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Title:
Transatlantic times
Uniform Title:
Transatlantic times (Winchester, Va.)
Added title page title:
Transatlantictimes
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United States -- Army. -- Corps of Engineers. -- Transatlantic Programs Center
United States -- Army. -- Corps of Engineers. -- Transatlantic Division
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Winchester, VA
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TAC Public Affairs Office, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
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Quarterly[<Oct./Dec. 2010>-July/Sept. 2012]
Bimonthly[ FORMER Dec. 2002-<Nov./Dec. 2004>]
Irregular[ FORMER <Spring 2005-July/Aug. 2009>]
quarterly
regular
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English
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v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

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Military engineering -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Military engineering ( fast )
United States ( fast )
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Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

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Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with vol. 1, no. 1 (December 2002).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for October, November, December 2010 also called First edition.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
231616861 ( OCLC )
ocn231616861
Classification:
UG1 .T732 ( lcc )

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Full Text

PAGE 1

SEPT 2013 http://www.tad.usace.army.mil/ Afghan Safety Professionals Apply New Knowledge Beyond WorkBuilding in Afghanistan: From Open Field to Functional Facility USACE Volunteer Professionals Provide TAA SurgeBagram Aireld Runway Repairs Reach Major Milestone The runway repair project at Bagram Aireld, the most heav ily used military air base in the world, reached a major milestone Aug. 10, with the paving and U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS TRANSATLANTIC DIVISION PUBLICATIONCFC Adds Online Option for Donors at MyPayby Todd Lyman USACE TRANSATLANTIC AFGHANISTAN DISTRICT KABULAfghan safety professionals are taking what they learn with the Corps into their homes and communities. In addition to capacity building here, USACE may also be responsible for a safety renaissance. The mission of the USACE Transatlantic Afghanistan District safety oce is to provide policy, programs, technical services, oversight and outreach related to safety and occupational health matters in support of Corps of Engineers missions throughout Afghanistan. To ensure mission accomplishment, training is a major tool in the quest. Safety Manager Ed McNamara explained We observed work practices that we found unacceptable. We made this training mandatory for all workers at Engineer Village; oce workers, warehouse workers and janitorial workers. For example we had industrial safety classes for our warehouse workers and in the afternoon we had re prevention safety for all. One valuable TAA employee took the training to heart. Hamid, a 36-year-old housekeeping worker who spent time as a security guard with coalition forces, observed areas at his home that needed attention. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE READINGKABUL Building in Afghanistan is not like building in suburban America. It is not simply a matter of choosing counter tops and CLICK HERE TO READ MOREKABUL There are few organizations with the means and resources to supply highly trained, skilled and enthusiastic professionals to a remote location on a short notice when a need is identied. Fortunately for Transatlantic Afghanistan District, USACE is an organization with a deep pool of ... CLICK HERE TO READ MORE WASHINGTON, Sept. 6, 2013 The annual Combined Federal Campaign adds a new feature for donors this year: an online pledge CLICK HERE TO READ MOREThis document is published by the USACE Transatlantic Division Public Aairs Oce. Alicia Embrey, Online Magazine Editor alicia.m.embrey@usace.army.mil Page 4 Page 6 Page 2 Page 7 USACESept 2013times Transatlantic TRANSATLANTIC DIVISION EXTERNAL PUBLICATION BUILDING STRONG 9/11 Remembrance CeremonyToday, we remember the nearly 3,000 men, women and children who lost their lives in the September 11, 2001 attacks at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and aboard United Airlines Flight 93. We invite you to leave a comment showing your patriotism and support of USArmy Soldiers who protect our freedoms. Page 7 Page 6

