the teacher States Housing Authority under laws of the State. This new function of gov- than crowded schools allow. If this boy loses his mechanical stride with the
-erment is being accepted by the people just as they have accepted public schools, class through illness, absence, diverted interest, or otherwise; he may drift farther good roads and other agencies for human betterment as a proper function of and farther from scholastic safety, because successive foundation principles upon
-government. Miami's enthusiastic acceptance of public housing arises from three which correct scholarship depends have become vague or meaningless to him. main sources; a widely recognized need for homes for low-income families who He may grope and become discouraged and even cease to progress. His philosocannot afford to pay normal and seasonal rents; the successful operation for phy of life can go awry because he is too young to know what to do in the face over three years of a public housing project; and a Housing Authority made up of this, to him, chaotic condition. ,of alert, civic-minded citizens headed by Hugh P. Emerson with George C. This boy needs experienced, extensive and well-organized help. The sooner
Stembler, Harry H. Hector, Arthur W. Kneibler and Peter McCabe. The au- this is given him the surer is he to redeem a bad situation. The longer it is dethority is appointed by the Mayor of the City of Miami and serves without me- ferred the more deeply and permanently does he mire into negation. When he mnuneration. receives proper help, the boy is thankful, happy and aware of the necessity of
The facts about Miami's need for housing were clearly brought out in the doing each day's work well and completey.
orginal surveys made for both white and negro projects, which established the Large schools have little time for such reconstruction. The straggler is apt
need before appropriations for the projects were asked for. The City of Miami to join the missing. Miami Military Academy has long and successfully carried through teh Housing Authority is attempting to face and help solve the problem on such special work through its personal teaching. Many of our most successful
-of housing low-income families living under sub-standard conditions, in some- students have come to us in need of individual instruction, and, under our thing more than shacks and hovels. The total 1,318 families that were compelled methods, have quickly recovered all lost ground and gone on to greater accompby circumstances beyond their control to live in crowded or sub-standard houses lishments than the average at which they formerly aimed before they lost touch. are now well housed at rents they can afford to pay, and therefore, will be better There is a belief among many teachers that the dull boy does not make all the citizens with clearer outlook on life and more capable of performing their duties final failures. Often the inherently bright boy goes down in defeat because he as citizens and as integral part of our social and economic structure, lacks proper reinforcement at the right time.
Through better housing and good environment offered by the two local When a new boy comes to us he takes up his work just where he left it in his
housing projects, Edison Courts and Liberty Square, approximately 2,000 children former school. He is urged to make all the progress possible, but, as a matter will be given opportunity for better mental and physical health and their stability of fact, most of his time and ours for a while is spent in quietly finding the as future citizens will be promoted. The cost of the City to maintain fire and flaws, mistakes, omissions and misapprehensions of his former study as they police protection, health and sanitary services, and all of the other functions Of appear from time to time in his daily work. Weak writing, spelling, English, a municipality will be reduced to a minimum insofar as these 1,318 families are fractions, decimals, conjunctions, declensions, syntax, factoring, quadratics; all concerned. A far reaching benefit will be derived from health conditions that the failures in his scholarship are analyzed as fast as they appear, and the boy is will prevail in the housing projects. Many of the tenants come from areas and aided in going back to the correct sources of information for himself. Progress homes where disease is most prevalent. In their new environment they will enjoy halts until the given faults are repaired with much drill and review. The boy may better health, and in the case of domestic servants their protection from disease worry over this process for a time, but he shortly awakes to the fact that his will be a protection also for the families and households in which they work, work is clearer, more logical and that he handles it more skillfully. No more Likewise their children attending public schoos will not be carriers of disease as wonderful human benefit can be conferred upon this boy at this time. Gone are they were likely to have been when living in unsanitary surroundings. As far his fears, worries, flounderings and misconceptions. Here new is courage, amas the two housing projects already provided can do so, the general appearance bition, growing success, and greatest of all a new and positive philosophy of life. of the section in which they are located is improved, and no one will be ashamed The work is not done for the boy. He must do it for himself, but he is shown to -show visitors where some of our low-income people live, how to do it and is drilled not only in the process of finding information for
During the past winter season approximately 4,000 visitors from every state himself but also in assimilating it. There is much drill in analyzing his problem in the union and three foreign countries registered at the Demonstration unit as or subject clearly, attacking one difficult item after another and summarizing the Edison Courts. Visitors were impressed with the beauty of the project with the whole thing logically and efficiently. The boy soon learns that by these more whte group houses of modified Bermuda Colonial architecture and the land- careful and intensive methods he gains much time that was formerly lost in his
scaping of the project with palms, tropical flowers and shrubs. The solar water school preparations. This discovery automatically leads to a desire either to comsystem which furnishes hot water in abundance throughout the year is a constant plete his school work in shorter time than the normal or else to do a great deal source of interest to visitors. This system which uses the sun rays for heating more work in the given subject than the average requirement. Both tendencies water instead of stoves or furnaces is well known in Miami but little known are positive, constructive and directed toward a far saner outlook on life. elsewhere. Edison Courts for white families has 345 dwelling units and was I firmly believe that there is no more valuable conservation work this which
opened with public ceremony by the late Mayor E. G. Sewell on December 15th, makes able leaders of boys who would otherwise have been lost to us. 1939. The annual family income for tenants ranges from $722 to $963 and the J. R. WILLIAMS, President of
average monthly rental including water and electricity for cooking, refrigeration MIAMI MILITARY ACADEMY. and lights is $15.93. Each of the units is modern and equipped with electric
range, refrigerator, hot and cold water and window shades. The administration The present generation must rise to the intellectual and moral stature of the
building houses the offices of the Miami Housing Authority and offices of the men and women who founded the Republic.-Education and the Defense of project. The auditorium is used for community gatherings, concerts and lectures. American Democracy, Educational Policies Commission.
HEATING GAI TON
COOKING RATR
REFRIGERATION specializing in General Real Estate
Brokerage
AIR-C NDITININGLot Sales on instalment Plan
IN SOLVING AN FTEEPROBLEMS EXPERIENCE TEACHES17N.E2nSt e3682
GAS DOES IT BETTER
~ AMOCO SERVICE
STATION
Mr. Leon Crow
MIAMI BE-ACH 801 Biscayne Boulevard
FT. LAUDE=RDALE= HOLLYWOOD IMLRD




68 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
DR. FREDERICK BUTLER
During the past ten years the practice of natural healing has comeMR.JMAKNISL N
into its own, as the general public has become aware of its possibili- TEACHER OF VOICE, EXPRESSION, PIANO
ties and the results of its use in the treatment of the sick. Further, 80D N.EC W.O3rRSretCPonI76O42 many men of vision and intelligence have adopted its precepts and _____________________________have followed them, with excellent results.
One of the most outstanding and nationally prominent of the Florida Naturopathic and Chirophactic physicians is Dr. Frederick Butler, of 41st Street, Miami Beach.
After years of research covering chemical body balance and mus ilr n triti- c
cular distortions of the body, or a combination of both, Dr Butler is /IE'JI'JI%.'J
today recognized as a leader in dietetic chemistry and its application. His lectures bring many who look for guidance and aid through diet 1745 S. WV. Sixth Street
when all else has failed them. The world today is food conscious and becoming more so with each succeeding year. Food research has Miami, Florida
definitely proven that many of our common ailments are after effects directly, or indirectly, of injudicious eating. What is one man's food is another's poison. Therefore, we, as individuals, require an individual anaylsis as to our chemical food needs, and we do not get the best results from some generalized food dietary, which cannot and does not undertake to analyze the chemical deficiency present, nor Interiors and Gifts
attempt to replace this deficiency by food material rich in that chemi- FR ED ER IC K T RA
cal lacking element.FR DICT A N
Dr. Butler combines the use of biological chemistry, or body 7 6 1 W. 4 1 s t .S t r e e t
chemistry, with deep abdominal manipulative treatment. In the chem- MIAMI BEACH
istry the body is fed the lacking chemical elements required to balance FLORIDA
bodily activity and function, glandulae, etc. In the manipulative _______________________________work the lack of circulation and drainage in the body is restored to as .......
nearly normal as possible, where there is abdominal pressure from gravity pressure, adhesion, congestion and excessive fluids and waste MONROE TOWERS HOTEL
material, this pressure is relaxed and greater circulation restored g30HSRE &OCA
thereby drawing off congestion.30HSRE &OCA
If and when the system is given easily digested food which will MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
leave the stomach in one half hour or a little longer, it stands to reason that there cannot be any great congestion in the stomach, ~9
and, as Dr. Butler says, "You are what you eat", the result of our food shows itself on our bodies either in good health or disease. But WEST END GROCERY
we can always turn over a new leaf and learn to use raw celery, Salutes Florida Teachers
and carrot juice as, well as papaya juice. GROCERIES FRESH VEGETABLES -MEATS
After these treatments, to keep the circulation of the body in its Mrs. G. N. Bailey. Prop.
improved condition, the Dr. usually recommends exercise, such as 2241 N. W. 7th Street Phone 4-4221
walking, tennis, horseback riding, in moderation. L________________________________French Benzol Cleaners & Laundry J,
99 S. W. 7th Street Phone 2-5901 jg0 a
_________________________________________________Ocean Drive between 10th and 11th Street
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
Compliments
THE
Ddnid GUDD & Goll
69 N. E. Thirty-sixth Street
bdnk LLMiami, Florida
Dowling Brothers
DANIA, FLORIDA FINEST FRUITS,
VEGETABLES, PRODUCE
________________________________________________ p111 Coral Way Phone 4-0441




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 69
Miami Music Teachers Association month in my home. This group has been a Junior Federated Club
Mrs. E. R. Treverton, President (under the Miami Music Club) for 5 years. They plan all the details
On December 15th, 1934, at the call of Miss Bertha Foster, the of every recital even down to the design and coloful execution of the Miami Music Teachers Association was organized, having as its pur- programs. It is an "event" for them, one by which all phases of a repose "the raising of the standard of teachers and teaching and keeping cital become familiar to them. It has been their "show" and part of abreast of modern methods of teaching." They became affiliated with them. the Florida State Music Teachers Association in 1935 and now have Oeo u eces r onRsercnl eyatysae
over 125 members, who meet regularly once a month. They are also temsino ui T ofr orw olgtnwrt rn
members of the National Federation of Music Clubs, thae miss exaion f musi "T tcmortle sorro, tolghend worit tohin
In 1938, this Club was given the honor of being host to the State peaceoupif and aatio tote the oube mfamnind, soac adsretyate Convention and is again to have that honor this year. Among the past msul, toupli and meubeterthenlife oft all, mankins torpacd bothiwellont nrte mIaSrucl fied MsoeAasBres brotherly love." And from Ruskin "All one's life is music, if one
bonel kof n the lare projecs, wichtieCulsasitndi.pn touches the notes rightly and in time."
soring, is the Musicians Club of America. This is to be located in KINDERGARTEN AND GRADES
D a d e C o u n ty a n d to s e r v e a s a C lu b h o m e o f a ll a c tiv e A m e r ic a n e c n s l e a y t a n n r p r o a i y p o l m musicians, a quiet retreat for composers and writers and to have pro- TWuaoleaytraing or Spersality polm vision for the care of needy older members.
Perhaps no other group of teachers contribute more to the mental PEARL SCHULTZ
development of a child than do the music teachers and in this changing 907 S. W. 15th Ave., Miami, Florida Phone 3-4003 civilization of ours, with music the only universal language, a great responsibility rests with the teachers. It is up to them to educate and -_______________________________mold the tastes of the people-"to educate THROUGH music" rather ANDERSON POLLACK
than "educate IN music".
One of the most important ways in which music teachers can in- TUTTLE GARAGE
fluence their pupils is by creating new and stimulating methods of G EN E RAL RE PA IR S
study. For example most teachers have their own Clubs where chil- 35 S. E. Fourth Street Phone 3-2912
dren are taught self assurance and poise by playing in public. In my own little Miami Beach Two Piano Club the children meet once a
DADE COUNTY BRANCH ELIKBROWARD COUNTY BRANCH
Factory: 765 N. W. 20th Street Federal Highway No. 1 (Biscayne Blvd.)
MIAMI, FLORIDA T N E Opposite Hollywood Jockey Club
HALLANDALE, FLORIDA
ORNAMENTS OF DISTINCTION
To wander through the outdoor and indoor studios of the Sellicks, is a pleasure of which all visitors and Miamians should
avail themselves.
The beautiful stone benches and chairs,
placed under huge spreading shade trees invite you to linger and gaze out at the naturally landscaped pools. A frog peeps out from a lily pad; a flamingo haughtily gazes at you; a dog is seated by the edge of a pool, as though watching the goldfish, all so realistic that you have to restrain
yourself from whistling to the animals.
Inside is a wealth of all types of plaques, statues, figurines-even ship models
and paintings. You can see how the sculp- V
tor (a permanent member of the staff) starts with just a block of stone, outlines his subject in charcoal, then starts to cut away the stone. Slowly and painstakingly,
the statue takes form and life.
Or you can wander into another section and Science, Civil Engineering), started his stone studio
watch the making of the molds into which glue is here in 1926, through necessity. Previously he had
poured, allowed to set and the outside mold then been a contracting plasterer, with over 400 men in
opened up and the glue taken away to reveal the his employ, but found that when stone work was
lion or whatever the subject has been. These are wanted for a job, it was not available here. Foresmoothed off, painted and shellaced, and are ready seeing the demand for that type work, he started the
for ornaments. Sellick Stone Studio.
At the Hallandale studio-with its nine acres, Since, he has done most of the reconditioning
golf range, bowling alleys and barbecue stand-you work for both the City of Miami and Miami Beach.
can spend an instructive as well as an active day. The fountain in Bayfront Park, the Indian EquesYou will find both Harry and Walter Sellick ideal trian statue at 41st St., and Alton Road, the fountain hosts. Even though they are kept continuously busy at 21st St. and Alton Road, the Flagler Memorial with the shipment of orders to all parts of the world Monument-all have had his attention. The one -you can feel assured that your particular problems hundred sets of park benches in Bayfront Park are
of securing just the right pieces for your home or also his work.
garden will be given the same thoughtful considera- Miami can well be proud of the high standards
tion that the Sellicks would give to their own fain- of quality set by the Sellick Stone Studio. It has ilies. been a real pleasure to know the Sellicks and their
Harry Sellick, a University of Washington grad- works.
uate, with the degree of B. S. C. E., (Bachelor of




'70 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
Wyidwood Tropical Gardens We wholeheartedly congratulate Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, Editor of the
National Magazine, "Good Health" on the seventy-fifth anniversary of the pub,South Florida has contributed many coloful and interesting lication. Concealed in the story, is seventy-five years of progress in the returnpersonalities to contemporary American history, who, in years to tontrmoentwihbgnactuygondrheldrspofheae
come, will stand out among the pages of such a history when it is tontrmoentwihbgnactuygondrheldrspofheae
compiled. Dr. Sylvester Graham. Dr. Kellogg spends the winter months directing the
On these personalities, none will have formed a more integral Miami Springs Battle Creek Institution.
part of this particular portion of the state than Commodore A. H. One of the interesting publications received is The Negro History Bulletin and
A man of vision and great personal charm, Commodore Brook we congratulate the publishers.
has contributed much to the civic progress and cultural pursuits of In recognition of the work of Carter G. Woodson, managing editor of the
his adopted state. His exotic Wyldwood Tropical Nurseries, located on Negro History Bulletin, in a program which has been uplifting and beneficial to the Federal Highway near Dania, Florida, are one of the show places teNgorc.Tepormhslkws epdt aebte iieswt
of the southland and have contributed materially in bringing hosts teNgorc.Tepormhslkws epdt aebte iieswt
of horticulturists and nature lovers to this part of the state. clearer understanding of mutual rights.
The landscaping division of the gardens are under the direct sup -______________ervision of William P. Brook and the grounds of some of the most magnificent and palatial estates in Florida have been designed and A. A.
landscaped by him. Exterminating Co. Geo. H. Bates 5-0690
These beautiful tropical gardens are a MUST STOP on the list of E.J UM ,MageD EPSA SHN
every resident of and visitor to South Florida. If you return north E.8 W. GMOE Ma.Phnaer DEE-SA2IS IN
without having visited them you will have missed much of the beauty 2388mW. Flag-St.Phneay 348307- .123
that is ours. Noon; 2-6 P. M--------$1.50
_______________________NITE-7 :30-12 P. M. (Tues.WILLIAM E. (BILLY) FOSSETT FO H ETQAIY(ther s open---$1.00c
It is one of the contradictions of the age in which we live that in a period FO H ETQAIYRACING FANS Notice! of definite specialization, the Drug Store-as such-now has assumed the place at the Special Morning Trip Reof the General Store in many communities. It is refreshing, then, to find a drug- LOWEST PRICE turns in time for races.
gitrmiigtrue to the oldest pharmaceutical traditions and yt ianup to the DOCK-Foot of Biscayne St.
ye iSane South end Alton Roadminute, modern way. William E. (Billy) Fossett is one of these. Miami Beach
In Mr. Fossett's pharmacy, only prescriptions and sick room supplies are sold. A
On his staff are six registered pharmacists, each a specialist in certain drugs orNersDoktFihnGoud medicines and possessed of information necessary to answer all inquiries pertaining I m l/ L. f 'No Bridges to Delay to any dose, action, use or contra-indication of their particular products._________________Further evidence of Mr. Fossett's modernity is found in his encouragement msic CO.
of all pharmacists to develop the research side of the business. Unusual develop- 42 W. Flagler St. MIAMIments in ointment bases, soap solutions and solvents thus have been made, and _______________ W__ I. ROSENGARTIN
many of these products are used by local physicians. It is a practice which, if Miami's Pioneer Furrier"
universally adopted, would tend to greatly elevate the profession to unmistakableAbouePtcin prominence and respect.AbouePtcin
For the wide range of services which Fossett (the man), and Fossett's (the -VAULTS pharmacy), offer to the medical profession, hospitals, laboratories, and the laity, HARRY'S BICYCLE this establishment enjoys a national reputation and patronage. Mr. Fossett believes SH PIn our New and Spacious Store that his success is due to his unswerving adherence to the highest ideals of his SHO 118 SO. MIAMI AVE.
profession-Quality, knowledge and dispatch. Ru WSp Cial intFrandCote
Billy Fossett is a member of the American Pharmaceutical Association, the I 10 S. W. 22nd Avenue R0%nuac Cold Storage le
National Association of Retail Druggists, and of the State and local associations. gg 10 nuac nAlAtce
He is also active in city clubs, being a member of the National Exchange Club Remodeling Moth Proofing
the Breakfast Club and the Chamber of Commerce. His hobbies are hunting Rnas-Sls-Rpis Cleaning Glazing
and fishing. ITEL. 3-4591
I I 118 South Miami Avenue
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Alp ert
The above residence at 1400 Lenox Avenue, Miami Beach, is the attractive home of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Alpert. This lovely place is a creation of Anton Skislewicz, one of the most popular and capable A 1 1 A I
architects on the Beach. It is not so large and impressive on the out- ANNA-u-PII
side, but the moment one enters the hospitable threshold he is conscious of a real work of art. It is warmly beautiful in all phases of SPEhCIALITY SHOP
interior architecture and decorations. The writer was particularly impressed with the delicate colors of its cheerful murals and the simple LADIES W EAR ANTIQUES
but rich furnishings, chief of which is a grand piano in a charming LARGEST KNOWN COLLECTION OF
Setting. How much credit should go to Mrs. Alpert could not be GIFTS
learned from her modest approval but she did admit that it was built BLUE AND WHITE TURNER-WEDGEWOOD
around the piano for music and hospitality. HATS RYLWRETRDNE E
Mr. and Mrs. Alpert were among the first permanent residents on BAGS RK ODEPST NVAE"83
the Beach. Mr. Alpert was a glass manufacturer in Springfield, Mass., OK ODEPST NVAE183
until his health forced him to retire at the early age of thirty-three. HOSIERY 'He was already an amateur builder before coming here and his energy LINGERIE 50 RARE EARLY AMERICAN
found a pleasant outlet in designing, first, his own home and apartment building, and, later, due to the persuasion of friends to be instru- B'GE 1LAK
mental in continued construction, yet remaining non -professional.EX PTOA
MVr. Albert holds the distinction of being the first to design and build CUSTOM MADEEX PTOA
"Bungalow Courts". He also gets credit for the following architectural EVNIGGO N EARLY AMERICAN
creations on the Beach: "The Castle", "Green Gables", the Kenmore,EVN GGO S
Breakwater, and Plymouth Hotels, as well as many homes and apart- POTTERY AND GLASS
ment houses.
Mr. and Mrs. Alpert have made many friends since their arrival VERY CHOICE COLLECTORS ITEMS
and are considered among the outstanding residents in social and 76 BISCf',AYNL D
civic life, as are their four children, Robert Zane, Ruth Shirley, Mrs. 76 AA N L D
Milton Nussbaum, and Mrs. Arthur Gold.




THE FLORIDA TEACHER 71
PERSONALITIES In 1930, with foresight toward better cooperation of the city's business
enterprises and the men conducting them, Mr. Goldstrom organized the Miami FREDERIC B. STRESAU Beach Bus'ness Men's Association, and for six years presided as its President.
A young man ...and progressive Frederic Stresau has achieved an He has also been active in Jewish welfare, Red Cross work, the Community
admirable record in the field of Landscape Architecture. Chest, and the Miami Beach Welfare Board, having been a member since 1932.
In Chicago, Illinois, Mr. Stresau spent his early years,-and later, from the Mr. Goldstrom has not only been alert in the pursuit of civic and busiUniversity of Illinois, received his degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Landscape ness improvement-but has also continued an active supporter of several fraArchitecture. He is a member of the Chicago Society of Landscape Architects. ternal organizations, such as the B. P. 0. E., of Miami Beach, of which he Entering actively in his chosen profession from 1934 to 1937 he was landscape is a member. A member too, of the Shrine, Scottish rites, he has also helped designer for the Chicago Park District. In this capacity he supervised general the Masonic home in his city. park work,. ... outdoor ampitheatre planning . airport work . playgrounds The Miami Beach Hotel Association also record him as a member, and
...and planting designing. He also participated in the Chicago lake front among his other interests Mr. Goldstrom at present operates the Hotel Gotham. development. Mr. Goldstrom is indeed a pioneer of Miami Beach, in civic, business and
In September 1937 Mr. Stresau came to Miami Beach and became associated fraternal organizations-well known among them for the service and helpwith C. D. Wagstaff and Company,-landscape and golf course experts. Since fulness he renders.
that time he has achieved recognition for his numerous successes in landscaping designi-especially for such residences as those of Mr. J. G. Coleman on Bay PROGRAM OF NATIONAL CONGRESS OF
Road, Mr. James H. Bereman and Mr. H. T. Morgan on La Gorce Island, and PARENTS AND TEACHERS
Mr. Robert Law Weed on Sunset Island Number One. The Board of Managers of the National Congress of Parents and Teachers
Mr. Stresau has also co-operated in the landscaping of various larger projects at its meeting in September adopted for 1940-41 a national legislative program such as Edison Court and Liberty Square in Miami, both United States Housing which includes: Abolition of compulsory block booking and blind selling of Authority developments-Dunbar Village in West Palm Beach-Dixie Court in motion pictures; federal aid for education, federal funds to be spent with miniFort Lauderdale-and the Miami Beach Housing Development on Belle Isle. mum federal control and maximum local support for equalization of educational
A life-long interest in planting design and a keen desire to achieve in the opportunity among the several states on a basis of need while maximum effort is field of Landscape Architecture are factors which have combined to make Mr. encouraged by the states; adequate support of federal educational services;
Stresau's work conscientious, creative and distinctive, election of a school-board by the District of Columbia; opposition to advertising
of intoxicating liquor; and opposition to legalizing a national lottery. MILES GALLOWA Y
By Jane Egbert. SALUTE TO THE FLAG
The judicious handling of realty transactions together with the men who I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the
have participated in them forms an integral part in the growth of any city. Reulcfrwihi7 tns n ain niiilwt iet n utc
In the expansion and development of the city of Miami Beach Miles Galloway fRpbi all.c tsads n ain ndvsbe ihliet n utc
has been closely identified in the realm of real estate.
Born in Atlanta, Georgia, Mr. Galloway was for seven years associated
with his brothers in the real estate business in that city. He was also active NORM ANDY PLAZA HITEL
in this field during the World War. This earlier association and knowledge of ON-THE-OCEAN Collins Avenue at 71st Street PRIVATE BEACH
the various phases of real estate activities, combined with a personality of DAILY ROOM TARIFF Sige Dul
quiet assurance and dignity, were contributory factors to his success as a real Decembe Doublery1-- ---------------------- 35 45
estate broker, in subsequent years. He has been a resident of Florida for sixteen January 15 to February 1------------------------------------- 6.00 7.00
years, having arrived in his adopted state in 1924. February 1 to March 10--------------------------------------- 7.00 8.00
March 10 to April 6--------------------------------------------- 4.00 6.00
For some years Mr. Galloway operated a realty business under his own April 6 to November 15 --------------------------------------- 1.50 2.00
name, and later in 1928 was interested in the subdivision project of Coral Solarium . Cabana Deck . All Outside Rooms . Private Beach
Gables. Following this he came to Miami Beach where he conducted a general ____________________________________brokerage for many years. Through this he has handled much Lincoln Road property in Miami Beach, and participated in the development of the mag- Ma iB ahFl
nificent Indian Creek area. Mim ec il&CLAM and OYSTER BAR
It is the opinion of Mr. Galloway that although the growth of Miami Soil Co.
Beach has been phenominal in the last few years-the real expansion of the Pop Marks
city is only beginning. The trend will grow northward-a fact soon to be SCHIJBERTII'S
recognized because of the crowded conditions in the already developed areas. MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA SEA FOOD GRILLE
Few people realize that the real estate broker is the catalytic agent in the _______________alchemy of modern municipal development who brings capital and constructive THE EVANGEL PRESS
forces together to produce the new horizons of the future. Printers and Dealers in Evangelical S. W. Corner Flagler Street
Such a man is Miles Galloway. Literature, Bibles, Books, Mottoes,
Plaques, Sunday School Supplies, and Miami River
Lesson Helps, Maps, Records, ReROBER C. ABIGwards, Gifts, Greetings, Games, AtROBER C. ABIGtendance Helps, Novelties, Etc. In November 1920, Robert C. Habig came to Dade County and began Justin Bare, Prop.
261 N. W. 3rd St. Phone 2-6512 Serving Complete Seafood
an active and constructive career in real estate. In the following year, 1921, and After Hours Call Phone 2-6538-. Dinners 50c
for five years until 1926 he was an able and efficient Assistant Sales Manager 44. of The Hollywood Land and Water Company, developers of the city of g Window Cleaning g1
Holwo, lrd.Service IOpen Night and Day
Mr. Habig's present office is at 605 Lincoln Road. He has been a realestate broker in Miami Beach for seven years, and in that capacity has greatly Att.: Mr. H. S. Hohn I
helped in the development of the city. He has participated in numerous 1665 Michigan Avenue gPhone 3-9197
outstanding realty transactions, and has negotiated many big deals, such IM I A M I B E A C Hi~ ________________as the sale of the Burdine building on Lincoln Road, and the present location .....
of Saks Fifth Avenue on Lincoln Road.
Mr ai' laigpersonality, combined with his spirit of drive and MIAMI MIAMI BEACH
Mer.een hags pleain mkn i nottnigra saeboe 218 N. E. 6th St. 1122 16th St.
peseeene a gnefr n ain imanotsanig ea sttebokr Phone 2-3119 Phone 5-3546
in a rapidly growing metropolitan area, as is Miami Beach._________________COL. SOL S. GOLDSTROM
Prominent among civic and business leaders of Miami Beach is Col. Sol ALEX -J P-- IN CS. Goldstrom. Coming from Omaha, Nebraska, his first business contact with Miami Beach was the organizing of The Goldstrom Baking Company, opening service there in April 1925.
Aside from business activities Mr. Goldstrom has been a diligent sup- PLUMBING GAS FITTING
porter in building and promulgating the public and civic welfare of the city.HETNOI BU ERWA RSY EM
For six years he was 'director of the Chamber of Commerce Board, and wa HEAIG WOIL BU NR WL B AERSYSEMS
also instrumental in organizing the junior Chamber of Commerce of MiamiREPAIR W0RK IN ALL BRANCHES
Beach.




72 THE FLORIDA TEACHER
grance put out by a local concern, is compelling of attention and more than worthy of the endorsement of perfume loving connoisseurs.
The names of the various fragrances put forth by Lejeune are arresting and connote all the beauty, warmth, and charm of a tropic night.
One of the perfumes, Ecstasie, rich, potent, sultry, is remiscent of moonlight nights and romances which found their beginning beneath the tropic moon.
Tropique, a very delightful and slightly milder fragrance, suggests days and evenings of tropical gaiety and glamour.
Perhaps the Lejeune perfume destined to become the best known is the popularly priced one called "Stars Over Miami." It has a Satisfying fragrance suitable for daytime use as well as night-time glamour.
Still another is 'After Twelve,' a young, gay, scintillating perfume with a fragrance as catchy as its name.
Back in 1913, this Buick was the "truck" and "Sunday Pleasure Car" of The firm of-Lejeune, as we have stated, had its beginning right the Dulbs family. In those days, Mr. Dulbs had his office in a converted here in Miami where it is manufactured and distributed. It has, then, a garage at 12th Street (now known as W. Flagler and N. W. 1st Avenue). No definite appeal for all Miami women-first and foremost, the appeal sidewalks or paved roads were known. Miami was in its infancy, and Miami that alluring perfumes will always have for members of the fairer Beach was just a swamp. sex; and secondly, the appeal of being a local product.
To make the "convertible job" above pictured into a truck, down came the To the visitor and tourist here for the season, it will afford an top, out came the back seat and in its place was bolted a huge tin box. On opportunity of taking back home with them at last a real perfume of Sundays, the process was reversed and the family proudly toured the town, the tropics-and to the Miami resident, it gives a chance of proudly Now, neat red and black trucks bear the C. J. Dulbs Plumbing Co. sign, and flaunting a glamorous perfume which they may truthfully say had the family has its own car. its inception here in their home town.
It was in 1910 that Mr. Dulbs came here from Cleveland, Ohio, where he The manufacturer of Lejeune has done a fine job of these perhad also been in the plumbing business. His inability to find a job working for fumes; he has skillfully contrived to blend together his ingredients someone else forced him to start in on his own, and his first work was on a in such a manner that the happy result brings to the mind a vivid group of five houses, at old Avenue K and 11th Street (now N. W. 1st Street picture of Miami magic-of warm sunlight on white beaches, of endand 5th Avenue). Then came the Rutherford Hotel job. Everyone said he was less stretches of broad, proud prados, of long golden eyenings, of gentle too young to handle it, but-with the confidence of youth-he went ahead, lapping waves, of soft strains of romantic music, dancing feet on doing a notably fine piece of work. palm sheltered terraces, the clear brightness of a tropic moon, and of
In 1812-13, came the Lawyers' Building-the six story "Sky Scraper" of Miami. endless romances beneath a star-filled sky-all the moods of MiamiNo contracts were needed in those days-people took each other's word . Miami, lovely and capricious as a beautiful woman-all these moods and capital to carry on ventures wasn't so hard to get. In fact, it was J. N. have been skillfully captured and are reflected in the fragrance of Lummus as head of the Southern Bank and Trust, at the time, who helped Dulbs Lejeune-A REAL PERFUME FOR THE TROPICS. over the financial hurdle on the Lawyers' Building job. Write to Lejeune, 1845 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Florida, for latest
over ~~~~~~ n comlet fianiaturleolteoawesuBueins.b
More and more work came his way-in Coral Gables, Miami, the Beach- and complete catalogues.
the Roman Pools Building for the then owner, Mr. St. John; Wee Tappy Tavern Office Phones 3-8795-3-8796 Market Phone 3-2404
(which only real old timers will remember) and the Roberts Hotel above it- Home Phone 7-4047
were some of his earlier jobs. Dulbs also carried on the City maintenance work KLEFEKER PRODUCE, INC.
and the County repair work.
Mr. Dulbs tells tales of hunting in the wilds-where the Miami Biltmore WHOLESALE FRUITS AND PRODUCE
now stands; of shooting crocodiles at Flagler and the Miami River; and of the Stall 70. Farmer's Co-operative Market
old Bridge Tender, and the Indians who looked upon him as their friend. He THE GROCERY BOY TO HIS LADY FAIR
was a real pioneer, and can tell the tales of the early days so that you relive them This Thrilling Love Letter Was Found in a Basket of Beans again with him. Dearest Sweet Pea:
Do you "carrot" all for me My heart "beets" for you, ids wife and three sons are all with him in the plumbing business at 8 South with your "radish" hair and your "turnip" nose. You are the Collins Avenue. His wife now runs the office for him and can't be stumped or "apple" of my eye. Give me a "date" and then "lettuce" any plunming term, nor be found at a loss in locating whatever piece or fitting marry. I know we would be a "peach" of a "pear". is needed. His three sons all work for him too, and are proud to be able to say that they are the oldest existing firm of plumbers in Greater Miami.
We Heartily Invite THE EDUCATORS OF FLORIDA to
Be Our Guests at
Irving Collins THE BOAT RESTAURANT
"Let the other fellow have the glory, I am satisfied with results"
-was Irving Collins motto-yet glory belongs to Irving for the stupen- when in Downtown Miami
dous amount of work he did in the management end of the growth of Sizzling Steaks our Specialty . Satisfactory Food Well
Miami Beach. Prepared. Unexcelled Coffee . Made Every Half Hour
"Pete" Chase has often remarked-"While Carl Fisher was the THE BOAT RESTAURANT
'maker' of Miami Beach-Irving Collins was the 'saver' ". In 1932 and 1933, when things were at their blackest, especially for the Miami Miami's Best Open All Night
Beach Bayshore Company, Collins borrowed on all his Northern interests, his life insurance, his personal credit, to save the Company. Had
-the Company been forced to liquidate their vast holdings, it would have been to our Real Estate values what a Stock Market collapse would be to the Bond business-land values would have been com-pletely ruined. j C
All through the depression Fisher, Pancoast and Collins treated 1006 LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH
their employees so marvelously that it is no wonder, today, you find 327 WORTH AVE., PALM BEACH
such complete devotion in their ranks.
Finest Petite Points
Enamels High-Class Novelties
Perfumes of Lejeune Bags Embroideries Silver
Haunting as a lovely memory, tantalizing as a half-forgotten We specialize in Tapestry to Work
melody, warm and provocative as a summer's night, glamorous as Bags Cleaned and Repaired
the tropics themselves, Lejeune Perfume, a new and arresting fra-




Biscayne Gardens0 OWN YOUR OWN ACRE TRACT
Own your own acre tract of rich, fertile soil. Get back to "Mother Earth," and enjoy a new home, a new life in the country, with all the city conveniences of electricity, telephone and paved roads. Grow what you will;
fish when you like, and tie your boat up to your own dock on beautiful Biscayne River.
" GROW YOUR OWN FRUIT and VEGETABLES
Grow your own fruit and vegetables. Raise poultry if you like. Whatever you desire to raise, Biscayne Gardens has a variety of tracts with the right kind of soil, from which you may make your own selection. See for yourself the 60,000 pounds of papayas one owner has raised on an acre of land. See the beautiful vegetable gardens at 159th Street. Then you'll know what this new home, this new life in Beautiful Biscayne Gardens can
mean to you.
" MORE THAN 145 NEW HOMES
More than 145 new homes have been built by enth usiastic home owners now enjoying this "country life with city conveniences" in Biscayne Gardens. They "live the life of Riley," yet are only 20 minutes from down town Miami; only 15 minutes from the beach, the new million dollar county park location, and Florida's largest fishing
pier; and they're only 10 minutes from Opa Locka and the government training base.
* YOU OWE IT TO YOURSELF to See Beautiful Biscayne Gardens
You owe it to yourself to see beautiful Biscayna Gardens. Drive out Biscayne Boulevard to 88th Street, continue north through Miami Shores, across Biscayne River bridge and bear left to 154th Street. Our representative at our field office will be glad to show y ou over the property, with no obligation whatever.
" TRACTS AS LOW AS $250 ...$10 DOWN ...$10 MONTHLY
Owned and Developed By
BLPAHD PLPOPUPTI[, IC.
502 Phone 2-2523
FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG. MIAMI, FLORIDA




V., V
Spend~~ ~ iyour day idlin oni warm, sn swep beachs and ejoylaguorou I !
nights beneath the stars in quiet content . or mingle with celebrities in a whirl of gaiety. Be a sportsman pursuing your own hobby . or takeites merely looking on at regattas, races or a dozen other sports. Live like a king in ~sumptuous surroundings or go in for the simple life. There's no end to the entertainment .. no end to the ways you can relax. Small wonder Miami Beach is the haven for those with_purses either full or -slender, for each vacations in
....his own way -in a setting of boundless- beauty. CH AMBER Of COMMERCE, Miami Beach, Fla (
Pleae sed free de uxe bookle lav-u m B
ishly illustrated in natural color 0 []I E C
Also data on Hotels []Apartments ].. Narne (3)
Address....
City State ..




Full Text

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/ e t % i t • *7143 r l4Josild f & Cf'ieat< All ^Ifea^i Abound Redact J

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THE MIAMI BEACH FIRST NATIONAL BANK RESOURCES OVER $19,000,000 THOMAS J. PANCOAST Vice President JOHN J. HUTCHESON Vice President OFFICERS F. Lowry Wall President CHARLES H. ALCOCK Cashier and Trust Officer FRANK SMATHERS, JR. Assistant Trust Officer ASSISTANT CASHIERS E. E. Stockwill Colton L. Lohr F. Rouse Smith H. H. Culbertson COMMERCIAL BANKING TRUST AND CUSTODIAN DEPARTMENTS SAFE DEPOSIT AND STORAGE VAULTS NIGHT DEPOSITORY Oldest and Largest Bank in Miami Beach Corner Lincoln and Alton Roads

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The PAN AMERICAN Solar System was first to use the following FOUR IMPORTANT IMPROVEMENTS ROCK WOOL HORIZONTAL TANK DOUBLE GLAZED, WITH AIR SPACE REYNOLDS METALLATION WITH TWO AIR SPACES FOR INSULATION CORRUGATED BACKING No. 1 Flat Tubing with Corrugated Backing No. 2 Horizontal Tank that Works No. 3 Double Glazed Heater that Gets Hotter No. 4 A Solar Heater Guaranteed not to Freeze Any Place in the U. S. A. at Small Additional Cost These Assure Unequalled Efficiency When we first put these improvements into general use our competitors said we were crazy; today they are trying to imitate. 100% More Heating Surface on our coil pipes, and approximately 20% more metal surface, per square foot, to the sun’s rays than other types of solar heaters. For this reason we can heat water much faster. PAN AMERICAN SOLAR HEATER Inc. E. L. Brigman, President P. J. Owens, Vice-President R. E. Booth, Secretary-Treasurer 2730-34 N. W. SECOND AVENUE, PHONE 3-5226, MIAMI, FLORIDA 212 WEST BAY 'STREET, PHONE 3-5588, SAVANNAH, GEORGIA D. B. Brigman, Vice-President and General Manager TERMS IF DESIRED 1, 2, 3 YEARS TO PAY—NO DOWN PAYMENT Member Florida State Bureau of Publicity

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2 yP ) S THE FLORIDA TEACHER Red and Gray Sun Room by “Grand Central Wicker Shop ” (Selected by and for “HOUSE BEAUTIFUL’S” Bride House of 1940) Our clientele of past twenty years has included such distinguished names as: Mr. W. K. Vanderbilt Miss Anne Morgan Mr. Dupont De Nemours Mr. Clarence H. Mackay Mr. Edward F. Hutton Mr. John McEntee Bowman Mr. Clarence Dillon Mrs. G. F. Baker, Jr. Mr. Wm. Ziegler, Jr. Mr. Walter P. Chrysler Mrs. Wm. Fahnstock Mrs. J. K. Willys Mrs. T. Suffern Tailer Mrs. I. Straus Countess De Frasso Miss Frances Alda Mr. Jascha Heifetz Mr. “Al” Jolson Mr. Harry Richman Mr. Thomas Meighan Miami-Biltmore, Miami Roney-Plaza, Miami The Everglades, Miami Hotel Flamingo, Miami The New Breakers, Palm Beach Whitehall, Palm Beach Bath & Tennis Club, Palm Beach Seminole Club, Palm Beach Our Manufacturing Experience of Twenty Years— Our Convenient Location Bein g Out of the High Rent Area— Our Personal Attention to Every Detail enables us to offer the finest quality rattan fu rniture in exclusive styles or made to your specifications—at prices that mean substantial savings. A Visit to Our Showrooms Will Convince You PAUL L. DUJARDIN President GRAND CENTRAL WICKER SHOP, INC. WILLIAM B. BEADY Secretary & Treasurer 1253 DADE BOULEVARD AT ALTON ROAD MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA Phone 5-1931

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 3 The CADILLAC DIRECTLY ON THE OCEAN FRONT Miami Beach’s New and Exclusive Hotel on the Ocean Towering majestically above the green palms and white sands of Miami Beach at Collins Avenue and 39th' Street arises THE CADILLAC, This hotel, steam-heated, with 125 rooms and penthouses, is an expression of the most modern in construction—luxuriously furnished and providing unlimited public space. Guests may lounge in two large lobbies and mezzanine—stroll out of doors through walks and tropical gardens—or again enjoy a dip in the attractive swimming pool—or along the block front of private beach. Here the new Cabana Club be comes a popular social center—as well as the beautiful dance patio planned for those who would dance under tropical stars. The exquisitely appointed dining room and cocktail lounge provide further convenience and enjoyment for guests, as well as a completely equipped beauty salon, barber shop, card and mahjong rooms and novelty shop. Mr. E. H. Dine, owner of THE CADILLAC, first became asso ciated with Miami Beach in 1924. At that time he came from Chicago to regain his health. Having regained it he decided to make Miami Beach his home. A year later, 1925, he acquired The La Flora, a 42-room hotel which he operated until 1935. In that year he became owner of The Netherlands, a hotel of 105 rooms, where for five years he was a successful and genial host. Mr. Dine, who is now associated with Mr. Nathan Borin of Detroit, Michigan, may well be proud of THE CADILLAC, his newest achievement in hotel ownership and construction. We salute this man of vision—whose creation of THE CADILLAC provides another beauty spot in Miami Beach. FOR RESERVATIONS WRITE OR WIRE E. H. DINE, Managing Director A Federal Savings Institution Which Has Never Paid Less Than 3% Dividends On Insured Savings The First Federal Savings and Loan Association of Miami is the largest mutual savings institution in the South. It is the oldest Federal in America, operating under United States Charter Number One. The account of each savings investor in the First Federal is insured up to $5,000 by the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, of Washington, D. C., an instrumentality of the United States Govern ment. In addition to the payment of liberal dividends, the Association has accumulated many times the required reserves. First Federal savings come largely from conservative persons who seek maximum safety and fair return, free from uncertain business conditions and the ris ks of market fluctuation. RESOURCES OVER $16,000,000.00 • FIRST FEDERAL • SAVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI One Hundred N. E. First Avenue W. H. WALKER, President

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4 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Smart and Mew • DANCES and ENTERTAINMENT • SWIMMING POOL • CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST • FREE PARKING • PALM GARDENS OPEN ALL YEAR BLACKSTONE Hotel and Cabana Club ALFRED STONE Managing Director. Where to Live in Miami Typical Royalton Bedroom THE ROYALTONOwned and operated by the Midwest Hotel Manage ment Co., Inc., who also operate the Marlboro Apart ments, 425 S. W. 10th Avenue, Miami. Deluxe bed room apartments—completely furnished and equipped —All outside rooms—in the exclusive Southwest resi dential section of Miami. Your Inspection Most Cordially Invited . Write J. M. BAER, Manager, ROYALTON HOTEL 131 S. E. FIRST STREET — MIAMI, FLORIDA ANNOUNCING A NEWCOMER TO WIOD’S EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS “The Teacher Hour” D EVERY SUNDAY AT 4:15 P. M. CONDUCTED BY MRS. LESSIE COLLINS (Educational Director of WIOD) Added to these “regulars”: University of Chicago Roundtable University of Miami Radio Workshop WIOD Classroom of the Air Five Important News Analysts Overseas Broadcasts Latin American News Music, Science, History Programs “Always a Star Perfonnance” NBC Red 610 K. C. <7 *4 Z ^boAAet at Collins Avenue Between 17th and 18th Streets NEW NINETY ROOM HOTEL Always one important thought — Y our comfort and convenience. A STONE’S THROW FROM THE OCEAN

