Citation
Transatlantic times

Material Information

Title:
Transatlantic times
Uniform Title:
Transatlantic times (Winchester, Va.)
Added title page title:
Transatlantictimes
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Corps of Engineers. -- Transatlantic Programs Center
United States -- Army. -- Corps of Engineers. -- Transatlantic Division
Place of Publication:
Winchester, VA
Publisher:
TAC Public Affairs Office, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Quarterly[<Oct./Dec. 2010>-July/Sept. 2012]
Bimonthly[ FORMER Dec. 2002-<Nov./Dec. 2004>]
Irregular[ FORMER <Spring 2005-July/Aug. 2009>]
quarterly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military engineering -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Military engineering ( fast )
United States ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with vol. 1, no. 1 (December 2002).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for October, November, December 2010 also called First edition.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
231616861 ( OCLC )
ocn231616861
Classification:
UG1 .T732 ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Transatlantic news

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Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

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Full Text

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AUGUST 2013 USACE TAD TRANSATLANTIC TIMES Construction of Afghanistan National Police Compounds in Kandahar Underway 553rd FEST-A provides expert recommendations for how to expand, shrink, consolidate, close Faces From the Front: Meet Chief Warrant Ocer 4 Keith Wright TO VIEW TRANSATLANTIC AFGHANISTAN DISTRICT CEREMONY PHOTOS U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS TRANSATLANTIC DIVISION PUBLICATION Safety a Vital Element of Corps Construction Success by Jasmine Chopra-Delgadillo, USACE Transatlantic Afghanistan District KANDAHAR AIRFIELD, Afghanistan The U.S. Army KANDAHAR Afghanistan Construction is underway on an Afghan National Police provincial headquarters and provincial response company compound here. Once complete, the headquarters will accommodate 200 police specialists and the company compound will accommodate 135 personnel. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Transatlantic Afghani stan District project consists of two adjacent sites. In cluded in the design and construction are administra tion buildings, training buildings, dining halls, separate barracks for men and women, force protection meas ures, wastewater collection and treatment systems, electrical generation and distribution systems, deten tion cells, fuel points, and more. The project is about 40 percent complete. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE READING CLICK HERE TO READ MORE CLICK HERE TO READ MORE This document is published by the USACE Transatlantic Division Public Aairs Oce. Alicia Embrey, Online Magazine Editor alicia.m.embrey@usace.army.mil CLICK HERE Web Release USACE AFGHANISTAN DISTRICTS COMBINE: TRANSATLANTIC AFGHANISTAN DISTRICT Page 3 Page 6 Page 2 USACE times Transatlantic BUILDING STRONG AUGUST 2013 USACE TAA Photos by Jasmine Chopra-Delgadillo/Released Page 4-5 CLICK HERE TO READ MORE

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3 AUGUST 2013 2 AUGUST 2013 USACE TAD TRANSATLANTIC TIMES USACE TAD TRANSATLANTIC TIMES TRANSATLANTIC TIMES TRANSATLANTIC TIMES Construction of Afghanistan National Police compounds in Kandahar underway U.S. Army, National Guard and Reserve soldiers provide transportation and security so that U.S. Army Corps of Engineers technical experts can go outside the wire to inspect project sites under construction. Without these soldiers, it would be nearly impossible for USACE to safely complete its mission to deliver critical infrastructure for the Afghan people. (USACE TAA photo by Jasmine Chopra-Delgadillo/Released) by Jasmine Chopra-Delgadillo USACE Transatlantic Afghanistan District KANDAHAR AIRFIELD, Afghanistan As responsibility for the safety, security and stability of Afghanistan is being assumed by Afghan authorities, the U.S. footprint here is getting smaller. As a result, United States Forces Af ghanistan, which is responsible for most of the base transitions and closures in the nation, looks to technical experts to assist with shutting down bases. One group of specialists helping to facilitate transitions and closures is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 553rd Engineer Detachment, Forward Engi neer Support Team Advance, based out of New York. The teams unique blend of engineering, environmental, geospatial and construction management professionals make them an apt choice for rec ommendations on how to expand, shrink, consolidate and close bases. The 553rd is one of eight FEST-A teams in the world. Each is composed of one ocer in charge, one non-commissioned ocer in charge and six highly-skilled USACE civilian technical experts. The teams quickly produce a wide-range of engineering products and services. Members of the 553rd were recently consulted on how one base in south ern Afghanistan should accommodate troops and equipment from other, nearby bases that are shutting down. Members included cartographer/ surveyor Richard Allahar, electrical engineer