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TAA Surge KANDAHAR AIRFIELD, Afghanistan The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed an Afghan Uniform Police headquarters facility in the Panjwai district of Kandahar City March 31. The facility will provide the AUP with a base from which to carry out their mission of providing security for the people of Panjwai. At a cost of about $4 million, the AUP district headquarters facility was built by an Afghan construction company and took a little more than one year to build. The facility can accommodate about 60 police ocers, said Michael Winkler, the USACE project manager. It includes oces, jail cells, a perimeter wall, guard towers, dining, restroom and dormitory facilities (for men and women), parking and utilities. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE HELMAND PROVINCE, Afghanistan Progress continues on construction of Afghan National Security Forces facilities at Camp Shorabak. The projects consists of the construction of buildings, training areas, water and elec tric distribution systems, wastewater treatment systems, armories, dining facilities, tness centers and other facilities soldiers need to live, work and train so they can protect and serve communities. CLICK HERE TO VIEW IMAGES USACE gives Afghan Uniform Police a base of operations in PanjwaiConstruction of Afghan National Security Forces facilities at Camp Shorabak3 2SEPT 2013 http://www.tad.usace.army.mil/ SEPT 2013 http://www.tad.usace.army.mil/TRANSATLANTIC TIMES TRANSATLANTIC TIMESUSACE Volunteer Professionals Provide TAA SurgeMegan Cullen, from USACE New England District stands with USACE St. Louis District volunteers Rachel Lopez and Bryan Dirks, and USACE Vicksburg volunteer District Brad Brady. These are four of the sixteen construction surge team volunteers. by Todd LymanUSACE TRANSATLANTIC AFGHANISTAN DISTRICT KABUL There are few organizations with the means and resources to supply highly trained, skilled and enthusiastic professionals to a remote location on a short notice when a need is identied. Fortunately for Transatlantic Afghanistan District, USACE is an organization with a deep pool of talent from which to draw while working to deliver critical infrastructure for the Afghan people. Mark Jones, TAA Engineering and Construction Division Chief, explained the need at TAA and the solution. With the standup of the Transatlantic Afghanistan District, a short-term need for additional construction quality assurance personnel was identied due to the number of newly awarded projects in the Kabul area. The surge team, made of sixteen construction and engineering personnel from around the country, has responded for 90day taskers. During this period, the surge personnel will augment the existing sta with project submittals, RMS data and completing necessary modications required to keep pace with the dynamic environment in Afghanistan. Jones, with command concurrence, contacted Transatlantic District to nd suitable manpower for a 90-day surge in support of the mission. The result: fteen USACE personnel provided by Corps districts across the U.S. arrived at Camp Phoenix July 21 eager and ready to get to work. Another arrived later. All were assigned to support TAAs Kabul Area Oce. Col. Richard Heitkamp is the ocer-incharge for KAO. And looking at how we resized the district, weve gone from two districts to one, and weve reduced our manpower both on the sta and at our area and resident oces. All because we understand that our mission in Afghanistan is drawing to a close. But conversely our project missions are as big as ever. So were trying to take advantage of our last two construction seasons before we are go ing to withdraw from Afghanistan. And in order to help the contractors make as much progress as possible during that construc tion period we have to be able to reply in a timely manner to questions, submittals, and just the regular process of administering a large construction contract. So what these great Americans have done is to come over here and jump on board. Not typically anything exotic, it is just the day-to-day re quirements of administering a construction contract, he said. While responding to requests from contrac tors and working submittals are part of an ordinary day for those whove been with the Corps in Afghanistan over time, such ac tivity is anything but routine for the surgers. They get what we say is like three times the amount of experience for time they spend here. So every day is worth three days of experience. That is our recruiting phrase, right? Heitkamp asked. Four or ve, more like, corrected Bryan Dirks, a civil engineer from St. Louis District. The surge team agreed in unison with a groan. Heitkamp praised the teams qualications, willingness to get to work and their contributions. So its been a great blend of experience. Most of them are out of school and have an initial experience with the Corps, an initial amount of construction experience and that works great because it is a win-win for them and for us. They get some great ex