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 5 The FLORIDA TEACHER “Florida’s Finest Monthly” TRADE MARK REGISTERED ALICE W. CRAWFORD, Editor A monthly publication devoted to the interests oj the schools, teachers, and others interested in educational work, to acquaint the public with the progress oj education. PUBLISHED ON OR ABOUT THE FIFTEENTH OF EACH MONTH EXCEPT JULY AND AUGUST By THE TEACHER PUBLISHING COMPANY Post Office Box 2648 Miami, Florida Downtown Offices Calumet Building, Phone 3-3267 J. VICTOR MALONE, 247 Park Ave., New York Representative HELEN HOCKETT, 311 Duval St., Jacksonville Representative Entered as Second Class matter April 6, 1939, at Post Office at Miami, Florida, Under the Act of March 3, 1879 Volume VI JANUARY, 1941 Number 5 Official Publication FLORIDA CENTENNIAL ASSOCIATION A non-profit corporation organized to assist in arranging for the celebration of the one hundred years of Florida statehood. Executive Offices 326 EAST FLAGLER STREET, MIAMI SUBSCRIPTION PRICE Two Dollars per Year Single Copy, 25 Cents Advertising Rates on Request The pages of THE TEACHER are open to expressions of opinions which are not injurious in any way by the fact of publication A TRIBUTE —TO THE PIONEER We learn from earliest history that, among many races, there have been pioneers . brave adventurers who courageously blazed trails and prepared the way for others to follow. These men, inspired by vision and an urge to overcome every obstacle in the path of their progress, have been our true leaders and builders. Farther back than history records we learn of the Norsemen who braved the dangers of unknown oceans when the earth was believed to be flat. Among our early records we learn that Christ commanded His disciples to “go into all the world” and carry the story of a new religion. This religion proved so pow erful that it became the strongest influence in causing its followers to seek new lands wherein they could enjoy freedom of worship. Later pioneers, in search of adventure or untilled fields, led the way into founding new nations. So has it been all through history that the first to endure the hardships and make the way easier for others to follow were not always the ones who received due credit and material rewards for their unselfish sacrifices. America would never have been discovered, nor would Florida have been formed out of the lush, tropical wilderness, had it not been for our hardy fore fathers’ fighting and winning in the face of every obstacle imaginable. It is even possible that this “Magic City” would still be uncut swamplands and unnavigable waters of Ponce de Leon’s day. Therefore, it is with great pleasure that I have the privilege and opportunity of paying tribute to one of the city’s and state’s living personaliies, an outstanding pioneer of yesteryear, whose proven ability, vision, indomitable courage and accomplishments, along with his associates, made it possible for us to enjoy the fruits of their labors. ALICE W. CRAWFORD. UTILITIES KEEP PACE Keeping pace with the rapid growth of the Greater Miami area, the Peoples Water and Gas Company has spent more than a million dollars during the past year in expansion of service facilities to take care of the development of Miami Beach. The executives of this firm, are ever alert to the duties of their company in providing first class service to the public. Foreseeing a continuation of the development in this area, the Florida Power and Light Company currently is expending about $2,500,000 in Plant construction and expansion for the generation of sufficient power to care for public needs for many years to come. This great company is built on the keen foresight of its officials in contemplating sectional expansions and taking steps to provide ex cellent service. BOOK OF THE SOUTH The James O. Jones Company of New Orleans has completed a splendid compendium of Southern personalities, entitled “The Book of the South.” The volume contains more than 500 pages, smartly illustrated. The intimate stories of hundred of leaders in the South were compiled by the Southern Editorial Association, with Hal Leyshon, brillian young editor of The Miami Daily News, as editor-inchief. Mr. Leyshon and his colleagues have done a masterful job and the book is a distinct contribution to knowledge in the South. Beach Churches In the rush, bustle and hurrah of life at Miami Beach, the religious side has not been neglected. Founder Carl G. Fisher, in the early stages of the city’s development, donated land sites for two churches. Other donations have constructed edifices since, so that, today, Miami Beach boasts of the finest churches in Florida. Beach Schools Miami Beach schools have kept pace with the rapid growth of this miracle city, with a high school and elementary institutions that rank among the best in the state. Florida’s sixty-seven counties boast over 2, <00 schools, with more than 14,000 teachers. The progress of Miami Beach is exemplified in having schools of top rank. Monsignor Barry Among leaders in Miami Beach cultural life, the redoubtable Monsignor William Barry of St. Patrick’s Parish and the Barry school is outstanding. Father Barry has devoted many arduous years to the development of his parish and school. These institutions always will stand as a monument to his Christian aggressiveness. Father Barry is one of the greatest assets of Miami Beach. The Fisher Memorial So that the memory of Carl Graham Fiber will never be forgotten and that future generations shall be cognizant of his great leadership in developing Miami Beach from a mangrove swamp into America’s greatest resort city, the Fisher Memorial Association has been or ganized. Plans are being evolved by the committee for a perpetual memorial to this great man, who was not only a sportsman and busi ness executive, but a profound friend of this city. Junior College Movement Florida’s department of education should make a serious study of the Junior College movement, as started in New Hampshire. There is a steady growth of the idea of junior colleges in cities of secondary size in many states. The proposal offers two years of education beyond the level of the secondary school and aims to meet the higher educational needs of communities in which they are located; general education for those who are not planning to attend a university and specialized preparation for particular occupation, with appropriate courses of college grade for adults. Splendid Action The National Audubon Society, 1006 Fifth Avenue, New York, is sponsoring a national camp for adult leaders, the object of which is to provide teachers, youth leaders and other interested adults with field experience and practical program suggestions for developing general interest in birds, mammals, insects, plants and other wild life. Campers at the resort, established at Medomak, Maine, will enjoy two weeks out of doors participating in informal field classes, and certificates describing the work covered will be awarded those who successfully complete the program. This is splendid action. Splendid Brochure Dr. Frank N. Freeman, Dean of the School of Education, Univer sity of California, has contributed materially to the progress of educa

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6 THE FLORIDA TEACHER The FLORIDA TEACHER “Florida s Finest Monthly' LIFE MEMBER tion through authorship of a splendid brochure on “Solving Hand writing Needs.” He has been doing research work in handwriting since 1907 and his booklet is a valuable contribution for schools. Copies of the brochure can be obtained for ten cents each from the Zaner-Bloser Company, Columbus, Ohio. NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED STATES ALICE W. CRAWFORD, Publisher ASSOCIATE AND CONTRIBUTING EDITORS ED. R. BENTLEY, Attorney Editor, Florida Law Journal Lakeland MRS. GRACE BROWN Publicity Director Miami Beach Senior High School GRACE DEXTER BRYAN Author and Lecturer Coral Gables JOSEPH T. BURLEIGH, S. J. Principal, Gesu School L. GRADY BURTON State’s Attorney Wauchula DOYLE E. CARLTON, Attorney Ex-Governor of Florida Trustee Stetson University Tampa MRS. HENRY CARR Past President, N. L. A. P. W. LESSIE O. COLLINS Radio Commentator, The Teacher Hour LAURA CUSHMAN Principal, The Cushman School HATTIE CARPENTER Journalist MRS. CHARLES J. DOUGHERTY Pres. Miami Branch, National League of American Pen Women MRS. RAYMOND EDWARDS Writer D. NEIL FERGUSON, Attorney Ocala BERTHA M. FOSTER Dean of the School of Music University of Miami AGNES M. GLEASON Supervisor of Music Cleveland, Ohio MRS. J. IRA GORE Poet MRS. J. AVERY GUYTON Past-Pres., Miami Women’s Club R. H. GORE Publisher, Gore Newspapers of Florida Ft. Lauderdale JOHN CLAYTON GIFFORD Professor Tropical Forestry University of Miami MRS. M. LEWIS HALL President of P. E. O. Sisterhood MRS. WADE H. HARLEY Poet MRS. LEONARD W. HASKIN Dade County Health Unit SIMON HOCHBERGER Instructor of Journalism University of Miami MRS. J. R. HOLT American Association, University Women West Palm Beach VIVIAN YEISER LARAMORE Poet Laureat of Florida MRS. W. BRUCE MacINTOSH President Miami Garden Club MAUDE KIMBALL MASSENGALE Journalist MANA-ZUCCA Composer MRS. FRANCIS M. MILLER Writer MRS. T. V. MOORE National Safety Chairman, Federation of Women’s Clubs GRACE MURRAY Past-Pres. Miami Music Club MRS. JOHN M. MURRELL Author and Attorney MRS. MARY NOEL MOODY President U. D. C. Plant City MRS. ETTA V. MENDENHALL President, W. C. T. U. Tampa MRS. EDWIN F. MONTGOMERY Pres. Florida Federation of Music Clubs Lake City NATHAN MAYO Commissioner of Agriculture Tallahassee VIAX MEYER Professor of Psychology Supervisor of Mod. Language Instruction University of Miami MRS. JOHN E. NORMAN Publicity Director, Miami Branch of the National League of Am. Pen Women MRS. VINCENT HILLES OBER Pres. National Federation of Music Clubs Norfolk, Virginia DR. J. RIIS OWRE Professor of Spanish University of Miami MRS. THOMAS J. PANCOAST President, Miami Beach Womans Club MARIE TELLO PHILLIPS Poet, Novelist, Literary Editor GRACE PORTERFIELD POLK State President, National League of American Pen Women MRS. CHARLES K. QUACKENBUSH Dade County Tuberculosis Association MRS. WARREN QUILLIAN Junior League of Miami RUSSELL A. RASCO Dean University of Miami Law School PAUL E. RAYMOND Dean of the College of Law Stetson University TToT .nnri DAVID HEFFERNAN Judge, Civil Court of Record, Dade County U. J. HISS Business Manaeer University of Miami GEORGE E. HOLT, Attorney Member of Faculty University of Miami MRS. RICHARD L. HOXIE Founder, Miami Branch National League of American Pen Women Washington, D. C. VERMAN KIMBROUGH President, Ringling School of Art Sarasota PEARL SAFFORD Musician, Composer MRS. FRANK SMATHERS Y. W. C. A. Board MRS. J. JULIEN SOUTHERLAND Past Director, Miami Beach Flower Show MRS. T. T. STEVENS Past-Pres. Dade County Federation of Women’s Clubs DR. LUDD M. SPIVEY President, Florida Southern College MRS. SYDNEY WEINTRAUB Girl Scout Executive LILLIE REED ZORTMAN Poetry and Feature Articles Advisory Editors and the organization with which they are affiliated do not neces sarily endorse all the statements or opinions offered in this magazine or all claims made in advertisements. Progressive Thought Every Florida school teacher should read an editorial in the February issue of Woman’s Home Companion which suggests Spanish as a primary foreign language for American schools in the practical interests of economic and cultural hemisphere solidarity. The editorial is a contribution of progressive thought. Fact Finding Fundamental economic issues in national defense are discussed by Harold G. Moulton in a booklet just published by the Brookings Institution, Washington, D. C., copies of which may be secured from the Maurice and Laura Falk Foundation, Farmers Bank building, Pittsburgh, Pa. For those interested in fact finding arguments, the booklet is distinctly worth while. Safety By Compulsion Massachusetts has taken the leadership in highway safety by passage of a compulsory automobile liability insurance act, and other states are falling in line with measures patterned after this bill, known as the Hampton Act. The American Association of Casualty and Surety Underwriters, New York, is actively engaged in sponsor ing such legislation in all states. The association will gladly supply information regarding such acts to members of the Florida Legislature. Milton Weiss Milton Weiss, brilliant young lawyer, who received his high school education in Miami Beach schools, has been elected as a member of the Dade County Board of Public Instruction. He is the youngest person ever chosen for this office and, as a member, he will exert splendid vigor in assisting in the advancement of Dade County education. Tourists and Conventions One of the prime needs of Miami Beach is a well-established, well-financed Tourist and Convention Bureau to promote summer business, in addition to the great influx of winter-season visitors. A movement is afoot to establish such a bureau and it should be joined by all hotels for an active campaign. One of the purposes of the or ganization should be the construction of a Miami Beach convention hall with sufficient seating capacity to handle a major meeting. The National Education Association’s annual convention could be brought to Miami Beach if such an institution were available. It is the hope of The Florida Teacher that progressive hotel managers and business firms will join in this forward movement. Suggested Improvement A cement walk, at least 60 feet wide, fronting the length of Lummus Park—and properly floodlighted at night—would afford a wellilluminated, beautiful promenade which would attract thousands of additional persons to Miami Beach. The City Council is welcome to this suggestion. Thomas J. Pancoast Today’s first citizen of Miami Beach undoubtedly is Thomas J. Pancoast, stalwart pioneer who has enjoyed the„pleasure of seeing a mangrove swamp developed into the metropolis which stands on these shores today. The accomplishments of Thomas Pancoast are a monu ment to his vision and his vigcr. He has been unrelentingly progres sive, always laboring for a greater city. His charming wife and his splendid sons have joined him in the traditional Pancoast zeal in contributing to the betterment of the city. We warmly salute the Pancoast family. Everglades National Park National parks are good businesses to have around—especially in states that attract millions of tourists. During 1940, 16,741,855 men, women and children visited the national parks in these United States. For many years past, there have been columns and columns of publicity regarding the Everglades National Park, to be established in South Florida. It is the hope of The Florida Teacher that Governor Spessard Holland will be more active in promoting the establishment of this park than was his predecessor. It is our hope that Mr. Holland will not make a political football of this park, but will have the aid of competent men who will secure action to complete Everglades National. We need real men who are worthy of good salaries for doing the worthwhile job.

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THE FLORIDA TEACHE? 7 Miracle of . Miami Beach by J. N. Lummus A Pioneer Developer and First Mayor of Miami Beach (COPYRIGHT, 1941) Owing to circumstances over which we have no control, we are unable to reproduce all of the photographs contained in the book of the original story, “The Miracle of Miami Beach,” and for that reason the following article is a condensation of the original manuscript, with appropriate illustrations.—The Editor. F o r over one thousand years, since the early Norsemen, the vision persist ence, perseverance and money of man have been the important factors in the discovery, conquest and development of America. It is no different today than when Christopher Columbus used an egg to get funds from Queen Isabella, to discover other lands. He had vision, persist ence and perseverance . but the Queen had the money. It is no different today than in 1567, when Don Pedro Menendez de Aviles, built a Spanish Mission on what is now Miami Beach, to Christianize the Indians, establish a port of call for his ships and exploit this area for the benefit of the Spanish Crown. He had vision and money .... but lacked the other essentials. It is no different today than in 1870 when Henry B. Lum and son, Charles H. Lum, landed on the ocean side of what is now Miami Beach, and seeing a few coconut trees growing by the water’s edge decided that here was a home with a future and a fortune. The Lums had vision, persistence, perseverance and . some money, so they returned to Red Bank, New Jersey, and interested a few friends in their venture. When Henry B. Lum and his son, Charles H. Lum, returned to their Red Bank, New Jersey, home, following their visit to Miami Beach in 1870, their tales of coconuts actually growing along the water’s edge, fell upon fertile field. Coconuts and “copra” were in great demand those days, and the Lums and their friends could visualize enormous profits in a “coconut growing” enterprise in this area. The Lums purchased a large tract of beach land from the State of Florida for seventy-five cents per acre and Henry B. Lum homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres from the United States Government. Twelve years later, to be exact, in 1882, the Lums returned, after having interested Ezra Osborn and Elnathan T. Field of Red Bank in their venture. ... Osborn and Field made the trip from New Jersey to Miami Beach and were so well “sold” on the idea that they purchased a strip of land about sixty-five miles in length along the ocean extending from the Lum holdings north to Jupiter. It is no different today than in 1912, when my brother, J. E. Lummus, our associates and myself purchased the Lum holdings and decided that the future of Miami Beach did not lie in growing coconuts, but would eventually be a real “Paradise Under the Sun” for the sun seekers of the North. We had vision, persistence, perseverance and, . some money, but more of this will be told later. Judging from the prospects of coconut growing along the peninsula of Miami Beach, as explained by Osborn and Field to friends in New Jersey, the wealth to be gained was almost likened to the rubbing of an “Aladdin’s Lamp”. In fact, it was estimated by the potential coconut growers that each nut planted would become a tree and each tree upon reaching maturity would produce at least one good nut each week. So Osborn and Field, while in New Jersey, employed twenty-five men from a life-saving station, and acquired from the Government several ancient life boats which they reconditioned. They bought some mules, wagons, tents, a portable house, tools and provisions, and sailed on a Mallory Line boat for Key West, where they chartered a small schooner to transport their goods to Miami Beach. When the schooner arrived off the coast of Miami Beach, it was found that the water was too shallow to permit the boat to dock, so the mules were shoved overboard, the men swimming with them to land. Lifeboats were then launched and provisions, workmen, tools, etc., were rowed to shore. Leaving the prospective coconut planters to carry out their work of preparing the land in readiness for the planting, the schooner sailed to the Island of Trinidad where a cargo of nuts was purchased. Part of the site selected for the initial coconut grove is now known as Lummus Park, the popular bathing and recreation beach made possible by the author of this book. Having had no previous experience in clearing South Florida mangrove swamp lands, Osborn and Field soon realized they had undertaken a real job. To pene trate the underbrush for only a few feet on the ocean front was impossible without the use of a machete, and they were harassed by millions of mosquitoes, sand flies, rattlesnakes, moccasions, coral snakes, rabbits, coons, and other denizens of the swamp. Assembling their portable house on the ocean edge, the coconut planters looked around for some entrance into the swamp and soon found an old Indian trail which had been in use by the Tekesta tribe long before the Seminoles were here, and by the Spanish Menendez when he built his mission in 1567. They used this trail, after widening it, as a highway for their mules. They had accomplished very little in preparing the land for coconut planting when the schooner arrived with one hundred thousand nuts,—only to find that the landing was unsatisfactory. For a short time the sea was calm and the coconuts were rafted ashore in burlap bags, but a “squall” set up and this method could not be used, so the nuts were dumped overboard to let the wind and tide carry them landward. This meant that thousands of nuts drifted by the ocean current, far north of Miami Beach. Only thirty-eight thousand of this cargo was allotted to Miami Beach, and the trouble of planting seemed insurmountable. It was impossible to plant them in rows, because of the undergrowth of the swamp, so they were planted willy-nilly in small holes with the tip of the nuts showing, which is the usual method, but without any conformity as to direction. By spring, the nuts were finally planted, a few baing planted on Cape Florida, and again the schooner arrived with another cargo, which came from Nicaragua. They were floated ashore, and were planted along the Indian Trail on Miami Beach. By fall, the job was finished, so the camp was moved to the Hillsboro House of Refuge above Boca Raton, where a third schooner load, brought from Cuba, was planted along the shore in that section. This procedure was repeated during the next two years and until a total of three hundred and thirty-four thousand coconuts had been planted along the Atlantic Ocean. The cost of buying the nuts, clearing the swamp and planting had been far greater than anticipated, so that at the end of the third year, the finances of the company had been virtually exhausted, so Field returned to New Jersey to seek aid. To all “back home,” Field told of the vast possibilities of coconut growing, and what he, Osborn and Lum had already done on the Florida peninsula. Particularly did he tell of the venture to a friend, John S. Collins, a prominent citizen of New Jersey, with the result that Collins advanced Field five thousand dollars to carry the scheme as far as possible to a successful conclusion. In the meantime, the Lums had interested Henry Robinson, of New York CARL G. FISHER Photo by Tooley-Myron

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER Washington Avenue at Twelfth Street Where the present City Hall now stands. City, in their part of the venture to the extent that they supplied the work and he, the finances. However, all was not rosy for the coconut “wizards.” Nature has a peculiar way all her own. It takes at least seven years for a coconut palm to bear nuts. This fact seemed to have been overlooked by the planters, unless they expected to wait “seven lean years” until they could begin to harvest for “seven fat years.” Neither did they take into consideration that rabbits thrive on young coconut fronds, and coons are crazy about digging up the parent nut before it takes root . but they soon found out. They decided to give the denizens of the swamp some real appetizing food, so they sent north and bought apples and corn which they dosed with strychnine and scattered throughout the swamp in an attempt to hold the rodents in check, but “Brer Rabbit’ and his friends must have waxed fat on this type of diet for it did not have the desired effect. After the final planting at Hillsboro, the portable house was brought back to Miami Beach and became the home of Captain Carney, supervisor of the planting, and several other members of the party who wished to remain on the Beach. The Carney property was located where the White House Hotel now stands at the north end of Lummus Park. In 1886, Charles H. Lum, feeling the call of Miami Beach, built a two-story house with a roofed porch, and brought his bride there to live. This house was located on the present site of the Tides Hotel, fronting Lummus Park. According to the records, Henry B. Lum, of Red Bank, New Jersey, father of Charles H. Lum, from whom our land was purchased, was the first white man to settle on our present Miami Beach. This deed is recorded in book 24 of deeds, page 305, records of Dade County, Florida. Captain Carney dismantled his house and moved it to Coconut Grove, where he staked out a one hundred and sixty acre homestead, and was followed by a number of others. Captain Carney still lives at Coconut Grove. For several years, the Lums lived a happy and not altogether lonely life. They had plenty of fish and game, raised chickens, lima beans, cabbages, beets, tomatoes, celery, bananas, and paw-paw's. Later they moved back to New Jersey. Although the coconut planting venture had proven a very definite failure, primarily because of the inability to market even a small portion of the ripe nuts, the faith of John S. Collins in the productivity of the soil of Miami Beach had not lessened, so in the early nineties, he came down to look over the situation. After being convinced that w'ith proper w'ater, fertilization, and care, the land could be made productive, of other fruits and vegetables than coconuts, he began to dicker with Osborn and Field for their holdings in the lands north of the Lum holdings. The Lum land was just south of Lincoln Road as it is now located, running from ocean to bay, and south to what is now Biscayne Street. Fifth Street and Alton Road— 1912 Where the Chamber of Commerce Building is now located. He finally purchased the share of Osborn, but Field was reluctant to sell, so Collins became his partnet. Then came the question as to what they should plant on the lands. Collins, after considerable investigation, decided upon the avocado, but Field wanted to plant grapefruit. The task of clearing the land w’as the greatest obstacle. A crew of negroes was hired to clear the mangrove swamp, but it was slow' and expensive work, costing about seventy dollars to three hundred dollars per acre. Later Collins purchased a sixteen ton thirty-five horse pow'er tractor, built to his own design W'ith special knife-bladed wheels. When it arrived, it speeded up the work to a marked degree, and the cost was reduced to less than thirty dollars per acre. Finally, a suitable tract of land located west of Indian Creek at about the intersection of Pine Tree Drive and 40th Street, was cleared, and Collins began to plant avocados. Field demurred, but during the summers of 1907 and 1008, a total of tw'o thousand, nine hundred and forty-five trees w'ere planted, regardless of Field. Again Collins was up against the problem of protecting the young trees, and when Field came to see how things were going and realized the avocado venture w'as proving a failure, he sold out to Collins. Therefore, in 1909, Collins became sole owner of sixteen hundred and seventy acres of land, running four and one-half miles north on the Atlantic and fronting Biscayne Bay on the west. Thomas J. Pancoast, son-in-law of Collins, paid a visit to the property, primarily to see for himself where all the family money w'as going, and if his father-in-law was not being fooled. However, w'hen he arrived at the Miami Beach farm in 1911, he was surprised at the progress which had been made and the quality of the produce being raised, and instead of remaining a skeptic, he became an enthusiast. Pancoast inspected the fertile acres of father-in-law Collins, and found the Red Bliss potatoes, planted by Collins, were most prolific and delightful to eat— and imagine new Irish potatoes being harvested in the winter! Fie also saw acres of Cavendish bananas, other tropical fruits and garden vegetables growing w'ith mangoes and avocados on the plantation. When Collins mentioned the construction of a bridge connecting with the fast growing village of Miami across the bay, this w'as almost the “straw' which broke the camel’s back.” But even at seventy-one years of age, Collins stood firmly, the result being that Pancoast brought his wife to Miami Beach, and he and his father-in-law and brothers-in-law, Lester and Arthur Collins, went to work in earnest on the bridge venture. The most likely route was surveyed and a franchise applied for, but w'as refused because of the opposition of the Biscayne Navigation Company, which operated boats from Miami to Miami Beach, landing at Biscayne Street on the Lummus development. Finally after a unique ruse, the charter was granted, and work w'as started on the bridge. This bridge was to be built of wood, but engineers in charge realized that to sink piling in the Bay w'ould soon mean that the wood eating toredo would eat the piling below' the water’s edge, necessitating replace ments very often. To offset this danger, the pilings were sunk in sheet iron casings, and concrete poured into the casing around the wood. While still half way across the Bay, the contracting company failed, and the Collins crowd w'as faced w'ith an almost insurmountable problem. With exhausted credit and virtually no cash, they hardly knew which way to turn. The coming of Carl Graham Fisher to Miami Beach, while considered an accident, should be accredited to the vision of John H. Levi, a marine engineer, who represented a firm of boat builders from whom Fisher had purchased several yachts. Carl G. Fisher, one of the most dynamic characters of the early days of automobile pioneering, was born on a farm in Indiana. At an early age, he showed much interest in athletics, especially in bicycling, and leaving the old homestead, he landed in Indianapolis, where he became a pal of Barney Oldfield. HOTEL OF W.J.BROWN BUILT 1914 The First Hotel Between First and Second Streets on Ocean Drive

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 9 These two "barnstormed” the country, attending country fairs where they raced for the benefit of the public and the small purse they got for the exhibition. At that time, the few automobiles in existence used oil lamps for lighting and by a co-incidence, Fisher and a friend, James A. Allison, of about the same age, met a man who claimed to have patented a metal cylinder to hold carbide vas under pressure, and which could be used for automobile headlights. Fisher and Allison bought a half interest in the patent for a few hundred dollars and incorporated the company under the name of the Prest-O-Lite Com pany of America. They built a small plant to make carbide gas, with which to fill the cylinders under pressure. Their product was so well received by the automobile industry that they were forced to build a dozen factories at strategic points throughout the east, and money flowed in like water. After a few years, Fisher and Allison were millionaires and they sold their holdings in the Prest-O-Lite Company to the Union Carbide Company, Fisher taking a real vacation by yachting, hunting and fishing. I : I The original wooden bridge, longest of its kind in the world at the time. On one of these leisurely yachting trips, John H. Levi, the marine engineer, delivered a new yacht to Fisher, at Cairo, Illinois, where Fisher had invited several friends to meet him for a voyage down the Mississippi, around the Florida Penin sula and up the Atlantic Coast. He invited Levi also. A series of minor accidents on the way down the “Father of Waters,” includ ing some navigation troubles, caused Fisher to terminate the cruise at Mobile, Alabama, and ship the boat by rail to Jacksonville. At the last minute, it was found that a bridge en route was too low to permit the yacht to pass, so Fisher arranged with Levi to continue the voyage via water. • ‘ Being a stranger to Florida waters and the many difficulties to be encountered in those days by shallows and reefs, Levi and party finally arrived at Miami to rest and relax. Levi liked the place so well that he wired Fisher to join him in Miami instead of Jacksonville. Fisher came to Miami and enjoyed a real vacation. Although having retired and with a fortune in the banks, he was not the type of man to sit idly and let a real opportunity slip by. The narrowstrip of land called “the Peninsula,” (now Miami Beach) intrigued him. On several fishing trips to the Gulf Stream he had noticed some activity on the ocean front, which was being done by the Lummus interests, and also a half finished wooden bridge headed toward Miami Beach from the mainland at ISth Street. Upon making inquiry as to the owner of the unfinished bridge, he was informed that it was John S. Collins. When Collins started the bridge and needed funds, as President of the South ern Bank & Trust Company, I loaned him ten thousand dollars and my brother, J. E. Lummus, President of the Bank of Bay Biscayne, loaned him fifteen thous and dollars in order to make the bridge a reality. But the difficulties encountered proved that more funds were necessary and here is where Fisher became a real Santa Claus for Collins. He loaned Collins fifty thousand dollars on the bridge bonds and received, also, two hundred acres of land, a strip between eighteen hundred feet wide from the ocean to the bay. The bridge was finally completed and became known as the world’s longest wooden bridge, which was later torn down and the right of way sold by Collins to the Venetian Causeway people who built islands along the road. S I have said before, it is vision, persistence, perseverance and money of man that has d'scovered, conquered and developed America. All the aforesaid mentioned men were in that class, and so was I, my brother J. E. Lummus, and those men who risked their money and future with us in developing Miami Beach. Coming to Miami from Bronson, Levy County, Florida, in 1895, before the Flagler Railroad was completed into the city, I saw that there was a great future here. I remained in Miami until after the first train of the Florida East Coast Railway puffed its way into the village over wobbly tracks, and observed the delegation from Key West, who came up by boat to see its arrival. When they saw the train, many of them ran for the hammocks and it was no wonder, because the old wood burning engine, with its big bell top, was spouting smoke and the whistle and bell were going full tilt, and those Key Westers, who had never seen a steam engine thought the Devil was coming to town. In 1897, one year after the Florida East Coast entered Miami, I returned to the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad as Chief Train Dispatcher, of which job I have always been proud. I stayed with the railroad for another seven years and in 1904 returned to Miami to make my future home. My brother J. E. Lummus, had the comm'ssary contract with the Florida East Coast on the extension of the road to Key West, with supply houses at each camp on the various islands. I took the job of making a boat trip each week to the islands to check the supplies and get the money. This lasted until 1908, when we sold the commissary business. My experience on the keys gave me the vision about building a city fronting on the ocean, so in May 1912, I formed a company with my brother, J. E. Lummus, and associates, and purchased the holdings of Charles H. Lum and Edmund Wilson, of Red Bank, New Jersey approximating five hundred acres of swamp lands which are now a part of Miami Beach. In October 1912, we pur chased eighty adjoining acres from Jennie H. Richardson, of Detroit, Michigan We paid Lum and Wilson eighty thousand dolars, thirty thousand dollars in cash and the balance a few months later. John C. Gramling, Miami attorney, and Avery C. Smith, who owned a small wooden bath house south of Biscayne Street, represented the sellers. I have forgotten the amount we paid Mrs. Richardson for her eight}' acres, but it was all swamp, mangrove and palmetto, and some of this land was under water at high tide. The three companies to start the development of Miami Beach were The Ocean Beach Realty Company, otherwise known as the Lummus Development, The Miami Beach Improvement Company, otherwise known as the Collins Development, and The Alton Beach Realty Company which was known as the Fisher Development. The Ocean Beach Realty Company, or Lummus Development, was the first to start developing a subdivision and filing its plat with Dade County. Collins was second and Fisher third. None of this territory was incorporated as a town or city at that time. The Lummus crowd filed their first plat in Book No. 2 of Plats, Page 38, Records of Dade County, Florida, July 9, 1912, and we had sold over forty thous and dollars worth of lots before Collins filed his first plat on December 11, 1912, in Book No. 2 of Plats, Page 47. Fisher’s first plat was filed on January 15, 1914, Book No. 2, Page 77. The Ocean Beach Realty Company had a cash capital of fifty thousand dollars, but we operated on borrowed money at eight per cent interest, and the money was loaned more on account of my brother and myself than upon the security the company could give. Some of our associates who were of the getrich-quick type wanted to sell and get out, so my brother and I bought the stock of the promoters and I resigned as President of the Southern Bank & Trust Com pany in 1913, and sold my bank stock, realizing the big job ahead. I took active charge of our beach development after buying out the “promoters.” From this time on we owned practically all of the Ocean Beach Realty stock. My brother remained as President of the Bank of Bay Biscayne and Southern Bank & Trust Company. Clearing land at Ocean Drive and Twelfth Street in 1913. Fisher said to me: "I see that you are clearing a great deal of land on the Penin sula. What are you going to do?” I told him that we were going to build a city fronting on the ocean. He wanted to know the amount of land which we owned and I told him. “Well,” said Fisher, “Why don’t you do it all at one time?” Early in 1Q13, Carl G. Fisher came into my office and introduced himself. Although he had been living in Miami, on Brickell Avenue (fronting the bay.) I told him we had a very good reason and that was the lack of funds. This conver sation must have started something, for within six weeks after my brother and I met Fisher, we had arranged to borrow one hundred and fifty thousand dollars

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10 THE FLORIDA TEACHER N. B. T. RONEY THOMAS J. PANCOAST IRVING S. COLLINS from him at eight per cent interest. But we also gave him one hundred and five acres of land off the north end of our property as a bonus for the loan. We had paid one hundred and fifty dollars per acre for the land we gave Fisher. This deal, and this alone, started the big development on Miami Beach. It could not have been done otherwise. After this was arranged, Fisher then loaned Collins the money to complete the Bridge. Fisher, later, used to jokingly say to his friends in my presence, ‘‘Get Lummus to give you some land and see if it does not break you to put it into shape.” . . but he was always with us and with the Collins crowd on anything that pointed towards making Miami Beach what we hoped it would be ... and what it is today. On the same day that we borrowed the one hundred fifty thousand dollars from Fisher, we gave him a mortgage on all swamp lands lying west of Washington Avenue, as recorded in Mortgage Book No. 39, Page 85, Records of Dade County, Florida. We kept lands East of Washington Avenue free and clear in order that we could give a clear title. Now that we had the one hundred and fifty thousand dollars borrowed from Fisher, we proceeded to carry out our development of a “City By the Ocean.” We bought the passenger boat “ Biscayne” and two others of similar size and inaugurated a boat service from Twelfth Street, now Flagler Street, on the Miami side to Biscayne Street, Miami Beach, with fares for passengers at five cents each way. Of course, the five cent fare did not pay for the operation of the boats, but the difference was made up in the sale of lots to the visitors. Everyone coming to Miami wanted to know what was going on across the Bay, as it could be seen from the Miami side that something was being done. The traffic was also good for the Smith and Hardie Bath Houses, as the boats left each side every thirty minutes. The boat trip was so popular that some of the people rode back and forth all day as it cost only ten cents per hour for the Bay trip. Incidentally, my real estate salesman on the boats did a good business. In the development of the west side of our properties, which included the Fisher and Collins crowd to the north, we were forced to build a wooden bulk head to hold the silt pumped in from Biscayne Bay by the suction dredges. Sometimes the water pressure would wash out hundreds of feet of this bulkhead, requiring entirely new wood work for the replacing, and this was very expensive. Roy Wilson, engineer for the Lummus Company, with John H. Levi, in charge of the Fisher work, and W. E. Brown, his engineer, cooperated to the fullest extent—resulting in soundings being taken in the bay and on the land through the palmetto and mangrove swamp, to find out how much material we needed for the fill and whether that material was in the bay before striking rock. Although the sale of lots to individuals brought over on our boats was rather regular, we needed a “speeding up” in order to be able to continue our development, so we decided to hold a series of auction sales in the winter. The idea was suggested to us by one E. E. (Doc) Dammers, who must have been Ihe world’s premier auctioneer of lots, because he proved it. Dammers had a partner named Gillett and of course, like all auctioneers, they had to have something to “attract” the public, or as they called it a “come-on,” and in this case it was free dishes, sets of china, crockery, glassware and an assort ment of other premiums. The “free” part was that you did not have to buy any thing to get a gift. To see “Doc” Dammers in action after the boats had brought the crowd to Miami Beach was worth the money. He would size up the people, and after giving them a real sales-talk on the future possibilities of this “Ocean Heaven for the Sun Seekers,” he would reach for the hat and draw out a number. As each passenger on every boat had a number, someone drew something. The Lummus Company bought chinaware by the carload and gave it away at these auction sales, and the publicity spread to other sections of the country, resulting in a record crowd whenever we held a sale. We did not get the prices we actually wanted for the lots, but we were satisfied. Later, Dammers staged auction sales for Fisher and Collins. After we had put the land into good condition, north of Fifth Street, Glenn H. Curtis, who was training men (for the government) to fly in aeroplanes, approached us for the use of a certain tract until 1915, and this was the first aviation field in Dade County, and, I presume, in Florida. The Lummus Com pany did not charge Curtis any rent as we considered it good advertising. The noise of the planes in flying kept the Miami populace looking toward Miami Beach. ELLING LOTS in one section while clearing the swamps in another was part of our work. We hauled kerosene to the Beach by the barge loads to burn the palmetto and mangrove. Only the small stuff would burn, so we chopped up the remainder and used the logs and stumps for reinforcing the dredged materials as it was pumped in, until it was built up from three to twelve feet. As this work was going on, we were bothered with rattlesnakes, hundreds of coons, thousands of rats and millions of mosquitoes. The rattlesnakes were dangerous, the coons a nuisance and the rats and mosquitoes were pests. Jim and Frank Hardee, who had charge of the clearing, disposed of the rattlesnakes. My son, Thomas J. Lummus, with an old black dog named “Joe” (which I owned) took care of the coons, some of which we tried to train into pets, but they were such thieves . they even tried to hide my shoes. The rats and mosquitoes we could not handle until I sent out an S.O.S. for cats—any kind of cats. It was not long before it looked as if everybody in Dade County had a cat he did not need, and sent it to me. This was just what I wanted. I turned the cats loose on the beach and within a short time, the cats had eaten all the rats. I don't know what became of the cats. But, . we still had the sand flies and mosquitoes, so I took the matter up with our representative in Washington. Fisher and I offered to pay the Govern ment men to come here and teach us what to do about mosquitoes. The Gov ernment sent the men who had cleared the Panama Canal of mosquitoes, with no expense to us except conveyance for these men and the assistants whom we sent with them. Thus we had the benefit of their knowledge. As we understood it, re-claiming or dredging in the bottom of the Bay to fill in swamp lands was something new' in Florida, so Frank B. Shutts, attorney representing Carl Fisher and I representing the Lummus Company went to Tallahassee to obtain a permit from the State of Florida. Park Trammell was Governor at that time and he had to consult with the Attorney General and other members of the Internal Improvement Board, before we could get w'hat we wanted.

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 11 After much consultation and consideration, we finally secured the permit and they all wished us success in our new development. But we were not through by any manner of means. After obtaining the State’s approval, we had to get the approval of the Federal Government. Crate D. Bowen, attorney, representing the Fisher interests, and I, representing the Lummus Company, made a trip to Washington to secure a government permit for the dredge work. Our engineers had prepared the plans and all necessary data, and the original Clark Construction Company of Baltimore, Maryland, was the best bidder. According to the plans, we had to move six million cubic yards of bay bottom on to the land. When I speak of “We,” I mean Carl Fisher and the Lummus Company let the contract together and the work was done at a cost of ten cents per cubic yard, or in other words six hundred thousand dollars for the dredging. Our (the Lummus Company’s) part was three hundred and fifteen thousand dollars and Fisher’s was two hundred and eighty-five thousand dollars. One of the most interesting features of the Government permit was that it was Federal Permit No. 1, for work of this kind in the State of Florida. Realizing that in any real estate development, sidewalks are a necessity, Mr. Bowen and I, after having secured in Washington the essential permits for pump ing the bottom of the bay to fill in the mangrove swamp, decided to visit Atlantic City, to look over that city’s famous boardwalk. After returning to Miami Beach, we immediately went to work on the con struction of sidewalks, but did not build them as wide as in Atlantic City. Our sidewalks were only ten feet in width, and the first one was laid along Biscayne Street to the ocean, thence along Ocean Drive to Fifth Street. North of Fifth Street, we built a walk ten feet wide of concrete. All of these walks were com pleted long before Miami Beach was incorporated, and the streets south of Fifth Street were paved by the Lummus Company. This company built many addition al sidewalks. Up to this time, development of Miami Beach had consisted of clearing the swamp, dredging the Bay bottom, pumping in the material to fill in the land and constructing the bulkheads. The sale of lots on land already high and dry had also been started. With the completion of the Collins Bridge, it was necessary to have a road built to South Beach, connecting it with these developments. In 1913, after meeting Fisher and arranging to borrow the money, and after the dredge contract was let in July, 1913, my brother, J. E. Lummus, and I arranged to have the county commissioners visit the development with us. In the party was John S. Collins, Carl G. Fisher and J. A. McDonald. On a barge, I sent a wagon drawn by a couple of mules, to meet the party of men when they arrived from the Miami side and to bring them to the Beach, but with the exception of Mr. McDonald, they all walked. When the Commissioners looked over what the Collins crowd, the Fisher interests, and the Lummus Company were doing and planned to do, they agreed to accept a deed to the land where Collins Avenue is now located, and the road along Collins Canal to the Bay to connect with Collins Bridge. Dade County was to pay one-third of the cost of building these roads, the Lummus Company one-third, and Fisher one-third. It took ten men one week to cut a right-of-way from where Mr. Collins was then having the canal dug to South Beach. I started cutting the right-of-way at South Beach and Fisher met me with his cutting at Fourteenth Lane, or midway on the Carney tract. This was the first road suitable for automobiles, built on Miami Beach, and it was completed in 1913. There is an old saying that “All is not gold that glitters”—well, who would have thought when looking over the mass of mangrove swamp, underbrush, tall grass and vines, that it would be necessary to re-plant with grass the entire beach, or peninsula after we had filled in the land? But it so happened. After the dredge work was done, we looked over a wide area of sand and muck and thought that after the silt settled, all we would have to do would be to survey our properties, and sell more lots to build a city by the ocean. This was not the case. The filled-in land became dry, and the gentle breezes were no longer zephyrs. The winds actually blew up sand storms, so we had to plant grass on our man-made ground. We decided upon Bermuda grass, and believe me, it was a real job. I em ployed school children on Saturdays, giving them free rides and paying them ten cents per hour. The children had fun out of it, and many of them would run over to the ocean for a brief dip and return to plant more grass seed. Believe it or not, those little children really did good work, and as children usualy do, made play out of it. Early in 1914, Miami Beach had sidewalks, several streets, beautiful ocean and bay frontage, a canal, and a wooden bridge, connecting it with Miami. However, the main thing lacking was the need of more houses. The Lummus Company had auctioned off lots and sold other lots. Fisher and Collins had auctioned off lots and sold more lots, but the mere fact of owning a lot did not mean that the purchaser intended to build a house. So I decided to stimulate the home building program, by inserting a full page advertisement in each of the Miami newspapers. I offered to give away This expansive airview shows Miami Beach, in present day progress, looking north from the Government cut. In the foreground is the reservations of the U. S. Engineering department, with the Miami Beach Kennel Club dog track shown in the right foreground.

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12 THE FLORIDA TEACHER twenty-five lots on Collins Avenue — a lot to ANYONE who would build a home. I specified the type of house and the lowest cost. Some of my friends said. “Lummus, what if you don’t get any answers?” I replied, “Just wait.” Within twenty-four hours, I had received telegrams and applications from various sources, not only in Miami, but from other cities. In fact, a total of seventy-five applications for free lots, upon which the applicant agreed to build a home according to my specifications, were received. Instead of giving away twenty-five lots, I gave away thirty-five, and that was the beginning of the build ing development on Miami Beach. Of course, my specifications of a house were not anything like what they are today. They were really typical beach houses, inexpensive yet modern at that time; some of them of the bungalow type while others were two stories. Many of these first houses erected on Miami Beach are still standing, having passed through the hurricanes and the boom days. To many of you reading this true story of “THE MIRACLE OF MIAMI BEACH”, and those of you who have never lived in this section, as well as many of you who have and do live here, the methods of financing the development of a mangrove swamp into what it is today, the most important winter playground in the world, may seem a bit fantastic. You have read how both the Lummus Company and the Collins crowd founda financial angel in Carl G. Fisher, which permitted both companies to carry on to a certain point. However, there were others from whom the Lummus Com pany also borrowed money and actually “paid through the nose” by giving a bonus. But if the money had not been available the development of Miami Beach would have been retarded many years. In 1914, when the World War started, the Lummus Company owed over four hundred and sixty thousand dollars, and we were paying eight per cent interest for the money. Miami was looked upon as merely a small and unde veloped town, and the jumping off place of the Everglades to the south. As far as Miami Beach was concerned, it was just a place where Miamians could enjoy a swim in the ocean. (This was, of course, before Miami Beach was incorporated.) Until the World War, the sale of lots by the Lummus Company had been very good, and houses were being erected on many lots which had been sold and given away. We owed Carl G. Fisher one hundred and fifty thousand dollars and Mr. Edwin B. Lent also one hundred and fifty thousand. Mr. Lent, a former resident of Peekskill, New York, was a firm believer in the future of Miami Beach, so we owed him from fifty thousand dollars to one hundred and fiftythousand dollars practically all the time from 1913 to 1916. In addition to paying him eight per cent interest, we paid him a bonus of ten thousand dollars even time we had to renew a loan, and he did not like to have the notes run for more than a year. In other words, we paid Mr. Lent in three years over thirty thous and dollars bonus money, plus the eight per cent interest. No, this was not “Shylocking”—but real business. He had the money. We needed it and were able to pay the premium he asked, because we were making money with his money. It was a fair deal all around. Among our other creditors were Frank A. Furst and R. P. Clark, from whom we borrowed one hundred and twenty thousand dollars. We also borrowed from B. F. Potter and others, thirty thousand dollars. I mentioned the names of these men to show that we had friends who had money and that they were also good sports. We did not borrow from the bank but kept that source in reserve in order that we could borrow from them to pay interest if necessary. I could almost hear that interest working day and night. In building homes, we were cognizant of the fact that we must have water for drinking purposes, as well as for washing, so we solved our fresh water prob lem by sinking wells about fourteen feet deep, and the water was pumped by wind mills which were placed in the alleys behind the houses. Each well served a five thousand gallon tank. The water was all right for house use but for drinking purposes, we had to catch rain water as the well water was brackish. Our sewer system was composed of septic tanks which served the purpose at that time. In addition to water, a lighting system was needed. In the early days, of course, we used kerosene, etc., but as our houses began to increase in numbers, we. attempted to get the old Miami Electric Company to run a line across the Bay to Miami Beach, but the owners could not see it. Therefore, it was up to the Lum mus Company, Fisher and Collins to do the job. We three paid for the running of wires across Biscayne Bay. When Collins ran out of cash, he would say: “I will give you some land.” And I would say to Fisher: “You will have to take the land we are short of cash.” 0L T have read of where I was made the first mayor of the Town of Miami Beach, after its incorporation, but as the town continued to grow into a city, we decided to change our charter accordingly. In 1917, we sent Judge Mitchell D. Price to Tallahassee, to get an Act passed by the Legislature, changing the name of the Town of Miami Beach to the City of Miami Beach. I was elected mayor in 1915, and served through 1918. It is rather amusing now, and in looking back to those happy days, I remem ber that as the Town of Miami Beach had no money, my brother, J. E. Lummus, and I paid the costs of incorporation, and also the cost of getting the Charter for the City of Miami Beach. After having served the young city as Mayor for three terms, I was elected a member of the Council in 1918, but resigned and made a trip out West. Early in 1015, it was decided by Fisher, Collins, and myself, that the set tlement should be incorporated into a town. As eighty percent of the popula tion in the area was living on the Lummus development, I suggested to Fisher and Collins that the town should be named “Miami Beach.” So, on March 26, 1015, a mass meeting was held in the office of the Ocean Beach Realty ComHere you get an airview of the midsection of Miami Beach along the ocean front, showing the miraculous progress in construction of new hotels.