Donna Johnson, engineering geologist Sandy Zelen, and construction engineer supervisor U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Roland Tajalle. Base closures, expansions and transitions involve much more than a knack for organizing and moving things. There are many directives and policies to consider. Questions that commonly surface include how best to congure structures, questions about capacity to produce electricity to accommodate the needs of residents and questions about environmental assessments. We look at regulations, including The Sand Book, explained Zelen, who deployed to Afghanistan from the USACE Baltimore District where she nor BUILDING STRONG BUILDING STRONG Construction is underway on an Afghan National Police provincial headquarters and provincial response company compound here. Once complete, the headquarters will accommodate 200 police specialists and the company compound will accommodate 135 personnel. (USACE photographer Jasmine Chopra-Delgadillo/Released) KANDAHAR Afghanistan Construction is underway on an Afghan Na tional Police provincial headquarters and provincial response company compound here. Once complete, the headquarters will accommodate 200 police specialists and the company compound will accommodate 135 personnel. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Transatlantic Afghanistan District pro ject consists of two adjacent sites. Included in the design and construc tion are administration buildings, training buildings, dining halls, sepa rate barracks for men and women, force protection measures, wastewater collection and treatment systems, electrical generation and distribution systems, detention cells, fuel points, and more. The project is about 40 percent complete. Infrastructure like the kind currently under construction in Kandahar will enable Afghans to provide increased security and stability in the province because these facilities provide adequate places for Afghan Na tional Security Forces to live, work and train, said U.S. Army Lt. Col. John Connor, ocer in charge of the Transatlantic Afghanistan District South Area Oce. Although a contractor is building the facilities, USACE personnel, includ ing Jason Riharb, conduct thorough inspections of the construction site by Jasmine Chopra-Delgadillo, USACE Transatlantic Afghanistan District Jason Riharb, a civil engineer with the USACE Transatlantic Afghanistan district, meets with an Afghan engineer at the construction site of an Afghan National Police provincial headquarters. Although a contractor is building the project, Riharb conducts thorough inspections of the construction site several times weekly to help make sure construction is progress ing in accordance with the International Building Code and the sites plans and specications. 553rd FEST-A provides expert recommendations for how to expand, shrink, consolidate, close mally serves as the districts enforce ment (Regulatory Division) program manager. The Sand Book is the colloquial term for the U.S. Central Commands Regulation 415-1. Construction and Base Camp Development in the US CENTCOM Area of Responsibility. Zelen, who has worked at USACE for some 25 years, also teaches college science and engineering courses. In a process that bears some resem blance to Defense Base Closure and Realignment or BRAC, some bases in Afghanistan will expand to accom modate American troops and equip ment from closing bases before the troops depart for the U.S. and equip ment, materials and supplies are ret rograded. Retrograde, from a defense logistics perspective, is the return of military materiel to the United States. Its expanding to shrink, explained Allahar. Whenever practical and within regu lations, the team incorporates cus tomers preferences into designs. The base where Allahar conducted a recent geospatial survey needs to accommodate two additional com pany-sized elements. A company is a military unit consisting of 80 soldiers. The base that is scheduled to absorb these troops will not gain any new real estate, so the recongura tion will have to happen within the existing parcel of real estate. Although he has only worked for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for three years, Allahar deployed to Iraq prior to his current tour in Afghanistan. He previously served with the U.S. Agency for International Development on road design and construction projects in Sumatra following the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. Johnson volunteered for the team from the Europe District. Her specialty, electrical engineering, is one of the most sought after in Afghanistan since electrical production and distribution are essential to the countrys devel opment. For Tajalle, his current deployment marks his fourth combat tour in eight years. His knowledge and experience in construction management and logistics in a contingency environment are essential to accomplishing the teams missions, said Johnson. Consolidating bases, closing some and expanding others is necessary as more than 34,000 troops are scheduled to depart Afghanistan by the close of 2013 and Afghan National Security Forces assume full responsibility for safety and security operations in their homeland. USFOR-A seeks the technical expertise of specialists, including the 553rd Forward Engineer