perience, and work with some experienced engineers on some interesting problems contractually in administering these contracts. These arent the typical things you nd back in the States. But it really makes you understand administration, what the Corps role is. So they win with the expe rience and we win because we have some great engineers who are able to surge on the projects who can help us with things without a lot of spin-up time required. So its been very successful so far. All of the people whove come over have integrated very quickly and gotten up to speed on their projects and have been a big help. Joe Kellett is the chief of the TAA construc tion branch. He aided in surge team recruit ment. We put a lot of time and eort into select ing the folks on our ANSF (Afghan National Security Forces) surge team. The surge has worked beyond my expectations. These folks have given us a tremendous boost with their spirited work and ready camaraderie and they have already had a signicant, positive impact on our program in just their rst 30 days. The depth of talent in USACE is remarkable and it is always elating when those talented folks come forward to meet a challenge, he said. Evan Taylor, a geotechnical engineer from St. Louis District at TAA as a surge team member, worked with contractors. Working with contractors has been very easy, positive. Even if the experience wasnt there, there was still the will to do well. Their willingness is denitely there. They try. They want to do well, he said. Taylor hopes to gain experience working with construction here. I did a lot of design at home, so I was on the other side of it but I dealt with construc tion. That was one of the reasons I wanted to come here: a) I wanted to get some construction experience, b) were a civil works district so this is experience with milcon (military construction). So thats a big part of why I came here. Brad Brady, a project engineer here from Vicksburg District, added, Id say the vertical construction is something most of us dont get to deal with at home. Dirks added, Experience is a big part of why I came. I wanted to do this for a while, I put school on hold, I was told that theyre wrap ping stu up and there isnt much time left, so I put other things on hold. We may not get the chance again in our careers to come over to a war zone and build stu for the people in that area and do good things. There is one former military member in the surge group; Mario Guerrero, a St. Louis District geotechnical engineer. Guerrero spent four years in the Army in the telecommunications eld. Surge team members Corps experiences range from three to seven years. Family members and stateside districts encouraged them to volunteer. My wife supported my deployment, Guer rero said. I learned about the opportunity when James Dalton from Headquarters, USACE spoke to our Leadership Develop ment Program III group. He recommended deploying for career development. Megan Cullen is a civil engineer from New England District. She said, I got a lot of support once I said I wanted to go. When I told my supervisor I was interested he said, Great. You should make it happen. But we didnt have as many contacts. So it was tougher for me to go. While districts supported the volunteers, some family members responses were mixed. Rachel Lopez, another St. Louis engineer, relayed, My husband also works for the Corps as an engineer. He was like the biggest cheerleader for me to do this until it came down for the time to leave, and then he was, What have I done? Nevertheless, Lopez precedes her husband, who has yet to deploy with the Corps. BUILDING STRONG BUILDING STRONG One surger has now experienced what is a way of life for so many service members. Brady said, I have four kids, theyre young. My wife was very understanding. She knows I didnt have the opportunity to come in uniform. But the kids took it a little harder. My oldest actually took it hardest. Cullen revealed what most multiple deploy ees have learned. I think it also depends on where youre de ploying to. When I talked to people who had deployed, just to get some information before I signed up, I had asked their experience and its very dierent than what I am experiencing here at Camp Phoenix. People I talked to were in forward operating bases and so I was expecting to be in the middle of nowhere being rocketed every day. I think it is awesome. Who gets to see this? Were so lucky that we get to see this part of the world. And experience, well were not really experiencing the culture, but to see a little snapshot of the day-to-day life, I think its awesome. Preparing friends and family members is also part of the deployment experience. Cullen continued, When I was telling peo ple that I was coming here they asked, Is your family going to visit? I said, It doesnt work like that. Taylor claried, Its not a vacation