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 13 pany, which was the Lumraus Company, and it was agreed that the town should be incorporated. Realizing that a recreational park and bathing beach of sufficient area, ex tending along the ocean, was absolutely essential, the ocean Beach Realty Com pany offered to sell and deed to the Town of Miami Beach for park purposes only, a tract of twenty acres and forty-one hundred and twenty feet in length above the high water mark of the Atlantic Ocean, for the infinitesmal figure of ten dollars per front foot. The land was worth at that time more than one hundred dollars per front foot. Today, the greatest asset Miami Beach has and ever will have is Lummus Park. It cannot be taken away from the public. It can’t be used for hotels or apartment houses — and belongs to the public for recreation and bathing . every person in Dade County and the countless thousands of visitors who flock to this ‘‘Paradise Under the Sun” each year realize that its tangible value for commercial purposes would run into millions of dollars. The tract sold to the Town of Miami Beach, extended from Sixth Street to Fourteenth Place. Although we set the price at ten dollars per front foot, the total amount derived from the sale to the Town was Forty Thousand dollars, or less than ten dollars per front foot. We graded the park, planted Bermuda grass and coconut palms; built a ten foot concrete walk the full length and paid for the upkeep of the park until 1917. John H. Levi, present mayor of Miami Beach, formerly of Charleston, W. Virginia, needs no introduction. Upon my resignation and departure from the Beach in 1917 Mr. Levi took my place as vice-president of The Ocean View Company, of which he had been secretary-treasurer. He has held the position of vice president or president ever since. In addition, he was and is still a director of the First National Bank of Miami Beach. Mr. Levi has been actively connected with the management of the city since the early days, which fact, alone, influenced many men of wealth to invest there. Among his many services in the development of the beach one of the most important was that of interesting men of prominence in big finance, such as Carl G. Fisher, James Allison, James H. and George Snowden, Henry McSweeney, Harry Stutts, Arthur C. Newby, and many others, into becoming active investors. My brother and I appreciated his valuable business acumen, and in return, pre sented him with $10,000 in stock of the Miami Ocean View Company, in 1916. John Levi has used the best part of his life in the continued development and improvement of Miami Beach and deserves full credit to his share in the present realization. At this point I must pay tribute to the one man who has been on the job continually during the past twenty years as city manager and one of the guiding lights through the boom, hurricane, depression, and all—Claude Renshaw. He and the members of the several city councils have held the best interests of the beach close to their hearts, which fact accounts for the excellent condition of Miami Beach today. I WAS the first man to suggest that Dade County build a road or causeway across Biscayne Bay from Miami to Miami Beach but as the major part of the population was on the Miami side, the suggestion met with strong opposition at the start. The Ocean Beach Realty Company owned the land on the beach side for a landing, and I got an option on the land for a landing on the Miami side. Then my engineer, Roy Wilson, drew plans and the county secured the services of Isham Randolph of Chicago to approve them and get the Government in Wash ington to approve them. Sam A. Belcher was Chairman of the Dade County Commissioners at the time and worked faithfully with us on the plans, and the commissioners called an election to vote six hundred thousand dollars in bonds to build the causeway. This was in 1916 and the population was small. Somebody had to spend some money to put the election over and convince the voters that a causeway to Miami Beach would be of benefit to every person in Dade County, as well as to the visitors coming here to enjoy the ocean beaches. Carl Fisher sent me two thousand dollars and our company spent four thousand dollars to acquaint the voters of the necessity of access to the ocean and the election went over two to one. Fisher wrote me saying: “J. N., I don’t think you can do it,” but I was the active campaign manager and believed in what I was talking about. In accordance with our agreement to the County Commission, the Lummus Company gave Dade County ten of our long bay-front lots for the landing on the Miami Beach end of the causeway. This piece of ground had a frontage of 500 feet on Alton Road, and 500 feet on Biscayne Bay with riparian rights. These were Lots 43 to 52 inclusive in Block No. 111. The property was conveyed to the Southern Bank & Trust Company as Trustee and the following was the consideration for the deed which was filed for record October 18, 1916, recorded in Deed Book 157, at Page 345. The trustee herein named is hereby given full power and lawful authority to convey the title to the above described property to Dade County, Florida, at any time within five years from the date hereof upon said county having completed the construction of a causeway, with bridges connecting same, between the Town of Miami Beach and the City of Miami, said causeway to be built in accordance with plans and specifications already passed upon and approved, subject to any amendments or alterations that may be deemed necessary by the engineers in charge of said work, or that may be required by the United States government. In the event said causeway is not commenced within two years and is not com pleted within five years from the date hereof, then, in such event, the Southern Bank and Trust Company shall reconvey the property above designated to the Ocean Beach Realty Company. Today, there are three causeways connecting Miami Beach with Miami: the County Causeway, for which the Lummus interests are responsible, is now under supervision of the State Highway Department; the Venetian Causeway, and the 79th Street causeway. This sectional airview shows a group of new hotels in the Twentieth Street area, just South of the famed Roney-PIaza, shown in the upper right foreground. ’ %  7 3 .'

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14 THE FLORIDA TEACHER We need another causeway at 36th Street on the Miami side; let Miami Beach decide on which street to land over there. This is urgently needed to take care of the traffic between the Hialeah and Tropical Parks (race track), Biscayne Fronton Jai-alai, and the dog tracks. The city of Miami owns a string of islands south of, and parallel to, the 13th Street causeway and ship channel up to Lummus Inland which is located in Miami Beach. The engineers could, if they were given a chance, work out a plan there to take care of the passenger boat business and yachts for the next one hundred years. The freight traffic should be left where it is. These islands could be landscaped and made into outstanding beauty spots of Dade County. The city owns these islands for this very purpose, and they cannot be used for anything else. A causeway should be run from Sth Street in Miami in order to meet all contingencies. The causeway to Virginia Key, for which we have just voted two million dollars in bonds, is a very good move and will go a long way toward relieving the congestion in ocean bathing; it will also aid in the parking problem, and will give Miami and Dade County, as a whole, more access to the ocean. Miami and Miami Beach have the tourist business and the housing accom modations to take care of it, but we must make provisions to store more auto mobiles, even if we have to do as the Du Pont building did—run them up a few stories. 5 A. BELCHER Mr. Belcher was one of the first men to build a home on Miami Beach. As chairman of the Dade County Commissioners he was instrumental in putting over the bond issue, in order to build the first county causeway at 13th Street Miami and Sth Street Miami Beach. He came to Miami in 1891; taking out a homestead he developed small orange groves and sold them. Organizing the Art Stone Construction Co., he made the first concrete blocks in Dade County. He and his associates, S. M. Tatum and E. Ford Wells built houses of these blocks in 1914 at Miami Beach. The houses are still standing. He organized the Belcher Asphalt Paving Co., in 1915 and was the first to introduce the oiling of roads, which was the proper treatment for our roadways as they were built of white coral rock, which was not only hard on the eyes, but was easily blown about by the sea breezes. The original company was changed to the Belcher Oil Co., in 1927. Throughout his entire business career much of Mr. Belcher’s time was devoted to developing good roads throughout Dade County. He was truly a great pioneer and leaves many monuments in commemoration of his deeds. No story of “THE MIRACLE OF MIAMI BEACH” would be complete without that of N. B. T. Roney and the part he played in the early development of Miami Beach. The writer is familiar with every step of Mr. Roney’s progress and will try to give the high spots of this almost unbelievable history without burdening the reader with too many details. Incidentally, Mr. Roney’s first purchase of real estate on the Beach was from me, and, later, many more deals were made either from or through myself. In 1918 Mr. Roney saw the possibilities of Miami Beach and wasted no time in transferring his interests from Camden, N. J., and Miami across Biscayne Bay. He first bought the interests of J. E. Lummus, my brother, and myself in the Ocean View Company and began his operations on the Beach. His first Miami Beach building was begun in 1921, the site being the N. W. corner of Fifth Street and Collins Avenue, which was formerly part of the Burroughs’ estate. This building still stands as a silent monument to his modest beginning and rapid rise to take his rightful place alongside those great pioneers of yesterday. His next building project was one that became the home of the Miami Beach Bank & Trust Company, of which he was one of the founders and a large stockholder. During this period he constructed a number of small buildings for shops and stores in this vicinity, along Collins, between Fifth and Eighth Streets. He paid a total of $102,000 for four blocks in this territory. Mr. Roney had become one of the largest individual operators on Miami Beach. In 1924 he continued his selections along Collins Avenue, acquiring choice corners from 3rd to 23rd Streets. Then came the “Spanish Village” in 1925. This grew out of the purchase of ten blocks on Espanola Way. Mr. Robert Taylor, who was the architect on all of Mr. Roney’s properties, designed a group of six hotels (all corner locations), eight apartments, and four other buildings, to make up this section. Over six millions were spent in making the village the show place on the Beach at that time. The Spanish style was carried throughout, with patios, balconies, casement windows, musical fiestas, gay costumes, bright shawls, and everything in complete accord with old Spanish customs. In 1925 the Roney Plaza became a reality and its unique and magnificent architecture completely overshadowed the Spanish Village or anything else of that day. The Plaza immediately caught the fancy of the best patronage through the publicity which was obtained by its being the first hotel in this country to have “cabanas.” Fashion shows and bathing beauties found this novel setting ideal for pictures and soon the northern papers were filled with them. The Roman Pools and several blocks west of the Plaza were acquired at this time. Then, for several years thereafter, Mr. Roney was inactive in the construction business, but, today, his latest architectural creations, including the Cromwell Hotel, Town House, and Shore Club, receive favorable attention among the many new structures of this rapidly growing beach resort. Mr. Roney is still an active personality and may be counted upon to continue his creative ability in adding to the show places on Miami Beach as long as there remains a demand for new sites. On August 11, 1919, more than four years after the Town of Miami Beach was incorporated and more than two years after it was made the City of Miami Beach, the Miami Beach Bay Shore Company was formed by Carl G. Fisher, Thomas J. Pancoast, Irving A. Collins and others. This is recorded in Corpora tion Book 2 at page 472, records of Dade County, Florida, and on August 19th, 1919 this company took over a lot of Collins Swamp north of Collins Canal. This deed is recorded in Deed Book 201 at page 130, and on March 26th, 1920, the same company took over some more of Collins Swamp. This deed is recorded in Deed Book 209 at page 245; and in 1923 the same company took over more and kept up the timber disposal, dredging, filling and bulk-heading similar to the work done by Lummus and Fisher in 1913-T4. This work was kept up by that The palatial new Whitehouse Hotel, in which Pete and Louis Weiner operate one of America’s finest drug stores, is shown on the ocean front in the left foreground, surrounded by other new hotels to the north, as shown from the air.

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER company until completed to the north line of the city limits and a lot of similar work has been done since by other developers building islands along the Venetian Causeway. From the time that the Miami Beach Improvement Company was formed on June 5th, 1912, Mr. Pancoast was the secretary-treasurer; he was also associated with the Miami Beach Bay Shore Company, which was organized by its president, Carl G. Fisher. This company continued the development of the bayside of the Beach and built some of the finest hotels. Mr. Pancoast is not only recognized as one of the outstanding leaders in the development of Miami Beach but has held, or still holds, the following titles: president of the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce, vice-president and director of the First National Bank of Miami Beach, and president of the Miami Beach Golf Club. This gives one a good idea of the high esteem in which he is held by thousands of residents of the Beach. Irving Collins came here from Moorestown, N. J., and was the son of John S. Collins. Mr. Collins became vice-president of the Miami Beach Improvement Com pany from its inception on June 5th, 1912. He was also vice-president of the Miami Beach Bay Shore Development Company, of which Carl G. Fisher was the president. This company not only did all of the development work north of 23rd Street, or Collins Canal, on the bayside, but also the one which built the Nautilus, King Cole, and Boulevard Hotels, the La Gorce and Bayshore Golf courses, the Beach Boat Slips Corporation, and the Peninsular Terminal. Mr. Collins was a director cf the First National Bank of Miami Beach and served as a member of Lincoln Road, in the process of clearing, looked like this. It was a mosquito-infested swamp. Compared to current-day pictures, you are able to vision the incredible progress of Miami Beach. the Dade County Budget Commission for five years, prior to his death on May 22, 1938. No community, however small, can expect the growth that is hoped for by its founders without certain fundamental requisites, such as a Chamber of Com merce or some similar organization. The first meeting was held under a Beach umbrella at the corner of Fifth Street and Alton Road. On July 13th, 1921, about forty residents of Miami Beach met at Hardie’s Casino and decided to organize a Chamber of Commerce. Later, meetings were held alternately between Hardie’s Casino and Smith’s Casino. J. Arthur Pancoast was named President of the newly organized body. In December 1921, F. R. Hummage, a director and a Miami Beach business man, proposed a unique scheme by which the Chamber could obtain a permanent home. He advocated raising the fund by $10.00 subscriptions bearing eight per cent interest to be paid back as soon as possible. The necessary amount of $3,200.00 was quickly raised, and today the Chamber of Commerce occupies its own home at the entrance of the County Causeway. Although I had gone west in 1920, I naturally had kept in close contact with my home town, reading of the things that were happening in real estate circles and the further development of Miami Beach. The 1920 census gave Miami Beach a total population of 644, but five years later, the town had a population of over 15,000. These were permanent residents and the winter population was more than thirty thousand. Its assessed valuation had increased from $224,000 to $5,540,112 in five years. In 1921, the Beach had only five hotels in operation and twelve apartment houses. Today Miami Beach has two hundred and seventy-six hotels and eight hundred and seventy-nine apartment houses, and three thousand residences. The assessed valuation of Miami Beach in 1940 is $66,690,535, and the 1940 census gives the city a population of 27,340, with a winter influx of 200,000 visitors. This great development has occurred within the short period of twenty-eight years, and the community has passed through a boom, a hurricane and a de pression. But it had something which other cities did not have; brave pioneers; optimistic developers with money; sunshine and ultra violet rays; ocean water with extra iodine contents and summertime three hundred and sixty-five days of the year. For several years, of course, I had been only an onlooker at the growth of Miami Beach, but it was in part “My Baby.” I was interested, so in 1923, when things began to “spruce up” in South Florida real estate, and particularly in 1924, I said to myself: “Lummus, your dream has come true!” And so it had. I knew then that I would live to see Miami Beach the city it is today. In 1924, the prices of lots on Miami Beach greatly increased and considerable building was going on. Among the major structures were the Fleetwood Hotel, Fisher's King Cole Hotel, and N. B. T. Roney’s Roney-Plaza Hotel. The Fleetwood installed a radio station called WMBF—WONDERFUL MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA. This idea was conceived by Jesse Jay, son of Webb Jay, inventor of vacuum tanks for automobiles. The next broadcasting station was WIOD— WONDERFUL ISLE OF DREAMS—located on Collins Island, opposite the Nautilus Hotel. Todajq WIOD is a part of the Miami Daily News Syndicate, and WMBF is today WQAM, operated by the Miami Broadcasting Company. To try and describe the boom of the Greater Miami area in a few pages would be useless and an attempt to describe it in one hundred pages would still be Although from 1922, through 1924, there was an unprecedented building activity going on in Miami Beach, Miami and Coral Gables, the people living in this vicinity were “too near the leaves to see the trees,” until there was a rush of outside people with money seeking investments in this “Paradise Under The Sun.” The old order of supply and demand became a fact again, of course, and lots one day worth five hundred dollars became worth twice that amount the next, and so on until by 1925, the value of the property sold was not based upon its earning capacity but only upon its resale price for a profit to the last buyer. Hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of property changed hands monthy, always with an upward trend. Of course, there was an unprecedented amount of building also going on, and the influx of buyers and sellers was so great, and the demand for housing so insistent that there was an embargo on all building materials coming by rail into Miami. Then ships began to be used and the Miami and Miami Beach water-fronts were filled with schooners, steamers, and any kind of vessel that could carry building materials. In fact, they were so close together that unloading was a problem. Some of the erstwhile historians of the Greater Miami area, at the request of their sponsors, do not mention the 1926 hurricane. They seem to fear that to mention such a catasthrope, would do this area harm, yet in my opinion, a true history must contain the bad along with the good. In September 1926, while the “boom” was at its peak, something happened to the weather. A small hurricane started somewhere in the Southeast, and gathering intensity, converged upon the Bahamas and the Miami area. Without the advantage of radio broadcast of such things, then, as we have today, the hurricane caught us unawares. To give you an idea as to its intensity, I quote the speical one-page edition of the Miami Daily News, printed the day after the storm: “Hurricane hits Miami. Tidal Wave Sweeps Bay Shore Drive, wrecking boats. Fear felt for Miami Beach, pounded by heavy sea. “Miami was laid waste Saturday by a raging hurricane attended by a gale of more than one hundred and thirty miles per hour, “Miami Beach was isolated from the mainland and no word has been received as to the effect of the storm there. It is feared that a master tidal wave has been swept across the entire island city. “Newspaper men called from Miami Beach at three a. m., with a story of pounding surf, broken communication and distressed boats. It was the first information to reach Miami—all boats on Miami water front except one, ADVENTLTRE II, was sunk. The NOHAB, former yacht of Ex-Kaiser Wilhelm, was split in two.” Well, from the hurricans in 1926, through 1930, the growth of the cities of Greater Miami area, including Miami, Miami Beach, and Coral Gables, was on a firmer basis. Gamblers in real estate had taken their “licking” and quit, and property values in all communities were back on a substantial basis. The inflation was a thing of the past. Then came the depression, during which time, building as well as lot selling, was at a standstill. Vacant property coud hardly be given away and development was stagnant. Miami Beach was the first community to react after the depression began to decline. New money started to come in again. New people with ideals and dreams of the future in the “Paradise Under The Sun”, arrived to build homes, hotels, and apartment houses. Their confidence and their money attracted atten tion until there did not seem sufficient room on Miami Beach for all, so others spread to Miami, Miami Shores, Hialeah, Miami Springs, Coral Gables, North Miami, North Miami Beach, Surfside and other localities, resulting today in the Greater Miami area. It is now the largest in population of any community in the state, and is still growing by leaps and bounds. Although I have not been actively identified with the real estate development of this section for many years, I still will prophesy that the Greater Miami area by 1950 will show a permanent population of five hundred thousand. This will be quite an increase from July 1896 to 1950, covering a period of fifty-four years.

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16 THE FLORIDA TEACHER The Story of GRANVILLE FISHER “I am a part of all that I have met; Yet all experience is an arch wherethro’ Gleams that untravelled world, whose margin fades Forever and forever when I move.’’ Wanderer, wrestler, cartoonist, sailor, hypnotist, world traveler, poet, actor, director, aviator, architect, sculptor, minister and artist .... such has been the amazing career of Granville Fisher, well known local man, who, for the past nine years, in conjunction with Alfred Barton, has planned and designed the world famous sets for Gala nights at the Surf Club. Blue eyed, with a frank and open countenance, an ingratiating smile and an infecious laugh, Mr. Fisher, who is also one of Miami’s well known sculptors and portrait painters, has a life story as colorful as anything from the pages of the most imaginative fiction. Seated one afternoon in his attractive Coconut Grove home in the Moorings, in company with his charming young wife, we learned from Mr. Fisher some thing of the colorful prologue to the present story of the successful Surf Club artist. Born in Nashville, Tennessee, he ran away from home at the age of fifteen, thus writing the first chapter in his Horatio Alger-like biography. The “hegira” of the young boy Fisher took him to the West, where he spent several years living on sheep and cattle ranches, mastering the fine art of broncho busting, working the wheat harvests from Texas to Nebraska, riding the rails—arriving finally in Mexico, where he spent months absorbing every bit of local color and native background that he could. In the course of events, Granville Fisher returned to his Tennessee home! there, he proceeded (in the manner of prodigal sons) to become a model student, finishing his three remaining years of high school in less than two years. It is interesting to note that one of his fellow students in that school was Hale McKeen, whom Miamians will remember as being the director and guiding spirit of the popular “Theatre of the Fifteen” in Coral Gables last winter. Granville Fisher had always sketched and drawn, and while still in high school, he secured a job as a cartoonist with a nationally known magazine. His artistic career was to be interrupted, however, as sometime along then, he began to evince his first real interest in the theatre. From then on, for the next several years, the drama—in all its forms—was to become the absorbing passion of Fisher’s life. It was he who organized the Community Players of Nashville, and the famous Community Theatre of Louisville, which had its first meeting in his studio. He played professional stock, also, with the Brown and National theatres in Louisville . some of his fellow players there being Donald Cook, Muriel Kirkland, Lester Vail, and Nancy Welford. Somewhere between his high school days and his career in the theatre, Fisher developed two utterly diverse interests. The first of these was wrestling; just how seriously he took this pursuit, may be judged by the fact, that before he was twenty, he had wrestled three world champions—Joe Stecker, “Strangler” Lewis, and Stanilaus Zibisco. The second of these youthful interests of Mr. Fisher’s, was the study of Hypnotism, a science in which he has an enormous belief, and which he feels has had a profound influence on his life. He is convinced that through its medium, many cures have been effected, and, in fact, advanced his theories on this subject, in detail, some years ago, when he lectured on Hypnosis at the University of Miami. Meanwhile, during the course of years, Fisher had been studying architecture, and therefore, when he paid his first visit to South Florida during the prosperous days of the early twenties, he became interested in the general building and and development projects of that period. Coral Gables, in particular, aroused his interest, and he designed many Gables homes of that period. When the bottom dropped out of things in 1926, little interest was evinced by anyone in architecture, and it was sometime along this time that Mr. Fisher joined the Merchant Marine, “just for the heck of it,” shipping out of Miami on the S. S. “Francis Weems”. This voyage made a great impression on Granville Fisher; during the course of it they ran into a hurricane, and he had opportunity to study still another phase of Nature. He began to ponder the age old problem of Man in his struggle with the elements . the problem took hold of him, and when he returned to Miami, Fisher had already decided to study for the Ministry. He entered the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, taking his degrees in 1931. After his ordination, he occupied the pulpits of several of the South’s largest churches including the Riverside Presbyterian Church and Main Street Baptist Church in Jacksonville, the Congregational, the Riverside Baptist and Little River Baptist Churches of Miami. Mr. Fisher left the Ministry some years ago. “I did not feel,” he said, “that my spiritual qualifications measured up to the demands of the Ministry. Rather than not give my very best to it, I diverged my interests to other channels.” It was during these years, that Fisher played and directed in the old Civic Theatre: he, Norman Mackay, Joe Cotton (now of Broadway fame) and Howard Southgate (now a Hollywood director, were inseparable companions). In 1937, Mr. Fisher assumed the post of supervising director of the Federal Theatre in Miami, having been asked to take that position by the National Board of Directors. He is still closely identified with the theatre in the minds of most Miamians, having last winter, been a member of the Advisory Board of the Miami Players, and still later appeared with the Temple Players in several of their offerings. He is, at time of writing, directing the Miami Junior League play, “Titian”. After he left the Ministry, Mr. Fisher returned to his first love—art—now, in addition to his work at the Surf Club, he does many portraits, and also a great deal of mural work. Interested in sculpture, he has done several busts, most notable among which is his one of General Lodeesen-Grevenck. In the way of sculpture, however, Mr. Fisher is not the only talented mem ber of the family—his wife having done some lovely things along these lines. We asked whether or not Mr. Fisher had been the guiding hand in the develop ment of this talent? “Yes”, said Mrs. Fisher. “No”, said Mr. Fisher! Last winter, Fisher designed the sets for the “Gulliver’s Travels” Premeire Ball at the Roney Plaza, and later did the prize winning floats in the Christmas Pageant of yachts at the Beach. It is interesting to speculate on the future career of Granville Fisher; of one thing to be assured, however, is that whatever Fate holds in store for him . it’s a pretty safe wager that it won’t be dull! Sherwin-Williams •PAINT HEADQUARTERS" The Oldest Paint Store still operating on the Beach 509 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH DIAL 5-2648 THE TUTTLE One of Miami’s Finest Modern Hotels with Rooms and Apartments Each with Private Combination Tub and Shower Bath, Inner Spring Mattresses, Outside Exposure and Tropical Doors Heat Beautiful Gardens bordering the Waterfront with Shuffleboard and Croquet Courts Recreation Room, Solarium and Sun Deck on Roof Prominently located at the Foot of South East First Avenue Three blocks from Shopping and Amusement Center ELSIE WADDELL, General Manager Telephone 2-5101

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 17 Lincoln Road ** “ The World's Most Beautiful ShoppinglCenter By GUY WORTHINGTON ELLIS Secretary, Lincoln Road Association AS TOLD TO JANE EGBERT Sparking like ribbon bejeweled and with exotic beauty—LIN COLN ROAD wends its glamorous way through Miami Beach. Extending from the shore of the Atlantic ocean westward to Biscayne Bay, with rows of coconut palms and carpets of green grass, this thoroughfare of ultra-modern establishments is indeed “the most beautiful retail shopping centre in the world.” Within a period of about twenty years, from what was once but mangrove-covered acreage, Lincoln Road has become the nation’s leading style centre. This was accomplished only through careful forethought and intelligent planning. Each season finds the country’s leaders of style in ladies wearing apparel showing their finest crea tions and exclusive designs on Lincoln Road foi the first time. This is also true of ladies shoes and millinery. Lincoln Road also boasts some of the finest stores selling men’s wearing apparel, jewelry stores, antique shops, art treasure and gift shops showing a most attractive line of merchandise from the four corners of the earth. Carl Fisher’s dream of what he wanted Miami Beach to be was not an idle one. He not only believed that he could make Miami Beach one of the most beautiful resort communities, but with marked aggressiveness set out to accomplish this purpose. The result accomp lished speaks eloquently of the wisdom of his vision and of the intelli gent effort he made to bring it all about.

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18 THE FLORIDA TEACHER An Assignment . in good taste . impeeeablv tailored . The perfect ensemble fashioned in Sheer Wool in luscious Cameo Rose and Sky Blue. The fitted crepe-lined jacket buttons snugly when wayward breezes blow ... or reveals the slim perfection of the frock when left casually open. He believed that Miami Beach was destined to be the mecca for people of wealth from all over this country and Europe as well, and to safeguard the interests of those who might want to come here and build beautiful homes certain restrictions were placed upon the resi dential property. Realizing at this time that when the residential section of Miami Beach was well built up there would be a real place for a quality merchandising center, he planned for the future of Lincoln Road. In laying out the first piece of property he ever had in Miami Beach Mr. Fisher made a road one hundred feet wide through the center of the tract running from the ocean to the bay. He believed that some day it would become a beautiful business thoroughfare. A number of the early investors, believing that he was right, made every effort to attract to Lincoln Road the finest stores of the north. The result was the establishment on Lincoln Road of a number of large and very reputable northern stores and these formed the nucleus of what Lincoln Road is today. In 1921 the First National Bank building was erected on Lincoln Road at Alton. Later the seven-story office and store building at Jefferson Avenue. August Geiger, well-known architect, was one of the first private individuals to erect a business building on Lincoln Road. This is known as ‘The Maison Des Beaux Arts’, located at Meridian Avenue. Many other attractive structures built during the years grace the street. In 1925 Lincoln Road was widened to its present width—fortynine feet from curb to curb, with additional space for sidewalks, grass plots and landscaping,—making it a street of real beauty. Investors in Lincoln Road property were called to join hands with the original developers in an effort to uphold the standards already set, and to this end, February 8, 1926, formed what is known as the Lincoln Road Association—composed of the owners of Lincoln Road property. This Association was responsible, with the assistance of the City authorities, for the procurement of Zoning Restrictions which would protect the high-class merchants and forbid the introduction of the less desirable forms of retail business which might lower the stand ards of the street. Much was accomplished along these lines as Lincoln Road began to build up and its character and position assured. The merchants on Lincoln Road also formed their own association, known as The Lincoln Road Merchants Association. Arrangements have been made by which the two Associations work together for the constant improvement of this attractive shopping center. The exotic beauty of Lincoln Road has been given much attention. The grass plots in the sidewalks, the flowering shrubs, the flower plots and rows of tall majestic coconut palms enhance its beauty. The elimination of all projecting signs, the control of awnings, canopies and light displays are all designed to maintain the quiet dignity and beauty of the street to be consistent with the quality of the merchan dise to be sold in its stores. The fame of Lincoln Road has already extended far beyond Miami Beach,—as it is known throughout the country here and abroad for its Enjoy Your Vacation — Let Us Do Your Work Secretaries furnished for your home or office. Social or Business Correspondence Parties — Decorations — Music Reservations — Fishing Trips. Kay-Raff You will find capable of taking the place of your Social or Business Secretary 5-7770 528 Lincoln Road Matching Stitched Wool Hat in the distinctive Minna Lee Mode. RUSSELL PAIGE, Inc. AUTOMOBILE DEALERS | 202.0 Biscayne Blvd. i j j i j Dial 3-8621

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 19 beautiful appearance, its marvelous merchandise and attractive stores. It has become the nation’s style center. Each year an increasing number of Northern publications send their representatives to Lincoln Road the early part of the season to write up the new fashions being The Charles Hotel “Overlooking the Ocean” 1475 Collins Ave. Corner 15th St. MIAMI BEACH LOW RATES EUROPEAN PLAN FEATURES Fireproof. Ultra Modern. Central. Beach at door. Patio for dancing, excellent cuisine. Private baths. Phone in room. Roof Solorium Recreation rooms. Also varied planned social activities. SAMUEL G. BAST, Mgr. dke. WHITEHART Jhdel PRIVATE BEACH -OSOLARIUM PRIVATE BATH ROOM PHONE SHOWER -oOPEN ALL YEAR ROUND THE WHITEHART EUGENE DANN, Owner Management shown,—styles which are the inspirations of the country’s best de signers. During the winter months, created and shown for the first time, are styles in wearing apparel which will be shown in Northern stores the following Spring. Undoubtedly one of the main reasons why Lincoln Road has the excellent reputation it now enjoys is because in no other city are there so many beautiful stores of distinction concentrated in so small a territory. The Lincoln Road of today is an example of the result of a collec tive control and intelligent direction on the part of its owners and effective cooperation from its high-class merchants. Sally-Phyllis Fashions There is a distinct air of smartness in this shop on Lincoln Road, where custom made and ready to wear clothes are displayed against the dusty rose decorations of the store interior. Miss Sally, for years dress designer and buyer both in Canada and the United States, has brought her style creations to Lincoln Road. Ably assisted by Miss Phyllis she presents a glamorous collec tions of models in dresses and sportswear, which have been designed in perfect combination for chicness and practicability. Well chosen styles in bags, sweaters, millinery and novelty jewelry are offered in wide selection for costume accessories. As new as the 1941 season Sally-Phyllis Fashions strike a bright note in the latest style trends. Fairyland Fine apparel for the well dressed child is the keynote at Fairy land. Childrens’ wear for boys and girls from infancy to sixteen is selected from no “run of the mill”, but rather from the finest of domestic and imported goods. From Belgium and Switzerland are the hand-embroidered and hand finished garments,—all so very sheer. From France the swiss and organdy creations provide perky silhouettes for the little girl. From England are the woolen coats, varieties of knitwear and sweat ers,—some of unbelieveable fineness, hand-made and daintily em broidered. Rose Brier Shoppe “The Children’s Department Store” A complete stock of distinctive Kiddie’s Wear “From Tots to Teens.” A shop that is always brim ming over with everything lovely and new. Rose Brier’s policy of “Exclu sive but not Expensive” makes it the popular Kiddies Shop. GIVE YOUR CHILD CORRECT BODY BALANCE MIAMI BEACH’S FINEST SALON OF CHILDREN’S SHOES EXPERT FITTING GUARANTEED 511 LINCOLN ROAD Phone 5-6988

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20 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Creators of Styles Phone 5-2224 MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 525 Lincoln Road For the Ultimate in Fine Apparel . . IMPORTFR Sportswear Gowns Furs Goats 9 729 LINCOLN ROAD — MIAMI BEACH 7 YEARS SAME LOCATION It Costs Less to Shop at Ann’s Present war conditions have made this merchandise extremely hard to obtain. The beautiful selection and complete stock of these importations at Fairyland is indeed a mecca for the discriminating shopper of childrens wear. A Modern Host John M. Duff, Jr. presides over The Cromwell Hotel at twentieth street and the ocean. His genial manner and efficient management make him one of the popular hotel men among “mine hosts” of Miami Beach. Mr. Duff, a native of Philadephia and son of the late pioneer hat manufacturer, retired as head of an automobile agency in Phila delphia in 1933. In that year he came to Miami to supervise construc tion and manage the LeRoy Villas and Hotel, which he operated for some time. Since he came to Miami Beach Mr. Duff has been active in civic work, the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce, the American Legion, and is now the vice-president of the Miami Beach Hotel Association. Juan INC. Sole Agents in Florida for RENEE THORNTON (DUCHESS CARAFA D’ANORIA) Preparations, Inc. COSMETICS — PERFUMES CHARLES MILLWARD HAND TURNED WOODWARE OF RARE WOODS Rare items from World’s Fair IRAN ENGLAND SWEDEN DENMARK LUXEMBOURG CZECHO-SLOVAKIA MIAMI BEACH % 923 LINCOLN ROAD

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 21 GORRYBURNS Incorporated EXCLUSIVE SPORTSWEAR for MEN Apparel of Distinction 743 Lincoln Road Miami Beach Hyannis, Cape Cod CORRY-BURNS, Inc. Anthony Correale, Pres. Hal Burns. Secretary Mr. Duff became manager of the Cromwell Hotel in 1939. Directly on the ocean with one-tenth mile of private beach, this hotel offers its guests wide enjoyment of solariums, a beautiful tiled swim ming pool, and two outdoor dance floors,—set in a grove of 100 year old palm trees. A series of 40 cabanas, amid a picturesquely-landscaped tropical garden, are part of, and help to make up the well-known “Shore Club”, where every guest of the hotel automatically becomes a member, entitled to all the privileges of the club. Under the Duff management and with the advantages offered by The Cromwell this modern hotel has enjoyed increasing popularity. A New Shoe Salon: The first Red Cross Shoe Salon was established in New York City by the Jacobs Brothers about 25 years ago. Since that time many branches have been established throughout the United States. Florida’s only exclusive Red Cross Shoe Salon, managed by Mr. Joe Surance, is now established on Lincoln Road. This shop is furnish ed in the modernistic manner with flourescent lighting and wall decorations of pinkish rose, with carpet to match. Ample seating space and full length mirrors have been provided for customers A fine selection of hose, costume jewelry and bags may be purchased in this new shoe salon. Here is offered a complete selection of the nationally advertised Red Cross Shoe, which has been designed for comfort—combining youth and beauty. The Pelletiers The new Mercantile Bank building, erected on the former site of one of our oldest hotels (the Lincoln, built in 1917), is receiving its share of well known tenants. One of the first to move in is Dr. George A. Pelletier perhaps our best known and most popular PediatristChiropodist. Although the doctor has been in Miami only five years, Mrs. Pelletier’s family—the Christopher D. Yborra’s—is one of our oldest pioneers, coming here over fifty years ago. Mr. Yborra says that in those days the Florida East Coast Railroad went only as far as St. Augustine. Stern-wheelers plied between Day tona and Jacksonville, but the inland waterways were treacherous and hard to navigate. Large pineapple groves flourished between Stewart and Fort Pierce. In Miami, the Brickell family owned most of the real estate, as well as the “fleet” of rowboats which were used to ferry to and from Cape Florida. As the railroad advanced, Mr. Flagler kept building hotels to house the visitors, until finally the Royal Palm Hotel was built as the Florida East Coast came into Miami. Until that time, if you wanted to come to little-known Miami, you came by yacht. Mrs. Pelletier herself, came down in 1919, and in 1924 established her own decorating business, specializing in the decoration of yachts. Many of our most familiar boats have had her supervision. The “Sequoia”—now a Government ship—was the last commission Mrs. Pelletier undertook before returning to New York in 1930. Dr. Pelletier, after fourteen years of practice in Flushing, N. Y.. came down to Miami with his wife, and built up an enviable practice here. Always an outstanding athlete—at Worcester Academy and Syracuse University (where he held various records in the broad and high jumps), the Doctor still finds time for his athletic hobbies—golf, tennis, and fishing. Nor have his civic affiliations and professional associations been neglected, for he is a member of the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce and of the State and National Associations of h c Junior l/cb Drop Distinctive Fashions for the Young DRESSES SKIRTS BEACH WEAR JACKETS PLAY CLOTHES SWEATERS ACCESSORIES BOYS’ WEAR 509 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI BEACH

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22 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Podiatrists. During the World War, he served with the Trench Mortar Battery Unit, and in Flushing, devoted a great deal of his free time to the American Legion work. Right now, Dr. and Mrs. Pelletier and their adorable seventeen months old son, are kept busy with the decorating of their new home on Bay Road and their suite of new offices, which by the way, are the most completely equipped of their kind—having even the latest whirl pools. Musician Turns Business Woman One of the recently established shops during the 1940-41 season is the Gladys Byrnes Shop on Lincoln Road. Here may be found dresses, hats and hose for the discriminating woman, together with a special featuring of slacks, play suits and accessories. The selection of slacks, designed for style and action, and many other attractive displays reflect the artistic temperament of Miss Byrnes. A concert pianist and professional musician Miss Byrnes has given many concerts throughout Canada and the United States. With her brown eyes, auburn hair and friendly attitude Miss Byrnes may be recognized at her shop as the versatile musician now concentrating on an already successful career in the business field. Hortense An artist who places the greatest emphasis on the need of specially designed apparel,—Hortense has created a distinct atmosphere of “clothes consciousness” in her shop at Alton Road. Here milady’s wearing apparel is entirely custom made. Hortense personally supervises the adaptation of clothes to each individual. Designs are first submitted with the intent purpose of ascertaining the need and use of clothes to be selected. The complexion, height, figure and social life of the individual are taken into consideration to accent the particular personality. Evening dresses, street dresses and sportswear are all designed with the same care. In fishing and golf clothes comfort is the keynote— for which Hortense has created “free action” sleeve. Strictly tailored suits and coats are fashioned from English woolens imported from Nassau. With her vivacious and charming manner and intense interest in her profession, it is easy to understand this designer’s 10 years of IVORIES SEMI-PRECIOUS CURIOS IVORY MINATURES GIFTS *1Ite Bags Vanities Jewelry 821 Lincoln Road Miami Beach 16 YEARS ON THE BE A C H l\u mi I hA a6 Ivu)tu\, vmc Dresses Sportswear Accessories 437 Lincoln Road Miami Beach THE TOY BOX “Olmstead” Doll House Furniture Dolls Books Toys • Games 1132 BOARDWALK 727 LINCOLN ROAD OCEAN CITY, N. J. MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA fAIY
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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 23 continued success in Miami Beach,—where for 7 years she has been in business for herself. Cherry’s Mr. L. A. Cherry is the guiding personality who directs the policies and activities of Cherry’s on Collins Avenue. For the past three sea sons he has owned apparel shops on Collins Avenue and Lincoln Road,—having originated from Philadelphia, Pa., where he was asso ciated with Mr. De May, creator of fashions. He has brought to Miami Beach all the wealth of experience from 20 years business in Asbury Park, New Jersey. He has created a shop which is attractive and stocked with the latest fashions,—specializing in spectator sports, beach wear, street and afternoon gowns, casual and sport coats. Hand Embroidered Fashions For over ten years in Miami Beach the Idamae Le Vine Shop now on Lincoln Road has functioned successfully with an air of artistry and competence. With Idamae Le Vine herself in charge, the most charming hand embroidered fashions are designed for the individual,—with hand embrodiery so exact in detail as to resemble a painting of the same subject. After original sketches are drawn, whether for cruise wear, dresses, suits or ensembles, the next study is of lines and correct figure. Here the ultimate object of the Idamae Le Vine creations is to make them seem “alive”,—with lines to give grace and life to informal and formal wear. There is a friendly personal atmosphere is this show room and busy work shop. In addition to the individually designed dresses and suits, match ing bags are made to complete ensembles, and chic custom hats by Ria, assume an air both intriguing and different. With its scope of design and color combinations and the personal supervision given to individual detail this shop continues to enjoy the patronage of an appreciative clientele. A Childrens Paradise The best way to enjoy The Toy Box on Lincoln Road with its countless items of attraction to children (and adults as well) is to visit it with leisure enough to browse among its interesting displays. It becomes at once a childrens’ paradise where dolls . toys . books . reign supreme. The variety of dolls and accessories which greet the visitor’s eye make this a real “doll style centre.” Especially complete is the doll house furniture,—items in miniature, to furnish every room of a modernly equipped “dolly home.” There are beautifully illustrated books for children at The Toy Box, some purely educational, others for entertainment. The toys, however perhaps evoke the children’s keenest interest. Of almost every type and description especially featured are the famous Holgate Toys. This group is educational,—their slogan being “Train as You Entertain.” Bags for children and knife and flash light sets, together with many other novelties, have been particularly designed for childrens’ use and delight. The Toy Box has a branch store in Ocean City, New Jersey, but has been on Lincoln Road for 12 years in the same location, carrying loads of suggestions for tiny tots pleasure and education. • --——-— -—•---— --PHONE 5-3800 i_ Juan, Inc. Here is the shop distinctive—where one may purchase really lovely out-of-the-ordinary things for gifts, or for one’s self. Whether it be a small remembrance or an exquisite object of art, it may be found in this chic new shop on Lincoln Road. Here are most unusual and artistic articles, chosen with dis criminating and excellent taste from the World’s Fair exhibits of Luxembourg, Denmark, England, Czecho Slovakia, Sweden and Spain. Della Robbia and seventeenth century alabaster plaques are among some rare antiques. Of especial interest is a Royal Persian bowl with detailed pictorial history. Here, too, is a choice selection of hand turned wood-ware of rare woods from the artistry of Charles Millward, the famous craftsman. Juan, Inc., is also the exclusive representative in Florida for the well-known Renee Thornton Preparation, Inc. (The Duchess Carafa D’Andria) cosmetics and perfumes,—so handsomely displayed. This new shop, presided over by the easy-mannered Juan Cortez Ayala, is a treasure-trove for admirers of art objects which reflect the romantic interest of things rare and unique. 5-7070 Opal Lee Beauty Salon Introducing new Creme Oil Permanents and Feather-cut “hair do” In Patio at 630 Lincoln Road MIAMI BEACH Multigraphing Mimeographing PHONE 5-7770 LINCOLN ROAD LETTER SERVICE 528 Lincoln Road HATS DESIGNED FOR THE INDIVIDUAL LE Y N A CHAPEAUX (Formerly 608 Lincoln Road) — NOW — 407 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI BEACH PHONE 5-3594 SALES RENTALS EUGENIA P. GIBSON REG. REAL ESTATE BROKER 1000 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA Speaking of Something New! Our up to the minute creations in ladies beach wear will simply take your breath away .... “Exquisite” and “lovely” are fitting superla tives in describing our Infants’ and Chil dren’s Wear. . Remember! A Gift from Salem’s Means More. V

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24 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Anne Wrigley One of the most brillant personalities who has adopted Miami Beach as a home is Anne Wrigley, foremost decorator of the greater Miami area. Mrs. Wrigley is recognized as a creator of interiors which are both original and exclusive in their charm. Since 1927 when Mrs. Wrigley established a Miami Beach Studio, her achievements as a designer of smart interiors would make a list too long to record, but notable in the group of houses completely ap pointed by Mrs. Wrigley are homes of A. T. Eldredge, Charles Corby, Oscar Webber, Robert Gifford, John D. Simmons, and John G. McRay. Mrs. Wrigley’s generous spirit recently prompted her to one of the finest gestures reported in connection with British War Relief charity. When Alfred I. Barton and Leslie Buswell were searching for a suit able place to establish headquarters for the Miami Beach section of the British War Relief Society, she willingly offered half of her beautiful studio, located at 925 West 41st Street, Miami Beach. The space was accepted and has been declared the best workroom the society has in the United States. The Augusta Shop One of the newcomers to Miami Beach is the shop on Lincoln Road known as ‘Augusta,’ carrying ready-to-wear resort fashions. A wide selection of daytime, afternoon and evening dresses is shown, and all types and kinds of coats and suits with or without fur trim. Beach wear and sportswear, too, in the latest styles are offered. Resort shoppers find this shop a source of delight in both the wide range of sizes (from junior Miss to larger women) and in the well chosen variety of up-to-the-minute fashions. Shopping Problems Solved A visit to Salems, Importers will easily solve shopping problems. Their creations in ladies beach wear are new and different, and one may make selections from most attractive displays. The beach ensembles and accessories . robes . slack suits . and play suits shown will delight the most fastidious shopper. Play clothes for “sun or sand,” . sport dresses . and jackets, . and beautiful hand knitted sweaters are also featured. There is also a lovely selection of infants and childrens wear,— dainty complete outfits for little folks. The latest of fashion creations and smart styles assure the popu larity of this fashionable Lincoln Road Shop. Cook’s Casino Cook’s Casino at Fifth Street and Washington Avenue,— 'where the Causeway meets the Ocean, is one of Miami Beach’s oldest and most popular bathing pavilions. It was established in 1925 by John A. Cook who lived in Miami Beach at that time. The original, a small structure, was demolished by the 1926 hurricane. The next season, however, the casino was rebuilt and en larged. It has enjoyed great popularity as an ocean front rendezvous, and is conducted by Walter and John A. Cook, Jr.—the two sons of the original founder. Beach wear and playclothes too, are featured,—with cute gay hats and bags to match. The latest styles makes this a real “fashion centre” for the younger set. Helen Mac Newly established on Lincoln Road Helen Mac offers exclusive gifts of dis tinction in de luxe assortments of tropical products. Tree-ripened citrus fruits of the choicest selection are carefully and attrac tively packed and boxed for shipment. Gift fruit baskets for any occasion are made to order featuring pleasing presentations. Some are arranged in unusual baskets, or in hampers—while others are presented in solid maple salad bowls, complete with fork and spoon ... a most novel idea. Beautiful gifts in solid maple . trays . nut bowls ... ice cube tubs and novelties for children as well as grown-ups are displayed in attractive setting in this modern, distinctive shop. A special line of marmalades, conserves, jellies, honeys, and preserves— together with brandied peaches and pears, form a truly grand array of Helen Mac’s tropical products. And to add further delight in the make up of gift baskets for family, relative, or friends are Sherry’s candies, tropical crystallized fruit, shelled pecans and Hawaiian Macadamia nuts. From so tempting an assortment no gift will find a heartier welcome than a Helen Mac selection at 523 Lincoln Road. Phone 5-1989. I j I THE GEORGIAN \ $ i ( THE GEORGIAN — a new and distinguished colonial j j type hotel keynoting smart comfort amid gracious atj ) mosphere. Large enough to afford every modern conj | venience, yet not so large as to lose that personal con tact between the guest and a management eager to please. Everyone familiar with gay Miami Beach 1 knows there is no finer address than “Directly on the ) ocean at Lincoln Road.” Our guests find themselves j j right in the center of a gayly moving resort world. j For your convenience a private beach, swimming j pool and cabana club are offered each cabana equipped j j with private dressing room and shower . coffee shop j | and a secluded patio where you may enjoy hours of j | quite relaxation ’neath beautiful palms. Florida’s fin| est bathing is at our door and guests may bathe directly from their room. 9 j The Georgian 3 ON THE OCEAN AT LINCOLN ROAD jj ? \ Distinguished New Hotel Directly on the Ocean j “Fashions for Little Ladies” One of the newest shops on Lincoln Road is The Junior Deb Shop . modern and cheerful. Here are displayed fashions for little folks from one year through junior sizes. Dresses, Skirts, Jackets, Sweaters, Suits,—everything to outfit the well-dressed little girl ... as well as “mother and daughter” combinations designed alike in style and color. r------BEVERLY, MASS. DAVI/CN, Inc. EXCLUSIVE BEACH AND SPORTSWEAR for LADIES AND CHILDREN 315 Lincoln Road. Albion Hotel Bldg., MIAMI BEACH GREETINGS from A FRIEND When shopping on Lincoln Road,—Davison, Inc., in the new Albion Hotel block affords a most attractive display of ladies’ and children’s beach and sport wear. This is one of two stores operated by Davison, Inc.—the other located in Beverly, Massachusetts, and catering to the better trade in that northern resort. Mr. Davison, genial and dynamic acting head of the store, is ably assisted by a group of well trained salespeople from shops of New York City and Boston. And in order to suoDly their clientele with the very latest in fashions they make several trips to metropolitan centers throughout the season for stock in the trend of advance styles. The newest fashions . prices in line with quality sold . wide variety . and attractive display ... all combine to make Davison, Inc., one of the most attractive marts for beach and sport wear on Lincoln Road.