Support Team Advance to make sure the process is done right. Donna Johnson, an electrical engineer with the 553rd Engineer Detachment, Forward Engineer Support Team Advance inspects a generator at a forward operating base in Southern Afghanistan. (USACE TAA photos by Jasmine Chopra-Delgadillo/Released) Richard Allahar, a surveyor and car tographer with the 553rd Engineer Detachment, Forward Engineer Sup port Team Advance conducts geo spatial survey work at a forward oper ating base in Southern Afghanistan. several times weekly. As a young civil engineer with ve years of experi ence, including nearly two in combat zones, Riharb has the education and expertise required to identify potential problems and coordinate corrective actions. My objective is to make sure the contractors here build safe and reliable facilities that comply with the International Building Code and project plans and specications, within the time and budget allotted, said Riharb. These facilities will support Afghan National Security Forces as these forces serve and protect their communities, he said. The project is expected to be completed in January of 2014.

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5 AUGUST 2013 4 AUGUST 2013 USACE TAD TRANSATLANTIC TIMES USACE TAD TRANSATLANTIC TIMES TRANSATLANTIC TIMES TRANSATLANTIC TIMES Last district standingTAA continues Corps mission in Afghanistan by Todd Lyman USACE Transatlantic Afghanistan District KABUL In three days the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers went from having three districts in Afghanistan to only oneone district with a huge mission-part of which is to continue the Corps legacy begun in late 2002 with only an Transatlantic Afghanistan District, the last district standing, was activated July 9 under the command of Col. Michael J. Price, who returns to Afghanistan from St. Paul District, which he commanded from July 2010 to this month. Maj. Gen. Michael Eyre, Transatlantic Division commander, hosted and presided. In the next two days Transatlantic District North in Kabul and Transatlantic District South at Kandahar would be inactivated and all responsibility to complete the Corps mission in Afghanistan would rest on the new district. More than 150 people assembled at Camp Phoenix Patriot Square. The color guard presented the cased colors. Command Sergeant Major Roy Ward, Transatlantic Division, retrieved the cased colors and positioned himself before Eyre and Price. As the senior enlisted leader, the command sergeant major is the custodian of the units colors. In this role Ward retrieved the cased Corps colors from the color guard and presented it to Eyre, who uncased the by Jasmine Chopra-Delgadillo, USACE Transatlantic Afghanistan District KANDAHAR AIRFIELD, Afghanistan Afghanistan Engineer District-South marked its inactivation after four years of delivering critical infrastructure projects in Afghanistan with a Over the course of four years, the districts technical experts completed nearly 200 projects valued at $1.4 billion that improved the safety, security and well-being of Afghans, U.S. and coalition forces. During his remarks, Afghanistan Engineer DistrictSouth Commander Col. Vincent V. Quarles, a resident of Stafford, Va., thanked Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Bostick, commanding general of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Maj. Gen. Michael BUILDING STRONG BUILDING STRONG colors and presented the TAA colors to Price, signifying the transfer of command responsibility and authority. The passing of the unit colors demonstrates to the members of the unit that the mantle of leadership has been passed on to the new commander, the narrator explained to the audience emblazoned with the Corps castle. Eyre addressed the crowd, There was much accomplished by the two districts that we are inactivating on Wednesday and Thursday. They have served with distinction. But it is time to pull together a new team working as one, to stand up a new districtwith a new identity. Working together we will move forward through 2014 and set . (USACE TAA photo by Jasmine Chopra-Delgadillo/Released) U.S. Soldiers assigned to the Afghanistan Engineer District-South color guard display the cased colors, which signies the inactivation of the district in a ceremony at Kandahar Aireld, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, July 11, 2013. U.S. Soldiers assigned to the Afghanistan Engineer District-South color guard display the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ag during the inactivation of the district ceremony at Kandahar Aireld, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, July 11, 2013. (USACE TAA photos Jasmine Chopra-Delgadillo, released) TAS inactivation photos CLICK HERE TO READ MORE U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Transatlantic Division Command Sergeant Major Roy Ward assists division commander Maj. Gen. Michael R. Eyre to uncase the colors for Transatlantic Afghanistan District as Col. Michael J. Price prepares to assume command during a cer emony at Camp Phoenix, Kabul province, Afghanistan, July 9, 2013. (USACE TAA photo by Todd Lyman/Released) Afghanistan Engineer District-South inactivates after four years of delivering critical infrastructure projects CLICK HERE TO READ MORE U.S. Army Col. Alfred A. Pantano, Jr. and Command Sgt. Maj. Ronald R. Flubacher case the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Transatlantic District North colors during the unit inactivation ceremony at Camp Phoenix. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Transatlantic District North (TAN) color guard takes its post during the inactivation ceremony for TAN at Camp Phoenix. Maj. Gen. Michael R. Eyre, Transatlantic Division commander, addresses the audience during the Transatlantic District North inactivation ceremony at Camp Phoenix, Kabul, Afghanistan, July 10. (USACE TAA photos by T.W. Lyman, released) TAN inactivation photos Transatlantic District North inactivated during Kabul ceremony by Todd Lyman USACE Transatlantic Afghanistan District KABUL, Afghanistan The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers bid farewell to the Transatlantic District North and the units commander during the last year, Col. Alfred A. Pantano, Jr., under a bright Af ghanistan sky Wednesday. Maj. Gen. Michael Eyre, Transatlantic Di vision commander, hosted and presided over the colors-casing ceremony. 2002 USACE received a request to as ghanistan (OMC-A) and Combined Joint Task Force (CJTF) 180 in their mission to develop facilities for the new Afghan National Army (ANA). The Transatlantic Program Center (TAC) responded quick ly by assembling and deploying a team to Kabul to help develop a master plan for standing up the ANAs Central Corps. Their arrival in October 2002 established (AAO) and became the foundation for the Afghanistan Engineer District (AED). AED was renamed Transatlantic District North in 2011. comprised of approximately 370 civilian, 32 military and 161 contactor personnel nearly 550 professionals on the rolls. This month TAN contracted to two area new district, Transatlantic Afghanistan District. More than 150 people assembled at Camp Phoenix Patriot Square. The color guard presented the district colors. TAN Command Sgt. Maj. Ronald F. Flubacher and Pantano cased the colors by rolling a sheath. The general received the cased colors from the colonel, and passed the colors to Flubacher, who remounts the colors in the color sergeants harness. The order directing the inactivation of TAN was read. By order of the com manding general, Transatlantic Division, the following action is directed. Transat lantic District North Afghanistan is inac tivated and assigned to control, head quarters, Transatlantic Division, United States Army Corps of Engineers effective 10 July 2013. The colors will be preserved in the event the district is reactivated. Eyre explained to the assembly, This Army and the Army way of life and to for mally say farewell to a highly principled, and experienced and successful leader, Col Al Pantano. Todays ceremony rep resents recognition and commemoration combined with change and continuity. We recognize the outstanding efforts and delivered results of this district and we welcome its historic accomplishments. He congratulated the command and complimented its leadership, which he said has led this team through what is ployed districts history ... preparing for the end of mission. The general said, While previous com manders had the luxury of focusing most ly on the present, knowing there was still time, TANs team was forced to concen trate on the here and now and with one eye looking out 18 months to two years. TAN has prepared TAA for success. plishments, Eyre stated, Col. Al Pantano has brought you safely and successfully to this day of transition, a transition that ter and the standing up of a new district. We are all part of an historic Army Corps of Engineers event today. Col. Pantano did an absolutely superb job. He led this team of nearly 550 military and civilian professionals representing so many oth ers in executing a $3.3 billion construc tion program in support of the U.S. and coalition strategy in Afghanistan. With Als guidance, and keen insights the TAN of Engineer contingency organization. Pantano stated that he was honored and privileged to serve with TAN in Afghani stan and thanked Eyre. He wished bless ings for the team members and their fam ilies and thanked them for their service. The ceremony concluded as all sang the Engineer song Essayons and Army song, Army Goes Rolling Along. U.S. Army Col. Alfred A. Pantano, Jr., commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Transatlantic Disrtrict North (TAN), addresses his unit for the nal time following the TAN inactivation ceremony at Camp Phoenix, Kabul province, Afghanistan, July 10, 2013. (USACE TAA photo by T.W. Lyman/Released) U.S. Army Col. Alfred A. Pantano, Jr., right, receives the Army Corp of Engineers Transatlantic District North (TAN) colors from TAN Command Sergeant Major Ronald F. Flubacher for the nal time as he prepares to case them at Kabul. Afghanistan Engineer District-South Commander U.S. Army Col. Vincent V. Quarles addresses an audience during the inactivation ceremony for the district at Kandahar Aireld, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, July 11, 2013. Engineer District-South marked its inactivation after four years of delivering critical infrastructure projects in Afghanistan. The audience at the Transatlantic District North inactivation ceremony listens to the speakers.