destination. Ultimately, as Heitkamp said, the construc tion surge teams three months in Afghanistan is a win-win situation. More like a win-win-win. TAA is able to make good use of some of the brightest young engineers in America as we move closer to mission completion. The volunteers will leave be hind nished projects vital to Afghanistan infrastructure and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will have sixteen professionals who know what its like to serve in a foreign land for the greater good. No doubt they will someday be the grizzled veterans at home districts who can regale future members who are trying to decide whether volunteering is right for them. TAA wins. The surge team members win. The Corps wins. USACE TAA photo by Todd Lyman USACE TAA photo by Todd Lyman USACE TAA photo by Alicia Embrey

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5 4SEPT 2013 http://www.tad.usace.army.mil/ SEPT 2013 http://www.tad.usace.army.mil/ 9/11 Remembrance CeremonyLess than one year after the devastating terror attacks in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania, Congress ocially recognized September 11th as Patriot Day in our Nation. While we can never forget the events of that day, we can honor the nearly 3,000 lives lost by participating in a National Day of Service and Remembrance. I encourage each of you to nd a way to mark the signicance of this day and, as the attached trisigned letter from our Army leaders reminds us, remember the more than 6,600 Service Members who have made the ultimate sacrice. Tomorrow in Winchester, Virginia, USACE will end a chapter in our post-9/11 history when the USACE Deployment Center (UDC) ocially closes its doors. Since 2005, more than 7,000 of our Soldiers and Civilians, as well as thousands from other commands, have processed through the UDC for Overseas Contingency Operations missions. The outstanding employees of Transatlantic Division and the UDC have ensured that those individuals who raised their hands and volunteered for deployment were trained, equipped and ready to serve in Iraq and Afghanistan. To the many folks who have made that possible, thank you. In the days after 9/11, retired General Colin Powell said: You can be sure that the American spirit will prevail over this tragedy. We have seen that American spirit prevail in the dedication of our tireless All Volunteer Army and their families in the Civilians and Contractors who have willingly deployed in harms wayin our reghters, police ocers and public safety ocials who risk their lives to save oursand in every citizen of our Nation who faced the dark days and weeks after 9/11 with greater resolve to live in freedom. It is that American spirit which we remember and give thanks for today. EssayonsBuilding StrongArmy Strong! Thomas P. Bostick Lieutenant General, US Army Commanding U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Balan Ayyar, Combined Joint Interagency Task Force 435 commanding general, speaks to an overow crowd at the 9/11 Memorial Ceremony on Camp Phoenix, Afghanistan, Sept. 11, 2013. The ceremony began at 5:16 p.m. Afghanistan time to coincide with actual events that began at 8:46 a.m. New York time Sept. 11, 2001. Camp memorial activities included reading poems, historical notes and letters reecting the tragedy, and moments of silence. HQ USACE Message from Lieutenant General Thomas P. Bostick USACE TAA photos by Alicia Embrey U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Balan Ayyar, Combined Joint Interagency Task Force 435 commanding general Department of Defense photo by Master Sgt. Jennifer LindseyTRANSATLANTIC TIMES TRANSATLANTIC TIMES BUILDING STRONG BUILDING STRONG

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7 6SEPT 2013 http://www.tad.usace.army.mil/ SEPT 2013 http://www.tad.usace.army.mil/ TRANSATLANTIC TIMES TRANSATLANTIC TIMESBuilding in Afghanistan: From Open Field to Functional FacilityAfghan Safety Professionals Apply New Knowledge Beyond WorkBY TODD LYMAN TRANSATLANTIC AFGHANISTAN DISTRICT KABULAfghan safety professionals are taking what they learn with the Corps into their homes and communities. In addition to capacity building here, USACE may also be responsible for a safety renaissance. The mission of the USACE Transatlantic Afghanistan District safety oce is to provide policy, programs, technical services, over sight and outreach related to safety and occupational health matters in support of Corps of Engineers missions throughout Afghanistan. To ensure mission accomplishment, training is a major tool in the quest. Safety Manager Ed McNamara explained BY TODD LYMAN TRANSATLANTIC AFGHANISTAN DISTRICT KABUL Building in Afghanistan is not like building in suburban America. It is not simply a matter of choosing counter tops and carpet over coee with the general contrac tor. Transatlantic Afghanistan District