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 25 • • ^Hie bastJz jjQSi the. indtuudlteal • • “AND.... Extra Money For”.. THE NEW Red Gross Shoe Salon NOW OPEN Your feet will feel young enough when you slip them into a pair of perfectly fitting perfectly lovely RED Cross Shoes. .All the season’s smartest fashion notes in a complete selection of STYLES and SIZES.. Every pair at the nationally advertised and standard price—$6.50. Sizes 4 to 11 Widths A AAA to EEE 445 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI REACH When you find you’re in need of “extra cash” . when emergencies arise that demand additional funds, the friendly officials of the Miami Industrial Bank want you to feel wel come to come in and “talk it over.” Remember, the Miami Industrial has a special teacher’s loan plan, at regular bank interest rates, with repayment terms designed particularly for the teacher. Our friendly officials will be glad to explain the details of the Teacher’s Loan Plan to you. Come in and talk it over! We pay the highest interest of any bank in Miami on your savings. OFFICERS R. DeWitt King J. T. Owens Chairman of the Board Exec %  Vice-Pres. and Treas. John M. Ogden, President Roy A. Perry, Secretary Wm. D. McKenzie, Assistant Secretary DIRECTORS J. P. Summons R. DeWitt King John M. Ogden Leland Hyzer Curtis H. Dodson JT. Owens Hugh Purvis Thornton M. Fincher "J cu INDUSTRIAL 46 W. FLAGLER ST. nrmmn HICKSON, INC. With a record of 29 years in the fruit shipping business in the metropolitan Miami area the firm of Hickson has achieved distinct recognition. Excellence in quality selection, attractive display and reliability in shipping have awarded this firm with the recognition of being the largest shippers of gift fruit boxes in America. During the holiday season sixteen and one-third solid carloads of fruits and gifts were shipped North within a period of 8 days. Hickson, Inc. at 747 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach has maintained the same location for S years,—with other Hickson Stores at East Flagler Street, Miami and West Palm Beach. In their own packing plant at 178 S. W. 3rd Street, Miami, cus tomers may drive in and see their own selecion of fruits packed for shipment Here the volume is so large that an express office is maintained in their own plant. Wide variety in displays for shipment is afforded in combinations of fruits, marmalades and attractively boxed glaced fruits and nuts. A shipment by Hickson well represents “Florida’s finest”. THE HOUSE OF ART Truly named ... a real “treasure house” . this interesting shop houses some of the rarest and most interesting works of art. Located at 821 Lincoln Road, The House of Art represents one of the oldest firms of its kind in this area, starting business in Miami in 1926—and being 16 years in business in Miami Beach. Here is featured the finest collection of semi-precious stones, ivory curios and art objects. Among the wealth of art objects is a rare collection of rose quartz, smoked crystal, and jade—ranging from spinach jade to apple green. One piece of particular mention is the largest rose quartz elephant in existence,— a real museum piece. Another outstanding work of art in rose quartz is a pair of complete scenes, exquisitely clear,—depicting the Chinese Goddess of Mercy, the sacred cow climbing the mountain side and the age-old cherry tree and birds. Each scene is about 10x10 inches in size with an elaborately carved teak wood stand. A group of Limage vases on copper—both large and small,—bought from the collection of a famous estate are reflective of the glamour of French scenes long gone. Ivory birds, painted, and with life-like animation are grouped in one cabinet. Yet another contains a wealth of ivory plaques with their intricacy of workmanship. Fascinating in detail and depicting an historical scene is one particular pair of plaques, where, carved in ivory, are 32 figures appearing in a space no larger than 2%x8 inches. An interesting display of costume jewelry and a large selection of beautiful bags are also displayed in this shop. Countless other art pieces of beauty and rare design and chosen with the dis crimination of a real connoisseur are found in The House of Art . Making this a veritable treasure trove of distinctive art objects—rich in the glamour of romance. It has been a great privilege as the architect of the New Lincoln-Washington Building to perpetuate a worthy structure and a landmark of Miami Beach, Florida. ALBERT ANIS. MIAMI BEACH BRANCH Phone 5-5129 Suite 217-1101 LINCOLN ROAD BLDG. Built in 1917

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26 THE FLORIDA TEACHER A Distinctive^ hotel. I JlL .For Discriminating Persons HEALTH PLEASURE RELAXATIOM 150 rooms moderate cost Macfadden Deauville, with the world’s largest circular swim ming pool, big private beach, unexcelled cabanas, and its world world famous health depart ment is the most ideal vacation spot in this glorious sunshine state for teachers, educators and school executives. Its at mosphere is restful and whole some. For vacation rates write to Warren C. Freeman, Manager. HEALTH BUILDING .... For those who prize their most valuable possession—good health— Macfadden Deauville offers a com plete body-building program, dietetic advice, daily physical culture exer cises, solaria, supervised hikes, hydro therapy, physiotherapy, electro therapy and massage at prices within reach of all. A DISTINCTIVE CLUB . For those of discriminating tastes, the Macfadden Deauville Cabana Club, with its wide and roomy 500foot private beach and the world’s largest circular salt water swimming pool offers the ultimate in ocean front recreation enjoyment and com fort. Prevailing moderately priced season or yearly rates furnished upon request. Address inquiries directly to Macfadden Deauville Cabana Club or call 6-2521. macfadden-deauville hotel “OVERLOOKING THE SEA ” 6701 COLLINS AVE. MIAMI BEACH

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 27 the Qroojfh of by Joe Copps The phenominal progress of Miami Beach during the past decade is reflected in the city’s building permit figures, its sound financial condition and in the manner it has been governed through the good and bad years. Since 1930 approximately $80,000,000 has been invested in Miami Beach for new construction alone, and it is estimated that an equal amount has been spent for land, furnishings and landscaping, bringing the total investment to approxi mately $160,000,000 for the 10-year period. The first five years of the past decade, 1930 to 1935, saw little progress in Miami Beach, as far as new construction was concerned, yet the city maintained its enviable financial condition, continued its public improvements and met all obligations without a default in principal or interest. Since 1935 approximately $67,000,000 worth of new buildings have been constructed and a like amount has been spent for land, furnishings and land scaping. In that period the city has kept pace with private construction by im proving its streets, installing a new sewer system, building a new golf course, two new fire stations, a new police station, installing additional water mains, a water storage tank and providing every other improvement made necessary by the rapid expansion of the entire city. Miami Beach, a city entirely dependent upon the number of visitors which visit the city each year, has weathered many catastrophies during its short 25 years of existence, and in that time managed to keep clear of many entanglements experienced by other cities, and has always enjoyed a reputation of attracting huge investors to its shores. Shortly after recovering from a disastrous hurricane in the late 1920’s Miami Beach was enjoying a slight building “boom” when the stock market crash of 1929 descended upon the country, causing a sharp decline in travel, especially to Miami Beach which at that time was more or less known as a “millionaire’s playground.” An example of progress during the first and second half of the 1930-1940 decade is shown by building permits. From 1930 to 1935, there were but 36 new hotels constructed in Miami Beach, but in the following year, 1936, permits were issued for 38 hotels, and in the next four years an additional 127 more hotels were built, bringing the 5-year total to 165, a record probably never equalled in any other city in the entire world. While this great hotel building program was going on other types of struc tures such as apartment houses, homes and building places were being erected and the entire geographical face of Miami Beach was being transformed from a former mangrove swamp into a beautiful city of modernistic buildings, wider streets, parks and other attractive facilities needed for the advancement of the entire community. Since 1935 Miami Beach has been well near the top among all the larger cities of the United States in the amount of building permits issued each year. For example, Miami Beach was exceeded by only 10 cities in the United States in 1935; 12 in 1936; 14 in 1937; 26 in 1938; 18 in 1939, and 13 in 1940. Compared to population with other cities of the nation Miami Beach can rightfully claim the distinction of being “America’s fastest growing city.” With this vast amount of new construction going on in Miami Beach it might be reasonably assumed that another real estate boom was in progress, but this is not the case and at no time during the heavy building program has there been any semblance of a boom. Pioneer real estate developers and builders have often been quoted as saying that approximately three fourth of the property being sold is for cash and that about the same percentage of all the new buildings are unmortgaged. This proves conclusively that Miami Beach properties are being built, owned and operated by investors rather than speculators. One of the most interesting facts about the sound financial condition of Miami Beach is that in all of the 25 years since the city was incorporated there was less than $30,000 in outstanding taxes at the end of the last fiscal year, October 31, 1940. BEACH PUBLICITY STORY By Pete Crossland Through the efforts of the city in establishing its own publicity department many years ago the name of Miami Beach has become so well known throughout the United States that practically every event and every Miami Beach happening is now considered “news.” Miami Beach Leadership . The TOWN HOUSE — with its swimming pool, private bathing beach — cabanas — superior service — will make your Miami visit a memorable one. The .. TOWN HOUSE MILTON B. KILLE, Manager ‘‘In Fashionable Collins Avenue at 20th Street”

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28 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Leading newspapers and magazines all over the country depend upon the Miami Beach publicity department, known as the Miami Beach News Service, for much of their news stories and pictures, and in many instances send their own reporters, editors and photographers direct to the publicity department offices when in need of help on special assignments. The Miami Beach News Service was established in 1925 by Steve Hannagan, nationally known publicity and public relations counsel. At that time the de partment was operated from the Chamber of Commerce office, but in 1927 it was taken over by the city and all operations since that time have been con ducted at the City Hall building. Joe Copps, director of the Miami Beach Service, has been with the Steve Hannagan organization since 1925 and has been in charge of the Beach office since Hannagan moved his main office to New York in 1932. At present there are 13 members on the publicity staff, headed by Copps. Stuart Cameron, former sports editor of the United Press, is chief assistant Cameron has been connected with the Beach publicity office for the past three winter seasons. Last summer he was with the publicity department at the New York World’s Fair. Pete Crossland, picture editor and summer director, has been with the pub licity department six years. Before that he operated a weekly newspaper in Miami Beach, and was city editor of the Old Evansville (Indiana) Journal before coming here 16 years ago. Stan Baitz, with 10 years of varied newspaper experience in New York and Washington, holds down the sports desk, is radio editor and feature writer in the Hannagan-Copps organization at Miami Beach. He is a member of bar of the District of Columbia and worked out of Steve Hannagan’s New York office prior to coming here. Jimmy Rend, who works with news reel men in staging the various “stunts and gags” which are shown throughout the country depicting Miami Beach bathing girls in action pictures, comes direct from New York where he worked for several years in the same line for Paramount News. Cynthia Powell, society and fashion editor, has been with the Beach pub licity staff for two years. She was formerly with the Miami Herald, did publicity work for the Roney Plaza Hotel, and for several years did publicity work for the Shoreham hotel in Washington, D. C. Society news and fashion pictures being prepared by her department this year reached many of the nation’s largest news papers and magazines. Miss Powell’s assistants include Emily Vance, May Lundgren and Kitty Reddick. Miss Vance has had wide experience in the newspaper field and was connected with the Surf Club at Miami Beach prior to joining the Hannagan organization. Miss Lundgren, society reporter, was formerly with Lord and Thomas and the Tower Magazine in New York, and more recently was employed by the Gradon Bevis Advertising Agency in Miami. Miss Reddick, who assists on both society and fashions, is from French Lick Springs, Indiana. She has a background of travel, and has wide experience on society news and fashions. Three photographers make up the photographic staff of the Beach office. James Hamilton, with 20 years background, joined the organization five years ago. He was with the Miami Herald several years and before that was a news reel cameraman, working out of Atlanta. Johnny Sarno comes from the photographic staff of the New York Journal American. He is a brother of the famous Tony Sarno, society photographer for International News Service. Ollie C. Fitz, veteran of the photographic staff, has done all of the finishing work for Hannagan and Copps at Miami Beach for the past 12 winter seasons. He hails from upper New York State where he worked for International News Photos. Jennie Sweeting, office secretary, has been a sort of “general manager” around the office for 12 years. CARL G. FISHER—AS I KNEW HIM By Steve Hannagan Carl G. Fisher was the greatest showman in America—but he didn’t want anyone to know about it. When running his little bicycle shop in Indianapolis, selling the first auto mobiles on the market, conducting the business of the remarkable Prestolite plant in Indiana, developing Miami Beach, he always displayed a rare flair for promo tion and not only avoided but dreaded personal publicity. He was scruplously honest in his endeavors and whether it was bicycles, automobiles, gas tanks or real estate, he always peddled honest values. Looking back over the years, today I am amazed at his foresight in every thing he handled. The Indianapolis Motor Speedway which he dreamed and built, Miami Beach which was his baby now grown to majestic manhood, and his little-known sponsorship of both the Lincoln and the Dixie Highways are examples of his long-sighted genius. Happily successful in his operation, with his partner Jim Allison, of the Prestolite plant in Indianapolis, his dream of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and the annual 500-mile automobile race which will be run for a 29th time this May 30 is an outstanding example of his uncanny inspiration. He conceived this gigantic track in 1909 and when short races on a macadam 411 OCEAN DRIVE The only complete modern fireproof hotel operating the year around directly on the ocean at moderate prices. # TWO DINING ROOMS OPEN AIR DANCE PATIO BEAUTIFUL COCKTAIL LOUNGE LARGE PRIVATE BATHING BEACH FULLY EQUIPPED MARINE GARDEN SOLARIUMS MASSAGE PARLORS • While located in the heart of all activities the Strath enjoys the seclusion of a private estate. READ THE MIAMI BEACH DAILY TROPICS Miami Beach’s Only Daily Newspaper Ho me-Owned Ho me-Edited JOHN D. MONTGOMERY Editor and Publisher

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29 THE FLORIDA TEACHER track were not too successful in the first two years of the operation of this track designed to be the great out-of-door laboratory of the automobile industry, in late 1Q10 he suggested a^d accomplished the bricking of the two-and-a-half mile oval and proposed and inaugurated in 1Q11 the longest automobile race in the world—SOO-miles to gold and glory. The Speedway at its inception, was not an easy track to drive. Fisher pur posely designed it that way—with four quarter turns connected with two long straightaways and two short straightways. It could have been a bowl which would have produced high speeds and records but Fisher wanted the boys to have a test even back in 1909. And the boys still have the same test today with the European drivers who came over last year proclaiming the Speedway, years later, still the most difficult and interesting automobile race course in the world. Such was Fisher’s foresight. Fisher always insisted that the 500-mile race be more than just entertain ment and he established a system, still in vogue, where the automotive engineers of America, along with officials of the American Automobile Association and officials of the Speedway, meet each year or so and draw up new racing rules which require mechanical preparation for the race which definitely contribute knowledge to the automobile industry. Fisher’s introduction of the 1,000 piece band, composed of small bands from Indianapolis and nearby cities to start the automobile race remains one of the outstanding examples of showmanship in sports even today. When Fisher came bo Miami Beach he had made his fortune and had an nounced his retirement. But he was a young man, slightly over 40, and he could have no more settled down to play than could Bill Knudson stop thinking of production lines. He visioned a play land here in the sun and immediately started his active brain in the direction of producing it. Besides being a dreamer, a showman, a building dreamer and an optimist. Fisher was also one who would always take a chance to back his far-sighted judge ment. He dreamed Miami Beach to its every hotel, business section and school house which today makes it the outstanding resort city of the world. As he walked about in the mud which his huge pumping machines were pumping in from Biscayne Bay and literally making Miami Beach from mangrove swamps, he pointed out the business and hotel section that were to be in years hence, and today his dream has more than come true. He kept a tight check upon his property to see that it only got into the proper hands, he designed the cost of houses that were to go in certain sections, he even demanded that his office supervise the type of architecture that would be used. His foresight and his strict regulations are today responsible for the most modern and best built city in America. Fisher interested the best people of America in his development hard by the Atlantic Ocean at Miami Beach in the early days. He laid the seed which have made Lincoln Road the most fashionable shopping street in the world. He built the best of hotels and persuaded his wealthy friends to raise palatial palaces in the sun on the ocean as well as the bay front. BEACH OFFICIALS Personal records at Miami Beach city hall indicate that the large “city family” manages to get along with their “bosses” rather nicely, because on a faded page in the record book is a notation showing that City Clerk C. W. Tomlinson and Fire Chief J. S. Stephenson began their duties in 1020, just a little over 20 years ago. Ray Miller, tax assessor, is another 20-year man, having begun with the city in April of 1921. C. A. Renshaw, city manager, will have completed 15 years in September of this year, and his secretary, Miss Elizabeth Doherty, has served in this position for 13 years. H. H. Horn, superintendent of the city water department, has been engaged in his present occupation 18 years, and his assistant, J. D. Roth, joined up in 1924, 17 years ago. J. J. Farrey, city building inspector, k another 17-year man, and his chief assistant, Ed Hancock, has served for 12 years. M. N. Lipp, city engineer, has been employed 14 years, as well as Ernie Wiess, life guard captain; Art Gleason, manager of the municipal golf course; Dave Cleary, chief accountant, and J. B. Lemon, director of recreation. J. Harvey Robillard, city attorney, with the exception of one two-year term, has acted in his present capacity for 13 years, and Police Chief H. V. Yocum has been in that department for 12 years. CITY OFFICIALS The voters and taxpayers of Miami Beach evidently are fairly well satisfied in the manner their elected officials have been running the city, because in most cases the councilmen asking for re-election win another term without a great deal of difficulty. Mayor John H. Levi is the city’s oldest employe, if he can be termed an employe. He was first elected to the city council in 1918, and has served on that body ever since. In 1920 he was re-elected for a four year term, and every four The Lear School NURSERY — TWELFTH GRADE . RESIDENT and DAY SCHOOL Outdoor Teaching — Afternoon Recreation — Regulation Swimming Pool on Premises DISTINCTIVE for its HIGH SCHOLASTIC STANDARDS . CULTURAL HOME ENVIRONMENT . CAREFUL HEALTH SUPERVISION IDA R. LEAR, Director 1010 West Avenue Miami Beach, Florida i j j i i i i i i i j \ i I i i j i j j i i i j i \ \ i j i \ i i f 'V E. D. KEEFER Realtor • Appraiser EXPERT APPRAISALS Member American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers Established in 1923 1035 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA Florida's Finest Sea Food Dinners Telephone6-1117 STONE CRABS—GREEN TURTLE STEAKS BROILED LIVE LOBSTER Cocktail Lounge On the Ocean at Baker’s Haulover

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30 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Centrally Located %  — Planned Athletic and Social Activities — Hand Ball Courts — Table Tennis — Tropical Patio. o io.d (l€4 OJ4414 a mmemcn Miami Beach on Collins Avenue at 15th Street years since that time has been re-elected. (Incidently, Mayor Levi has never publicly asked a citizen to vote for him.) Harry Hice is the second oldest councilman, in point of service. He has been continuously re-elected ever since 1924, rounding out 17 years on that body in June this year. Baron de Hirsch Meyer entered Beach politics in 1930 by being elected tc the council for a two-year term. In 1932 he received a four-year term, and again in 1937 he was re-elected for another four years. Robert W. Ralston was first elected in 1932, re-elected in 1934, and 1937, and in 1939 he received a four year term which does not expire until 1943. Val C. Cleary, in his first campaign for city councilman in 1934 was given a four-year term, and again in 1939 he was re-elected for four years more. Prior to his entrance into the councilmanic field, however, Mr. Cleary served as mayor from 1930 to 1932, and he was city tax assessor from 1922 to 1926. Mitchell Wolfson and Herbert A. Frink are the other members of the sevenman council. They were both elected for two-year terms in 1939, and with Levi, Meyer and Hice must run again in June this year provided they choose to serve further. Nate Fisher s GIFT BOX JEWELRY—BAGS—HOSIERY 1441 Collins Avenue Miami Beach, Florida At last! An effortless way to REDUCE and STAY SLENDER EXERCYCLE REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. “Effortless Exercise”... Exercycle is the modern way to peel off pounds—easily. No strenuous diets—no harmful drugs. Operated by Electricity . Just get on, turn the switch and relax. The machine exercises you. Adjustable to four types — swimming, horseback riding, rowing, bicycling. A few minutes a day is enough and the exercise is so passive it is recom mended even for invalids. Takes up no more room than an arm chair. Costs less than a health club course. Fun to Use . yet it gets results fast! Hundreds of enthusiastic letters in our files from users prove it! EXERCYCLE CO., 1654 MERIDIAN. Ph. 5-7688 Miami Beach Please send me your illustrated brochures telling about the Exercycle. ABRAMS HOTEL 302 EUCLID AVE. MIAMI BEACH All Dietary Laws Strictly Observed THE HOTEL FOR CHILDREN KINDERGARTEN TRAINING — TUTORING — BOARDING BY DAY, WEEK OR MONTH TRAINED DIETICIANS AND NURSE .PRIVATE CABANA AT EXCLUSIVE POOL AND CABANA CLUB EXTENSIVE PLAYGROUND James Ave. at 19th St. your child needs N. MIAMI BEACH this climate — if you’re \ 5-3849 going away, send your child to our “Corner” for comfort and play. MR. and MRS. HAROLD TAMARIN MR. MORTIMER GARBER

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 31 The UNIVERSITY of MIAMI MAIN BUILDING In December 1940 the University of Miami reached a highly significant milestone in its brief but vigorous life. Its formal admission to membership in the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools brings to it national recognition as a fully accredited institution and places the degrees of its graduates on a parity with those of much older and much more completely equipped uni versities. This recognition of Miami as a standard university, even though without endowment and adequate plant, is a glowing tribute to its able manage ment, sound scholarship, stability, and rapidly expanding service to the community and nation. As the University is clothed with its new honors, it is fitting to record that it was established by a group of public-spirited citizens in 1926; it is governed by a Board of Trustees of twenty-one public-spirited citizens; it is manned by a hard-working faculty and administrative staff; and it is attracting nearly sixteen hundred students, not only from the Miami area but from almost every state in the union. The University is in no sense a private enterprise. There is no stock and there are no stockholders. Its property is held in trust by the trustees for the benefit of the public. Its sole purpose is the promotion of human welfare. Today the press, civic organizations, and leaders in countless fields salute the University of Miami for its high achievements in spite of unparalleled financial handicaps. Today its acute limitations are those imposed by the lack of funds for plant, equipment, new departments, faculty, and student aid. Challenging opportunities are here and ahead. Literally hundreds of students are seeking training in fields in which the University has not had the funds and facilities to give instruction. The demand is immediate and urgent for courses in home economics, engineering, architecture, and graduate work. The University is fully alive to these and other potentialities, eager to speed the day of their realization. Perhaps nowhere in America is there such an opportunity for fruitful return on the university dollar. To those about to write or re-write their wills, the University of Miami offers unparalleled opportunity to weave their lives into the lives of the youth of today and of tomorrow. From the local business men, from those who come on occasional visits for health or pleasure, the Llniversity of Miami now asks boldly and earnestly for adequate funds with which to do its work in 1941 and thereafter. It has entirely proved its worth. MIAMI BEACH WOMAN’S CLUB In 1926 a group of civic minded women, under the leadership of Mrs. Clayton Sedgwick Cooper, formed the Miami Beach Woman’s Club for the purpose of promoting friendliness between the visitors and the residents. From that original group of some 32S members has grown one of the most progressive and outstand ing Clubs of Dade County. In 1927 a Book Shower was held at the Pancoast Hotel—this was the origin of the Miami Beach Public Library—now financed by the City but still one of the Club’s pet projects and under its supervision. From the beginning they have cooperated in every way with the City—in fact have been a Chamber of Commerce all their own—and it is fitting that in 1928 Mrs. Thomas Pancoast was elected President and is still serving in that same capacity. Their annual Art Exhibits are a “must” on the visitors and residents lists. Their Club house at 2401 Pine Tree Drive is one of the city’s most attrac tive and homelike places. Their part in the tree planting and plant distribution has had much to do with the beautification of Miami Beach. Among their Welfare activities are: Children’s Home Society, Red Cross, Mississippi Flood Victims, Infantile Paralysis Drives and most all worthy local charities. Since 1928 a University Scholarship has been given a graduate student of the Ida M. Fisher High School. The Miami Beach Woman’s Club, through its welfare work, its aid in the forming of the University of Miami, proves that Greater Miami is as one whole— each part, Miami, Miami Beach, Coral Gables, all working together for the betterment of Dade County, where “to be” is “to Live.” Clothes that . Make FASHION NEW/ Our New 1941 Collection .. “Round-the-clock” Resort Fashions—all with that youthful gayety and simplicity which have made ELEANOR’S a by-word among America’s Best Dressed Women. Prices within reach of all. ZleaHXVi'i, HOUSE OF FASHION Huntington Building Collins Ave. & 23rd St. 174 S. E. 1st St., MIAMI MIAMI BEACH

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32 THE FLORIDA TEACHER JOSEPH TESEI An en\ iable record of progress has been made by a young man, who, almost penniless, came to Miami Beach in 1924 and started in the landscape business with a ramshackle Ford truck. He is Joseph Tesei and holds a contract to do all landscape hauling for the city of Miami Beach. Mr. Tesei today is the proud owner of 22 trucks, with his own garage, and he employs 25 men to carry on his landscape business. It is men like Joseph Tesei who are the foundation of this country. SEE OUR NEW 1941 MODELS BEFORE YOU BUY Nolan-Peeler Motors Inc. CADILLAC LA SALLE PONTIAC Sales and Service PHONE 3-5363 2044 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD MIAMI, FLORIDA ALBURY & COMPANY Steamship Agents Established 1921 Operating Regular Passenger and Freight Steamship Service between MIAMI NASSAU and MIAMI HAVANA TRAVEL BUREAU at CAUSEWAY TERMINAL East end County Causeway — Phone 5-4544 HEAD OFFICE at PIER 1, MUNICIPAL DOCKS Phone 2-6564 Cable Address “ALBURY” MIAMI, FLORIDA < 7/te niuesiMtu
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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 33 Dade County Personalities L. O. Bricker Grace Brown Charles Meyers Dr. Luther O. Bricker As far back as 1928, Rev. Dr. Luther O. Bricker, saw the great potential value of Miami Beach property and made a trip from Atlanta, Georgia, for the express purpose of purchasing several par cels. He later added to his original purchases and in 1933, bought what is now regarded as one of the most destinctive homesites of the greater Miami area, located on Pine Tree Drive. Dr. Bricker, an intensely interesting person, has aided materially in the growth, development and progress of Miami Beach. A graduate of the Union Theological Seminary in New York City, he is universal ly noted as an author of theological works and as a lecturer. Probably the most famous of Dr. Bricker’s works is one of his newest, popularly known as “The Altar”. One of the outstanding achievements in the life of the Doctor was the building of Peachtree Church, in Atlanta, Georgia, known throughout the United States as a beautiful gothic cathedral of prime importance. Dr. Bricker still acts as senior minister of this church and was able, through shrewd business management, to clear the debt on it in a comparatively short period. Dr. Bricker, brilliant and learned though he is, may be found daily in his beautiful study, bringing himself abreast of current problems. He sympathizes wholeheartedly with civilians who suffer from the affects of the war and has helped many morally and financially. He has little time, to spend in private clubs, but maintains membership in the Surf and Indian Creek Clubs, Miami Beach. is Florida Chairman of that organization. For four years, Mrs. Mur rell has been urging organizations and individuals in Florida to take more interest in the married women’s law of this state. A year ago, the State Bar Association decided to redraft married women’s law, to liberalize it and to bring Florida up to date with other states along these lines. Mrs. Murrell was appointed chairman of a committee to draw up a bill of this nature to be presented to the Legislature. Mrs. Murrell attended the International Labor Conference in Havana as representative of the World Woman’s Party of Geneva, Switzerland. During the past several years she has been writing a legal page, “Law If You Like It”, for The Florida Teacher Maga zine. Born in Laramie, Wyoming, Mrs. Murrell’s travels have carried her to every nook and corner of the world. She has thrice circled the globe and made many trips throughout America and leading foreign cities. She was educated at Chevy Chase Junior College, Washington; Sorbonne, Paris, France; University of Wyoming and the University of Miami, where she was awarded her law degree in 1934. She practices in state and Federal courts. Mrs. Murrell’s home is at 1500 Brickell Avenue, one of the oldest and most exclusive residential sections of Miami. There she finds time to be a charming hostess to her numerous friends in social and professional circles. ETHEL ERNEST MURRELL One of the most interesting personalities in Miami is Ethel Ernest Murrell. Her accomplishments include writing of prose and poetry, author of law books, lecturer, columnist, radio commentator and polit ical activities. In her legal profession, Mrs. Murrell is recognized and honored as a successful practitioner of law, as well as being an authority on legal subjects. One of her books, “Law for Ladies, published in 1937, is used as a textbook at the Florida State College for Women. Another of her books, “Practical Law,” a text book for junior colleges, is being used at Chevy Chase Junior College as a basis of the only law course of its kind in America. Orlando High School and Ivenson Hall for Girls, Laramie, Wy oming, also are using this book. Mrs. Murrell conducted a Legal Forum over station WKAT and also worked as news commentator and lecturer over that station. Eight Florida newspapers carried her legal columns under the title, “Married Women’s Law” over a twoyear period. Her lectures on legal subjects recently were made throughout the country and she was booked by A. H. Handley for a series of professional lectures in northeastern seaboard states. Mrs. Murrell also has lectured widely under the auspices of the National Woman’s Party, with headquarters in Washington. She

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Pearl Safford George A. Brockway If you should ask Pearl Safford what she has done in the musical world of Miami, she would answer “Why, really nothing”. Yet there is hardly another who has done more—in establishing the musical clubs of Florida. Possessor of the degree of Bachelor of Music, Mrs. Safford found ed the Miami College of Music and Oratory. For eight years she directed this, but patriotically gave it up to do war work in Washing ton, during the last war. When you read the “first” positions which she has held in the Florida Federation of Music Clubs, you will see why her name is such a factor in that organization. Founder of the Junior Miami Music Club (the oldest Federated Junior Club in the state), she was their first State Chairman and is always anxious and willing to assist other clubs in getting their Junior groups started. She was the first President of the Florida Federation of Music Clubs and has since served as Vice President, Historian and Legislation Chairman. She was the compiler of the first scrap book and was the first Settlement Chairman, also the first State Chairman of Music Contests. Mrs. Safford now holds the title of Honorary Past President of the Florida Music Clubs and is also the music editor of the Florida Teacher. In the literary field, Mrs. Safford was co-founder, with Mrs. Ruth Hoxie, of the Miami Branch of the National League of American Pen Women and is now an honorary member of it. She is International Vice President of the Poetry Society of Great Britain and America, Inc., chairman of membership of the Song Writing Group, Poetry Society, Inc., as well as being a life member of the Bookfellows of Chicago. Mrs. Safford, an unassuming, extremely considerate person, ranks as one of our real leaders in the furtherment of musical interests in Florida and any who are fortunate enough to know her have benefited from her sterling character. MR. CHARLES S. MEYERS Among the leading business and professional men of Miami, none is proving more worthy of recognition than Charles S. Myers, who came here 15 years ago. He has represented the Royal Typewriter Company since 1927, becoming exclusive sales agent five years ago and since then has held a preferred position for Royal in this area, as well as for the Monarch Address and Fridon Calculating machines, which he sponsors. Mr. Meyers has in his employ expert workmen who have spent years in the repairing and rebuilding of these well known typewriters, adding and calculating machines .... and so is able to render effi cient service at all times. The repair department maintained by his company insures prompt attention for all machines, either purchased or rented. Even the smallest detail receives immediate personal at tention. Mr. Meyers is a member of the Junior Chamber of Commerce and is actively interested in all civic programs. He has built a reputa tion far and wide on his courtesy and ability and business concerns in Miami are learning of the valuable service he is offering. GEORGE A. BROCKWAY, A MAN OF DEEDS In 1863, during the Civil War and just about the time the Battle of Shiloh was being bitterly fought, there was born in Homer, New York, George A. Brockway, a name later to be indelibly impressed on the business world. In 1880 he became associated with his father, William N. Brock way, in the manufacture of high-grade, horse drawn pleasure car riages and at his father’s death in 1889, he continued the business. The Company known as William N. Brockway, Inc. manufactured as high as 4,500 vehicles per year. In the following years as horses were replaced by motors, Mr. Brockway organized in 1912 the Brockway Motor Truck Co., of Cortland, New York, which soon took its place among the leading truck manufacturers. With the advent of this Country into the World War, 1000 Liberty trucks were manufactured by the Company and shipped abroad to be used by the A. E. F. Mr. Brockway headed this successful organization from 1912 to 1929 when he retired, feeling that his ambition was fully realized and satisfied that the Company could go on indefinitely making durable and de pendable products. He became Chairman of the Board which posi tion he still holds. ]yf]Brockway is President of the Cortland City Water Board, President of the Board of Trustees of the Cortland Children’s Home, Vice-President and Director of the First National Bank of Coitland, New York; Vice-President and Director of the Homer National Bank, Homer, N. Y., having been President of the Bank for fifteen years, also President of the Board of Trustees of the Cortland County Home for Aged Women, Homer, New York. Mr. Brockway was one of the founders of the Cortland County Hospital, and still is Vice-Pres. and Trustee. He is an active member of the Surf Club, Miami Beach, Boca Raton Club, Lotus Club of New York, Century Club, Syracuse, N. Y., Masonic Club and Cortland Country Club, Cortland, N. Y. Civic and charitable organizations have benefited from the personal interest and material aid received from Mr. Brockway and especially those of his own county, Courtland. In 1927 he incorporated the Brockway Founda tion of Homer, N. Y., his birthplace. The income from this Founda tion is handled by a Board of Trustees and used for the benefit of needy and worthy people of his home town. Although Mr. George A. Brockway is devotedly a native of Cort land, New York, he proudly says that he has visited Miami Beach many winters since 1899 and is equally proud of the fact that he is a Miami Beach property owner, residing at 2054 North Bay Road. Mrs. JC. Brown Mrs. J. C. Brown, who has been connected with the school system of Dade County and is now head of the Foreign Language Department of the Miami Beach Junior-Senior High School, needs no introduction to the residents of Greater Miami. Her accomplishments in education and the literary world have made her one of the most highly respected personalities on the Beach. There she is teaching the French language. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Florida Teacher monthly.