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AUGUST 2013 6 USACE TAD TRANSATLANTIC TIMES TRANSATLANTIC TIMES BUILDING STRONG Safety a Vital Element of Corps Construction Success by Jasmine Chopra-Delgadillo, USACE Transatlantic Afghanistan District KANDAHAR, Afghanistan Building is a dangerous business, no mat ter where it occurs. Safety and occupational health specialists work hard to prevent accidents like those reported world-wide so far this year. In the U.K., a construction worker plummeted off scaffolding 50 feet to the ground. In the U.S. a boom on a poorly-maintained crane dropped and crushed a worker. Geronimo Gomez, a safety and occupational health specialist with the USACE Transatlantic Afghanistan District is part of a team dedicated to preventing such events here. In Afghanistan, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is building water, power, and transportation projects as well as Afghan National Security Forces facilities to enable security and stability in the nation. Although the district contracts with competent, experienced, Afghan-owned and most dangerous industries in the world, explains Gomez. Safety is the districts top priority, but sometimes accidents, incidents or near misses happen, Gomez said. He urges the best defense against near misses or worse is prevention through education, training and awareness. When an accident, inci dent, or near miss occurs at a district job site, Gomez investigates; identifying all the possible factors in his pursuit to determine the cause in order to prevent future occurrences. We have to ask who, what, when, where, why, and how did the event occur, says Gomez of investigations. It is necessary to identify fac tors such as work pace and work load, whether or not machines and equipment have received proper maintenance, whether or not person al protective equipment was used, physical working conditions such as temperature, and how well-informed workers are about hazards, Gomez says. During investigations, Gomez follows a rigorous checklist, interviews relevant parties to the event including witnesses, reviews pictures and footage, visits the event site, takes measurements and carefully evalu ates all of the data. The purpose of my investigation is not for punitive measures, its to determine the root cause of the event for the purposes of eliminating hazards and preventing recurrence, Gomez said. Safety and occupational health standards in developing nations lag be hind those in developed ones according to the United Nations Interna tional Labour Organization. Striving to impart a culture of safety is really important if we want to reduce and eliminate accidents here, explained Gomez, who for 25 years worked for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and has taught workplace safety courses at the University of Texas in Arlington. must have safety and occupational health specialists on job sites dai ly, Gomez inspects job sites, the related environment and equipment at sites weekly. He observes labor practices to promote adherence include reduced absenteeism due to illness or injury, fewer lost days, less damage to property, overall costs savings and most important ly, fewer fatalities. When workplace-related unfortunate events occur, Gomez investigates and recommends preventive actions to curb and eliminate future accidents, incidents or near misses. One loss of life is one too many, especially when the loss is prevent able, Gomez said. If we can determine root causes, recognize and eliminate hazards and promote a culture of prevention and awareness, we can save lives. (USACE TAA photo by Jasmine Chopra-Delgadillo/Released)