is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers primary agent to accomplish the building mission here. One veteran Transatlantic Division member explained, The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers mission in Afghanistan has some of the most challenging dynamics and ob stacles of any construction environment across the globe. First nding contractors who can demonstrate the ability to per form work in a contingency conict zone is dicult. In addition, there is not a skilled workforce readily available in Afghanistan, and the pipeline for materials and supplies is long and dicult to navigate. Contractors come from across the globe to accept work in Afghanistan and some nd the environment more challenging than they imagined and some leave before completing the work they were contracted to perform. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers does everything within its authority to hold contractors accountable for the quality and completion of work for which they were contracted. The bottom line is that constructing in Afghanistan is not like constructing anywhere in the USA and the ability to hold contractors fully accountable in a CFC Adds Online Option for Donors at MyPayBY KAREN PARRISH AMERICAN FORCES PRESS SERVICE WASHINGTON, Sept. 6, 2013 The annual Combined Federal Campaign adds a new feature for donors this year: an online pledge option available through the Defense Finance and Accounting Services MyPay website, which most service members and civilians already use to view their leave and earnings statements. Anthony DeCristofaro is assistant director of the DoD Voluntary Campaign Management Oce, which is within the Washington Headquarters Services human resources directo rate. He told American Forces Press Service during a telephone interview that the online pledge option oers several advantages over paper pledge forms: -Its available all the time, from any computer; -Its more condential and secure, as no paper forms pass from hand to hand; and -Its less prone to error. He explained that donors directly enter their input online only once, while the information on paper pledge forms is typed and retyped into the system -oering more chances for mistakes to creep in and also consuming thousands of total work hours in processing. He said ease of use is potentially much great er, since donors using the online pledge op tion can search local, national or international charities. Here in Washington, we have 4,500 charities, he noted. But nationwide, there are about 20,000 dierent charities in this campaign. DeCristofaro added that donors also are encouraged to use local CFC websites and other resources to research charities before giving DFAS their nal instructions. I made my gift on Tuesday, [and] I was easily matched to my local campaign, he said. DeCristofaro said the process took him 10 minutes, and the next morning he had an email conrming his donation and start date. BUILDING STRONG BUILDING STRONG We observed work practices that we found unacceptable. We made this training mandatory for all workers at Engineer Village; ofce workers, warehouse workers and janito rial workers. For example we had industrial safety classes for our warehouse workers and in the afternoon we had re prevention safety for all. One valuable TAA employee took the training to heart. Hamid, a 36-year-old house keeping worker who spent time as a security guard with coalition forces, observed areas at his home that needed attention. The electrical safety and re extinguisher use and maintenance training was very helpful and I was able to apply it in my Tim Kerr (right) and Kabul Area Oce resident engineer Randy Braley, serving here from USACE Rock Island District, brief TAA commander Col. Michael J. Price, Kabul Area Oce ocer-in-charge Col. Richard Heitkamp at the site of a project that began as an open eld near a village. (USACE Photo by Todd Lyman) The system has been in active development for two years, he said. The Defense Finance and Accounting Service led the eort, with support from the Oce of Management and Budget, which has a similar system in its ex ecutive agencies. In its rst year, the service is open to employ ees in 90 of the 160 local CFC areas. Ocials said more areas may be added in the future, and ask donors to use paper pledge forms in areas where the MyPay option is not available this year. DeCristofaro said use of the system, like par ticipation in CFC, is strictly voluntary. Many employees have asked for and will likely pre fer electronic options, he said, although any one who wants to make a one-time gift or use a paper CFC pledge form still can do so. The new option is an example of a collaborative eort that went into increasing our eciency, he added. DFAS hired computer pro grammers and worked with payroll oces to build and test the system, he said. You really had to have a lot of collaboration to