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 35 In addition to her regular duties Mrs. Brown has graciouslydirected language study in the Pan-American League’s Language Study Institute which, for several years past, has provided night classes in conversational Spanish for adult students without cost to the pupil. She personally conducts a beginner’s class in Spanish on Saturday evenings and this work is also free of costs to the student. Each year Mrs. Brown takes several different groups of Spanish students to Cuba and has broadcast frequently over radio stations in Havana. Her broadcasts here, over a period of two years, was a series of “English Lessons for Spanish Listeners.” This successful method of teaching English, with explanations entirely in the Spanish language, was broadcast to all of our neighbors to the south over short-wave station W4-XB. Mrs. Brown is enthusiastically interested in the furtherance of our relations with Spanish speaking countries through the medium of languages. Mrs Brown’s early education included courses at the University of Washington, in Seattle, and the Florida State College for Women. Since then she has studied at Sorbonne University, in Paris, and also attended two summer schools at Universidad Nacional de Mexico m Mexico City. Mrs. Brown confesses that her chief hobby is her life s work in the study and teaching of Latin, French, Spanish, German, and Italian languages. But she is also interested in literature and music and still hopes to learn to play her own pipe organ some day. MRS. M. LEWIS HALL Mrs. Hall was born in Elsberry, Missouri, the daughter of Judge and Mrs. F. L. Dawson. Perhaps her close companionship with her father, who served four terms in the Missouri Legislature, created her first desire to know and love people and enjoy public life. She was graduated from Christian College, Columbia, Mo., and holds an A. B. degree from Missouri State University. A member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority, and past president of the Miami K. A. Q. alumnae club. She married M. Lewis Hall, prominent Miami attorney, and moved to Fort Lauderdale 17 years ago. They have three sons, Lewis Hall, J., 16, a student at Riverside Military Academy; Frank Dawson Hall, 13, and Vincent Thomas Hall, eight. While living in Fort Lauderdale. Mrs. Hall was president of the 1919 Study Club. The family moved to Miami seven years ago and Mr. Hall established law offices in the Ingraham building. He was chairman of the Dade County “Holland for Governor” Club in the recent successful campaign of Spessard L. Holland for the chief executiveship of Florida. Since coming to Miami, Mrs. Hall has been president of the Miami branch of the American Association of University women; president of Beta Chapter of Delphian; president of the Miami Childrens Thea ter, Inc., and a member of the board of The Florida Teacher. The growth and development of her children is paramount in her life. For recreation, she most enjoys swimming and horseback riding, which she pursues with her men folk on their ranch near Punta Gorda, Florida. Mrs. Hall has a flare for writing and needlepoint. The former was recognized a few years ago, several plays were presented at “Farmer’s Fair Week” at the University of Miami—and by visiting her home, one can find much evidence of her excellent needlepoint. Mrs. Hall and her husband belong to the Century Club, Miami Biltmore and Roney-Plaza Cabana Club and the Tatem Surf Club. She is a member and regular attendant of the Miami First Christian Church. Bertha Foster Even if you are not interested in music, you will know the name of Bertha Foster, Dean of the School of Music of the University of Miami. Born in Indiana, Miss Foster has lived in many places—from California to Miami, “the best of all ” After graduating from the Col lege of Music in Cincinnati, Miss Foster made her first trip abroad— to Paris and London. It was in Paris that she first became interested in the musical education of the blind. Later, in Jacksonville, she founded her own school of music for these students. Before coming to Miami in 1921, Miss Foster was a member of the faculty of the State College for Women at Tallahassee. She is one of the charter members of the Board of Regents of the University of Miami and has been their Dean of Music since the founding. A personality brimful of enthusiasm, a mind keen as a whip, a talented musician and a grand friend—that—is Bertha Foster. Lawrence Priddy Lawrence Priddy, a native of Virginia, made his home in Mont clair, N. J. until his retirement in 1940, when he selected Miami Beach as his permanent residence. Here he owns one of the most attractive homes on Prairie Avenue—2350. After his graduation from Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Mr. Priddy was responsible for the erection of two buildings there—one of them for the Y. M. C. A., an organization in which he actively parti cipated before engaging in the life insurance business. In this, his wife, the former Jane Laubscher, proved to be a real partner and aided him in reaching the top in his profession. Mr. Priddy started with the New York Life Insurance Company

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36 THE FLORIDA TEACHER and remained with them throughout his successful business career. Among his wealthy and important clients have been two former United States’ Presidents. Before Mr. Priddy’s retirement, he sold from one to five million dollars business for twenty-two consecutive years. With the Brokers in Wall Street—with all his clients—Mr. Priddy has always been able to establish a feeling of real friendly service. People have felt that they could implicitly follow his advice, and none have been sorry for doing so. As Chairman of the Business Practice Committee, of which he was Chairman for nineteen consecutive years, he untiringly sought to raise the standard of salesmanship in his own business. He was instrumental in having the practice of rebating made unlawful and to have salesmen checked for any infringement. As President of the National Association of Life Underwriters and the Life Underwriters Association of New York, he effected many important revisions in the profession. Honorary membership in the Phi Kappa Phi fraternity was con ferred upon him by his Alma Mater for his success and for loyalty to the institution. Mr. Priddy, a great traveller, and a worthwhile friend, has always been interested in cultural subjects and is proud to be a Patron of the American Museum of Natural History, Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the National Geographic Society. S. H. Tobin A true sun lover who, in Florida, recaptured his health, is S. H. Tobin, pioneer real estate broker in this area. Advised by medical men in 1914 in his home town of Providence, Rhode Island, that it would be necessary for him to go south during the strenuous New England winters, Mr. Tobin went south. In those days Aiken, South Carolina, was considered the far South. Spending three winters in that resort town our New Englander heard rumors of tropical South Florida. The following winter was spent in Jackson ville, Florida, where he heard considerable talk about the future of a small community known as Miami. The following year, 1916, Mr. Tobin came to Miami, and, after a short stay, decided to move his family and take up permanent residence in the magic city. In 1915 the real estate firm of Tobin and Tobin was founded. Charles S. Tobin, the son of S. H. Tobin, joined the firm in 1921, establishing an insurance department to handle all forms of insurance coverage. During the twenty-four years of activity the firms which were first established at what is now N. E. First Avenue and Fourth Street, were moved to the Seybold building, and, later, to Miami Beach. The Beach office was established in 1933 and, following the policies established at the firm’s inception, this office has engaged in real estate brokerage business only. It has had no part in sub division developments. During the period of 1923-26 branch offices were maintained at Daytona Beach and Sebring, Florida. Mr. Tobin, a true convert to the healing qualities of Florida sunshine feels the state of Florida is assured so long as the Gulf Stream flows off the coast of South Florida and the prevailing tropical breezes blow and that Dade County’s progress must be ever forward. We have created a garden in which we have emphasized our play and recreational activities. The greatest asset arises in our climate and very little has been done to educate the people of the north that here one can regain health and the life span be lengthened under living conditions to be found nowhere else in the world. To Mr. S. H. Tobin goes the credit of having completed, as the pioneer broker, the first ninety-nine year lease in Dade County. Today over fifty per cent of our new hotel structures are built on land under the ninety-nine year lease form of ownership. Walter E. V. Schulke When one can retire from active business at the early age of thirty and devote one’s time to social and charitable interests, the community in which such a person lives and the people who come into contact with him definitely benefit from the association. Such certainly is the case of Walter E. V. Schulke, who lives at 6020 North Bay Road, Miami Beach. Mr. Schulke combines a keen mind and abundant energy for participation in his various activities. He always has an open mind and a willing ear for anything which may benefit humanity in general, and his community in particular. Specificially, for instance, he actively participates in the work of the Miami Salvation Army, Dade County Council of Boy Scouts, Miami Beach Committee of 100 (of which he is a Governor) and St. Francis Hospital. He has taken an important part in Pan-American work and is an active member of the Pan-American League, taking a leading role in the International Magna Charta Day Celebration Association. Other of his interests include Miami Aviation Balls and the Miami-Havana races and cruises. Mr. Schulke is an active member of the Indian Creek, Surf, and Rod and Reel Clubs, and also of Sigma Chi Fraternity and the University Club of St. Paul and Everglades Club of Palm Beach. Mr. Schulke is the son of Adolph G. V. Schulke, who migrated from his native Prussia in 1875. He first stopped in Canada where he met and married Mary Graeme Irwin, Walter’s mother, who is of direct Scotch and English lineage, and who was living in Toronto at the time. His father’s meeting with James J. Hill, the great railway magnate of the day, was largely responsible for the family moving to Minnesota. The railroad was opening that territory and—believing in its future—the Schulkes were among the first settlers of New Ulm, Minnesota. Here, Walter was born. After graduating from the public schools, Mr. Schulke completed a four year course at the University of Wisconsin. He began his busi ness career in 1923 as Assistant-Manager of the Langon, North Dakota, store of Schulke and Sons, and later became Vice-President and Direc tor in the home office at New Ulm. In 1927 he took over the wholesale promotional management of the Twin City Motor Co., at St. Paul, Minneapolis, and was President and Treasurer of the company until its liquidation in 1932. Since then, Mr. Schulke’s only active business has been the management of his farms in Minnesota and New Hamp shire, and his investments. Mr. Schulke was married to Elizabeth Livingston Phelps-Kalman, of St. Paul, and has three children—Paula Livingston, Graeme Phelps, and Roxana Willard. John W. Quinn Soft-spoken, modest, quiet and unassuming, it is difficult to im agine that the charming and youthful-looking John W. Quinn, D. C. is not only a thoroughly versed doctor of Chiropractic, but is in addition one of America’s acknowledged experts in manipulative, or as it is sometimes called “bloodless surgery.” Fourteen years ago Doctor Quinn left England where he com pleted his early education and came to America attending the Lincoln

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Dr. John W. Quinn J. P. Simmons College at Indianapolis, Indiana, and upon receiving his degree there graduated from the Palmer School of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa. He became a citizen of the United States and engaged in the practice of chiropractic in the east. Manipulative surgery was attracting a great deal of attention and because the study of this new science interested him, Doctor Quinn gave up his practice and took post graduate courses and in dulged in research work in dissection, pathology and X-ray. For three years following this he toured the United States as instructor in manipulative surgery and technician,—lecturing to those who wished advanced knowledge in this science. For the past two years his offices have been established at 1000 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, where Doctor Quinn’s large practice is constantly augmented by cases referred to him by other doctors. In spite of his extensive duties professionally, he still finds time for his hobbies. A former amateur champion boxer, the doctor has loads of trophies, cups and medals and is an ardent fisherman. He is a most enthusiastic member of Miami Beach’s famous Rod and Reel Club. Quietly authoritative, Doctor Quinn attributes many of his suc cesses to his close attention to the patient’s abdomen. He said “nourish ment for the entire body is manufactured in this mixing-bowl of na ture,—hence should there be any difficulty or interference with these natural processes, it follows that the entire body will be affected in varying degrees. The relieving of nervous pressure from the spine, the readjustment of organs in the human body which have gone out of alignment without the use of a knife, and the restoring to health those who are nervous and upset to the point of becoming neurotics are gifts of chiropractic, which I am humbly proud to be able to offer.’ J. P. Simmons Mr. J. P. Simmons does not consider himself a pioneer but he was among the first to establish permanent residence in Miami Beach at 2318 Prairie Avenue. His family, including his wife, formerly Miss Rachel June Elliott, of DeLand, and three children, June Elizabeth, Margaret Elliott, and J. P. Simmons, Jr., is prominent in church, social, and civic activities in Miami and Miami Beach. They have been residents in this area since 1921. Mr. Simmons is a graduate of Stetson University, as is also his wife, and is a member of the law firm of Shutts, Bowen, Simmons, Prevatt, and Julian. This able firm took part in the early development of modern Miami Beach in representing the interests of Carl G. Fisher and John S. Collins as well as the Miami Ocean View Company, all of whom were largely responsible for the growth of the south end of the Beach. Mr. Simmons personally represented the company which built the Venetian Causeway and developed the islands in that area. He went to Tallahassee when it was necessary to purchase the bay bottom in order to complete the bridge and islands. Since that time Mr. Simmons has won the reputation of being one of the outstanding attorneys in real estate. Mr. Simmons is a native of Richmond, Kentucky, but has been a resident of Florida since 1910 and has not left except for his service in the World War as First Lieutenant of Artillery in the 81st Division. He is a member of the Dade County Bar Association and the Ameri can Bar Association. He is also Vice-president and director of the Miami Industrial Bank and his firm represents the First National Bank of Miami. Among his other business connections are President of Jupiter Sound Corporation; Secretary of Mekin Corporation; Vicepresident of Corporation Company of Miami; Secretary of Bruce Realty, Farge Realty, and Roal Properties, Inc. He is on the Board of Governors of the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce, and is a member of the famous Committee of One Hundred of M. B., Biscayne Yacht Club and Colony Clubs; his fraternal connections are Delta Sigma Phi fraternity, American Legion and Military Order of the World War, Shriner and Masonic Lodge of Miami. Walter Wilson Born in Salisbury, Maryland, Mr. Wilson made his first visit to Miami in June of 1925, and became a permanent resident by Labor Day of that year—so impressed was he by the tropical atmosphere. A graduate of Wesleyan University, and of the New York Law School, Mr. Wilson spent the first fifteen years of his business career as Assistant General Manager of the Hoboken Land & Improvement Company. For four years he was the Eastern Representative of the U. S. Foil Co. (manufacturers of tin, lead and composition foils) with an office in New York. Upon his arrival in Miami, Mr. Wilson entered the Real Estate

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38 THE FLORIDA TEACHER brokerage business, remaining in it until December of 1926 when he went to Miami Beach as Manager of L’Ecluse, Anderson & Co., Inc., real estate office. Three years later he took over the business of this firm and has kept his offices in the Hampton Arcade Building ever since. His property management and appraisals as well as his ability at sales and rentals, have made him one of the most popular of our real estate brokers. In his thirty years of real estate experience, Mr. Wilson has held almost every office of importance in the various organizations con nected with the business. In 1929 he was made President of the Miami Beach Realty Bureau (then a branch of the Miami Realty Board) and has held the same position with the Miami Beach and the Florida Association of Real Estate Boards. He has also been a Director of the National Association. An approved appraisor for the Federal Home Owners Loan Board of Atlanta, and for the U. S. Treasury Depart ment, he has testified a number of times as expert witness on real estate values in this area—both before Federal and Circuit Courts. Mr. Wilson’s home at 5347 La Gorce Drive is one of the beach’s most attractive—although with his varied civic activities, it is a won der that he is able to find time to enjoy it. He is Chairman of the Dade County Chapter of the American Red Cross, President of the Y. M. C. A., Chairman of the Dade County Visiting Board. He is a Director of the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce, the Miami Beach Board of Realtors, the Chase Federal Savings and Loan Asso ciation (also Vice-president), the Lincoln Road Association (past President), the South Florida Children’s Home, the South Florida Crippled Children’s Society, and the South Florida Crippled Children’s Hospital, (in both of which he is also Secretary and Treasurer). Mr. Wilson is Junior Warden of Trinity Episcopal Church, and is a mem ber of the Committee of One Hundred. Charles S. Symonds Man forever seeks the Ideal. A vague, elusive quality, it acti vates his supreme efforts to achieve. It is solely the result of an ob jective state of mind, by which Man creates, out of the vast store of resourcefulness and initiative that are his peculiar inheritances. Architecture, the wedded harmony of science and art, is Man’s most powerful creation. It is, at once an inexorable and sensitive authority, conceived by Man to better himself. It commands, alike, his social, economic and moral destinies. It has the power of law and more. Law says Man must or take the consequences. Architecture says Man must because the forces of natural phenomena necessitate control, and further as an art, it appeals to the sensibilities of Man— to his mental and moral consciousness. Architecture is not a static quality. It is not a matter of masonry, steel, and concrete. It is in herently a vibrant, sensitive, and activating Force. It has all the at tributes with which its human creator is endowed. It can be ugly and beautiful, sad and gay, cruel and humane, indolent and dynamic. Architecture is Order. Today, America seeks order and unity in its national society. It seeks what has been termed the “good life”, the unobstructed flow of commerce, parity of economics, equal ity of opportunity, and a high standard of living commensurate with a productive society. To attain perfection of this state, planning is necessary. Planning does not imply socialistic regimentation. Oper ating within fixed limits, it provides channels for the ordered prog ress of society and its comprehensive activities. It is embraced by the contemporary concept of Democracy, which admits the necessity of economic regulation by government, but fosters the maintenance of civil liberties, private enterprise, the equality of man, and which con ceives of government as being no more than an administrative agency composed of people, controlled by the people, and created for the people. How can Architecture contribute to the perfection of such a society? America must first be awakened to full cognizance of this mar velous Force it commands. By its judicious application I believe that society can reap tremendous benefits. I believe that a Federal system of planning should be incorporated into our democratic form of gov ernment. I believe that it should be national in scope, organized as a highly selective research body, composed of technical experts in the various fields of planning, and endowed with statutory as well as advisory powers. By the creation of such a body, urban, rural, and regional planning would come into effective existence to tackle the tremendous problems of health, order, safety convenience, and the public welfare. At the present time no such coordinated control exists in our form of gov ernment. The basis of approach in the solution of these problems would involve the elements of community planning, the Physical, or the natural conditions of the site; the Economic, or land values, distribuCharles S. Symonds tion of industries, transportation and taxation; The Social or housing and recreation. Specifically the solution would be limited to the five essential spheres of society comprising a community. These are Gov ernment, or the agency of control, Consumer or the agency of pro ductive absorption, Commerce or the clearing house for the distribu tion of productive goods, Industry and Agriculture, or the agencies of production. These spheres are necessarily interrelated, and this state of interrelation as it exists today is badly complicated and discarded. Here is the cause of maldistribution, poverty, discrimination, disease, social unrest, and demoralization. Planning is the essence of Architecture. Order is the result of a successful application of architectural principles. It is not logical to conclude, therefore, that if these evils of civilization have been les sened, and in some instances, eliminated in certain planned communi ties, that these same principles of planning can be applied nationally with the same successful results? The problem is not a small one. It is the most comprehensive in the world today, for it involves all of the intricate and highly com plex activities of a modern society. Thor S. White The story of Thor S. White, talented and rising young artist, is the story of one of Dade County’s youngest pioneers. It is a story of success comparable to Miami’s own colorful history. When one attempts to look back upon Mr. White’s career, a number of pictures present themselves to the mind . the boy, Thor, living with his family on their plantation in South Miami, shooting bear and deer in what is now the town proper . the youth, who took up professional boxing . the young man winning first prize in the Decorators Club’s Annual Exhibit, and painting his “SKYSCRAPER SCAPES” high above New York in his Radio City Studio ... or, perhaps, again, we see the artist, fed up with the artificiality of city life, enlisting in the Merchant Marine, and shipping off to sea ... we follow his versatile career, but always, we like to remember that Thor White is Miami’s own product, and we Miamians are proud of our history, and of those men and women who helped to give her a place in the Sun. Reared in Miami, Thor White has many stories to tell of his early boy hood days here . days when he went to school in South Miami (then Lark ins) in the school house which is now the bicycle shed of the present school . days when they hunted in the jungle which lay between Larkins and Coconut Grove, a jungle where wild cat, bear, and deer roamed unmolested. He tells of excursions to Coco Plum Beach, on which trips a whole crowd would start out in wagons draped with mosquito netting, taking the darkies along to cook chickens, and prepare the food for the picnic. Later the White family moved into Miami where they lived on Riverside Drive at what is now 12th and Flagler Street. There was a swamp there then where the Flagler Repair place now is. Still later the Whites moved to Akron, Ohio, and shortly after this Thor entered the Cleveland School of Design; from there he went to New York, where he attended the National School of Design, and the Beaux Arts Institute. About this time he won a Scholarship for private instruction with Naum Los; after studying with Los, Mr. White decided to go into mural

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39 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Thor S. White work. He assisted the famous Victor White (no relative) on the mirrors and mosiacs for the Starlight Roof of the Waldorf Astoria, and the following year won first prize in the Annual Exhibit of the Decorator’s Club. During his career in New York, Mr. White maintained a studio on the sixty second floor of Radio City, where in 1936, he started work on his famous “Skyscraper Scapes”, brilliant scenes of New York as he observed that city from his studio in the clouds. Among these are “Dawn on Welfare Island”, “Twilight in Central Park”, “Rain Over Lower Manhattan”, and others. Still in his twenties, and on the threshold of success, Thor White did the incredible thing ... he left it all . disgusted with New York, and feeling weary and jaded, he gave up his studio, and just disappeared ... to the amazement of his New York friends who could not understand anyone casting aside, even temporarily, so promising a career. But young Mr. White knew what he wanted, so he joined the Merchant Marine, and went in the good old traditional way, to see the world. The next thing we see of him, he has become a sort of “Gentleman Beachcomber” on Vera Dero in Cuba; there he, and a group of other congenial “derelicts” from Cuba’s leading families, lived the lives of modern Robinson Crusoes, living in their bathing suits, cooking on the sands, and even build ing their own shacks, and making their own furniture. Several of the “mem bers” belonged to the Yacht Club, and on Saturday nites, the Beach Combers would go up to the dances. Our hero had about a year of this, and then he felt two calls . the call of respectability, and the call of . Miami. So three years ago Thor White returned to the scenes of his early youth, and took a studio (the one he now occupies) in Coconut Grove. The minute he returned, he said he knew that this was the place for which he had always been looking . the place he knew was the one for him to paint in. His work is the testimony of this ... no local artist has better captured the very spirit of South Florida native life than has Thor White. In the three years that he has been back, he has done a noted assort ment of murals for hotels, bars, and private dwellings in Miami and Miami Beach ... in all of these he has represented some form of South Florida flora and fauna, which fairly seem to breathe the spirit of the tropics. Mr. White is second Vice president of the Blue Dome Fellowship, and last year was chosen by the American Artists and Professional League to represent Miami during National Art Week. At time of writing, he is hard at work on two Miami Beach hotel murals . one the mural for the lobby of the Shelbourne, which is to depict the “Festival of Venus at Cyprus”, and the other, the mural for the tap room of the Raleigh, which gaily and charmingly portrays scenes from “As You Like It”, with the background of the Forest of Arden. Modest and unassuming, Mr. White has little to say on the subject of his own accomplishments . “More than anything else,” he said, “I like to try and recapture in my work, some form of native life, and no place offers me more in this way than Miami ... so, here I am!” Harry Watts XECUTIVE director, Harry W. Watts of the Miami Housing Authority, is well fitted to fill this important post by education and his work in the engineering and development field. Before he resigned as a member of the Miami Housing Authority in 1938 to become the executive director, he had served sevHarry Watts eral years with the Federal Housing Administration and the Public Works Ad ministration which built Liberty Square. These connections gave him added equipment for the responsible task of administering several millions of dollars for the Miami Housing Authority which was expended in building three USHA aided projects, Edison Courts and two additions to Liberty Square, the last ad dition being opened Aug. ISth. With a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering and with a pronounced interest in sociology he is fitted for both the building and development of housing projects and for the solving of social problems incident to his position as general manager of both of the local housing developments. Born in Illinois and reared in Louisvile, Ky., Mr. Watts has lived in Dade County for a quarter of a century, and has the pioneer’s pride in the growth and development of this section of which he has been a part. His first years were spent in the south end of the County, memories of which he still cherishes. A life-long Democrat, Mr. Watts served the Dade County Democratic Committee as secretary for two years and as chairman for two years from 1928 to 1932 when he was a candidate for the State Senate. He is a mem ber of the Board of Directors of Woodlawn Park Cemetery Company and a member of Sigma Nu Fraternity. While most of his work has been in the field of engineering and develop ment, he has been active in the growth and development of Dade County, and it is largely through his ability and foresight that Miami has shared so splendidly in the Public Housing program. John C. Frazure When executive ability and business experience are reviewed as outstanding qualities, the name of John C. Frazure is among the most prominent of real estate men in Miami Beach. A native Floridian, Mr. Frazure has resided in Miami since 1905. This was the year when only one building was to be seen on Miami Beach—the old coast guard House of Refuge at 71st and the ocean. The following year Smith’s Casino was built. Mr. Frazure’s first business association was with the D. P. Davis Realty Company in Miami in December 1918, after service during the World War in the U. S. Navy. In 1928, Mr. Frazure became an associate of Mr. Harry S. Bastian in Miami Beach at his present address on Lincoln Road. Since that time he has conducted a real estate business continuously from this address. It is interesting to note that Mr. Frazure and associates enjoy the distinction of being the only firm in Miami Beach to conduct business from the same location since starting. For five years, Mr. Frazure served in the best interests of Miami Beach as Director and Vice President of the Miami Beach Realty Board. In 1938, he became its president. During the past twelve years this progressive realtor has handled some of the largest transactions in Miami Beach, particularly Lincoln Road property and the better class water front homes. With an eye toward the future, Mr. Frazure predicts that, because of its present trend in building and expansion, Miami Beach will be built up solidly by 1950. Because of this city’s close proximity to the majority of the population of the United States, its wide spread transportation facilities, its first-class accom modations and ideal climate, it is Mr. Frazure’s opinion that Miami Beach will continue to take an even greater place among the most desirable cities of our Nation.

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40 THE FLORIDA TEACHER MAUDE KIMBALL MASSENGALE Maude Kimball Massengale, described by WQAM’s announcer as “Dade County’s best known society editor”, has more friends, per haps, than any other woman in Miami Beach. That’s why the society pages she edits in the Miami Beach Daily Tropics are filled with numerous exclusive stories, appearing under her by-line before they reach any other newspaper. Her column, “Social Sundial”, records the gaieties of beach so ciety, appearing as a daily feature of the Daily Tropics. Her bright, whimsical column “Peachtree on the Beach,” appearing weekly in the Atlanta Constitution, widely publicizes Miami Beach as a winter re sort and chronicles the happenings of interest to Atlanta and other society capitals. Magazine writing and radio broadcasting have also claimed the time of this busy and popular journalist. Her radio program entitled “Society on the Air”, was her first broadcasting venture. Later she conducted the program, “The Teacher Hour”, sponsored by The Florida Teacher Magazine. Mrs. Massengale is a member of the League of American Penwomen. Her poetic works include the favorites: “Love Song” and Proud Possession She belongs to Psi Psi Psi sorority, composed of mothers of Tri-Delta sorority girl. Perhaps no mother was ever prouder of her daughters than Mrs. Massengale. Allyn, now Mrs. Benjamin Anthony of Greenville, S. C., attended Ogontz School. Vernon, who is Mrs. Raymond Edwards of Miami Beach, attended Duke and F. S. C. W. Mrs. Edwards is also a splendid newspaper woman. Both girls are members of the Junior League. Mrs. Massengale’s journalistic work started when she organized a Parent-Teacher page for the Miami Daily News three days after ar riving here from Atlanta, and within a year she was made head of the woman’s department. This position she held for twelve years. Endowed with a keen sense of humor, an alert awareness of life, and deep interest in other people’s problems, she is one of the most interesting of personalities. And, with her big blue eyes, curly hair and peppy manners, is certainly one of the most attractive. Reared in Atlanta, Mrs. Massengale regards that as “home”, but her ambitions and work are centered in Miami Beach and Miami. She has traveled widely and has friends in most states of the Union. They affectionately call her “Billie” or “Maidie” but the best known by line in Society journalism in Florida is—Maude Kimball Massengale. A FRIEND OF THE TEACHER Florida’s educational program is certain of expansion in the next four years. Spessard L. Holland, new chief executive of the sunshine state, is certainly a friend of the state’s educational system. That is not an idle thought. He has proved his friendship during his years in the state legislature where he either sponsored or supported every progressive educational measure introduced during his tenure of office He made promises during his campaign that he would center his at tention on the state educational department, that he would personally see that the teachers, educators and seats of learning would receive adequate assistance, financially and morally. This he intends to do because he is a man of his word. The teachers and educators of Flor ida should rejoice in having such an outstanding statesman as Spes sard L. Holland in the governor’s chair. Teacher Magazine joins them in wishing our No. 1 citizen the best of good fortune for a suc cessful administration. CHARLES H. SMALL. FREDERICK J. WARD Since leaving his native Newark, New Jersey, to establish law offices in Miami, Frederick J. Ward has developed a fine practice in his chosen profession. His early education was gained in St. Mary’s and St. Benedict’s parochial preparatory schools in Newark. He re ceived his law course at Fordham University in New York City. Following his graduation from Fordham, Mr. Ward returned to his home city and started practicing in civil courts, specializing in equity matters. He moved to Miami from Newark in 1925, and was admitted to the bar in Florida. After practicing here almost ten years, he moved back to Newark and last year again deserted the city of his birth to open law offices at 1000 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, where he is specializing in real estate legal matters. Mr. Ward was wed to Miss Mary Margaret Schreiber in Newark and they have three attractive children, Mary Jane, Jacqueline and Frederick, Jr. All are members of the Catholic church, with Mr. and Mrs. Ward both active in civic and charitable work. Gladys Krebaum Many men have been successful in the building supply business in the Miami area, but we know of only one lady who has been able to carry on in the face of adversity and emerge successfully and that one is Gladys Krebaum. Miss Krebaum has headed the Krebaum Building Material Com pany since 1933. She inaugurated the business herself and although conditions often appeared rough, she continued to fight on. Miss Krebaum’s work in the building supply business, has been equally distributed throughout the Greater Miami area. She supplied materials for many outstanding hotels, residences, and stores in the area, not to mention unique apartment houses, in Coral Gables and Southwest Miami. The Krebaum Building Material Company supplied some of the materials for Kress’ Store on Flagler Street as well as the beautiful Walgreen store on Flagler Street and Second Avenue, Miami. Ma terials for the Rendale and Netherlands Hotels, Miami Beach were likewise furnished by the Krebaum Building Material Company. Miss Krebaum has gained the confidence of her clients and the general public, because of her determination to be fair and just in all transac tions. Miss Krebaum was born in Illinois, has been in Miami since 1923 and resides in Coral Gables.

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 41 Mrs. Florence N. Blakely Take liberal portions of courage, ability and honesty, and mix them with an intelligent, charming personality and you have the formula for the successful civic and business leader—Mrs. Florence N. Blakely. Mrs. Blakely, a Registered Nurse, early perceived a need in Dade County for what she now admits is her pet hobby, namely the Greater Miami Nurses Registry, which she founded a few years ago. It is a non-profit organization, chartered by the State of Florida, with mem bership open to all Florida State Registered Nurses, undergraduate— practical or trained child’s nurses. “The purpose of the Registry is to further the efficient care of the sick, to uphold the dignity of the nursing profession and to foster cordial relations among the nurses.” Mrs. Blakely feels that her first duty is to the Dade County resident nurses, and she makes this one of the main objects of the Registry. All nurses sent out are thorough ly investigated—for Mrs. Blakely likes to fit the nurse to the indi vidual case, the patient, and his immediate surroundings. Although Mrs. Blakely spends the better part of the day at her office, she is still able to find time for her many worth while civic and political affiliations. The Historians of Dade County, of which she is founder and President, has accomplished many things of note. They were pioneers in the “Get out the vote ’ campaign; and have cooperat ed whole-heartedly in the Safety campaigns for school children, and they make worthwhile charity cases—especially of children—a major project. In 1938 Mrs. Blakely was appointed Chairman of the Womans Diviison of the National Infantile Paralysis Foundation Campaign and strongly urged the building of a hospital for cripled children here. As a Lieutenant on the Governor’s staff, she made the trip to New York s World Fair with the official party, to participate in the celebrating of Governors and Florida Days. Last May, Mrs. Blakely was appointed a delegate from the 4th Congressional District and while at the Democratic Convention, was elected Honorary State Vice Chairman of the National Convention— an honor not only for Mrs. Blakely but for South Florida as well. Because of her unselfish service in behalf of the citizenship and the problems which confront a growing metropolitan community, she was appointed a member of the Florida State Board of Examiners of Nurses. She is extremely conscientious in this position and devotes a great deal of time and study to it. As can be judged, Mrs. Blakely has that rare gift of being able to do a dozen things at once AND of doing them all well. She has given unceasingly of her time, energy and money to the causes in which she is interested. Somehow she still finds time to be a grac ious hostess, presiding over and entertaining in the beautiful home which she and her husband, Judge Norman Blakely own in Miami. Winnie Moore When visiting celebrities still continue to frequent a certain spot year after year something of interest and glamour must be there to attract them. Such a place in Miami Beach is “Winnie’s Waffle Shop” where for seven years people from the theatrical world and all walks of life have congregated to share the fun and congeniality of this interesting place. A former show girl, Miss Winnie Moore left her profession in the East and started as a waitress in Miami Beach in 1931. Later she established her first “Winnie Waffle Shop” on 23rd Street, which has remained unchanged except for its growing popularity. ’Tis evidenced by the great number of autographed pictures which literally line the walls from ceiling to floor. A second “Winnie Waffle Shop” now located on 1445 Washington Ave nue near the Cameo Theatre is also a favorite rendezvous, being conducted with an interesting and unusual combination of vivaciousness and competent supervision. Blonde—cheerful—personable—everybody knows Winnie and her famous waffles. Hattie H. Carpenter The year of 1900 does not seem long ago but, when one stops to realize that Miami only recently celebrated its fiftieth birthday, that date of arrival to take up residence here puts Miss Hattie H. Carpenter and her family in the pioneer class. She was born in Columbus, Ohio, daughter of Stephen Van Rensselaer and Naomi J. Carpenter. After her father’s death, her mother brought the family, conisting of five daughters and one son, to Miami and built a home on S. Bayshore Drive. The home is now at 59 S. E. 6th Street, Miami. Miss Carpenter’s early education was received in the public schools of Columbus, and she studied at the Ohio State University. Teaching in public schools was her first vocation and she holds a life state certificate for high school teaching in Florida. She was principal of Miami High School for five years, resigning this position in order to take up full time work as a newspaperwoman. Miss Carpenter was in charge of the editorial page on the afternoon paper, then The Metropolis, for twelve years until it was sold and changed to the Miami Daily News. Since then Miss Carpenter has been writing fiction and articles for papers, journals, and national magazines under various pen names. She was also publisher of the Florida School Exponent for a number of years. In closing this brief sketch, since Miss Carpenter will not talk about herself, it is befitting to further establish her as pioneer both in residence and education it is of great interest to learn that she was the first women principal in a village of a few thousands and the only one in an undeveloped state. She laughs at the memory of the school board refusing to consider her idea of putting the high school on the banks of the river at 12th Avenue because it was too far out in the country. Miss Carpenter has always been active in charity work and de voted much of her time and writing in impressing the importance of early education. She was a member of the Woman’s Club for twelve years and has been a keen participant in politics. She is still mentally active and her many friends find her very delightful and entertaining in conversation.

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42 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Mrs. Thomas T. Stevens Mrs. Thomas T. Stevens has a natural liking and aptitude for working in organizations, inherited perhaps from her mother who was a prominent club woman. She began her club career as a young girl in Atlanta. She was Vice-president of the General Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy in her early 20’s. Later she was President of the Atlanta Federation of Women’s Clubs; one of the founders of the Uncle Remus Memorial Association; member of the Executive Board of the Atlanta Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution; President of the Atlanta Chapter U. D. C.; and is now a trustee of the Tallulah Falls Industrial School, with headquarters in Atlanta. An indefatigable worker in the cause of education, Mrs. Stevens admits being “education-obsessed”, believing that if a child is given a spiritual and social background, supplied with the equipment to carve out his own destiny, nothing more can be done for him. He must make of his own life what he can and will. Her interest in education brought her to club work in Miami. In 1924 she came here to live primarily for her husband’s health. She had been an occasional visitor to Miami for many years. She took a vacation from club work when she came, lasting almost four years, until the Dade County Federation of Women’s Clubs asked her help in a scholarship project—the one thing she could not refuse; this was ing 1928. She has been active in club and civic affairs ever since; President of Dade County Federation in 1930-32; Vice-president and later President of the Miami Woman’s Club in 1933-34. She resigned to return to Atlanta at the request of the State Welfare Board to assist with the Georgia organization of the first New Deal project to create jobs for women. After five months, she returned to Miami when the set-up was completed. She was Vice-president of Section Eleven, Florida Federation of Women’s Clubs and served from 1935 to 1937. She is a member of the Dade County Planning Council appointed by the Governor, and the Dade County Zoning Board, and is beginning her third term as Dade County Congressional Committeewonan from the 4th District. Mrs. Stevens believes women of the highest type should enter politics as a duty to their community. She is proud of her memberships in three major patriotic organizations: The Everglades Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution; Harvey Seeds Unit, American Legion Auxiliary; and the Atlanta and Southern Cross Chapteis of United Daughters of the Confederacy. She also served as a member from Florida of the National Advisory Committee on women’s partici pation in the New York World’s Fair. Mrs. Stevens is interested in every phase of activity for com munity betterment, and serves in the ranks as diligently as she does as a leader. She is a natural and convincing speaker on subjects in which she is interested, and she has unlimited poise and an unhurried manner in all that she does. Louis Karlebach Arriving in Miami Beach prior to the swift boom momentum, Louis Karlebach, accompanied by his good wife, saw ahead the phe nomenal opportunity to apply his experienced knowledge of merchan dising the finer meats and foodstuffs, and thereby take up his post of honest money-making in a spot which he foresaw was sure to become magic. Grimly they pioneered, these inseparable two, Louis and Rose, Business steadily grew from promising into boom proportions. Not one, but three Master Meat Markets were flourishing, when came the black-out of 1926. Like all of the rest, the business of Louis Karle bach was completely wiped out. But the Beach remained, and here was one believer who knew it was merely a matter of time, of new money, new pioneering. Looking back, he is not so sure he could have kept the faith, but for the sustaining courage and tireless shoulder-toshouldei cooperation of his faithful wife. Slowly they started over, steeling themselves to hardship, grateful for each forward step, sure in their hearts that they could come back—with Miami Beach. Today his New York Meat Market at 619 Washington Avenue is the oldest market at the Beach. None could question the principles and standards which have held the faith of its patrons through the years. Many food stores, less standardized, less sincere, have flourished and passed from the picture. Loui Karlebach’s market was the first to introduce to Miami Beach and to Southern Florida, the real Hothouse baby lamb, famous Beach Nut Bacon, that finest Jones sausage, the new popular cube steak, and the meaning of a real filet mignon. Only strictly fresh-killed poultry, the finest and freshest of dairy products, local and shipped fruits and vegetables are offered for the public’s complete assurance. “Nothing short of the best—is safe, or fair, in food merchandising,” is the conviction upon which this pioneer built for a sound future. Louis Karlebach is public-minded, public-spirited, in his varied affiliations. He is a Brother Elk, a 32nd degree Mason and a Shriner, of Miami, and a Life Member of the Blue Lodge, New York. Margaret’s SALON DE BEAUTE Realistic Permanent Waving ZOT OS Machineless Permanent Waving • The Parker Method Hair and Scalp Treatment Louey Venn of London, Facials Hot Oil Manicure and Pedicures CALUMET BUILDING 20 N. E. 3rd AVENUE MIAMI, FLORIDA PHONE 2-5796 THE SOUTHERN A Pioneer in Miami Beach GOOD FOOD SOUTHERN CAFETERIA 936 WASHINGTON 356 EAST FLAGLER MIAMI A M RIT T A The Shoe Doctor and Hat Renewer Best in the Long Run 221 N. E. SECOND AVENUE MIAMI, FLORIDA Specializing in WATCH, CLOCK and JEWELRY REPAIRING BAUER’S WATCH SHOP Phone 2-5822 W. E. Bauer 50 S. E. First St. Miami, Fla. i i \ \ \ \ i i i i i i i ) I \ m i i i i i 'V

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 43 A BOTANICAL REUNION EDITORS NOTE: Sr. de Baseon, essentially a cosmopolite, and having traveled extensively on several continents, writes of the love of mankind and Mother Nature. He writes mostly in fable form por!" a '*v. ng m otlons through life of plants and insects and the voice of Mother Nature. At one time he spent a year in solitude in the Mojave Desert collecting material for his writings, and concentrating on phil osophical ways of thinking. Here we have one of Sr. de Bascon’s latest writings—a short fable entitled “A Botanical Reunion.” By Sr. de Bascon ]\/| ANY years ago there existed in remote parts of this earth, botanical T’Jworlds of indescribable beauty. Flowers, trees, vegetables and plants of e\er\ living kind, daughters of nature, grew in quantities and without effort. Such a world would seemingly radiate a spirit of joy. But—not this one! Arguments were violent, frequent and of long duration. In fact, they often lasted until Mother Earth, unable to further endure the constant woes reaching her ears, found it absolutely necessary to relax her trembling nerves. And this she did by proceeding to give her body a good, hard shake. Each time these incidents occurred, the botanical family was frightened practically out of its wits. It instantly, and in one breath, declared that never again would a voice be raised in anger or in complaint. However, as is often the case in such situations, the resolution was usually forgotten almost as soon as the excitement had abated. It happened, therefore, one day that the Rosebush, forgetting her vows even more quickly than the others, let go a great wail of lamentations to the skies . and it also happend that the Vine, tired of hearing his tale of woe, did not hold his own tongue as he should have, and replied: “Why don’t you stop complaining of the way you have to live, my dear Rosebush, and try to do as I do? ... If you’ll grow as I grow, then you can go where you please and do as you please . See!” it explained, stretching to its utmost, “I climb to the highest points where the sunlight plays and to the profound depths of precipices . Now, my dear, you just stop complaining and try that, and your situation will improve.” This idea really pleased the Rosebush. She had, to be exact, even thought of it herself. Having, however, already tried it in vain, she answered bitterly: “Yes, you! . you, my dear Vine, can well afford to ramble there and give me such advice! Every day you frolic, unencumbered, yet see that I must spend my whole life here, forever pregnant with blossoms. And for what!” The hope lessness of her state proved entirely too much for the Rosebush and here her voice chocked miserably. “Why, in the Springtime when my children come out wishing to see the light of day, the poor things are faced with hours of darkness! That terrible, gigantic Pine tree, above, refuses to share part of the sunlight with them! They can scarcely grow! You can see for yourself that they are small and of a pale color, and that their fragrance is insipid ... Oh yes! my proud Vine, if you had to carry a family, such as I have, on your shoulders, perhaps you would not go so far nor so high nor so low. And furthermore, you would not be so boastful!” It was here that the trouble grew . The Pine tree heard what was going on. True, his head was cloud-high, far above the reach of casual or even angry words. But, a wind carried them to him, and hoping to adjust matters to some extent, he made the mistake of bending low and saying: “Precious Rosebush, I am sorry to hear your com plaints. It is true, I take the sunlight from you part of the day, but—although you have not mentioned it—it is also true that from early morning until late afternoon, I suffer the intense rays of the sun in order to protect you. And who, may I ask, offers to protect me ? No one! . Not only this—there are other things that I must bear; when the sun has descended, there is often a full moon that disturbs my sleep while you are in deep slumber. Then, there is the wind, the fury of which you do not feel, and the rain—it is I who is hit by it . The trouble with you, my little one,” and here the Pine tree lowered his voice, “is that you know you are beautiful and delicate and you have a desire to be con stantly seen, admired ... I greatly fear,” he concluded shaking his head, “that yours is a case of—too much beauty, very little mind.” Now all this time, a half-hidden mushroom has whistled in as disturbing a tone as possible. And as soon as the Pine had ceased talking, it raised its caustic voice and called: “God help me for what I’m going to say! but Rosebush, those arguments of yours won’t get you anywhere . Convince yourself, my dear hag, that it’s your age that annoys you . For many years, your one joy here has been to give a headache to all of us in this community.” At this moment, Mother Earth herself found it necessary to intervene. “It is enough! Enough of such arguments,” she exclaimed. “I am the Mother of all that exists. You, all of you, are my children and your words are without reason. I too have my sorrows, but you do not hear me complain of them. I carry in my body the weight of you all, in my veins, water that you may drink, and in my breasts the roots that give you life. But you miscomprehend life and freedom. As you grow into independence, you—all of you—refuse advice and wisdom. Furthermore, you complain unceasingly, of the one thing for which you are born—service. I grow tired listening to your empty thoughts, and this time, I must do something about it.” Then—Mother Earth, after a few moments of deep thought, said: “All of you, my children, must come to a family reunion where I can listen undisturbed to the joys and sorrows of each of you. After doing so, if necessary and if possible, I will improve your lives.” The proposed Botanical Reunion took place in the early part of the month of May on a day when a winged song hung aloft in the skies. Delegates and representatives from every living green thing were there. The fruit trees chose the Apple for their delegate. The trees of rich wood and general utility, the Pine. The creeping whips of the earth, the Ivy, and the vegetables, the lowly Cabbage, thinking thus, to particularly impress their misfortune upon the As sembly. The flowers, unhesitatingly sent a full-laden Rose . Alone, and far removed from the others, the Poison Oak took its place and awaited its turn to speak. Upon their arrival, Mother Earth silently looked at her children for a while, admiring first the beauty of one and amenting the ugliness of another. “Gracious me!” she concuded, after a thorough inspection. “I never before realized how fully the evolution of life has refined some of my children and completely cor rupted others!” Almost an hour elapsed before the Reunion was called to order. The pur pose of the day was then revealed to all. “I want to know, in full, the joys and the trials of each of you here today,” Mother Earth assured them in a tone of quiet compassion. “Let’s see if we can come to some agreement whereby we end all such arguments which should not exist among our family.” The Apple tree spoke first. Clearing its throat several times, it addressed the Assembly thus: “Mother Earth, I represent all the fruit trees, we, your devoted children. Our life is long, but once our offsprings are in their prime, they are pulled forcibly from our body to be eaten.” At this a shocked groan ran through the delegates present. The Apple tree waited until it died, then stated: “The worst part of it all is, that often we are crushed and our blood is drunk. We are put into form to make alcohol and when in that state, often find ourselves intoxicated . But!” and the Apple tree’s voice became some what elated, “we often get our revenge for when others drink our blood, they too become intoxicated . You see, Mother earth, that even if we are happy part of the time, we of aged years suffer for what befalls our children.” Then the Pine spoke. In a deep, bass voice, it said: “Mother Earth, I’m the delegate from your children, the rich and useful woods. We live a long, long time, but for the simple reason that we are taken good care of in order for us to grow fat and high. Once, however, we are in full growth, we are cut down at our base and our woods are made into many things. From some of

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44 THE FLORIDA TEACHER the things into which we are made, we see things that I don't even want to talk about . You can see now, Mother Earth, that when we stop growing and begin to enjoy life, our life is taken from us . Knowing this inevitable fate, we have a lot of headaches while awaiting it.” The Rosebush, after being sure that all were listening, attentively, expressed herself in this manner: “Mother Earth, I’m the delegate of all the flowers. We are endowed with much beauty, but we are sold like slaves. And we, too, are crushed, even as the Apples are, but for another purpose. The Oil in our veins being made into perfume to satisfy the vanity of mankind. You can well see, Mother Earth, that although perhaps we experience happiness to some extent, our happiness is never complete.” The Cabbage, being uneducated, expressed himself in very bad English. “Mother Earth,” it moaned, “I’m the member sent by your children, the vege tables. We can say without argument about the matter that our life is no life at all. We spend our infancy in your body and when we stick our nose outside of you, we are taken immediately to our death . You can see, Mother Earth, that we might as well be dead to begin with.” The Ivy then crawled forward and said: “Mother Earth, I represent your children of the creeping whips. We are usually happy because we can go wherever we wish. Sometimes, however, we get into places where we’re not wanted and then trouble begins. We are cut! And oh! the pain . Now, if you’ll give us a lot more mind, Mother Earth, we can save ourselves from stupid paths and can be happy.” At last, the Poison Oak saw that his chance had come. “Mother Earth,” he prounced, moving as close to the group as he dared, “I am a delegate of myself. I have no sorrows, but neither do I have joys. In fact, I’m neither here nor there, so to speak, and who wants to live in this Limbo?” And with this, the complaints were ended. Mother Earth could scarcely believe her own ears. Not one sincere word of gratitude had been spoken. Not one joyous tone in a voice. “Your com plaints are entirely without reason,” she said decidedly. “Not one of you seem to appreciate that you are here for the purpose of service. The length of one’s life is of no importance, whatsoever. The question is,—what do you accomplish while you’re here? . Well, not much as far as I can see from today’s ex perience . But I, alone, am not your Creator. It is now necessary for me to commune with Him who has seen and heard all on this occasion . Children,” she ended, sadly, “go in peace to your places. I will await the decision of your Creator . Everything is relative in life, you know—happiness brings sorrow and sorrow brings happiness. This should have been kept in your hearts from the day of your birth.” So, saying goodbye to one another, the botanical family each took its own road home. It was four o’clock in the afternoon. The sun had descended to the pro founds of the earth. The dominion of silence could be felt. Unexpectedly, rum bling sounds, at first distant, then nearer, broke the tranquility of the universe. Heavy winds, traveling at great velocity, hurried over the earth, while from the earth itself, one convulsive upheaval occurred, leaving in its wake a horizon of sand where once the botanical world of such indescribable beauty had been. The place was then entirely deserted. That is why today we have worlds of desert in remote parts of the earth, where flowers, trees, vegetables and plants of every living kind, daughters of nature once grew in quantities and without effort. Accept life with its inconveniences and life will accept you with your faults. The Florida Centennial Association Has Made Arrange ments with the Florida Teacher to Publish a Special Edition Which Will Contain Its Program for the Next Five Years. It is a powerful and constructive program for the State of Florida WATCH FOR THIS SPECIAL EDITION THE FLORIDA CENTENNIAL ASSOCIATION A Non-Profit Corporation Duly Organized 326 EAST FLAGLER STREET MIAMI Write for Advance Information fJ
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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 45 WILLIAM CAREY COFFIN William Carey Coffin was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on September 7, 1862, just at the time when the Civil War was beginning to flame into the final blast of the melting pot of this great nation. His father, also William Carey, was a direct descendant in the genera tion of Tristam Coffin who settled in Newbury, Massachusetts, in 1642. This man of family was not a proverbial ‘Pilgrim Father’, but was a Royalist in old England, and, when he foresaw that Cromwell was destined to win, he migrated to North American shores, rather than be ruled by the ‘Roundheads’. The mother of Dr. Coffin was Jane McCormick Osborne, of Scotch-Irish Covenanter clan, who landed in Pennsylvania during George Washington’s administration. Graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a degree of civil engineer. Later, this institution conferred upon him the honorary title of Doctor of Science for his notable work in the designing and building of blast furnaces, steel plants, and oil refineries. He has the distinction of being the first graduate under Doctor Carhart in 1883. In the same year he began his notable career as Chief Engineer of the Fort Pitt Boiler Works. Dr. Coffin remained with this company only two years. He then started a series of changes in firms which finally took him to the chair of Vice-presidency of the Blaw Knox Company in 1915 until 1923 and to many important countries all over the globe. His next position was Chief Engineer of Riter and Conley Company which was followed by the position of Vice-president of this company. In 1908 he joined with the Jones and Laughlin Steel Company as their contracting engineer and remained with them until he accepted the Vice-presi dency of his last connection with the Blaw Knox Company. Then he came to Miami Beach in 1923 and, until his retirement in 1927, he had his own office as an engineer and architect on the Beach. One of his latest works before coming to Miami Beach and retire ment was the designing and constructing of eight blast furnaces at one time and in a new territory, Gary, Indiana, for the Illinois Steel Company. This was the largest group construction in the world at that time. Another one of his late constructions was the first large oil refinery in the Beaumont, Texas, oil field, famous for the discovery of a new source of petroleum. This field is familiarly known as “Spindle-Top.” In addition to Dr. Coffin’s outstanding achievements as a struc tural engineer in this, the greatest of all industrial nations, his ability and the confidence of his associates is proven by the following big jobs of which he was the head in other parts of the world: he designed and built the steel frame power houses in Dublin, Ireland; Glasgow, Scotland; Bristol, England for Great Britain; he designed, the water works towers for one hundred cities in the United States, Merida, Yucatan, Tsin-Tsin, China, and Shanghai, China; he designed, advo cated, and finally introduced the 55,000 barrel oil tank which eventu ally became the national standard oil tank; he also made several extensive trips to Europe to study and report on gas engines, welding by both oxy-acetylene and blue gas hammer, and received credit for the introduction of the latter method of welding into the United States; in 1913 he was made chairman of the “Business Conditions Committee of the National Structural Fabricators Society” and filed a report, “Monograph on Governmental Regulation of Co-operation in Trade,” which was sent by the society to every Congressman and left a strong impression on the congressional action in the formation of the Federal Trade Commission. Its adoption at that time would have established fair trades practices and fair trades as early as 1913. He is a life member of the Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburgh. He is a member of Council, National Civil Service Reform Association; Director and Delegate of National Structural Steel Fabricators So ciety; the American Society of Civil Engineers; the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers; the American Society of Mechanical Engineers; the American Iron and Steel Institute, En gineers Society of Pennsylvania; and the American Association for Advancement of Science. This famous engineer relates that his most valuable experiences in life were due to his membership on the Council of the National Civil Service Reform Association from 1908 until 1918. Dr. Charles Elliot of Harvard University was Chairman, and among the presidents were Hon. Joseph Choate, Ambassador to Great Britain when the Alabama claims and the final boundaries of Alaska were settled. Another was Hon. Charles Bonaparte of Baltimore, who was Attorney-General in Theodore Roosevelt’s cabinet. The University of Miami is fortunate in Dr. Coffin’s selection of this section for his home of retirement. He succeeded Dr. Fairchild as Chairman of the Board of Trustees seven years ago, and has taken a very active part in the rapid growth of this fine school. He is the donor of trophies for extra-curriculum work of members of fraternities and sororities. His activities at Miami Beach include active membership of the Committee of One Hundred and founder-member of the Bath Club. He is also an active Mason of thirty-two degrees standing. Dr. Coffin’s residence on the Beach is at 3591 Flamingo Drive. RENT A CAR from J. E. PYLES, inc. Perfect Gars — Perfect Service Best Mileage Rate 1520 ALTON ROAD PHONE 5-5655 Cherry’S Exclusive Dresses Spectator Sportswear Beach wear Coats 1906 Collins Avenue MIAMI BEACH BRANCHES LINCOLN RD. NEXT TO LINCOLN THEATRE MIAMI BEACH FLORIDA PHONE 5.2724SHELBORNE HOTEL AND SEA ISLE HOTEL MIAMI BEACH Gift fessie Zinn Shops S< I UANI Y Si M Cl A Private Boarding and Day School For Boys and Girls KINDERGARTEN THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL LEO HUBERMAN (Harvard) Headmaster 1021 Biarritz Drive — Phone 6-1061 — Miami Beach Local Transportation Provided Without Charge