get to this end product, he said. So many legacy systems come together here. The new option will be available to eligible donors outside of the Defense Department, he noted, as the departments of Health and Human Services, Veterans Aairs and Energy, along with the Environmental Protection Agency, also are DFAS clients. It is easy, it eliminates paper, and inside the government, its really going to save time, he said.home. I got home after the training and checked to see if our extinguisher was ac cessible and in working condition. I saw immediately that our extinguisher needed serviced, and I got it xed. Next I looked at the extension cords in our house to see if they had the UL or CE labels. For more than a century Underwriters Lab oratories (UL), an independent, non-prot organization has tested and certied products for safety. The European Commission (CE) certies that products have met EU health, safety and environmental require ments that ensure consumer and work place safety. I also checked to see if they were overloaded or if I had any daisy chains. When I saw the pictures in training of what happened when infractions occur and saw what we had at home, I removed the television, re frigerator and others from the same cord, Hamid continued. I explained to my family the dangers of putting so many items on one cord and they understood. I did not only tell my family, but my relatives, too. I explained to my brothers, sisters and told them what could happen. Omid, 24 years old from Kabul, learned English through classes he took on his own and assists with administration and interpretation here. He recalls the safety training, Ac tually I learned a lot. I was new at that time and felt the same way. It was good training that I could also apply outside of work. The newfound safety awareness brought memories into perspective for some of Hamid explains to Omid what he found when he inspected his home re extinguisher following safety training.CLICK HERE TO READ MOREcombat zone, in a foreign country, is rather limited. Despite these challenges the pro gram managers, engineers, construction oversight teams, legal advisors and contracting personnel all work together to try to assure the highest quality of product possible. As the largest public engineering agency in the world, USACE had developed proven processes and principles that enable pro jects to be completed which will meet the customers needs. Before exploring the how of mission accomplishment it is important to dene the overall mission and why it must succeed. In Afghanistan USACE designs and constructs projects for Afghan National Security Forcesspecically for the national army and national police. ANSF projects... CLICK HERE TO READ MORE The runway repair project at Bagram Air eld, the most heavily used military air base in the world, reached a major milestone Aug. 10, with the paving and opening of a temporary runway. Completion of the temporary runway allowed the primary runway to be shut down for much needed repairs. Use of the primary runway will resume in January 2014. The Army Corps of Engineers awarded a contract to Anham-ICS Serka Joint Venture for repair of the runways at Bagram Aireld on Feb. 11. Under the oversight of the Middle East Districts Oce at Bagram, the construction team developed a plan to repair the runways in two phases, beginning with the old Russian runway that runs parallel to the primary runway. On April 6, the contractor began demolishing the old Russian runway while the pri-Bagram Aireld Runway Repairs Reach TRANSATLANTIC MIDDLE EAST DISTRICT mary runway remained fully operational. The aged concrete runway which had not been used for years was reduced to rubble while approximately 24,000 cubic meters of concrete debris was removed, crushed and recycled. Assistance from the 455th Expeditionary Civil Engineering Squadron and close coordination with aireld management ensured ecient throughput of earth-moving equipment hauling materials to and from the aireld. After rebuilding the earth and gravel base, the concrete runway was replaced with nearly 10,000 cubic meters of asphalt, transforming a non-functional and crumbling runway into nearly two miles of smooth asphalt surface. Working to the very last minute, the contractor diligently worked to put down the last of the pavement mark ings the evening before the scheduled turnover. On Aug. 9, this major milestone was achieved as the old Russian runway was reborn and prepared to relieve the primary runway for repairs. The on-going success of this project is due to the hard work of a large team of experts representing Air Force and Army military and civilian personnel, the contractor, the Air Forces 455th ECES, Force Projection Flight, Security Forces, Aireld Manage ment, and the Army Corps of Engineers team. The complexities of this project with re spect to the number of organizations involved, the number of moving parts, and the high level of coordination, compromise, partnering required cannot be stressed enough, said Robert Schaible, chief Project Management Military Construction Branch. Failure to deliver on time is not an option given the high strategic importance of the runway itself. During the next few months, the primary asphalt runway at Bagram Air Field will be resurfaced and should return to full operation in January 2014.Major Milestone