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46 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Miami Beach Has Own Daily Newspaper Under its masthead, The Daily Tropics publishes each day this statement: When Horace Greeley said, “Go west, young man,” it was very apt, for that injunction to the youth of the land was offered when the regions to the west offered much promise to those with initiative and courage. Rut in 1925, the famous Greeley suggestion was outmoded, for America had discovered a new frontier—southern Florida, and if Greeley had lived in that year of magic improbabilities, doubtless he would have pointed southward. Even without a Greeley to guide him, a western journalist, a young Kansan named John Montgomery, saw things were happening here, and he came and established The Coral Gables Riviera. Now he is publisher and editor of The Miami Beach Daily Tropics, Miami Beach’s one and only daily newspaper. Back in 1929, when the Miami Beach population was only 6,800, Mr. Montgomery established The Miami Beach Tropics, as a slickpaper society weekly. But in 1940, the census disclosed Miami Beach had 28,012 yearround residents, and, realizing that a daily newspaper in such a fast growing city was inevitable, The Tropics enlarged its plant facilities its staff, contracted for the International News Service, and entered the afternoon daily field. The Coral Gables Riviera is still owned by Mr. Montgomery, under management of James B. Moore, but The Daily Tropics is his first love and it is at the Tropics office where this young dynamo makes his headquarters, giving personal supervision to all depart ments. In less than two months of daily operation, The Daily Tropics has made rapid week-by-week gains, both in circulation and in advertis ing. More than 40 first-class hotels purchase copies for all their guests each day, however, principal outlets consist of carrier routes, news boys and newstands. A final sporting extra after 5:30 p. m. reaches the Miami Beach streets usually 20 to 25 minutes ahead of any other sports edition. C. Marlin Lundry is managing editor and Parks Rusk is advertis ing manager. “Owned, edited and published in Miami Beach, a city with an assessed valuation of $70,000,000 and real and personal property of a full sale value of $150,000,000 with 279 hotels, 893 apartment houses and 3,352 private residences—housing accommodations for threequarters of million visitors during a six-months season—the nation’s fastest growing city (1940 census...” Marie Tello Phillips Perhaps one of the most sought after celebrites in Miami is Marie Tello Phillips (Mrs. Charles J. Yaegle). Born in Toronto, Canada, Miss Phillips spent her childhood in Louisville, Ky., where her father was a member of the Bar. She received her B. A. Degree from Ursurline College in Nottingham, Ohio, and later taught in the public schools in Cleveland. She also acted as Assistant Principal of the North Doan school until her marriage to the later Watson P. Phillips. Miss Phillips’ family history is one of the most colorful imaginable —dating back to Christopher Columbus, and including such well known people as Gov. A. C. Scales, Rear-Admiral Scales, and Admiral Bartholomew de Perestrello. Perhaps it was from her father, Manly P. Tello, an able writer, editor and published, that Miss Phillips inherited her literary ability. Among her best known novels are “There’s A Divinity”, “Bound in Shallows”, and “Stella Marvin”; of her poems—“Mary of Scotland “Honeysuckle and the Rose”, “Ten Thousand Candles’ and ‘A Voice from the Stars”. Her book of essays—“More Truth Than Poetry” is regarded as one of the best produced by modern writers. How Miss Phillips finds time to write and to be as active in the various clubs she belongs to, is a wonder. The honors bestowed upon her are almost unbelievable: Poet Laureate of the Bookfellows Library Guild and the Poetry Society of Pittsburgh; holder of the Diamond Torch, tenth Degree, of Sigma Tau Delta (the English Professional Society for literary distinction). The National League of Pen Women (of which she was the founder and the first President of the Pittsburgh and Miami branches) has also bestowed several awards as has the Society of Arts and Letters. Correctly Corseted 307 POSTAL BUILDING 327 N. E. FIRST AVE. MIAMI, FLORIDA PHONE 2-5368 LeCiel Corset Studio CORSETS and SURGICAL BELTS 839 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA PHONE 5-4911 Made for the Individual FITTINGS GIVEN BEFORE GARMENT IS COMPLETED PERFECT FIGURE CONTROL AND COMFORT ASSURED COMPLETE ABDOMINAL UPLIFT Lucile Stephenson Incorrectly Corseted

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 47 Modern Trend In School Architecture By AUGUST GEIGER Present day school design is very different today from what it was in the so called “good old days” in Dade County. Today we have associations to study thA various problems incurred in designing schools so that they will be as nearly perfect as possible with respect to safety, perfect lighting, proper ventilation, and limiting the capacity of rooms to number of pupils which the teacher can most efficiently handle. In fact school design has now developed into a highly specialized profession and most states including Florida now have Codes which go into great detail specifying how our schools are to be built, and in this way there is a certain uniformity in recently built schools. But in the “good old days” there were no such Codes, Associations or Commissions for studying school problems and the architects who designed the early schools generally followed their own ideas of what a school should be like and thus there was little uniformity in the design of these schools. Most of the older schools were built in a more or less rectangular shape with center halls with hooms opening out of these inside halls. Doors from classrooms generally opened inward because many teachers thought this made it easier to control the pupils but forgetting the great danger in case of fire. For the same reason the classrooms of the earlier schools generally had only one door while today two doors are required which must open outward. While at present all newly built classrooms must be equipped with hardware which cannot be locked against anyone inside of a room trying to open the doors, any kind of hardware was allowed in the olden buildings. Many of the floors of the halls were of wood and the rooms faced in all directions. There was no regulation as to the size of the windows, the ceiling heights or any of the other matters which are at present considered so important in a properly designed class room. The first schools were of wooden construction. The first school built here along modern lines was the Neva King Cooper School at Homestead which was built about 1912, and was considered quite a model school. Later, Mr. Fisher, who was then Superintendent, decided that it was desirable to set up standards for school design based on the best practice of the time and employed Mr. Ray Hamon who made a study of the latest practice of the time and standardized the construc tion of school buildings in the County. Since that time the rapid inmprovements which have been made in school design and construction can be seen by comparing the various schools which have been built during the last fifteen years. It is a far cry from schools like the old Central School (where the post office is now located) or the original Orange Glade School with their inside halls, plaster ceilings, etc. to such buildings as the Miami Beach Senior High School or the new Miami Beach Elementary schools. These have their rooms all facing east or south so as to get proper ventilation, all classrooms opening onto fireproof corridors, and with all classrooms equipped with accoustical ceilings. In addition there are now clinics and cafeterias and the various rooms are also equipped with public address systems, inter-communicating telephones, fire alarm systems, etc. which are operated from the Principal’s office in the Miami Beach schools previously mentioned. All the other improvements which are considered essential in the modern system of education, have been incorporated in the designs. Sometimes we hear criticisms of the locations of some of the schools due to their being located along busy streets with heavy traffic. However, in many cases these conditions have developed since the schools were built. Take the case of the Orange Glade School as an instance. When this school was built it was out in the country surrounded by pine woods and orange groves, a typical country school and it is a question whether the wildest optimists of the time could have visualized this school in the center of the busy business section which has grown up here. Phone 7-6273 FACIALS j | DANITA BEAUTY SALON j | A COMPLETE BEAUTY SERVICE | Parker Herbex Method Scalp Treatments I Individual Hair Styling j j 9534 N. E. Second Avenue Miami. Florida j I COMPLIMENTS j I. E. SHILLING MR COFFEEN I ) j i 1818 PURDY AVENUE MIAMI BEACH j _ _J SVBIL’S CLOTHES OF CHARM Afternoon Dresses Classic Sport Dresses Redingotes and Jacket Dresses Evening and Dinner Dresses SUITS—Tailored and Dressmaker Types. COATS for every occasion. Fur Trimmed Coats — Fur Jackets — Beachwear — Slack Suits and Playclothes — Millinery and Accessories CORNER OF S. E. FIRST STREET AND S. E. FIRST AVENUE MIAMI, FLORIDA I. ROSENGARTEN “Miami’s Pioneer Furrier” IN OUR NEW AND SPACIOUS STORE 118 SOUTH MIAMI AVENUE WE SPECIALIZE IN FUR AND COSTLY RUG COLD STORAGE 100% Insurance on All Articles Remodeling — Moth Proofing — Cleaning — Glazing TELEPHONE 3-4591 118 SOUTH MIAMI AVENUE

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4# THE FLORIDA TEACHER Development of the home ... By J. EDWIN PETERSEN From time immemorable it has been man’s desire to create a lome; and as time advanced, and modern improvements were devised and invented, the development of this home went through many changes. Our first notice of the family home was back in the pre-historic days when man built his home in caves on the hillstides, and under projecting rock ledges. Today, in many places all over the world, the very same home that was used thousands of years ago is still being used. For instance, in the State of New Mexico, we still find the Indians living in the sides of the cliffs. Then, along the Loire River Valley just outside the City of Tours, we find a whole community of cliff dwellers. It is very interesting to drive along the road and see these peculiar little dwellings spotting the abrupt hillsides,—some with glass windows and framed doorways, and others with nothing but a piece of cloth hanging over the openings; then the funny looking chimneys corbled out and zig-zagging up the perpendicular side of the cliff. The next step was the development of a home built of materials such as rock, timbers and mud, which were thrown together in a hap hazard fashin, but proved to be nothing more than shelters. As civili zation progressed, and as man became more conscious of his artistic instincts, his desire for a more refined mode of living brought forth the idea of a multi-room home. We find some very good examples of these early dwellings in the excavations at Pompeii, Italy. Of course, the multi-roomed house was used in many other parts of the world, and perhaps long before the building of the City of Pompeii, but little or no records are left for us to study. Therefore, this City with its well preserved ruins offers us a good record of the mode of living of ancient times. These homes consisted of a large colonnaded court semi-outdoor, where the general entertaining and living was done. This space also acted as a connecting link between the other rooms of the dwellings which were rooms for dining and preparing of foods, and small cubicles which were used as chambers. The next point of interest in regard to the home was the decora tion of the interiors, and the profound simplicity and bareness of the exteriors. Man s first instincts were toward the beautification of him self. Along with the realization of a more formulated mode of living, man’s thoughts were for creating a setting to exemplify the beautifi cation of himself; therefore, the use of decoration and color was brought forth in the homes. All great periods of the history of Art have coincided, with rare exceptions, with the fashions and prosperity of the nations and the home developed very rapidly, and to a high degree of efficiency in the more prosperous countries. It is perhaps with interest that we consider the lack of develop ment of the homes in countries which have been unable to develop, due to ignorance, or oppression by church and government. In the rural sections of Mexico we find homes similar to the type which were throughout Europe in its very early days. The home consisted of a barricative fence surrounding an area of approximately one hun dred feet on each side, with a little thatched roof hut in one corner for sleeping, and in the opposite corner a similar thatched roof hut for cooking and eating. This is perhaps the method by which these people have lived for hundreds of years, with little or no improve ments. In speaking of this little thatched or barricative fence, another point of great importance in the development of the home is brought out, that being the desire and need of protection. This little Mexican dwelling must be protected against the wild animals of the surround ing country, and so our earliest forms of dwelling were likewise. The next step was to build a home which would withstand the attacks or invasions of tribes and bandits. That gives us one of the explanations as to why the home was decorated on the interior and little thought given to the exterior, and the outside gave the appearance of a for tress. Inborn in man, along with his desire for a home, is the instinct for socialized and community life. It was then that man realized mutual benefits for protection could be had by group communities or cities which could be fortified. This general fortification relieved the tension for individual protection, and allowed them freedom and thought for beautification of the exterior of the home, as well as its surroundings. Many examples of ancient walled cities may be found today, such as Paris, Provin, Rome, Luca, etc. With many changes and adjustments familiar to their individual lands and countries, the home was developed to fit the needs and requirements of these individual peoples. The American people being of creative ability and highly imaginative, have not been able to settle on any one style, but have developed a mode of living which is typi cally American. Today, although our homes are of many styles and designs, the old idea of home still prevails; but, with our modern mode of living, a more efficient arrangement of rooms and equipment has been devised to fit the need. ARTHUR BEREL 68 EAST FLAGLER STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA THE DEPENDABLE HEDDEN METAL LOCATOR PATENTED DETECTS and LOCATES ALL METALS THROUGH ANY SUBSTANCE INCLUDING WATER MODELS FOR PLUMBERS and ELECTRICIANS and for TREASURE HUNTING MANUFACTURED AND DISTRIBUTED BY HEDDEN METAL CAN DIFFERENTIATE BETWEEN MAGNETIC AND NON-MAGNETIC METALS LOCATORS, INC. 6230 N. W. SECOND AVENUE MIAMI, FLORIDA Cable Address: HEDMETALOC MIAMIFLA The LIGHTHOUSE “On the Beach'’ Superb in Sea Foods BAKER’S HAULOVER—N. MIAMI BEACH Always Open N Oysters and Clams on Half Shell Frog Legs Live Stone Crabs Soft Shell Crabs Sutffed Deviled Crabs Pompano Florida l obsters Green Turtle Steak COCKTAIL BAR—PACKAGE STORE STEAKS CHOPS CHICKEN Prime Beef Used Exclusively PHONE 6-1723 S. D. MACRIS, Manager v— — >

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 49 5t. Francis Hospital Miami Beach, Florida In a neighboring town of the City of Indianapolis a man lay ill in a small room of a little hospital. One day he remarked that he was gonig to build a hospital where the patients could have the com forts of home, and a view that would interest them when they looked out of the window. In 1925, Mr. James Allison of Indianapolis and Miami Beach built a fifty bed hospital in Miami Beach and named it “Allison Hospital.” In 1927, Mr. Allison requested that an Order of Sisters conduct his hospital; and learning of the good work ac complished by the Sisters of St. Francis of Allegany, New York, he invited the Sisters to inspect the institution. After making the neces sary negotiations, the Sisters assumed charge of the Hospital in 1927. A year later, Mr. Allison passed to his eternal reward, and in 1929, the Hospital was purchased from his estate, and became known as the St. Francis Hospital. This Hospital, approved by the American College of Surgeons, is a complete modern hospital, equipped to administer to medical and surgical patients. Located on Allison Island, in sub tropical splendor, it affords comforts unequalled in hospital accom modations. The Staff, composed of approximately sixty-five physicians, members of the American College of Physicians and the American College of Surgeons, has three divisions, namely: the Active, the Visiting and the Courtesy Staff. In 1936, in order to care for the growing population of Miami Beach, an east wing was added, which increased the original accom modations from fifty to one hundred patients. Although a comparatively short time has elapsed since the capacity of the hospital was doubled, by the addition of the east wing, the need for more beds was so apparent during the past season that another wing has been added to the west side of the Hospital. The possible necessity of another addition was recognized when the east wing was planned and consideration was made for architectural symnetry of the hospital buildings so that the new addition completely balances the plan. The original building faces south and the wings extending north from the east and west ends of this building complete an inverted “U” formation. The popularity of the various clinics made it mandatory to assign more space to this branch of the hospital’s service; therefore practical ly the whole first floor is being utilized by the emergency ward and the clinics. The second floor of the building is divided into wards to accommodate men, women and children who prefer this kind of hos pitalization. The third floor is composed entirely of private rooms, and these are in great demand during the winter months. The entire fourth floor of the new wing is devoted to surgery. This department is completely air-conditioned, and is the last word in modern surgical equipment. The Sisters of St. Francis who operate and manage the St. Fran cis Hospital are members of the community founded in Allegany, New York, in 1865. Copying the example of the St. Francis of Assisi, the Sisters of the community renounce all personal claim to worldly riches and renown; following the rule of St. Francis, these Sisters dedicate their lives to the service of God in the benefit of mankind. To this end the Sisters of St. Francis have been doing Hospital work in the northern states for many years, but it was not until 1927 that this work brought them as far south as Florida. Since that time, they have unceasingly bent their efforts to the care of the sick. The improvement of the facilities to combat disease and sickness here at Miami Beach has been their major aim. Since the Sisters assumed full control of Allison Hospital and re-named it St. Francis Hospital, under the patronage of the Patron Saint of their Order, the City of Miami Beach has grown rapidly. Additions to the Hospital as well as new equipment have been necessary to maintain a fitting standard of hospital facilities for such a growing city. Such expansion is in perfect accord with the ideals and practices of the Sisters of Saint Francis. The management and most of the administrative positions, which in other institutions are held by high salaried execu tives, are at St. Francis Hospital filled by the Sisters. This permits a large portion of the income, which usually is absorbed by an executive payroll, to be turned back to the hospital maintenance in a true “non-profit” sense. The very nature of the Religious Life which the Sisters have chosen to follow includes a great amount of charity work. In the spirit of true charity these cases are not given prominence, but they are cared for with the same attention and consideration as all other cases. They go unnoticed by those who but casually observe the work of the Sisters conducting St. Francis Hospital, but such cases are not infrequent, and the expense entailed in caring for them amounts to a large sum. In the past there have been times when the capacity of the Hos pital has been taxed to its utmost by an unexpected number of people requiring hospitalization. However, at no time has the stress been so great that anyone in need of care was turned away. With the addition of a west wing, which makes the hospital’s total capacity one hundred seventy-five, another step has been taken toward keeping the hospital facilities up to the need of this growing city. This most recent addition manifests the definite desire of the Sisters at St. Francis to furnish the best possible hospital service for the people of this vicinity. Announcing the Opening of . -Paulines Camera Store, Inc. 70 WEST FLAGLER STREET PHONE 2-5881 MIAMI, FLORIDA

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50 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Miami Beach Public Schools Show Definite Program For Child Development and Community Usefulness By Mrs. J. C. Brown, Head of Foreign Language Department of the M>ami Beach Junior-Senior High School “Your child’s school is your ally. Every day it does something for your child. A sound schooling is the richest legacy you can leave him.” The casual tourist or the permanent citizen who places his child in the public schools of Miami Beach can do so with the full assurance that no stone will be left unturned to give that child the best schooling obtainable. A full program characterized by long range planning to cover courses from the kinder garten through the twelfth grade is a feature of the several schools making up the Miami Beach Public School System, and graduates of the school are more and more attesting its value through acquitting themselves creditably in their chosen fields. Visiting specialists in the field of education have frequently commented on the variety of problems confronting the Beach schools which draw pupils from all states of the union and from many foreign countries to meet here in a real “melting pot” of pupil personnel. In addition to a large permanent population depending on the public schools, each year sees an increasing number of visitors to Miami Beach and for these students coming from all types of schools, with every conceivable degree of background and preparation, the school’s unending task is to pick up the loose ends of the pupils educational pattern, link them with our own curricular and extra-curricular design, and, without, lowering our own high academic standards, return the tourist pupil to his home school without handicap resulting from the change. The Miami Beach public school enroll ment rises some two hundred and fifty percent as the “season” moves toward its “peak”. Fortunately, more and more of our visitors are realizing the advantages of remaining here until the close of the school term in the early part of June. The Miami Beach Public Schools function as a unit under a supervising principal. The original nucleus of that system was a portion of what is now the Miami Beach Central Elementary School. In 1920 that school opened with an auditorium and six classrooms, covering grades one through eight. In 1925-1926 the 9th grade was added, and in 1926 work was begun on the Ida M. Fisher High School building. Some five years ago that structure was taken over exclusively for junior high work as our PWA building program was nearing completion. This federal project included a new senior high school, a new high school gym nasium, an elementary school on South Beach, one on North Beach, and many improvements and additions to the existing Central Beach Elementary School. The Miami Beach Senior High School opened for classes in September of 1936, and in most welcome relief to the almost intolerable, over-crowded conditions prevailing the year before. But so spectacular has been the growth of the population of the city that already extensive plans are underway for enlargements and new structures to meet new needs. The Beach public schools have been exceptionally fortunate in the quality of leadership in the members of its Board of Trustees. The present personnel of that Board is as follows: Messrs. Van C. Kussrow, chairman; Hugh Larrick and Robert Taylor. Capable men as supervising principals has been another of our strokes of good fortune. Dr. C. C. Carson first held this post, beginning in 1926. From 1930 to 1936 Mr. James T. Wilson served in this capacity, and when he was elected County Superintendent of Public Instruction for Dade County the present Supervising Principal, Sidney H. Ellison, took the post. Financially the Beach public school system has been kept in the soundest condition. Through the wise planning and good business judgment of men at the head of this vast enterprise, the system has gone steadily forward, through “fat” years and “lean”. Supported by a 10-mill levy in its own district (the school district and the city limits coincide) the Beach has not had to depend on outside funds in order to keep its schools in unimpaired operation. During those most difficult years when school all over the country were closing for lack of funds, the Beach public schools went forward with the slogan of “Full steam ahead”. Teachers’ salaries have never been held up, and every opportunity and encouragement has been given faculty members for professional improvement. No teacher in the Beach schools holds less than an A. B. degree. Many hold an M. A. and have long years of teaching experience to their credit. A single salary schedule prevailing in all grades has made each teacher realize the importance of his job in contributing to the progress of the system as a whole. The faculty members have come from outstanding institutions from all sections of the country. The Beach public schools are thoroughly accredited and have high ratings. An unusually large percentage of students from our high school go to colleges and universities and graduates are admitted to the most conservative institutions on par with graduates from any other high school. By means of standardized and other tests given at regular intervals, the Miami Beach public school pupils have been shown to have a high grade of accomplishment in all the regular academic fields. But it is not simply to prepare students for college that the Beach schools operate. Mr. Ellison, the supervising principal, has some well-defined notions as to what twelve years in a public school should do for a boy or girl. He knows that any school has failed which does not—in those twelve years—equip a boy or girl with enough of “what it takes” to face life and to cope, with some reason able degree of success, with its varied problems, even in a world apparently threatened with chaos. He believes the school must help the boy and girl find some degree of security in his or her niche in the economic and social scheme of things in which his or her life is to be cast, and to find some considerable amount of personal satisfaction and social usefulness in that niche. For the realization of this ideal of service which must ever be paramount with the school, the whole program of the Miami Beach Public School system has assumed a definitely socialized trend, and both classroom and extra-curricular activities are being planned and interpreted with less regard to theory or text book formula and more in terms of life as the boy and girl of today will have to live it when once they are outside the portals and the shelter the school has afforded. For the carrying out of such a program, Supervising Principal Ellison has realized that complete cooperation of students, faculty, school administrators and school patrons must be a “sine qua non” in the process. An interesting and worth-while by product of such a program has been the building of an unusually fine and har monious relation between the local public and the Beach schools. Each of the three elementary and the high school has its own organization of Parent-Teachers, working in pleasant and useful harmony among themselves and with the school system as a whole. The City of Miami Beach finances and the school plant houses a program of student health check-up that is probably without an equal in any other city. A clinic, staffed by competent nurses, makes daily and minute check-up on all in-coming students, with adequate follow-up work and the maintenance of a complete card case-history of each pupil. Each of the schools in the system has a well-equipped cafeteria, operated by the PTA, giving meals-at-cost to pupils and teachers. An adequate system of bus operation handles the student transportation problem. A Custodians’ Club, made up of alert, efficient workers keeps the various buildings of the big plant functioning smoothly and the grounds well cared for and beautified. The beauty of the high school patios has been a source of much admiration among the countless visitors who see them each year. All buildings in the various schools are equipped with two-way radio systems, electric bell and clock apparatus, and are planned to give the maximum benefits for lighting, ventilation and safety. Mr. Ellison is ably assisted by the heads of the three elementary schools. Miss Katie Dean is principal of the Miami Beach Central Elementary School. Among the improvements listed at that school during the present year are an enlarged library, a full-time librarian and the purchase of some excellent visual education equipment. Similar equipment has been secured for the North Beach Elementary School where Miss Mabel Tucker directs the activities of several hundred pupils. Rinalden Saunders is at the head of the South Beach Elementary School where an outstanding program in character education has been worked out by the faculty. Through many phases of daily routine and activity pupils are taught the value of such qualities as humility, respect, reverence and responsibility. For the upper grades there are two large buildings, the Ida M. Fisher Junior High and the Miami Beach Senior High schools, connected by a series of corridors and both built cloister style around beautiful patios. These buildings occupy the greater part of two city squares and are located in the center of the city of Miami Beach, about three blocks from the ocean and a few blocks from Biscayne Bay. Like the other structures, these are built on a style fitting to the sub-tropics, embody the latest and most approved structural features and are equipped for the Salute. Proudly, we salute the Pioneers of Miami Beach and also the present-day leaders of this glorious city: CARL AULT, EUCILD HOTEL, Mayor of Hialeah 320 Euclid Ave. AGNES BEAUTY SALON, MIAMI BEACH OTEL, 2916 N. E. 2nd Avenue 520 Ocean Drive BRICKELL GRILL, J. K. DORN, 143 S. E. 8th Street Miami, Florida BLUE DERBY, JACK GREESON, S. W. 8th at 7th Avenue 304 S. W. 8th Ave. LITTLE BOHEMIA CAFE, MAX GROGER, 930 N. E. 2nd Avenue 1103 S. W. 2nd Ave. W. D. BIEVER, AL HICKLAND, 112th St. at Biscayne Blvd. 4660 S. W. 13th St. MISS COLEEN CHAPMAN, HARRY HIGGINS, 159 N. E. 11th Terrace 1333 S. W. 8th St. JOHN M. COGAN, AL LABER, Hermitage Hotel Barclay Plaza C. E. CASEY, CHARLES M. MOORE, 1688 Coral Wav Tropical Cottages DEXTER SKATING RINK, JAKE MILES, T. FIERE, N. E. 2nd Ave. at 24th St. N. E. 2nd Ave. at 63rd St. MIAMI HEALTH INSTITUTE, JOHN J. FRITZ, 7613 Biscavne Blvd. 3121 N. W. 27th Ave. MIAMI ART SCHOOL, H. W. FLYYN, 111 N. E. 2nd Ave. Brownly’s Candy Store, MAGIC CITY PARK, 247 E. Flagler 6005 N. E. 2nd Ave. GREEN CANDLE TEA ROOM, RHODES VACUUM CLEANER, Coral Gables 1312 N. E. 2nd Ave. SUN RAY PARK RELIABLE SOUTHERN SERVICE, M. F. SCOTT News Tower WINCRICHE STATION, MRS. A. B. BRICKER 1129 Grand Avenue WEAVER’S SERVICE STATION, 7603 N. E. 2nd Ave.

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 51 maximum in comfort, beauty and achievement. Across the street from the senior high is still another large modern building, the gymnasium. On the same grounds with junior and senior high are the “annex”, housing the Home Economics and the Manual Arts departments. The most recent structure on the grounds is a spacious air-conditioned, sound-proof band rehearsal hall, said to be one of the few of its kind in the country and the only one in the state. The public schools of the Beach have the full use of all of the varied facilities offered by the City of Miami Beach in its 33-acre sports and recreation center, Flamingo Park, about two blocks from the high school. Doing effective work in the high school is a group of well-trained faculty members serving as counselers for students to avoid the hit-and-miss tragedies of poor planning in the matter of subject selection and courses, particularly in grades 10, 11 and 12. In a large number of homeroom and extra curricular activities, pupils in the Miami Beach Public Schools are learning to “stand on their own feet”, to think clearly and express themselves effectively, to practice the actual operation of democratic government and to become acquainted with adult leaders in the world outside the school room. Developing students in self-reliance and in a sense of responsibility by giving them an opportunity for participation in life situations is another “must” in Supervising Principal Ellison’s educational creed. Teachers, students and parents cooperate gladly in his wise leadership in recognizing that “What the School is today, Democracy will be tomorrow!” The Miami Beach Public School System is pledged and dedicated to a program planned for the normal, healthy and happy growth and development of the whole child, to help him find his place in the world and in his usefulness to that world and to the day in which he lives. It subscribes wholeheartedly to that admirable tenet set forth by the National Education Association: “Let us set the child in our midst as our greatest wealth and our most challenging responsibility. Let us exalt him above industry, above busi ness, above politics, above all the petty and selfish things that weaken and destroy a people. Let us know that the race moves forward thru its children, and, by the grace of Almighty God, setting our faces toward the morning, dedicate ourselves anew to the welfare of CHILDHOOD!” RUSSELL F. HAND, Inc. INSURANCE FOR EVERYTHING Member of Greater Miami Insurance Board, Inc. Seybold Building Phone 3-4751 MIAMI, FLORIDA Going Places ? ? ? ? Get the Most for Your Money V. I S I T The Ocean Hi-Way Travel Bureau 44 Biscayne Boulevard MIAMI, FLORIDA Reservations Made and Tickets Sold. Hotels Recommended NANCY’S HAT SHOP 212 HALCYON ARCADE MIAMI, FLORIDA Smart Hats, Reasonable Miss Nancy Beery KINSMAN’S LANDSCAPE SERVICE ISLE OF NORMANDY MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 6-1677-PHONE-6-1678 CONSCIENTIOUS BEAUTY SERVICE In the Southwest: In the Northeast: THE VOGUE BEAUTY THE MARTHA LEE SALON BEAUTY SALON 311 S. W. 12th Avenue 6211 Biscayne Boulevard Dial 3-1619 Dial 7-5472 Esther Taylor Kunkler — Latest Model Cars To Rent — BY MILE, DAY, WEEK OR SEASON PENT -A CAP DQ/VC IT yOUPSCLT COUTURE’S MOTOR CORP. 825 FIFTH STREET PHONE 5-5811 MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA Couture’s Motor Corporation is the oldest drive-yourself company in the Greater Miami area. The company was estab lished over 15 years ago and maintains the largest fleet of late model cars of several makes and types. Dependable chauffeurs can be furnished. HUSKAMP MOTOR COMPANY . Ford Dealer . • CORAL GABLES, FLAPHONE 4-2566 Miami Conservatory of Music Here pupils may have the advantages of individual instruction under Leading Teachers, as well as group and class instruction. Dancing — Voice — Violin — Piano 1737 N. Bayshore Drive Phone 2-5835 138 Minorca Ave. 1122 S. W. 21st Ave. 431 41st St. Coral Gables Miami Miami Beach FEATURING “THE REVERSA TIE” Mildred M. New House of 1000 Ties 227 HALCYON ARCADE PHONEMIAMI, FLORIDA LOUIS GRILL 731 LTNCOT N ROAD PHONE 5-9933 12 Years on Miami Beach Sirloin Steak Dinner $1.50 Sirloin Steak Dinner for TWO $2.75 MINUTE STEAK $1 25 DINNER _ 1 From Show Beef Complete With Cocktail and Soup, 2 Vege tables, Avocado Pear Salad, Dessert and Beverage 10 SELECTIONS ON $1.00 DINNER TRU FRUIT “It’s Refreshing” MADE FRESH DAILY “Florida’s Finest Fresh Fruit Drink” TRU FRUITS PRODUCTS, Inc. 207 N. E. 39th Street Phone 2-9417

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52 THE FLORIDA TEACHER PHONE 5-3355 COMPLIMENTS OF amt' RUSSELL A. NICELY Resident Manager 1236 WASHINGTON AVE MIAMI BEACH BEST SERVICE MODERATE PRICES THERESA S BEAUTY SALON FREE: with this ad, one shampoo with anly paid item. SPECIAL: $2 off on any PERMANENT WAVE—Hours Daily 9:00 to 6:00 P. M. —Open till 9 P. M. Tuesdays-Fridays Halcyon Arcade, 145 East Flagler Street, 2nd Floor, Room 252 Phone 2-9819 LARISON FRUIT SHOP PANCOAST HOTEL FANCY GIFT BOXES—INDIAN RIVER FRUIT Flowers for any occasion Phone 5-1151 Miami Beach EDWARD'S LUBRICATING CO. PHONE 3-1661 1101 N. E. 1st AveMIAMI, FLA Gasoline, Oil, Lubrication, Wash, Polish, Visit Florida’s Most Beautiful DINING ROOM Arrange to meet your friends here . The food is delicious, and the tariff is always modest. A la carte service at all times. Nightly music and entertainment—no couvert or minimum at any time. 3651 S. W. EIGHTH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA 3 HOUR LAUNDRY LAUNDRY — DRY CLEANING Complete in 3 Hours Phone 2-7738 433 N. E. 1st Avenue MIAMI, FLA. Batteries, Tires and Accessories “QUALITY IN EVERY DETAIL” LA FRANCE CLEANERS PHONES 2-1034—5 1733 MIAMI, FLORIDA Garment Dyeing a Specialty—Also Cleaning of Rugs, Drapes and Upholstered Furniture REUBEN’S RESTAURANT of New York 23rd Street Near Collins Avenue MIAMI BEACH M. & M. Dredging & Construction Co. Engineering Contractors POSTAL BUILDING MIAMI, FLORIDA Dredging—Seawalls—Hydraulic Fills—Bridges QUALITY DRY CLEANING AND LAUNDRY SERVICE AT LOWEST PRICES FRENCH BENZOL CLEANERS AND LAUNDRY Laundry Plant: 99 S. W. 7th St. — Dry Cleaning Plant: 1420 S. W. 8th St. 25 Branch Stores for Your Convenience Phone 2-5901 for Your Nearest Store HOLLEMAN’S RESTAURANT Patrons of HOLLEMAN’S RESTAURANT on Miami Beach will be pleased to greet again the jovial proprietors, Mr. and Mrs. Holleman, whose popular rendezvous remains popular always. The place itself is attractive and intimate ... a big feature is the attractive patio where guests may lunch or dine enjoying the ocean breezes ... it is justly famous for the menu offers a variety of quality food at moderate prices. BATHERS WELCOME HOLLEMAN’S RESTAURANT WASHINGTON AT 14th MIAMI BEACH MR. FOSTER S STORE (Air Conditioned) OFFICE SUPPLIES STATIONERY OFFICE FURNITURE ENGRAVING GREETING CARDS 33 N. E. 1st Avenue Miami Dial 3-7694 Always a Good Show at— THE TOWERS 1508 S. W. 8th Street Miami, Fla.

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 53 HOWARD JOHNSON’S RESTAURANTS and ICE CREAM SHOPPES • 1100 Biscayne Boulevard 1631 West Flagler Street Dedicated to Cordial Located in the Center Hospitality of all Activities THE FRIENDLY CAVALIER HOTEL SUPERBLY LOCATED ON THE OCEAN FRONT On the Ocean Between 13th and 14th Sts. All Rooms with Bath, New, Ultra Modern, Shower and Phone Individual Solariums Portaits of Distinction Oil Paintings — Color Portraits “Catering to a Fastidious Clientele” Columbus Hotel—320 N. E. First St. Mutwosi Studio Phones 3-4613—3-4614 Miami, Florida Phone 2-4613 HAIR STYLING By fir g m rnfi p Srautg For Smart Appearance e Experts in Styling For Discriminating Ladies M. HEYSER 68 N. E. 2nd STREET CROMER WHOLESALE CORP. Hotel and Apartment House Furnishings 12-14 N. E. THIRD STREET PHONE 2-5559 MIAMI, FLORIDA INFANTS AND CHILDREN’S APPAREL BLANCHE CORSET SHOP EXPERT CORSETIER Corsets.Lingerie 28 N. MIAMI AVENUE MIAMI, FLORIDA MIAMI BEACH HOTEL ASSOCIATION By ALFRED STONE, Past President. The Miami Beach Hotel Assocation, organized at a meeting held at the Hotel Alamo, Miami Beach, on November 10, 1936, with an attendance of some fifty Miami Beach Hotel owners, has since grown into a powerful governing body of closely-knit hotel managers and directors. Under the guiding hand of community and civic leaders associ ated with the hotel business, the organization has become a driving wedge, safeguardiing every principle on which this $100,000,000 bus iness has been founded. The first president, J. S. Saeger, and his original seven directors, N. Bernkoph, John Duff, Irving Evans, A1 Jacobs, Harry Sirkin, Alfred Stone, and Bruno Weil, have been materially added to and strengthened from time to time. It is in teresting to note that, of the eight original directors, six are still holding office. One of the many forms of legislation, conceived and executed by the association, was the fight originated against the payment of “Turkey money” to taxicab drivers. This form of maliciaus diverting of guests from hotels of their own choice had become a major prob lem and in November 1937 an ordinance was passed in Miami and Miami Beach prohibiting the soliciting and diverting by taxicab driv ers of guests from their chosen hotel. In this connection, the Miami Beach Hotel Association has been able to secure the co-operation of the Florida State Hotel Association in submitting a bill destined to eliminate distribution of circulars on highways. Other worthy bills, submitted by the Hotel Association, include the “Blue Sky” law which combats the unauthorized solicitation of funds for various questionable projects. Plans are now under way for the construction of a convention hall and the plans have been presented to the Miami Beach City Council through William T. Law, its capable and energetic secretary. The Miami Beach Hotel Association, representing, as it does, the largest business in Greater Miami, is now prepared to welcome the greatest influx of visitors in the history of this world’s resort. The roster of present officers and directors includes, in addition to the active secretary, Wm. T. Law, Fred Rossner, Pres., John Duff, Harry Sirkin, Edwin Mead, V-presidents, Norman Pancoast, Chairman of the Board, Directors Jack Beber, Abraham Halperin, Stuart Moore, Archie Greenberg, E. L. O’Leary, Irving Evans, Mrs. Jennie Grossinger, J. Sugarman, Saul Resnick, and Neal Kars; Alfred Stone is Treasurer and Arthur Adler is honorary secretary. Garner’s Luncheonette & Sundry Shop HOME COOKING Special Club Breakfast—Luncheon—and Full Course Dinner Reasonably Priced 1443 COLLINS AVENUE PHONE 5-9325 Alyce Mayne importer 629 Lincoln Road Miami Beach Distinctive Jewelry Had Baws Hosiery Accessories Agency for JledeSie'i of Paris, Inc. Fifth Avenue New York HOFFMAN’S CAFETERIA Mr. Samuel Ritter and Mr Julius Hader operated the largest cafe in Brooklyn, N. Y., for seventeen years. They also had ballrooms for catering and service restaurant. They sold the cafe and property for $350,000 along with their homes. Then they and their families settled here. While they were looking for a hotel to buy, which was their intention upon coming here, they decided what this town needed was a good restaurant, and thus the opening of— HOFFMAN’S CAFETERIA

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54 THE FLORIDA TEACHER The Contribution of the Dade County Federation of Women’s Clubs to the Civic and Cultural Life of Dade County By Mrs. Sidney L. Weintraub, President Claire Weintraub The Dade County Federation of Women's Clubs has always been an integral part of the life of our communities, of our state and nation. Its membership includes, to date, fifty-six women’s organizations. The object of the Dade County Federation of Women’s Clubs is to bring into closer cooper ation the various women’s clubs of Dade County, to the end that they may become mutually helpful and through united effort become a factor in all humanitarian, educational, social and civic work. The Dade County Federation is non-political and non-sectatrian. The most outstanding project in the County Federation is its scholarship work. There are two scholarship funds, the general revolving fund and the Memorial Fund. The Memorial scholarship is awarded to a student of high est attainment in honor of the memory of a past president of the Dade County Federation, Vera M. Simmons. Seventeen scholarships have been awarded this year. Young men as well as young women are eligible for these scholarships which are made possible through the excellent contribu tions of the individual clubs in the County Federation and through the funds raised by the “Annual Fiesta of Stars” held in the Royal Palm Club. Through the courtesy of Mr. Arthur Childers the Royal Palm Club contributes its complete show for the afternoon’s entertainment. The entire proceeds are used for scholarships. The Health program of the Dade County Federation is extensive. This or ganization was instrumental in establishing a county health unit. Resolutions were adopted providing for petitioning the City of Miami to add two white and two colored nurses to the City Health Department and petitioning the city and county commissions to cooperate in establishing a tuberculosis sanitorium. A resolution was also adopted to promote a uniform health card for -domestics and provide a place where these health cards may be obtained. A telephone brigade will be appointed to contact every housewife by tele phone urging her cooperation in seeing that her servant has a health card. Resolutions were also adopted endorsing the principles of the pre-natal and pre marital laws and the law requiring the use of silver nitrate in newborn in fants’ eyes. The library department of the County Federation this last year has con tributed fifty works to the library of the University of Miami. The Dade County Federation of Women’s Clubs has always taken an active part in the welfare of the colored race and of the Indians of our -county. A special Inter-racial Committee has been appointed and problems pertaining to the negro have been discussed and active work done in the -colored communities. As to the welfare of the Indians, effort has been made to know the Indian better, to become better acquainted with the conditions and problems of the Seminole. The scope of the work of the Dade County Federation of Women’s Clubs is wide and varied. The members of the Dade County Federation are united in effort and purpose and because they are united, they constitute a tremendous civic force. The urgency of living and working for our great nation, our state and our community inspires us onward on our march of achievement. Greetings Our Friends of the Dade County and Miami Schools %  ^MACHINE-LESS WAVES HERBEx'mETHOD • REALISTIC PERMANENTS HAIR AND SCALP FOR • RAIN WATER ECLUSIVELY „ BOTH WOMEN AND MEN LOUEY VENN — of LONDON — FACIALS —Expert Hair Stylist— 20 N. E. 3rd AVENUE PHONE 2-5796 Thermique Permanent Complete Beauty Service Waving Our Specialty Phone 7-3223 ROGKMOOR BEAUTY SALON 5857 N. E. Second Avenue, Miami, Fla. I. F. RUSSELL. Owner Clarice Enders Margaret Sensiba Culturist Beautician Optometrists — Opticians Scientific Examinations of the Eyes Accurate Lenses — Stylish Mountings Any Lens Duplicated — Expert Adjustments 103 N. E. 1st Avenue Phone 3-3434 McArthur JERSEY FARM DAIRY, Inc. Producer and Distributor of PURE JERSEY MILK 169 Northeast 62nd Street Phone 7-1017 Miami, Florida PRINTING — ENGRAVING — MULTIGRAPHING MIMEOGRAPHING — LETTER SERVICE RHODES PRESS formerly MIAMI OFFICE SERVICE EDW. H. RHODES, Mgr. Telephone 2-7164 155 North East Second Street Miami, Florida