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8SEPT 2013 http://www.tad.usace.army.mil/TRANSATLANTIC TIMES BUILDING STRONG HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (May 3, 2013) -The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville, working with the Army Energy Initiatives Task Force (EITF), today awarded the rst of its kind Indenite Delivery Indenite Quantity (IDIQ) Multiple Award Task Order Contracts (MATOC) for the rst technology under this contract to support renewable energy on Defense Department installations. Individual MATOC awards are being staggered by technology starting with todays announcement for geothermal. Announcement of awards for the remaining technologies, solar, wind and biomass, are anticipated for staggered release through the end of calendar year 2013. The total amount for all awards under the Renewable and Alternative Energy Pow er Production for DoD Installations MATOC will not exceed $7 billion. The MATOC will be used to procure reliable, locally generated, renewable and alternative energy through power purchase agreements (PPA). The $7 billion capacity would be expended for PPAs to procure energy over a pe riod of 30 years or less from renewable energy plants that are designed, nanced, constructed, operated and maintained by contractors using private sector nanc ing. The ve companies awarded contracts for use in competing and awarding PPA task orders using geothermal technology are Constellation NewEnergy, Inc., Baltimore, Md.; ECC Renewables, LLC, -Burlingame, Calif.; Enel Green Power North America, Inc. -Andover, Mass.; LTC Federal, LLC, Detroit, Mich.; and Siemens Government Technologies, Inc., Arlington, Va. The contracts provide a three-year base with seven one-year options, for a total ordering period of 10 years. Having these contracts in place will expedite the ac quisition process for future projects. Huntsville Center, working on behalf of USACE with the Armys EITF, issued the Request for Proposal for the $7 billion Renewable and Alternative Energy Power Production for DoD Installations MATOC on Aug. 7, 2012. These contracts will place the Army one step closer to meeting the Congressionally mandated energy goal of 25 percent production and consumption of energy from renewable sources by 2025 and improving installation energy security and sustainability while remaining cost conscious. In our current scal environment, attracting third-party money to build renew able energy production facilities that will allow military installations to purchase energy at a pre-determined rate without building, owning and maintaining the facility is the right thing to do, said Col. Robert Ruch, Huntsville Center commander. Increasing energy security is a top priority for DoD and Army leadership, and this eort will lead to enhanced energy security and sustainability for our installations. In April 2012, the White House announced the Defense Department was making one of the largest commitments to clean energy in history, by setting a goal to deploy 3 gigawatts of renewable energy -including solar, wind, biomass or geo thermal -on Army, Navy and Air Force installations by 2025. That is enough energy to power 750,000 homes. The Armys goal is 1 gigawatt of that total. These goals support the broader DoD goal to enhance installation energy security and reduce installation energy costs. By awarding these contracts, the Army will increase its agility by streamlining ac quisition processes to develop large-scale renewable energy projects that use private sector nancing. This approach will help speed overall project development timelines to ensure the best value to the Army and private sector. Mr. John Lushetsky, the EITFs executive director, spoke about the role of the EITF in helping the Army meet its renewable energy goals. To reach the Armys goal of deploying 1 gigawatt of renewable energy by 2025 will require a dierent way of doing business with the private sector. The issuance of the MATOC is a clear milestone for us, and the signicant interest weve seen from industry indicates that we are on the right path. The EITF has worked closely with the Huntsville Center to make the MATOC a streamlined and agile tool for the government to procure power from large scale renewable energy projects.BY DEBRA VALINE USACE ENGINEERING AND SUPPORT CENTERArmy MATOC First awards under $7 billion renewable energy contract