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 55 FISH AND THE FLEET THAT GETS ’EM By JANE EGBERT Each year the number of angler enthusiasts in Florida increases. Old and young, rich and poor, alike, answer the lure to display their Waltonian skill. Miami Beach has become the mecca for game fisher men. It is ideally located near that “fisherman’s paradise” the Gulf Stream. That great ocean river flows from the Florida Straits to within 3 miles of the Miami Beach shore. “HAZEL MACK” A MODERN CHARTER BOAT Over 600 varieties of the finny tribe are found in Gulf Stream waters. This great attraction sends fishing fleets sailing out of Government cut each day bound for marine game. There are several groups of fishing craft in Miami p e ach waters. But at the east end of the County causeway is docked one of the finest fleets in the world. Modern craft, many equipped with ship-to-shore radio telephones, can be chartered with excellent guides—captains who are experienced and noted for their skill in luring “the big ones.” The most sought after salt water game fish are mar lin, sailfish, blue marlin, tuna, kingfish, barracuda, and species of the shark family as well as the smaller dolphin and wahoo. Iji SIGHTSEEING “LAKE PANCOAST” Many record catches have been weighed in by these Miami Beach captains. Each year many classes in the Met ropolitan Miami Fishing Tournament are won by fisherm en who have been guided by members of this nationally famous group of skippers. “NEW RIVER” Nikko_ Roney Plaza Yacht Basin Captain George Stevns_“New River” C. of C. Dock Captain O. H. Curtis_“Bay Queen” Gulf Dock Captain Earl Crosby.—.__“Lake Pancoast” Roney Plaza Yacht Basin “BEACHCOMBER” A TYPICAL GULF STREAM FISHING CRAFT CAPTAINS: Who know where to catch the big ones. CHAMEBER OF COMMERCE DOCK Dockmaster, Captain Herbert Carey. Captain Ray Savary-Panacea Captain W. W. Howd-Dawn Captain O. L. Schubert_Serenade Captain Art Wills_Sea Queen Captain C. H. Mack_Hazel Mack Captain Harold (Crunch) Schmidt, Neptune Captain George Fizell_Beachcomber Captain Larry Bagby-Three Rings Captain Lloyd McNeil_Miamian GULF DOCK Docmaster, Captain O. H. Curtis. Captain O. H. Curtis_Bay Queen Captain Hinson_Speed Boat Captain Jim AlbrightJambar Curtis Enterprizes-Sea King ALrCEC C. SCHMIDT CREATOR OF Artistic Lifelike Taxidermy Individual Mountings Portraying Life and Action SCHMIDT TAXIDERMY STUDIO 533 WEST AVE. Phone 5-6378 MIAMI BEACH

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56 THE FLORIDA TEACHER The Value of the Church to the Community By JAMES V. JOHNSON, Westminster Presbyterian Church How many people stop to consider the value of the Church to the Community? For the Church is not an obtrusive feature of our Civic Life. It goes quietly about its business; there is no blare and garish ness about it or its program. It does not bedazzle the eye at night with colored Neon Signs, nor does it scream at you when you pass. In Miami its buildings are for the most part of modest architec ture, and its leadership is men and women of modesty, sincerity and earnestness. As we consider the place of the Church in the Com munity, two questions at once assail us: First. What is the program of the Church, and Second—Suppose there were no churches in Miami at all? DODGE PLYMOUTH PHONE 4-7641 TUTAN MOTORS Sales and Service 216 MINORCA AYE CORAL GABLES First then, What is the program of the Church? If the Bible is true, men and women stand vastly in need of knowing God, and about God, and getting in step with His plans for His world. The Bible is true, therefore this necessity exists. The Church will introduce you to God; it will tell you about God, and of His plans for the redemption of men and women who have broken His commandments, and who live lives of sinfulness. The Church will teach you how to live in peace with your fellow men; it encourages honesty and industry in social, business and domestic relationships. It will show you how to live and how to die, how to overcome sin, and how to face temptation without falling a victim to it. It makes better and law-abiding citizens of those of us who attend it, and it prepares a man to meet his God. Second: Suppose the Churches were bodily lifted out of Miami, and taken completely away? The Churches are the greatest force we know for righteousness in the land. We do not look to our secular Boards and Commissions to lead us in moral things. Some think they are not qualified so to do anyway: the Church alone offers that leadership. Were it withdrawn, there would be no moral leadership in the community. The Churches are an ally of the Police, in that they are a verile restraint upon lawlessness and crime. Take the Church away, and there would be no organized force working for the inclucation of law abiding principles in the city. The schools are handicapped in teaching morality. Morality is a by-product of our school system, whereas it is the prime function of the Church to teach it. Without the Church, the morals of the community would be at a low ebb, ineed. The Witters Construction Co. MIAMI BEACH MIAMI Washington Avenue 1745 S. W. 6th Street Phone 5-7469 Phone 2-1755 MISS TODD’S SCHOOL Distinctive for its High Scholastic Standards, Cultural Home Environment, and Careful Health Superviison . . Where the high scholastic standards and careful supervision of health and moral habits have attracted children from France — Switzerland — Cuba—anama —as we l as from all parts of the U. S. 47 Alhambra Circle GORAL GABLES Phone 4-0718 PHONE 2-5843 DELIVERY SERVICE MODERN CLEANERS, INC. Dry Cleaning and Laundry BRANCHES: MAIN OFFICE 7811 BISCAYNE BLVD. 47 Alhambra Circle CORAL GABLES Phone 4-0718 EAT.. TOM’S TOASTED PEANUTS Clark R. Parker, Dist. 1214 S. W. 2nd Street Phone 2-5497 If It’S M)u£ane$'i MASTER, FOOD STORES — It’s Delicious i Western and New York Guts of Beef Domestic and Imported Groceries 411 41st Street . Miami Beach . 325 71st Street MANDELL AND CO. RUGS AND CARPETS WHOLESALE — RETAIL MADE TO ORDER Domestics COMPLETE SELECTION OF PATTERNS AND PLAIN COLORS 1626 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE MIAMI BEACH RESORT FASHIONS ... ext Door to Beach Theatre Telephone 5-0871 434 Lincoln Road Miami Beach SALES SERVICE RENTALS SUPPLIES CHAS. S. MYERS TYPEWRITERS Exclusive Representative ROYAL STANDARD Typewriters 120 N. E. FIRST ST. C. S. MEYERS, Mgr. Phone 3-3159 DIAL 5-7189 Qladtifl feytieieA. Shop* SLACKS—PLAY SUITS 612 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 57 Morris Brothers Department Store February 1, 1941 was the fifth birthday of Morris Brothers. Those who have followed its growth will recall kaleidoscopic changes —a modern five and ten cent store grow into a beautiful drug and mer chandising store and finally evolve into a modern streamlined com plete department store, carrying the last word in style to supply the demands of this great vacation land. Morris Brothers has been operating successfully from its inception, because it kept pace with the rapid growth of Miami Beach and with the exacting demands of the Miami Beach public. It has operated on the principle that it must not only serve the public with its needs but must also be an integral part of the life and growth of the community and share in its social and welfare problems. It is an all year round institution, right in the heart of Miami Beach, near the City Hall and Main Post Office. To make this institution and shopping center complete, its owners have themselves developed the neighboring property. On the same block, they built one of the most beautiful theatres in the South, the Cinema Casino, which exhibits the latest and finest pictures. Also on this block is the famous STRAND PRIME RIB restaurant. One of the most progressive shoe chains in the South, Butler Shoes, have just completed their salon in this mid-town shopping center. On this same block is a smart dress shop, a millinery shop and men’s shoe store. There are plans for completeing this block this coming year with one of the finest chain stores in the country. With this development, Morris Brothers, the largest department store on Miami Beach, will be part of the most complete shopping center of this city where every possible need of the shopper can be satisfied. Morris Brothers looks ahead with faith in this wonderful city, resolved to serve and grow with it. La Favorite Barber Shop Mr. Karl Dodtenhoff, one of the two genial owners of La Favorite Barber Shop on Alton Road near Lincoln, has indeed seen the miracu lous growth of Miami Beach. Having been a resident of Miami for 27 years Mr. Dodtenhoff can remember “way back” when there were very few houses in Miami Beach, and when even Lincoln Road was yet but Carl Fisher s dream. Twelve years ago Mr. Dodtenhoff started in business in Miami Beach with Mr. Harry Eckhardt, a graduate barber, with several diplomas to his credit. With their latest type of hair growing ma chines and real scientific barber serve their shop “La Favorite” as it is known, became a real rendezvous for Beach peronalities. Carl Fisher, Uncle Ed Thomas, Mr. Winton and George Ade have all been the clients, and likewise the friends of Karl and Harry. TURZEL’S DTDOW might well be added to the name of Turzel, for these two young partners have designed several gowns for the Duchess of Windsor. It is interesting to note how Miss Turley and Mrs. Butler work. First an intensive study is made of the clients’ personality, her measurements are carefully taken and, in most instances, several photographs are made. With this knowledge, they are able to elim inate these tiresome fittings. These partners work as one, in complete harmony and that, perhaps, is the secret of their harmonious designs. Miss Turley, a graduate of the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts, where she showed exceptional ability, came here from Chicago. Mrs. Butler from Atlanta and Bostwick, Georgia. Mrs. Butler has done various Fashion Academy work, has been head designer in one of the leading French Shops and also has had her own Salon in Georgia. Forseeing the difficulty that the war would cause in the im portation of materials from abroad, these partners laid in a beautiful stock of English tweeds and woolens—French crepes and rare laces, so that, in this shop, you will have no difficulty in finding just the fabric you desire. Turzels, by the way, is the only completely custom made gown shop in Greater Miami. All the models are created for the particular individual. It is a place where the combination of color—style--and wearability of fine fabrics is a true Art—conscientiously practiced These two energetic creators predict that Miami will shortly be recognized as the advance style center of the world, and we, in turn, predict that Turzels will take the foremost place in the creating of these styles. Monroe Towers Dining Room Dine in Luxurious Surroundings Unexcelled Cuisine DINNERS FROM $1 UP COLLINS AVENUE at 30th STREET DIAL 5-7351 FOR RESERVATIONS COOK’S FIFTH STREET and OCEAN DRIVE MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA Bathing — Sun Baths — Private Beach — Restaurant BATHING SUITS AND ACCESSORIES SHOP Rubber Caps and Toys — Sports Wear — Beach Chairs and Umbrellas JANTZEN HEADQUARTERS Traditional SUPERIORITY The Pancoast combined all the fac tors—private beach, cabanas, veran dahs, gardens, tennis courts—a tra ditional superiority of cuisine and service — a congenial clientele — everything to make it the one entire ly correct place for YOUR Miami Beach vacation. WRITE for new pictorial booklet, giving full details. ^PANCOAJT Arthur Pancoast President Norman Pancoast Manager American Plan in Winter •kNew illustrated booklet with scenes of the Pancoast and Miami Beach will be sent on request.

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58 THE FLORIDA TEACHER The Hollywood-British School of the Theatre The Hollywood-British School of the Theatre is the first and only school of its kind in the United States. It was founded by Lady Louis Mountbatten, the Duchess of Hamilton, and Carmen Balfour, which name disguises the identiy of Margaret Gibbons MacGill, who is the wife of the famous Irish poet, novelist and dramatist, who was also at one time in the Chapter Library, Windsor Castle. In Great Britain, France, Spain, Russia, India, and even in far-off Iceland the name of Patrick MacGill is revered as one of the greatest sociological novelists of all time. His name is included in the list compiled by Webster’s Dictionary of the 3,000 greatest living men. Mrs. MacGill is also herself a novelist with seventeen novels to her credit. They are of the popular variety and include such titles as “Hollywood Madness”, “Painted Butterflies”, “The Ukekele Girl,” “Hid den Fires”, etc. All have been made into motion pictures. The MacGills have have been made into motion pictures. The MacGills have three children of whom two are twin girls. The Hollywood-British School of the Theatre was founded for the benefit of the many young screen aspirants from England who come all the year round seeking work in the motion picture industry. They are always unaware of the many pitfalls that lie in wait for the stranger to Hollywood who is also a for eigner, and invariably are made the prey of the many unscruplous “sharks” and bogus schools that abound in th film capital. Eventually they are sent home by the Immigration authorities as “undesirable aliens” when they become charge able to the publicIt was when she was in the office of the British Consul in Los Angeles that Mrs. MacGill conceived the idea of opening a school where the young aspirants could not only be trained for a reasonable, fixed sum, but where an effort would be made to interest those whose work consists of scouting for and booking talent. Mrs. MacGill was well qualified for such an undertaking. Her education had included the full Course of the famous Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London from which she graduated with honours that enabled her to become a dramatic reciter and lecturer all over the world. In Roumania she was the favorite reader of the late Queen Marie, in Sweden the Crown Prince bought out a whole lecture tour so that his children could be taught to speak English in exactly the same way as Mrs. MacGill speaks it. The Holly wood-British School of the Theatre, which was opened on June 1st, 1937, has made an overwhelming success. Naturally, a British school, run by an English novelist, with such an object and such famous sponsors, could not fail to attract a great deal of attention in Hollywood, especially when the intention was declared to teach diction by means of the Bible. However, after the first show, major companies like Warner Bros, and Twentieth Century Fox were asking to be kept informed of their activities that they might be sure to have the performances covered. Some outstanding students have been Victor Maurice, who went straight from the School theatre to the stage of the Los Angeles Biltmore, where he played the lead in “Sejanus”, and adaptation of a Ben Jonson play. Return ing thence to London, he writes later to say that as a result of his American stage success, he has not been out of work for a single week in a year. Clyde Willson, the child actor who has played with Mickey Rooney, Carole Lombard, and many other famous stars, and who has been in eight pictures this year, is proof that school specializes in developing clever children. Within three years, the school has moved from the downtown theatre, which housed its early efforts, to a beautifully appointed theatre of its own, in the best part of exclusive Bever y Boulevard As well as the finest training ground for an approach to stage, motion pictures or radio, the school is regarded as akin to a select finishing school for those whose future activities will require beauty of speech, poise, and absolute control. Perhaps the greatest compliment that the school has yet received has come from Mr. George A. Hirliman, who, as a motion picture producer in Florida wishing to develop local talent for his pictures, has engaged the school to open a branch on his studio lot, so that, as the talent, by reason of training, becomes available for use, it may be called to his attention. “I am only too glad to add my name to the list of sponsors of the Holly wood-British School, and it is my sincere hope that you may be able to develop me some talent which will eventually attain stardom” were the words which accompanied Mr. Hirliman’s ready consent to act as one of the school’s sponsors. This unique school is now located at 137 Coral Way, in Coral Gables, Fla.— The Colonnade Building. DR. EDWARD CLARKE Dr. Edward Clarke began his talks for musicians at the American Conservatory in Chicago where he was a member of the vocal faculty. These popular lectures attracted so much attention that he was in demand for various schools, colleges and clubs and finally was engaged by the University of Chicago Extension division to give a series on various courses in the city of Chicago. These continued for several years until extended concert tours took him abroad to foreign lands. Several years ago Dr. Clarke settled in Miami and joined the fac ulty of the music school of the University of Miami. Again he began his talks for the musicians and now his course at the Miami Woman’s Club is in its fifth year and each season draws more and more music lovers. His success as a popular lecturer is due to the fact that he tries to remember that most of his audience are not trained musicians but just people of ordinary experience. He tries to awaken an interest in his subject without going too deeply into the science of music. He makes the lives of the composers real and human—and the music something that has interest for everyone—something vital and real, not something obtainable by those of special training alone. A HAROLD R. DAVIS Harold R. Davis, head of the Davis-Merrill Publishing Co., and President of Harold R. Davis and Associates, Realtors, Inc., is president of the Miami Beach Board of Realtors, having recently been elected to serve a second term, an unusual proceeding as the board usually elects a president for one year only. Mr. Davis, came to Miami Beach from Tennessee several years ago, and has been active in the real estate business. His firm publishes the Florida and West Indies Year Book of Hotels, a publication whose illustrations have won wide acclaim. During the first World War, Mr. Davis was an aviator in the forces of the United States, having been commissioned a lieu tenant. DATES TO BE REMEMBERED February 13-15, 1941—American Camping Association to meet in Washington, D. C. Write to Ross L. Allen, 330 South State St., Ann Arbor, Michigan. February 22-27, 1941—American Association of School Administrators to meet in Atlantic City. February 27-March 1, 1941—Meeting of the American Association of Junior Colleges, to be held in Chicago. Write to 730 Jackson Place, Washington, D. C. April 30-May 3, 1941—NEA Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation to meet in Atlantic City. Write to the Department at 1201 Sixteenth Street, Northwest, Washington, D. C. June 29-July 3, 1941—National Education Association to meet in Boston. July 8-12, 1941—Meeting of the Association for Childhood Education in Oakland, California. Address the ACE at 1201 Sixteenth Street Northwest, Washington, D. C. BIGGER AND BETTER THAN EVER! “The Original” FAN AND BILL’S FAMOUS PLANK STEAK HOUSE — Something New — Now Serving BREAKFAST LUNCHEON DINNER SUPPER Collins Ave. at 21st St. — Miami Beach FREDERICK’S MARKET GROCERIES — MEATS — VEGETABLES Serving the Fast-growing Northwest Section 680 N. W. 62nd Street Phone 7-2377 TH E ELY AGENCY ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE Fire General Liability Windstorm Plate Glass Automobile Bonds of All Kinds Burglary Workmen’s Compensation Accident and Health 15% to 33% Savings for Home Owners on F. H. A. Hazard Insurance 127 Giralda Avenue Phone 4-6915 Coral Gables, Florida RING, MAHONEY and ARNER | (ACCOUNTANTS) j duPont Bldg. Phone 3-5523 j -s) MARFLEET LEATHER GOODS CO. 47 W. Flagler St. MIAMI, FLORIDA Phone 3-4981 Nationally Advertised Brands LUGGAGE LEATHER GOODS for every Fitted Cases Wallets mode of TRAVEL Wardrobe Trunks Luggage for Air or Motor Travel

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 59 He was a bad stammerer and in her effort to help him, Mrs. Harned, a graduate of Emerson College, began studying at Columbia. Then followed Germany, Denmark, London, back to America and to Syracuse University, and then to New York for study in psychology and psychiatry. She also has worked in the speech clinic of the Massachusetts General Hospital with Samuel D. Robbins, the founder of the American Speech Correction Association. Ever on the alert for new and interesting discoveries in her field of work, Mrs. Harned should go far in her profession down here. She pays Miami’s climate a high tribute—“nearly as perfect as the Riviera”, and thinks it ideal for the European type of school. MANNHEIMER PRIVATE OUTDOOR SCHOOL Beautiful and extensive facilities for outdoor and indoor instruc tion . Kindergarten through high school grades. Experienced teachers . small classes . individual attention. 1054 Pennsylvania Avenue_Phone 5-1312_Miami Beach, Fla. Florida Transportation Go., Inc. FIFTH STREET at BISCAYNE BOULEVARD Sightseeing MIAMI, FLORIDA Phone 2-5372 And Charter Buses (At the Aquarium) ESTHER HARNED One of the most interesting and instructive mornings 1 have had in a long while, was when I interviewed Mrs. Esther Harned, a fairly newcomer to our midst, in her home in Coral Gables. Mrs. Harned does speech correction work and told me of the work being done in other countries. In Germany, the correction of speech has been a science for 60 years, in Denmark for 42, in Italy about 30, and in the United States—only since 1919. Stammering, Mrs. Harned says, is caused by environment; is as serious as being crippled, and should be treated as such. The emotions and the mentality are both involved, causing inferiority complexes, and—in the case of adolescent boys— often will lead to suicide. To treat it properly, children should be removed from their homes and schools, and placed in a special school where their speech defects can be concentrated on. In Denmark, for instance, the Government corrects every speech defect, and has two schools—one in Copenhagen and one in Aarhus. Dr. Svend Smith, in the Copenhagen school, has evolved his own method which he claims brings 100 percent results in two months time. He takes adolescent boys from thirteen to twenty years of age in groups of ten. For the first two weeks a boy is not allowed to speak; the second two weeks he works on breathing and exercises; at the end of the month he is allowed to read aloud, and Dr. Smith claims he never falters. He keeps the children in his school for two months and being a psychologist (as are all good speech correction teachers) he shows them the cause behind the stammering and teaches the normal reactions to the things which had previously annoyed them. He adjusts them mentally as well as physically. Mrs. Harned spent several weeks in the state schools studying the technique and methods carefully and watching the amazing progress of the children. Those who have “graduated” keep in constant communication with the factors and none have “gone back”. In Germany during the last war, Dr. Calzia, working under the government, corrected the speech defects of the soldiers, using a method so advanced (that of applying electric current) that we here today don’t even know its details. Dr. Calzia found that war caused the soldiers’ stammering, and that even after correction and when the men were home on furlough, the arrival of the pink slip ordering them back to active service, would cause a relapse. However, in the schools and private classes, stammering can be brought to a state of permanent latency. The patient can be taught how to help himself, so that, should he be under any severe emotional strain which causes a tendency to a relapse, he can bring himself back to normalcy. In Italy, at Milan, the Municipal School had over S00 children for speech correction. In England, there are many schools for training, best known perhaps, being the Training School for Teachers at the West End Hospital. At the Institute held there, Mrs. Harned and a teacher from New York were the only Americans. Twenty-seven different countries were represented and all got along as one happy family. In New York, Columbia University and the New School of Social Research have lately acquired many of the famous German Professors—refugees now. In Hamburg, Germany, the head of the Phonetical Department (who is Italian) bemoans the fact that so many of his colleagues have gone, leaving him only his own trained students for helpers. We Americans, have gained the services of many of these great men, and can look forward to a steady advancement along the lines of speech correction. I asked Mrs. Harned what started her in this work. It was her youngest child (she has four children—one in the University, two in High School, and one in Elementary-—all of whom have accompanied her on her journeys abroad) EVERGLADES EXCURSION Combination River and Bay Trip to Musa Isle Indian Village "YACHT SEMINOLE QUEEN” (Under U. S. Steamship Inspection) If your stay is of short duration, this is the only and logical way to study and see this wonderful, gay, and captivating city. You have no conception of the beauty and marvelous scenery until you have made a circuit of the Magic City aboard the "Seminole Queen” via the Miami Rivers, Canals and Inland Waterways. You can gain a comprehensive idea of this great trip only by utilizing the "Seminole Scenic Route,” which will enable you to visualize clearly the attractions of Miami and its environments. Three-hour Boat Trip, Departs 2 p.m. Round Trip $1.00 Leaves Pier 6, City Yacht Basin < Rivermont Park Hospital AND SANITARIUM 1389 N. W. 7th Street Miami, Florida Phone 3-7301 A new hospital became a reality in Miami because of Nazi brutality. Dr. Samuel Beer was the victim and fled his beloved Vienna, where he was once chief of staff of one of the largest hospitals, and became a political refugee. Dr. Beer arrived in New York and lost no time in returning to his unfinished task of aiding humanity and his life’s work of using his great store of medical knowledge and famous skill in the pursuance of his practice. He and Dr. I. S. Klieger, a well known physician of New York City, decided to establish a sanatarium for the treatment and cure of chronic ailments. A careful study was made for a site which would meet the requirements as nearly perfect as possible. This section possessed most of the advantages for which they sought and thus Miami became the home of another fine medical institution. Rivermont Park Hospital and Sanatorium took its place among the other health-restoring resorts in this land of longevity The sanatarium was opened in 1941 on the banks of the Miami River at 1389 N. W. 7th Street. Miami. It is only five minutes to the heart of the city and yet, due to its setting in the midst of six acres of flowers, shrubbery, and trees, it is far enough from noise and disturbances to make it as restful and quiet as the open country. Here under the skillful care and proper guidance Dr. Beer and his capable assistants many seekers of health will be restored to a normal life in this beautiful hospital and sanatarium in Florida’s incimparable sunshine and climate.

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60 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Edison Courts Miami may well be proud of its new local housing project— Edison Court—and its own local architects, Harold D. Steward and Associates, who designed this project. Under the direction of Harold D. Steward, chief architect, Edison Courts developed into a widely recognized model housing project of modern construction and beauty. Situated on a site slightly under 25 acres, Edison Courts has a total number of 89 buildings, comprising 345 apartments ranging from two and a half to 5 and a half rooms each. The units are one and two story structures and combinations thereof,—and vary in size from two apartments to nine apartments each. The Administration Building was planned for general public use and enjoyment. Beside housing the offices of the Miami Housing Authority, it has an auditorium, nursery, kitchen repair shop, toilets and store room. The most modern features known to hurricane proof construction were incorporated in Mr. Steward’s design of this Edison Court hous ing project. These features include concrete block stucco walls, gyp sum roof on steel trusses, tile roofs, steel casement windows and metal pipe porch posts. For permanent interiors floors are of suspended con crete slab design, covered by asphalt tile,—with concrete block interior partitions, gypsum plaster walls with Keene cement plaster in baths and kitchens and gypsum lath on ceilings throughout. Among the fea tures of convenience are solar hot water heaters, electric ranges and refrigerators. Paved streets line the houses with concrete sidewalks at the front and rear. Parking areas are provided for the tenants cars, and play areas provide many happy hours for the children. This group of housing units designed by Mr. Steward standing white and gleaming in the Miami sun, is a credit to the metropolitan area and has evoked the admiration of local residents and visitors alike. “Serving Better Food" THE MAXWELL HOUSE DINING ROOM invites the Teachers to meet their Dade County friends | of the profession for Special Dinners. j "Good to the Last Bite.” Breakfast — Luncheon — Dinner j PHONE 2-5922 2147 S. W. EIGHTH STREET j Your stay in Miami is not complete unless you visit j \ THE MAXWELL HOUSE j New Royal Portable Typewriters—Latest Models R. W. THACKER Agency ROYAL PORTABLE DEALERS Discount to Teachers 123 N. E. 1st St. Miami. Fla. Phone 2-0115 PHONE 7-9368 EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT Helen’s Beauty Shop DISTINCTIVE BEAUTY SERVICE Shampoo, Set, Rinse and Neck Trim all for Twenty-five Cents Permanents $1.95 up 2178 N. W. 54th STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA MIAMI BEACH ABSTRACT AND TITLE COMPANY ABSTRACTS — TITLE INSURANCE Complete Title Service covering Miami Beach Properties MIAMI BEACH FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING The Only Abstract Plant in Miami Beach TELEPHONE 3-4028 DELIVERY SERVICE KATHRYN ERB INVISIBLE WEAVING—FINE MENDING—BURNS—TEARS MOTH HOLES RE-WOVEN LIKE NEW Moderate Prices 718 CONGRESS BUILDING MIAMI, FLORIDA BETTER LUBRICATION WRECKER SERVICE BEST BRAKE SERVICE P&A 24 HR. GARAGE 22 Years of Satisfactory Service Miami’s Only Complete COMPLETE Garage Service, Wrecker Service anywhere—anytime EVERY REPAIR FOR EVERY CAR Wheel Alignment Specialists STORAGE 53 N. E. 8th St. — MIAMI — 3-5568 NATURAL HEALTH FOOD STORE 119 SOUTH MIAMI AVENUE MIAMI, FLORIDA Free Health Lectures Every Wednesday—8:00 P. M. PHONE 3-7249 MAE OWENS BRIDGE Lectures — Lessons — Supervised Play Conducted by Mervin Ray 127 N. E. First Avenue Telephone 2-7545 I. D. PADORR PHONE 3-5822 hi-tone PHOTO SERVICE COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS HI-TONE PHOTO PRINTS Guaranteed Photo Finishing 704-6 N. E. SECOND AVENUE MIAMI, FLORIDA For Sightseeing . Shopping ... To and From the Races You Can Always Depend On STANLEY DE LUXE TAXI and SIGHTSEEING TOURS Office: 14th & Collins Phone 5-6266 "Florida's Most Colorful Tours” MIAMI BEACH, FLA. Office: 12th & Collins Phone 5-6113 A FOUR-HOUR TRIP . TWICE DAILY ... 10 A. M. and 2 P. M. METROPOLITAN cleaners and dyers 1085 N. W. 62nd STREET PHONE 7-1654 DIAMOND JEWELRY Nationally Advertised WATCHES Easy Weekly Payments No Carrying Charge Every Purchaser a Satisfied Customer! DIAMOND JEWELRY CO. 20 WEST FLAGLER STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 61 Coburn Country Day School Established in 1926, the Coburn Country Day School is located right on Biscayne Bay, with an inspiring view of Miami, Allison Island, Indian Creek and the great Atlantic. Here the children have their own fleet of small and safe sailcraft and the School maintains membership in the International Snips Assoociation as well as the National Association (Junior Division), for their pleasure. Horeback riding, baseball, football, archery and dramatics are but a few of the other student activities. School starts at 8:20 and ends at 12:45, with the children returning after lunch for their extra-curriculum work. Classes are kept small in order that each pupil may have as much individual attention as possible—yet the group spirit among the children is strong. A wide variety of subjects is offered, compatible with the better elementary and college preparatory schools throughout the country. Foreign languages, mechanical and architectural drawing, journalism and dress design are among the elective subjects. Through an arrange ment with the School of Music of the University of Miami, private lessons may be taken at the school. Parents coming to Miami for short vacations, may enroll their children for just the duration of their stay and the pupils will be aided in following the assignments from their home schools. In this way, it is not necessary for a child to lose any work while on a vaca tion with his parents. In order to maintain the highest possible standards of education, the school has always associated to itself a faculty of very superior order. Graduates from the leading American Universities are members of their teaching staff. A college preparatory course is offered and many of the students have entered college on certificate and diploma from this school. The main building, of modernistic design, was planned with a view to maximum utility and contains, beside the office, a science lab oratory, auditorium with stage and twelve large, light and airy class rooms. The i oof has been designed for use as outdoor classrooms and special activities. The Coburns have rightly named this school the COUNTRY Day School. With its splendid location, its careful supervision of health, and its excellent faculty, it is an ideal place for your child to receive her or his education. REPAIRS Open' ’Till Midnight C. H. OEHLER MOTORS GASOLINE 234 Minorca Ave. STORAGE CORAL GABLES Personalized Service 4-5450 CORAL GABLES GROCERY 9 2012 Ponce De Leon Boulevard CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA PERFUMES Presenting “SHANGRI-LA” This glamorous perfume is the last one of the light Orientals that came out of France before the war stopped further exportation. Due to severe financial conditions French perfumers sacrificed this particu lar essence which was to sell for $18.50 an ounce. We are fortunate in having a limited quantity which we can retail at $7.50 an ounce, or $1 00 per dram. Hundreds of Other Selections “SWEET TOBACCO BLOSSOM” (NICOTIANA) One of The World’s Finest Floral Bouquets Sometimes called "The Evening Star” A glorified Replica of a Fragrant American Garden Favorite What Memories! Blossoms in an Old-Fashioned Garden at Sundown From $1.00 Up LLOYD W. MOORE PERFUMER COLUMBUS HOTEL ARCADE OPEN EVENINGS MIAMI. FLORIDA Telephone 2-5996 Established 1897 Sutton Ga. Miami’s Oldest Jewelry Store DIAMONDS — WATCHES — SILVERWARE JEWELRY and NOVELTIES Club payment plan — weekly and monthly terms, no carrying charge 132 E. FLAGLER ST. MIAMI, FLORIDA HARVEY R PAYNE HAS CONSCIENTIOUSLY SERVED THE LIFE INSURANCE PUBLIC OF DADE COUNTY FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS DUPONT BUILDING — P. O. DRAWER 1269 MIAMI, FLORIDA DR. F. CORNEJO INVITES YOU TO HIS HEALTH RENDEZVOUS 129 N. E. First Street — Arcade Patio — Miami. Florida This RESTAURANT has several UNIQUE FEATURES: (1) The food is selected and prepared under Scientific Supervision by a food and medi cal specialist. (2) The meus consist of pure, fresh vegetables. VITAL items of human nutrition, in tasty, appetizing form. (3) All the PRICES are ECONOMICAL. (4) It supplies mental food as well as bodily health. HEALTH LECTURES are given Tuesdays and Thursdays—7:30 P. M. Window Gleaning Service H. S. HAHN, Mgr. 1885 Michigan Avenue MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA PHONE 5-5907 JOE’S GROCERY AND MARKET JOE S. GONG, Manager 1201 N. W. 1st Place MIAMI, FLORIDA

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62 THE FLORIDA TEACHER If You Are Interested in Antiques One of the most famous TURNER-WEDGEWOOD collections is right here in Miami! Started by Mr. and Mrs. W. Oakley Raymond (from two old family pieces) this collection, through the years, has grown to over 30. Diligently, this well known Miami couple have searched from California to Massachusetts for these additional pieces. Another collection well worth viewing is the one of EARLY AMERICAN FLASKS. A blue George Washington and two De Witt Cintons—as well as others of rare shapes and patterns—are in this collection of over 50. Just run up to 7766 Biscayne Boulevard (next to the Boulevard V. J. Hoecherl Over a period of time we have heard some funny tales about pioneering in Florida, but one of the most unbelievable ones is of a man who started from Chicago for Miami—but was slightly detoured en route. The year was 1924—and V. J. Hoecherl, Journeyman Painter of Chicago—the man. On November 6th of that year, Mr. Hoecherl arrived in Jacksonville to find himself in the wake of two solid weeks of rain which had inundated the entire state. Determined to reach Miami (his avowed destination) in spite of “high water,” Hoecherl got as far as St. Augustine, but found that floods and washouts made further progress toward Miami impossible. There followed a restive waiting period of two weeks in St. Augustine, but wishful thinking did little to cause the high water to abate. Finally, Mr. Hoecherl decid ed that if he had to cross any water, he’d made the crossing a good one—so while waiting for Florida roads (vintage of 1924) to become passable again, he decided to cross the Atlantic Ocean (which he did), and took a two month’s vacation in Europe. Upon his return to the United States, he again headed for Miami, and even after two months, found that some highways still had six inches of water over them. This time, however, he got to Miami, and—believe it or not, he has been here ever since—the oft repeated story of the “visitor” who gets “sand in his shoes” and stays on, and on, and on . ! In 1925, Mr. Hoecherl started in business for himself in Miami—as a painting and decorating contractor. Contrary to so many business stories of these boom days, Hoecherl did not find immediate dazzling prosperity. His company did, however, use this period to get its roots deep into Florida’s business soil, with the result that its progress has been steady, its volume substantial, and its reputation increasingly enviable. Today—he operates all over Florida. Very affable, extremely courteous, and surprisingly young looking (for one who has accomplished so much), Mr. Hoecherl says that Miami has him so enmeshed that he can’t even resent the fact he’s been too busy to get away from the city on a vacation for over three years. Among his decorting and painting jobs, Mr. Hoecherl mentions the Huntington Building, the Broward County Court House, the Hotel Roosevelt, and quite a few private homes in Palm Beach, including that of Joseph M. Schenck (the movie magnate). Last summer he did considerable work for the Government at the Key West Naval Training Station, and is now working on white and negro housing projects in that city. In the spring of 1925, Mr. Hoecherl married Alma Totten, of Miami. They have one daughter, June Olive. He is a member of the Rod and Reel Club, B. P. O. E., K. of C., Executive Association of Miami, Optimist Club of Miami Shores, and the Junior Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Hoecherl is owner of the V. J. Hoecherl Co., painting and decorating contractors. He is a member of the Painting and Decorating Contractors of America, and is President of the Local Chapter in Dade County In 1938-39, Mr. Hoecherl was also President of the Florida State Association of Painting and Decorating Contractors, and is currently a Director of that Association. Nation’s School Officials Listed in 1941 Educational Directory American education’s annual directory of school officials, colleges and universities, and educational associations is in preparation by the U. S. Office of Education, Federal Security Agency. | HARI0N INCORPORATED j | 1455 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH, FLA. | The 1941 guidebook lists names of more than 15,000 school offi cials, 1,700 colleges and universities of all types, and 1,500 educational associations. WiUtam Pmt HitIpI 722 Washington Ave. Miami Beach Centrally Located OPEN ALL YEAR American and European Plans SOLARIUM — PATIO — ELEVATORS • W. Harmt’a Heataurant Dining Room of WILLIAM PENN HOTEL A Pioneer of Sixteen Years in Miami Beach with an Enviable Record as a Purveyor of High Quality Foods. ... The Finest of Coffee . “Where Quality Reigns Higher Than Price” 722 Washington Ave. The Heart of Miami Beach Your Fuel Oil requirements ir this area will be handled to your entire satisfaction by a company that has been in bus iness since the yea r 1915. e BELCHER OIL COMPANY MIAMI — MIAMI BEACH — FORT LAUDERDALE

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 63 STANLEY TOURS The Stanley De Luxe Tours are the joint efforts of Mr. Stanley Yasner, familiarly known as “Mr. Stanley”, and Mr. Bernard Chauncey, known as “Ben”. Mr. Yasner is a native of Brooklyn, and, at one time, studied at the Brook lyn Law School, but left his career when he became a pilot and aerial photo grapher in the U. S. Air Corps. He left the service and came to Miami Beach in 1332, and worked for Mr. Chauncey, who was conducting sightseeing tours and taxi service. Mr. Chauncey had been a student at Harvard University and returned later to receive his degree in medicine. He decided not to practice and was engaged in the brokerage business on State street, Boston’s financial center. In 1926 Mr. Chauncey came to Miami Beach and engaged in the tour business and these two ambitious men were friendly competitors until 1940 when they decided to become partners and expand their service. Now their equipment includes one of the largest and latest model sightseeing bus, ten seven-passenger cars, and eight cabs. Every driver is carefully selected for ability and courtesy and is expertly trained in order to insure the highest type of service for their patrons. The Tours include every point of interest in the Greater Miami section, requiring four hours, and providing delightful entertainment. The Tours are run twice daily and leave from two convenient offices on the Beach. ALL STATES CARD CLUB, INC. The All States Card Club, Inc., was organized in 1924 to promote friendli ness not only among visitors but also among permanent residents. During its sixteen years it has continuously contributed to all worthy chari ties as well as contributing to those of the Dade County Federation of Women’s Clubs. It maintains its own scholarship fund and has financed a talented blind musician through four years at Gainesville and two years at the Boston Conserva tory of Music. Hundreds of baskets of food are supplied annually to Miami’s needy families. In the hurricane years the club officers distributed truck loads of staple supplies directly to victims in counties north of Miami. Hospitalization and operations have also been arranged for patients who were unable to pay. Weekly meetings are on Mondays at 2 p. m. at the Civic Center, where members and friends may enjoy an afternoon of card playing, or just visiting. The monthly bridge luncheons have attracted as many as 387 guests at one time. Meetings and memberships are open to both visitors and residents, and every state in the Union and a number of foreign countries are repreesented in the membership of the Club. This year’s President is Mrs. Nellie Gramenstetter, 131 N. W. 31st Street. The Contact Chairman, Mrs. H. J. Lehfeldt, 2341 S. W. 16th Terrace, telephone 4-1048. DEDICATION OF BARRY COLLEGE An invitation which this publication just received is of momentous interest to many of our subscribers and thousands of Catholics throughout the state. The Board of Trustees and the faculty of Barry College, Miami, cordially invite us to attend the dedication of this fine institution by His Excellency, The Most Reverend Amleto Giovanni Cicognani, D.D.J.U.D., who is the Apostolic Delegate to the United States. The dedication services are to be held in Cor Jesu Chapel on Tuesday morning, February 4, 1941. An academic program will follow in t-he afternoon of the same day at the conclusion of which the Pontifical Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament will be rendered by The Most Reverend Joseph P. Hurley, D.D., who is Bishop of St. Augustine. Talk of the Town WE HAVE “STEAKED” A NEW FRONT (STAINLESS STEEL) ALSO MODERNIZED AND ENLARGED INSIDE TO BETTER SERVE YOU OUR FAMOUS CHARCOAL BROILED PLANKED STEAKS BLUMENFIELD’S MIAMI PIONEER VEGETARIAN — FISH — DAIRY RESTAURANT 668 Collins Avenue Miami Beach COMMERCIALIZE ON YOUR IDEAS If you have imagination, I can QUICKLY help you turn rejection slips into PAY CHECKS. Write for VALUABLE INFORMATION. NATALIE NEWELL Studio, 3310 Cornelia Drive, Coconut Grove, Florida. (Not a school or sales agency) Science and Philosophy of Creative Writing. for HEALTH PLEASURE RIDE HORSEBACK Underweight? Gain The Pleasure Way . Separate classes for children — age 5 or over “Moonlight rides over winding trails” Instruction of all kinds -— Horses boarded and trained ED. MAYNARD, Riding Master MILLER BROS. RANCH On Bird Road, 2 Miles West of Tropical Park — Phone 4-6137 Phone 2-0286; Res. 7-2346 PEARL S BEAUTY SALON 14 N. E. First Avenue A Complete Beauty Service 206-7-8 Townley Building Miami, Florida ZOTOS and ALL METHODS PERMANENT WAVING Parker Herbex Individual Hair Styling Method Scalp Treatments R E SORT LIFE AT ITS BEST—centered around the gleam ing, white sands and the gently billowing ocean—tem pered to an average seventy degrees by the proximity of the warm waters of the Gulf Stream—beckons to you, bids you hasten to the land of sun-drenched days and mellow, lit nights. Brand new, but with a management long experi enced in Miami Beach hotel operation, offering all the im provements which go hand in hand with 1941 living: beautifullyfully decorated rooms with large and numerous windows (most have ocean view), colorful yet subdued appointments, moderately priced meals in an attractive, intimately-planned dining room, spacious comfortable lobby, fully-equipped so larium, game room—everything, in fact to make your visit to Miami Beach one to be long remembered and oft-repeated. Situated in the heart of the exclusive North Beach Section, near theatres, shopping centers and golf clubs, THE COPLEY PLAZA, with its wide, sun-flooded porches, private beach, modern appointments, unobtrusively friendly atmosphere and thoughtfully planned services, offers its guests the ultimate in fine living—a truly luxurious home away from home. RATE SCHEDULE ON REQUEST Harry R. Nash, Manager Copley Playa 39th and Collins Miami Beach

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64 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Royal Salon of Beauty The art of beauty culture has achieved a new and higher plane. In this ultra-modern era women expect from the beauty culturists a greater degree of privacy and professionalism no less proficient than that received in the offices and clinics of other professions. The Royal Salon of eBauty has spared no expense or effort in order to be among the first to initiate the novel methods and to pioneer the reparture from the conventional type of operating booths. The salons in this most modern of parlors are suites of the latest type and are air-conditioned throughout. A group of highly trained beau ticians who are expertly skilled in the art of creating beauty. The Royal Salon is in a colonial type building, located in the new section of Biscayne Boulevard, at 71st Street, and is easily accessible an dhas ample parking facilities and freedom from traffic. One of the nicest surprises awaiting visitors to this charming and attractive salon is price list which is very reasonable. Consultations are invited—diagnosis is made. FREDERICK’S MARKET GROCERIES—MEATS—VEGETABLES Serving the Fast-growing Northwest Section 608 N. W. 62nd Street Phone 7-2377 OPEN TILL MIDNIGHT REPAIRS GASOLINE C. H. OEHLER MOTORS STORAGE 234 Minorca Avenue PERSONALIZED SERVICE CORAL GABLES 4-5450 PHONE 4-2350 B. F. HOLLAND, Manager CORAL GABLES TRANSFER AND STORAGE BAGGAGE MOVING, CRATING and STORAGE HAULING OF ALL KINDS 310 CORAL WAY THE PINE TREE RESTAURANT and Delicatessen, Inc. PHONE 5-9763 217-219 23rd ST., at COLLINS MIAMI BEACH, FLA. DIABETIC FOOD SANDWICHES ON HEALTH BREAD MIAMI BEACH HEALTH FOOD SHOP 534 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida Specializing in NATIONALLY KNOWN HEALTH FOOD PRODUCTS Fresh Made Vegetable Juices HEALTH MENUS PHONE 5-7165 WASHINGTON STORAGE CO., Inc. ESTABLISHED 1927 m 1001 1009 WASHINGTON AVENUE MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA PALM TYPEWRITER COMPANY Largest Stock of Office Machines in the State Sales Department Service Department 17 N. E. 2nd Ave., Phone 2-05 4 171 N. E. 2nd St„ Phone 2-1555 Sperial Concessions to Teachers and Students MIAMI, FLORIDA 1627 ALTON ROAD PHONE 5-1416 MIAMI BEACH, FLA. C I U N c LADIES WEARING APPAREL Costum Made MIAMI’S LEADING SCHOOL OF MUSIC STUDIO LOCATIONS 138 Minorca Ave. 1122 S. W. 21st Ave. 429 41st St. Coral Gables Miami Miami Beach MIAMI CONSERVATORY 1737 N. Bayshore Drive Phone 2-5835 SWISS WATCH REPAIRS A SPECIALTY' I. FOWLER WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER FINE WATCH. CLOCK AND JEWELRY REPAIRING ON THE PREMISES Est. 1927 115 South Miami Ave. MIAMI, FLA. PHONE 2-2462 50 PERCENT OFF ON ANY PICTURE ORDERED THROUGH THE WILSON PICTURE FRAME SHOP WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER ORDERS 172 N. W. First Street Miami, Florida HARRISON’S GARAGE BUICK AND HUPMOBILE BODY FENDER PAINTING — SEAT COVERS 166-168 N. W. FIRST STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA EAT TOM’S TOASTED PEANUTS CLAUDE R. PARKER, Distributor 1214 S. W. 2nd Street MIAMI KOOLMOTOR GASOLENE and OILS ACME TIRES CITIES SERVICE MIAMI PRODUCTS ORANGE STATE OIL COMPANY Distributors Hand Bags Costume Jewelry Sylverns 527 Lincoln Road Miami Beach, Fla.

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 65 GEORGE T. GREER One of the first favorable and striking impressions a newcomer to Miami and the Beach receives is the unusually attractive and effective use of cement garden furniture on the lawns of the beautiful residences, estates, hotels, and apartment buildings. A large part of this ornamental display of cement and pottery decorations is due to the knowledge and workmanship of George Greer. Mr. Greer probably does not class himself as an artist and yet he and his associates create, design, and manufacture this artistic cement furniture for gardens and lawns in their own plant at 4110 N. W. 2nd Avenue, in Miami. Mr. Greer established this unique business nine years ago and, from a modest beginning, he has developed one of the best and largest plants of its kind in the world. Here he and his capable assistants do all of their work and it is quite interesting to watch them at their work. First the molds must be made from the designs and from these molds the cement furniture is made. He started his business with only twenty molds and now the last count was two hundred and fifty-four which gives one a fair idea as to his popularity in this area. His creations include benches of all types, tables, sun dials, glazing globes, bird baths, flower boxes, urns, flamingoes, cranes, ducks, and other appropriate designs. Mr. Greer has specialized in beautiful Grecian, Roman, and Spanish urns for which he has estab. lished an enviable reputation. His novelties have also won the approbation of the artistically inclined purchasers. In addition to the manufacture of their own products out of cement Mr. Greer also sells the best and most beautiful pottery in the country. They represent Haeger’s Pottery, of Dundee, Indiana, which is recognized as an outstanding leader in this field. There is nothing in fine quality and artistic design which this famous and popular pottery maker cannot create. Wherever you may see an unusually attractive piece of pottery on a building or lawn the chances are that it is a creation by Haeger and placed in a proper and lovely setting by Mr. Greer and his assistants. Mr. Greer also carries a line of Monmouth pottery as well as the Haeger line. So, between these two well known and popular manufacturers of pottery it is almost impossible for the most exacting landscape artist or the most discrim inating purchaser to be unable to select exactly the proper piece for any setting. They are also assured that each piece will be given expert and careful emplace ment if done by the Greer organization. Mr. Greer is very unassuming in his part of this business’ great success but he loves to talk about his work. You are cordially invited to visit his plant at any time and see for yourself just how this type of creative work is done. THE MIAMI AQUARIUM BISCAYNE BOULEVARD AT FIFTH STREET Open 8 A. M. until Midnight PLENTY OF PARKING SPACE Admission 30c : : : Children 15c Let’s Go To The Aquarium Strong and Dependable Coconut Grove Exchange Bank Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation SAFETY SERVICE COURTESY COCONUT GROVE PHONE 4-2544 MIAMI, FLORIDA HAWKINS RUG CLEANERS AND DYERS Our ECONOMY is Outstanding Our QUALITY is Equal CALL US! Phone 7-6398 60 N. E. 39th Street PURITY FOOD PRODUCTS Manufacturers of Mayonnaise 2426 N. W. 7th Avenue MIAMI Dial 3-2721 | Alperts Restaurant and Delicatessen j 6 Ocean Drive | | 6 years in the same location under the same management j j QUALITY FOOD THE MASSACHUSETTS PROTECTIVE ASS’N, Inc THE PAUL REVERE LIFE INSURANCE CO. W. D. CHRISTMAS, General Agent Non-cancellable Accident and Health Insurance 901-02-03 duPont Building Phone 3-1633 ctlatel A NEW MODERN HOTEL Centrally Located . Offering All the Comforts For a Pleasant and Restful Vacation. Descriptive Booklet Upon Request. Emanuel Schein, Resident Manager Collins Avenue at 8th Street Miami Beach, Florida FAUTH FURNITURE GO. EXCLUSIVE FURNITURE INTERIOR DECORATORS Biscayne Boulevard at Fourteenth Terrace MIAMI, FLORIDA Artistic Millinery Mrs. Seiderman’s Exclusive Hat Shop 237 N. Miami Avenue Miami, Florida BILTMORE CLEANERS & DYERS “Known for Quality” Office and Plant: Miami Beach Store: 43 N. E. 38th ST., MIAMI 1686 ALTON RD. Dial 7-1276 Dial 5-7513 PHONES 5-4778 RENTALS, SALES 5-4779 AND MORTGAGES TOBIN & TOBIN REALTY ASSOCIATES, Inc. Established 1916 665 Washington Ave. MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA

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66 THE FLORIDA TEACHER THE TCArMCCE HCTEL ... is on the Ocean Promenade in fash ionable North Beach section of Miami Beach. Located di rectly on the ocean at Lake Pancoast, nearly every room of the Traymore overlooks w a t er This hotel operates on the European plan. Delicious meals are served in the Continental Din ing Room; break fast and luncheon are also served on the Ocean Patio ad joining the private beach. Rooms may be had either with twin beds or studio living room arrangement. The smart cocktail lounge and famous shops and night clubs on Twentythird Street, but a block away, pro vide diversion and adddtional enjoyment for the Traymore’s guests. The location and luxurious appoint ments of the Tray more attract a re fined clientele and its name has be come an address of prestige. Address the Traymore Hotel, Ocean at Twentyfourth Street, Mi ami Beach, Florida. Robert B. Hyatt, Manager. —Miami Daily News Photo. Mrs. R. L. Milliken By Helen James One of the most interesting women it has been my pleasure to meet in Miami—is Mrs. Milliken, better known to the old Pioneers as the “Little Colonel’’. To hear her tell the story of her first visit to Miami, with her husband in 1919, and of her subsequent activities—is to visualize, not only the physical but also the cultural growth of Miami Beach. Their first visit was made in the days when one had to take a little terry across from the mainland. So impressed was Mrs. Milliken both by the beauty and the future possibilities of this Island, that she urged her husband to buy some water front property. His reply was—“You’re too old to play with sand now”. However, in 1920 when they returned from their home in Chicago, Mrs. Milliken immediately started buying property. SHE BUILT THE FIRST APARTMENT HOUSE on Miami Beach, at 8th and Collins. Mrs. Milliken’s interest in civic affairs goes back to the days when the Chamber of Commerce held forth under an umbrella, at the corner of Sth and Washington Avenues. Aside from Mrs. Thomas Pancoast, the wife of the president, Mrs. Milliken was the first woman member of the Chamber of Com merce. She was a charter member of the Miami Beach Woman’s Club, having given, untiringly, of her time and money, towards the completion of their present spacious quarters. The Community Church and The Players as well as many other organizations, have relied on her for her foresighted advice and splendid cooperati:n. She is greatly interested in music and attends the many worthwhile concerts and musicals, given here. One can easily recognize her by her sweet misch’evous smile and her buoyant personality. The Florida Transportation Company originated in 1933. They special ize only in Sightseeing and give a four-hour, fifty-mile trip around the Miami area. The busses used were specially designed for sightseeing and were so successful at the World’s Fair in Chicago that the equipment was duplicated in Miami. THE NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION Since its organization in 1857, the National Education Association has been fighting the battles of public education for American youth throughout the nation. Although the Association has suffered defeat after defeat, and progress has been slow, the success of its efforts is marvelous. Among major efforts and accomplishments in which the N. E. A. led the fight on a national scale or furnished material support to the educational systems of the respective states are: The conversion of a national sharply divided on the principle of universal educa tion to one solidly in support of that principle! molding and crystalizing popular opinion in favor of public support of education; establishment of teacher welfare programs including adequate salaries, tenure in employment, retirement systems,, group insurance, high standards of professional ethics, desirable certification and leave of absence laws; and improved professional standards through dissemination of knowledge relating to improved methods and means of education, philosophies of education, reports of progress, and numerous other pertinent and significant facts of interest to education. The potential strength of the National Educational Association consists of more than a million persons employed in educational service in the Ignited States. ARCHITECTS Who Have Made Dreams Come True. The story of Henry Hohauser, progressive Miami Beach architect, is a record of multiple achievement. Born in New York City, Mr. Hohauser attended its public schools, grad uating in Architecture from Pratt Institute in 1915 . from there he went to New York University where he took extension courses for a year. From 1916-1917, he was employed as a Junior Draftsman ... a position he aban doned to enlist in the United States Army, where he served for over two years . seeing service for eleven months in France and England as Top Sergeant with the Ambulance Corps. On returning from the war, he was, in turn Draftsman, Senior Draftsman, and Chief Draftsman with a New England firm which specialized in insti tutional buildings. Leaving this firm in 1925, Mr. Hohauser went to New York where he entered into business for himself, designing and supervising skyscrapers up to tw'enty six stories, including hotels, apartment and office buildings and commercial structures. Ten years later ... in 1935 . Henry Hohauser came to Miami Beach, w’here he inaugurated the modern in design ... of some of the outstanding examples of his achievements in this direction, are, among hotels, the DemseyVanderbilt, the Collins Park, the Governor and the Park Central Essex House as well as numerous others. Associated with Mr. Hohauser in his firm are Mr. Frederick A. Gibbs, Mr. Sidney Lehrer, and Miss Kathryn McCready. In the past five years, this firm has designed, in all, forty three hotels, seventy two residences, ninety five apartment houses, forty five alterations and additions, and twenty seven miscellaneous and institutional buildings. Among the many hotels of distinction on Miami Beach, which the firm of Henry Hohauser has designed are . the Liberty Arms, the Shorcham, th? Cardoza, the Greystone and the Greenview. Notable among the attractive apartment houses which he has designed are the Castle, the Cameo, the Weissman Studio Apartments and the Parc Vendome. Such outstanding and well known public buildings as the Beth Jacob Synagogue, Walgreen’s Drugstore, the Carrousel and the Mammys, Pappys, Roadside Rest are also numbered among the achievements of the firm nf Hohauser. Over a period of years, Mrs. Milliken’s holdings grew and she laughingly tells of a card that was printed: “The three big Real Estate operators—Roney, Fisher and Milliken”. After the crash, friends urged her to sell and salvage w^hat she could, but her faith in the Beach was too strong. She fought hard, weathered the storm, losing none of her properties and lives now to see her faith in Miami Beach justified. It is interesting to contemplate the professional future of this Architect, who, although still a young man, has already revolutionized forms of building design, and thus occupies a very definite place among the men who have con tributed to the phenomenal growth of Miami Beach. Henry Hohauser, a man of vision, undoubtedly rates as a Pioneer of today . and . tomorrow!

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 67 The Value of Public Housing to Miami Mrs. T. T. Stevens Associate Editor, The Florida Teacher Public Housing is no longer a theory in Miami, the experiment stage is passed and the community has settled down to the acmoplished fact that here as in 140 other cities in the United States, low-rent dwellings for low-income families have been buit and are being occupied through the aid of the United States Housing Authority under laws of the State. This new function of gov ernment is being accepted by the people just as they have accepted public schools, good roads and other agencies for human betterment as a proper function of government. Miami’s enthusiastic acceptance of public housing arises from three main sources; a widely recognized need for homes for low-income families who cannot afford to pay normal and seasonal rents; the successful operation for over three years of a public housing project; and a Housing Authority made up of alert, civic-minded citizens headed by Hugh P. Emerson with George C. Stembler, Harry H. Hector, Arthur W. Kneibler and Peter McCabe. The au thority is appointed by the Mayor of the City of Miami and serves without re muneration. The facts about Miami’s need for housing were clearly brought out in the original surveys made for both white and negro projects, which established the need before appropriations for the projects were asked for. The City of Miami through teh Housing Authority is attempting to face and help solve the problem of housing low-income families living under sub-standard conditions, in some thing more than shacks and hovels. The total 1,318 families that were compelled by circumstances beyond their control to live in crowded or sub-standard houses are now well housed at rents they can afford to payand therefore, will be better citizens with clearer outlook on life and more capable of performing their duties as citizens and as integral part of our social and economic structure. Through better housing and good environment offered by the two local housing projects, Edison Courts and Liberty Square, approximately 2,000 children will be given opportunity for better mental and physical health and their stability as future citizens will be promoted. The cost of the City to maintain fire and police protection, health and sanitary services, and all of the other functions of a municipality will be reduced to a minimum insofar as these 1,318 families are concerned. A far reaching benefit will be derived from health conditions that will prevail in the housing projects. Many of the tenants come from areas and homes where disease is most prevalent. In their new environment they will enjoy better health, and in the case of domestic servants their protection from disease will be a protection also for the families and households in which they work. Likewise their children attending public schoos will not be carriers of disease as they were likely to have been when living in unsanitary surroundings. As far as the two housing projects already provided can do so, the general appearance of the section in which they are located is improved, and no one will be ashamed to show visitors where some of our low-income people live. During the past winter season approximately 4,000 visitors from every state in the union and three foreign countries registered at the Demonstration unit as Edison Courts. Visitors were impressed with the beauty of the project with the white group houses of modified Bermuda Colonial architecture and the land scaping of the project with palms, tropical flowers and shrubs. The solar water system which furnishes hot water in abundance throughout the year is a constant source of interest to visitors. This system which uses the sun rays for heating water instead of stoves or furnaces is well known in Miami but little known elsewhere. Edison Courts for white families has 345 dwelling units and was opened with public ceremony by the late Mayor E. G. Sewell on December 15th, 1939. The annual family income for tenants ranges from $722 to $963 and the average monthly rental including water and electricity for cooking, refrigeration and lights is $15.93. Each of the units is modern and equipped with electric range, refrigerator, hot and cold water and window shades. The administration building houses the offices of the Miami Housing Authority and offices of the project. The auditorium is used for community gatherings, concerts and lectures. The welfare and social program for the project is well under way with mothers’ clubs, cooking and sewing classes and self improvement classes conducted by the tenants. Liberty Square for negroes is built on a 63 acre tract and is a three unit project which makes it the largest negro project in the South and sixth largest in America. INDIVIDUAL TEACHING The average boy under normal conditions can carry his easy course of study successfully under existing standards, without more personal help from the teacher than crowded schools allow. If this boy loses his mechanical stride with the class through illness, absence, diverted interest, or otherwise; he may drift farther and farther from scholastic safety, because successive foundation principles upon which correct scholarship depends have become vague or meaningless to him. He may grope and become discouraged and even cease to progress. His philoso phy of life can go awry because he is too young to know what to do in the face of this, to him, chaotic condition. This boy needs experienced, extensive and well-organized help. The sooner this is given him the surer is he to redeem a bad situation. The longer it is de ferred the more deeply and permanently does he mire into negation. When he receives proper help, the boy is thankful, happy and aware of the necessity of doing each day’s work well and completey. Large schools have little time for such reconstruction. The straggler is apt to join the missing. Miami Military Academy has long and successfully carried on such special work through its personal teaching. Many of our most successful students have come to us in need of individual instruction, and, under our methods, have quickly recovered all lost ground and gone on to greater accomp lishments than the average at which they formerly aimed before they lost touch. There is a belief among many teachers that the dull boy does not make all the final failures. Often the inherently bright boy goes down in defeat because he lacks proper reinforcement at the right time. When a new boy comes to us he takes up his work just where he left it in his former school. He is urged to make all the progress possible, but, as a matter of fact, most of his time and ours for a while is spent in quietly finding the flaws, mistakes, omissions and misapprehensions of his former study as they appear from time to time in his daily work. Weak writing, spelling, English, fractions, decimals, conjunctions, declensions, syntax, factoring, quadratics; all the failures in his scholarship are analyzed as fast as they appear, and the boy is aided in going back to the correct sources of information for himself. Progress halts until the given faults are repaired with much drill and review. The boy may worry over this process for a time, but he shortly awakes to the fact that his work is clearer, more logical and that he handles it more skillfully. No more wonderful human benefit can be conferred upon this boy at this time. Gone are his fears, worries, flounderings and misconceptions. Here new is courage, am bition, growing success, and greatest of all a new and positive philosophy of life. The work is not done for the boy. He must do it for himself, but he is shown how to do it and is drilled not only in the process of finding information for himself but also in assimilating it. There is much drill in analyzing his problem or subject clearly, attacking one difficult item after another and summarizing the whole thing logically and efficiently. The boy soon learns that by these more careful and intensive methods he gains much time that was formerly lost in his school preparations. This discovery automatically leads to a desire either to com plete his school work in shorter time than the normal or else to do a great deal more work in the given subject than the average requirement. Both tendencies are positive, constructive and directed toward a far saner outlook on life. I firmly believe that there is no more valuable conservation work this which makes able leaders of boys who would otherwise have been lost to us. J. R. Williams, President of Miami Military Academy. The present generation must rise to the intellectual and moral stature of the men and women who founded the Republic.— Education and the Defense of American Democracy Educational Policies Commission. HEATING COOKING REFRIGERATION AIR-CONDITIONING IN SOLVING ANY OF THESE PROBLEMS EXPERIENCE TEACHES GAS DOES IT BETTER PEOPLES j^SSSSBaasgiSS8S8S8a^SgSS8SSS8S8W8888866S58^g88gB8SSg8g88^8S^S8i COMPAOT MIAMI BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE DeLUCCA’S ORGANIZATION REALTORS Specializing in General Real Estate Brokerage Lot Sales on Instalment Plan 170 N. E. 2nd St. Phone 3-3681-2 AMOCO SERVICE STATION Mr. Leon Crow 801 Biscayne Boulevard MIAMI, FLORIDA HOLLYWOOD

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68 THE FLORIDA TEACHER DR. FREDERICK BUTLER During the past ten years the practice of natural healing has come into its own, as the general public has become aware of its possibili ties and the results of its use in the treatment of the sick. Further, many men of vision and intelligence have adopted its precepts and have followed them, with excellent results. One of the most outstanding and nationally prominent of the Florida Naturopathic and Chirophactic physicians is Dr. Frederick Butler, of 41st Street, Miami Beach. After years of research covering chemical body balance and mus cular distortions of the body, or a combination of both, Dr Butler is today recognized as a leader in dietetic chemistry and its application. His lectures bring many who look for guidance and aid through diet when all else has failed them. The world today is food conscious and becoming more so with each succeeding year. Food research has definitely proven that many of our common ailments are after effects directly, or indirectly, of injudicious eating. What is one man’s food is another’s poison. Therefore, we, as individuals, require an indi vidual anaylsis as to our chemical food needs, and we do not get the best results from some generalized food dietary, which cannot and does not undertake to analyze the chemical deficiency present, nor attempt to replace this deficiency by food material rich in that chemi cal lacking element. Dr. Butler combines the use of biological chemistry, or body chemistry, with deep abdominal manipulative treatment. In the chem istry the body is fed the lacking chemical elements required to balance bodily activity and function, glandulae, etc. In the manipulative work the lack of circulation and drainage in the body is restored to as nearly normal as possible, where there is abdominal pressure from gravity pressure, adhesion, congestion and excessive fluids and waste material, this pressure is relaxed and greater circulation restored thereby drawing off congestion. If and when the system is given easily digested food which will leave the stomach in one half hour or a little longer, it stands to reason that there cannot be any great congestion in the stomach, and, as Dr. Butler says, “You are what you eat”, the result of our food shows itself on our bodies either in good health or disease. But we can always turn over a new leaf and learn to use raw celery, and carrot juice as, well as papaya juice. After these treatments, to keep the circulation of the body in its improved condition, the Dr. usually recommends exercise, such as walking, tennis, horseback riding, in moderation. MRS. J. MACKENZIE SLOAN TEACHER OF VOICE, EXPRESSION, PIANO AND SPEECH CORRECTION 80 N. W. 93rd Street Phone 7-6142 Witters Construction Co. 1745 S. W. Sixth Street Miami, Florida Interiors and Gifts FREDERICK T. RANK 7 6 1 — W. — 41st. Street MIAMI BEACH FLORIDA i MONROE TOWERS HOTEL j 30TH STREET & OCEAN j MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA j \ ___ WEST END GROCERY Salutes Florida Teachers GROCERIES — FRESH VEGETABLES — MEATS Mrs. G. N. Bailey. Prop. 2241 N. W. 7th Street Phone 4-4221

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 69 Miami Music Teachers Association Mrs. E. R. Treverton, President On December 15th, 1934, at the call of Miss Bertha Foster, the Miami Music Teachers Association was organized, having as its pur pose “the raising of the standard of teachers and teaching and keeping abreast of modern methods of teaching.” They became affiliated with the Florida State Music Teachers Association in 1935 and now have over 125 members, who meet regularly once a month. They are also members of the National Federation of Music Clubs. In 1938, this Club was given the honor of being host to the State Convention and is again to have that honor this year. Among the past Presidents are Mrs. Iva Sproule Baker and Mrs. Rose Adams Burgess, both well known in the musical field. One of the largest projects, which this Club is assisting in spon soring, is the Musicians Club of America. This is to be located in Dade County and to serve as a Club home of all active American musicians, a quiet retreat for composers and writers and to have pro vision for the care of needy older members. Perhaps no other group of teachers contribute more to the mental development of a child than do the music teachers and in this changing civilization of ours, with music the only universal language, a great responsibility rests with the teachers. It is up to them to educate and mold the tastes of the people—“to educate THROUGH music” rather than “educate IN music”. One of the most important ways in which music teachers can in fluence their pupils is by creating new and stimulating methods of study. For example most teachers have their own Clubs where chil dren are taught self assurance and poise by playing in public. In my own little Miami Beach Two Piano Club the children meet once a r month in my home. This group has been a Junior Federated Club (under the Miami Music Club) for 5 years. They plan all the details of every recital even down to the design and coloful execution of the programs. It is an “event” for them, one by which all phases of a re cital become familiar to them. It has been their “show” and part of them. One of our teachers, Mr. John Rosser, recently very aptly stated the mission of music “To comfort sorrow, to lighten work, to bring peace and relaxation to the troubled mind, solace and serenity the soul, to uplift and make better the life of all mankind, to replace misery, suffering and misunderstanding w-ith joy, happiness and brotherly love.” And from Ruskin “All one’s life is music, if one touches the notes rightly and in time.” — -—— —— --| KINDERGARTEN AND GRADES i “We can solve any training or personality problem” Tutoring a Speciality PEARL SCHULTZ 907 S. W. 15th Ave., Miami, Florida Phone 3-4003 | —-—-—-——-—-•ANDERSON POLLACK TUTTLE GARAGE GENERAL REPAIRS 35 S. E. Fourth Street Phone 3-2912 DADE COUNTY BRANCH Factory: 765 N. W. 20th Street MIAMI, FLORIDA s ELLICK TONE TUDIO BROWARD COUNTY BRANCH Federal Highway No. 1 (Biscayne Blvd.) Opposite Hollywood Jockey Club HALLANDALE, FLORIDA ORNAMENTS OF DISTINCTION To wander through the outdoor and in door studios of the Sellicks, is a pleasure of which all visitors and Miamians should avail themselves. The beautiful stone benches and chairs, placed under huge spreading shade trees invite you to linger and gaze out at the naturally landscaped pools. A frog peeps out from a lily pad; a flamingo haughtily gazes at you; a dog is seated by the edge of a pool, as though watching the goldfish, all so realistic that you have to restrain yourself from whistling to the animals. Inside is a wealth of all types of pla ques, statues, figurines—even ship models and paintings. You can see how the sculp tor (a permanent member of the staff) starts with just a block of stone, outlines his subject in charcoal, then starts to cut away the stone. Slowly and painstakingly, the statue takes form and life. Or you can wander into another section and watch the making of the molds into which glue is poured, allowed to set and the outside mold then opened up and the glue taken away to reveal the lion or whatever the subject has been. These are smoothed off, painted and shellaced, and are ready for ornaments. At the Hallandale studio—with its nine acres, golf range, bowling alleys and barbecue stand—you can spend an instructive as well as an active day. You will find both Harry and Walter Sellick ideal hosts. Even though they are kept continuously busy with the shipment of orders to all parts of the world —you can feel assured that your particular problems of securing just the right pieces for your home or garden will be given the same thoughtful considera tion that the Sellicks would give to their own fam ilies. Harry Sellick, a University of Washington grad uate, with the degree of B. S. C. E., (Bachelor of Science, Civil Engineering), started his stone studio here in 1926, through necessity. Previously he had been a contracting plasterer, with over 400 men in his employ, but found that when stone work was wanted for a job, it was not available here. Fore seeing the demand for that type work, he started the Sellick Stone Studio. Since, he has done most of the reconditioning work for both the City of Miami and Miami Beach. The fountain in Bayfront Park, the Indian Eques trian statue at 41st St., and Alton Road, the fountain at 21st St. and Alton Road, the Flagler Memorial Monument—all have had his attention. The one hundred sets of park benches in Bayfront Park are also his work. Miami can well be proud of the high standards of quality set by the Sellick Stone Studio. It has been a real pleasure to know the Sellicks and their works. L.

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70 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Wyldwood Tropical Gardens South Florida has contributed many coloful and interesting personalities to contemporary American history, who, in years to come, will stand out among the pages of such a history when it is compiled. On these personalities, none will have formed a more integral part of this particular portion of the state than Commodore A. H. Brook of Fort Lauderdale. A man of vision and great personal charm, Commodore Brook has contributed much to the civic progress and cultural pursuits of his adopted state. His exotic Wyldwood Tropical Nurseries, located on the Federal Highway near Dania, Florida, are one of the show places of the southland and have contributed materially in bringing hosts of horticulturists and nature lovers to this part of the state. The landscaping division of the gardens are under the direct sup ervision of William P. Brook and the grounds of some of the most magnificent and palatial estates in Florida have been designed and landscaped by him. These beautiful tropical gardens are a MUST STOP on the list of every resident of and visitor to South Florida. If you return north without having visited them you will have missed much of the beauty that is ours. WILLIAM E. (BILLY) FOSSETT It is one of the contradictions of the age in which we live that in a period of definite specialization, the Drug Store—as such—now has assumed the place of the General Store in many communities. It is refreshing, then, to find a drug gist remaining true to the oldest pharmaceutical traditions and yet in an up to the minute, modern way. William E. (Billy) Fossett is one of these. In Mr. Fossett’s pharmacy, only prescriptions and sick room supplies are sold. On his staff are six registered pharmacists, each a specialist in certain drugs or medicines and possessed of information necessary to answer all inquiries pertaining to any dose, action, use or contra-indication of their particular products. Further evidence of Mr. Fossett’s modernity is found in his encouragement of all pharmacists to develop the research side of the business. Unusual develop ments in ointment bases, soap solutions and solvents thus have been made, and many of these products are used by local physicians. It is a practice which, if universally adopted, would tend to greatly elevate the profession to unmistakable prominence and respect. For the wide range of services which Fossett (the man), and Fossett’s (the pharmacy), offer to the medical profession, hospitals, laboratories, and the laity, this establishment enjoys a national reputation and patronage. Mr. Fossett believes that his success is due to his unswerving adherence to the highest ideals of his profession—Quality, knowledge and dispatch. Billy Fossett is a member of the American Pharmaceutical Association, the National Association of Retail Druggists, and of the State and local associations. He is also active in city clubs, being a member of the National Exchange Club, the Breakfast Club and the Chamber of Commerce. His hobbies are hunting and fishing. Mr. and Mrs. Morris Alpert The above residence at 1400 Lenox Avenue, Miami Beach, is the attractive home of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Alpert. This lovely place is a creation of Anton Skislewicz, one of the most popular and capable architects on the Beach. It is not so large and impressive on the out side, but the moment one enters the hospitable threshold he is con scious of a real work of art. It is warmly beautiful in all phases of interior architecture and decorations. The writer was particularly im pressed with the delicate colors of its cheerful murals and the simple but rich furnishings, chief of which is a grand piano in a charming setting. How much credit should go to Mrs. Alpert could not be learned from her modest approval but she did admit that it was built around the piano for music and hospitality. Mr. and Mrs. Alpert were among the first permanent residents on the Beach. Mr. Alpert was a glass manufacturer in Springfield, Mass., until his health forced him to retire at the early age of thirty-three. (He was already an amateur builder before coming here and his energy found a pleasant outlet in designing, first, his own home and apart ment building, and, later, due to the persuasion of friends to be instru mental in continued construction, yet remaining non-professional. Mr. Albert holds the distinction of being the first to design and build “Bungalow Courts”. He also gets credit for the following architectural creations on the Beach: “The Castle”, “Green Gables”, the Kenmore, Breakwater, and Plymouth Hotels, as well as many homes and apart ment houses. Mr. and Mrs. Alpert have made many friends since their arrival and are considered among the outstanding residents in social and civic life, as are their four children, Robert Zane, Ruth Shirley, Mrs. Milton Nussbaum, and Mrs. Arthur Gold. We wholeheartedly congratulate Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, Editor of the National Magazine, “Good Health” on the seventy-fifth anniversary of the puli" lication. Concealed in the story, is seventy-five years of progress in the returnto-nature movement which began a century ago under the leadership of the late Dr. Sylvester Graham. Dr. Kellogg spends the winter months directing the Miami Springs Battle Creek Institution. One of the interesting publications received is The Negro History Bulletin and we congratulate the publishers. In recognition of the work of Carter G. Woodson, managing editor of the Negro History Bulletin, in a program which has been uplifting and beneficial to the Negro race. The program has likewise helped to make better citizens with a clearer understanding of mutual rights. A. A. Exterminating Co. E. J. GUMMOE, Manager 2388 W. Flagler St. Phone 4-5207 Miami, Fla. Night-Sunday, 3-1483 FOR THE BEST QUALITY at the LOWEST PRICE See rtakaa# MUSIC CO. 42 W. Flagler St. MIAMI i i HARRY’S BICYCLE SHOP j 10 S. W. 22nd Avenue j | Rentals %  — Sales — Repairs j Geo. H. Bates 5-0690 Deep Sea Fishing HALD DAY—9 A. M.-12:30 Noon; 2-6 P. M. .$1.50 NITE—7:30-12 P. M. (Tues.Thurs.) __$1.00 (Other nites open to public) RACING FANS — Notice! Special Morning Trip Re turns in time for races. DOCK—Foot of Biscayne St. South end Alton Road— Miami Beach Nearest Dock to Fishing Grounds No Bridges to Delay I. ROSENGARTIN Miami’s Pioneer Furrier” Absolute Protection CERTIFIED COLD STORAGE VAULTS In our New and Spacious Store 118 SO. MIAMI AVE. We Specialize in Fur and Costly Rug Cold Storage 100% Insurance on All Articles Remodeling Moth Proofing Cleaning Glazing TEL. 3-4591 118 South Miami Avenue AMNA MARIE 5PEGALITY SHOP LADIES WEAR ANTIQUES GIFTS HATS BAGS HOSIERY LINGERIE BUDGET CUSTOM MADE EVENING GOWNS LARGEST KNOWN COLLECTION OF BLUE AND WHITE TURNER-WEDGEWOOD ROYAL WORCESTER DINNER SET ROOKWOOD EXPOSITION VASE “1883” 50 RARE EARLY AMERICAN FLASKS EXCEPTIONAL EARLY AMERICAN POTTERY AND GLASS VERY CHOICE COLLECTORS ITEMS 7766 BISCAYNE BLVD.

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THE FLORIDA TEACHER 71 PERSONALITIES FREDERIC B. STRESAU A young man . and progressive . Frederic Stresau has achieved an admirable record in the field of Landscape Architecture. In Chicago, Illinois, Mr. Stresau spent his early years,—and later, from the University of Illinois, received his degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Landscape Architecture. He is a member of the Chicago Society of Landscape Architects. Entering actively in his chosen profession from 1934 to 1937 he was landscape designer for the Chicago Park District. In this capacity he supervised general park work, . outdoor ampitheatre planning . airport work . playgrounds . and planting designing. He also participated in the Chicago lake front development. In September 1937 Mr. Stresau came to Miami Beach and became associated with C. D. Wagstaff and Company,—landscape and golf course experts. Since that time he has achieved recognition for his numerous successes in landscaping design,—especially for such residences as those of Mr. J. G. Coleman on Bay Road, Mr. James H. Bereman and Mr. H. T. Morgan on La Gorce Island, and Mr. Robert Law Weed on Sunset Island Number One. Mr. Stresau has also co-operated in the landscaping of various larger projects such as Edison Court and Liberty Square in Miami, both United States Housing Authority developments—Dunbar Village in West Palm Beach—Dixie Court in Fort Lauderdale—and the Miami Beach Housing Development on Belle Isle. A life-long interest in planting design and a keen desire to achieve in the field of Landscape Architecture are factors which have combined to make Mr. Stresau’s work conscientious, creative and distinctive. MILES GALLOWAY By Jane Egbert. The judicious handling of realty transactions together with the men who have participated in them forms an integral part in the growth of any city. In the expansion and development of the city of Miami Beach Miles Galloway has been closely identified in the realm of real estate. Born in Atlanta, Georgia, Mr. Galloway was for seven years associated with his brothers in the real estate business in that city. He was also active in this field during the World War. This earlier association and knowledge of the various phases of real estate activities, combined with a personality of quiet assurance and dignity, were contributory factors to his success as a real estate broker, in subsequent years. He has been a resident of Florida for sixteen years, having arrived in his adopted state in 1924. For some years Mr. Galloway operated a realty business under his own name, and later in 1928 was interested in the subdivision project of Coral Gables. Following this he came to Miami Beach where he conducted a general brokerage for many years. Through this he has handled much Lincoln Road property in Miami Beach, and participated in the development of the mag nificent Indian Creek area. It is the opinion of Mr. Galloway that although the growth of Miami Beach has been phenominal in the last few years—the real expansion of the city is only beginning. The trend will grow northward—a fact soon to be recognized because of the crowded conditions in the already developed areas. Few people realize that the real estate broker is the catalytic agent in the alchemy of modern municipal development who brings capital and constructive forces together to produce the new horizons of the future. Such a man is Miles Galloway. ROBERT C. HABIG In November 1920, Robert C. Habig came to Dade County and began an active and constructive career in real estate. In the following year, 1921, and for five years until 1026 he was an able and efficient Assistant Sales Manager of The Hollywood Land and Water Company, developers of the city of Hollywood, Florida. Mr. Habig’s present office is at 60S Lincoln Road. He has been a real estate broker in Miami Beach for seven years, and in that capacity has greatly helped in the development of the city. He has participated in numerous outstanding realty transactions, and has negotiated many big deals, such as the sale of the Burdine building on Lincoln Road, and the present location of Saks Fifth Avenue on Lincoln Road. Mr. Habig’s pleasing personality, combined with his spirit of drive and perseverence has gone far in making him an outstanding real estate broker in a rapidly growing metropolitan area, as is Miami Beach. COL. SOL S. GOLDSTROM Prominent among civic and business leaders of Miami Beach is Col. Sol S. Goldstrom. Coming from Omaha, Nebraska, his first business contact with Miami Beach was the organizing of The Goldstrom Baking Company, opening service there in April 192S. Aside from business activities Mr. Goldstrom has been a diligent sup porter in building and promulgating the public and civic welfare of the city. For six years he was director of the Chamber of Commerce Board, and was also instrumental in organizing the Junior Chamber of Commerce of Miami Beach. In 1930, with foresight toward better cooperation of the city’s business enterprises and the men conducting them, Mr. Goldstrom organized the Miami Beach Business Men’s Association, and for six years presided as its President. He has also been active in Jewish welfare, Red Cross work, the Community Chest, and the Miami Beach Welfare Board, having been a member since 1932. Mr. Goldstrom has not only been alert in the pursuit of civic and busi ness improvement—but has also continued an active supporter of several fra ternal organizations, such as the B. P. O. E., of Miami Beach, of which he is a member. A member too, of the Shrine, Scottish rites, he has also helped the Masonic home in his city. The Miami Beach Hotel Association also record him as a member, and among his other interests Mr. Goldstrom at present operates the Hotel Gotham. Mr. Goldstrom is indeed a pioneer of Miami Beach, in civic, business and fraternal organizations—well known among them for the service and help fulness he renders. PROGRAM OF NATIONAL CONGRESS OF PARENTS AND TEACHERS The Board of Managers of the National Congress of Parents and Teachers at its meeting in September adopted for 1940-41 a national legislative program which includes: Abolition of compulsory block booking and blind selling of motion pictures; federal aid for education, federal funds to be spent with mini mum federal control and maximum local support for equalization of educational opportunity among the several states on a basis of need while maximum effort is encouraged by the states; adequate support of federal educational services; election of a school-board by the District of Columbia; opposition to advertising of intoxicating liquor; and opposition to legalizing a national lottery. SALUTE TO THE FLAG I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. NORMANDY PLAZA HITEL ON-THE-OCEAN Collins Avenue at 71st Street PRIVATE BEACH DAILY ROOM TARIFF Single Double December 15 to aJnuary 15.....$ 3.50 $4.50 January 15 to February 1_ 6.00 7.00 February 1 to March 10. 7.00 8.00 March 10 to April 6........— 4.00 6.00 April 6 to November 15-1.50 2.00 Solarium . Cabana Deck . All Outside Rooms . Private Beach Miami Beach Fill & Soil Co. Pop Marks MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA K —A THE EVANGEL PRESS Printers and Dealers in Evangelical Literature, Bibles, Books, Mottoes, Plaques, Sunday School Supplies, Lesson Helps, Maps, Records, Re wards, Gifts, Greetings, Games, At tendance Helps, Novelties, Etc. Justin Bare, Prop. 261 N. W. 3rd St. Phone 2-6512 After Hours Call — Phone 2-6538 J I Window Cleaning j Service I Att.: Mr. H. S. Hohn 1 1665 Michigan Avenue I [MIAMI BEACHj CLAM and OYSTER BAR SCHUBERTH’S SEA FOOD GRILLE • S. W. Corner Flagler Street and Miami River • Serving Complete Seafood Dinners 50c • Open Night and Day Phone 3-9197 MIAMI 218 N. E. 6th St. Phone 2-3119 MIAMI BEACH 1122 16th St. Phone 5-3546 PLUMBING GAS FITTING HEATING OIL BURNERS WATER SYSTEMS REPAIR WORK IN ALL BRANCHES

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72 THE FLORIDA TEACHER Back in 1913, this Buick was the “truck” and “Sunday Pleasure Car” of the Dulbs family. In those days, Mr. Dulbs had his office in a converted garage at 12th Street (now known as W. Flagler and N. W. 1st Avenue). No sidewalks or paved roads were known. Miami was in its infancy, and Miami Beach was just a swamp. To make the “convertible job” above pictured into a truck, down came the top, out came the back seat and in its place was bolted a huge tin box. On Sundays, the process was reversed and the family proudly toured the town. Now, neat red and black trucks bear the C. J. Dulbs Plumbing Co. sign, and the family has its own car. It was in 1910 that Mr. Dulbs came here from Cleveland, Ohio, where he had also been in the plumbing business. His inability to find a job working for someone else forced him to start in on his own, and his first work was on a group of five houses, at old Avenue K and 11th Street (now N. W. 1st Street and Sth Avenue). Then came the Rutherford Hotel job. Everyone said he was too young to handle it, but—with the confidence of youth—he went ahead, doing a notably fine piece of work. In 1812-13, came the Lawyers’ Building—the six story “Sky Scraper” of Miami. No contracts were needed in those days—people took each other’s word and capital to carry on ventures wasn’t so hard to get. In fact, it was J. N. Lummus as head of the Southern Bank and Trust, at the time, who helped Dulbs over the financial hurdle on the Lawyers’ Building job. More and more work came his way—in Coral Gables, Miami, the Beach— the Roman Pools Building for the then owner, Mr. St. John; Wee Tappy Tavern (which only real old timers will remember) and the Roberts Hotel above it— were some of his earlier jobs. Dulbs also carried on the City maintenance work and the County repair work. Mr. Dulbs tells tales of hunting in the wilds—where the Miami Biltmore now stands; of shooting crocodiles at Flagler and the Miami River; and of the old Bridge Tender, and the Indians who looked upon him as their friend. He was a real pioneer, and can tell the tales of the early days so that you relive them again with him. His wife and three sons are all with him in the plumbing business at 8 South. Collins Avenue. His wife now runs the office for him and can’t be stumped or any plumping term, nor be found at a Igss in locating whatever piece or fitting is needeu. His three sons all work for him too. and are proud to be able to say that they are the oldest existing firm of plumbers in Greater Miami. Irving Collins Let the other fellow have the glory, I am satisfied with results” was Irving Collins motto—yet glory belongs to Irving for the stupen dous amount of work he did in the management end of the growth of Miami Beach. “Pete” Chase has often remarked—“While Carl Fisher was the ‘maker’ of Miami Beach—Irving Collins was the ‘saver’ In 1932 and 1933, when things were at their blackest, especially for the Miami Beach Bayshore Company, Collins borrowed on all his Northern inter ests, his life insurance, his personal credit, to save the Company. Had the Company been forced to liquidate their vast holdings, it would have been to our Real Estate values what a Stock Market collapse would be to the Bond business—land values would have been com pletely ruined. All through the depression Fisher, Pancoast and Collins treated their employees so marvelously that it is no wonder, today, you find such complete devotion in their ranks. Perfumes of Lejeune Haunting as a lovely memory, tantalizing as a half-forgotten melody, warm and provocative as a summer’s night, glamorous as the tropics themselves, Lejeune Perfume, a new and arresting fra grance put out by a local concern, is compelling of attention and more than worthy of the endorsement of perfume loving connoisseurs. The names of the various fragrances put forth by Lejeune are arresting and connote all the beauty, warmth, and charm of a tropic night. One of the perfumes, Ecstasie, rich, potent, sultry, is remiscent of moonlight nights and romances which found their beginning beneath the tropic moon. Tropique, a very delightful and slightly milder fragrance, sug gests days and evenings of tropical gaiety and glamour. Perhaps the Lejeune perfume destined to become the best known is the popularly priced one called “Stars Over Miami.” It has a satisfying fragrance suitable for daytime use as well as night-time glamour. Still another is ‘After Twelve,’ a young, gay, scintillating perfume with a fragrance as catchy as its name. The firm of Lejeune, as we have stated, had its beginning right here in Miami where it is manufactured and distributed. It has, then, a definite appeal for all Miami women—first and foremost, the appeal that alluring perfumes will always have for members of the fairer sex; and secondly, the appeal of being a local product. To the visitor and tourist here for the season, it will afford an opportunity of taking back home with them at last a real perfume of the tropics—and to the Miami resident, it gives a chance of proudly flaunting a glamorous perfume which they may truthfully say had its inception here in their home town. The manufacturer of Lejeune has done a fine job of these per fumes; he has skillfully contrived to blend together his ingredients in such a manner that the happy result brings to the mind a vivid picture of Miami magic—of warm sunlight on white beaches, of end less stretches of broad, proud prados, of long golden eyenings, of gentle lapping waves, of soft strains of romantic music, dancing feet on palm sheltered terraces, the clear brightness of a tropic moon, and of endless romances beneath a star-filled sky—all the moods of Miami— Miami, lovely and capricious as a beautiful woman—all these moods have been skillfully captured and are reflected in the fragrance of Lejeune—A REAL PERFUME FOR THE TROPICS. Write to Lejeune, 1845 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Florida, for latest and complete catalogues.

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Biscayne Gardens • OWN YOUR OWN ACRE TRACT Own your own acre tract of rich, fertile soil. Get back to "Mother Earth,” and enjoy a new home, a new life in the country, with all the city conveniences of electricity, telephone and paved roads. Grow what you will; fish when you like, and tie your boat up to your own dock on beautiful Biscayne River. GROW YOUR OWN FRUIT and VEGETABLES Grow your own fruit and vegetables. Raise poultry if you like. Whatever you desire to raise, Biscayne Gar dens has a variety of tracts with the right kind of soil, from which you may make your own selection. See for yourself the 60,000 pounds of papayas one owner has raised on an acre of land. See the beautiful vegetable gar dens at 159th Street. Then you’ll know what this new home, this new life in Beautiful Biscayne Gardens can mean to you. • MORE THAN 145 NEW HOMES More than 145 new homes have been built by enthusiastic home owners now enjoying this “country life with city conveniences” in Biscayne Gardens. They “live the life of Riley,” yet are only 20 minutes from down town Miami; only 15 minutes from the beach, the new million dollar county park location, and Florida’s largest fishing pier; and they’re only 10 minutes from Opa Locka and the government training base. • YOU OWE IT TO YOURSELF to See Beautiful Biscayne Gardens You owe it to yourself to see beautiful Biscayne Gardens. Drive out Biscayne Boulevard to 88th Street, continue north through Miami Shores, across Biscayne River bridge and bear left to 154th Street. Our repre sentative at our field office will be glad to show y ou over the property, with no obligation whatever. • TRACTS AS LOW AS $250 .$10 DOWN.$10 MONTHLY Owned and Developed By &RAND PROPERTIES, imc. 502 Phone 2-2523 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG. MIAMI, FLORIDA

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W///' >///r CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, Miami Beach, Ela Please send free de luxe booklet lav ishly illustrated in natural color Q Also data on Hotels Apartments Q Name_(3) Address_ City_ State_ feath Snmm&i and f Win9e/i-Miami QeacU 94, Qallincj, f l/ou Spend your days idling on warm, sun swept beaches and enjoy languorous nights beneath the stars in quiet content ... or mingle with celebrities in a whirl of gaiety. Be a sportsman pursuing your own hobby ... or take it easy merely looking on at regattas, races or a dozen other sports. Live like a king in sumptuous surroundings or go in for the simple life. ThereÂ’s no end to the en tertainment ... no end to the ways you can relax. Small wonder Miami Beach is the haven for those with purses either full or slender, for each vacations in his own way in a setting of boundless beauty. minmi beach