Citation

Material Information

Title:
Soundings
Uniform Title:
Soundings (Detroit, Mich.)
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Corps of Engineers. -- Detroit District
Place of Publication:
Detroit, MI
Publisher:
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Bimonthly[<Apr. 1984>-]
Monthly[ FORMER -<1983>]
bimonthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Numbering Peculiarities:
Not numbered: <, Apr. 1984>-
Statement of Responsibility:
US Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
15002090 ( OCLC )
ocm15002090

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

Full Text

PAGE 1

FALL 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG 12 Employees of the QuarterThird Quarter 2013 CORPS SPEAKS Lt. Col. Robert Ells, Detroit District Engineer, spoke in May to members of the Great Lakes Maritime Task Force, discussing the shipping communitys request for an extension to the Soo Locks operating season. Ells also spoke in June at a meeting of the Harbor Technical Advisory Committee, HTAC, in Duluth, Minn. He discussed low lake levels, dredging, dredged material management, the Soo Locks and St. Clair River compensation. Another key topic was the 21st Avenue pilot project in Duluth. reuse materials from maintenance dredging over the next three years. Sabrina Miller, project manager Team, spoke in May to about 50 people during a meeting of the Huron Beach Civic Association in Ocqueoc, Mich. Afterward, the audience had questions on topics including Michigans beach grooming law, and whether a permit is needed to remove boulders from near-shore areas. John Allis and Keith Kompoltowicz of the Great 30 at a University of Michigan seminar and panel discussion, Low Great Lakes water levels: Understanding the causes and potential consequences. The presentation was offered before a live audience and as a webinar. Kompoltowicz also spoke about Great Lakes water levels to the Port Huron Rotary Club on June 13 at the Masonic Lodge in Port Huron, Mich.; and at the Michigan Water Environment Association annual meeting on June 26 at Boyne Mountain Resort in Boyne Falls, Mich. On June 29, Kompoltowicz staffed a USACE information booth during Engineers Day festivities at the Soo Locks, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. He reported answering many questions about Great Lakes water levels. Allis gave a Great Lakes water levels overview June 28 to the environmental group Green Drinks in Battle Creek, Mich.James Lewis Great Lakes Oce of Hydraulics and Hydrology Justin Proulx Soo Area Oce Crystal Kelley Operations Oce Engineers Day awards recognize employeesInnovator of the Quarter Nathan Schulz Lake Michigan Area Oce Justin Proulx demonstrated exceptional per formance as construction representative with the the success of a project to replace a compressed air bubbler system that keeps ice away from miter gates in the locks, and a project involving roof and masonry repairs to the North Main tenance Support Building. Proulxs performance and dedication are exemplary himself, the Detroit District and the Corps of Engineers. James Lewis, lead water level forecaster in the Watershed Hydrology Branch, developed new and im proved graphics for use in speaking engagements and media interviews pertaining to Great Lakes water lev els and the nature of water presentation slides explain things in easy-to-understand terms and have been wellreceived by technical and non-technical audiences alike. Lewis innovation, hard work and dedication self and the entire Corps of Engineers. Crystal Kelley, senior program analyst in the districts environmental compliance coordinator, is recognized for her initia tive, can-do attitude and leadership qualities. She helped revamp the districts compliance program for the Environmental Review Guide for Operations, establishing a team to ensure Detroit District facilities are in accord with this initia tive. Kelleys dedication to great credit upon herself, the district and the Corps. Nathan Schulz, a biolo gist with the Lake Michigan automated wetland deter mination data form. His synthesis and integration of various key components into an automated form ed to the districts mission. Wetland determinations are observations. Schulzs innovation and dedication great credit upon himself, the district and the Corps of Engineers.

PAGE 2

FALL 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG FALL 2013 2 11Commanders ColumnCorps employees demonstrate teamwork and professionalismLt. Col. Robert J. Ells Continued on Page 3DISTRICT ENGINEER Lt. Col. Robert J. Ells PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER Lynn M. Rose EDITOR / LAYOUT Thomas M. BlackSoundings is an authorized newspaper of the Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District. It is published quarterly, under supervision of provisions of Army regulation, AR-360-1. It is prepared using desktop publishing and printed by offset press. The Soundings is also available on the Internet at http://www.lre.usace.army.mil/ Circulation: We print 400 copies per issue and circulate them to employees, retirees, and anyone requesting a copy in writing. Contents: Views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the Department of the Army. The U.S. Army does not endorse any product or service that may be advertised or mentioned in this publication. News copy is prepared in accordance with Associated Press, AP Style Guide. All photos are U.S. Army photos unless otherwise indicated. Submission: welcomes comments and opinions about the information published in Soundings. News tips, ideas, suggestions and articles may be mailed to Soundings, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District: 477 Michigan Ave. Detroit, MI 48226. Fax: 313-226-5993 E-mail: Lynn.M.Rose@us.army.mil. For general information, call toll free: 1-888694-8313 COVER: Detroit District Engineer Robert Ells and Deputy District Engineer James Booth congratulate Michael OBryan, chief of the Engineering and Technical Services Division, for his 40 years of service to the district. The Commander honored outstanding employees and participants in the Leadership Develop ment Program. (Photo by Tom Black)and coming loose from some of its attachments to the concrete pier. Crews removed the structure in pieces which they loaded onto the Manitowoc The Corps worked out an arrangement with a local scrap metal company to take possession of the metal, thus eliminating disposal concerns. Itll be a win-win for both of us, Kane said. On the dredging front, several key projects were recently completed, said Mollie Mahoney, project man include Green Bay, Wis., and the Michigan harbors of Holland, Muskegon, St. Joseph and New Buffalo. Grand Haven Harbor was slated to be done by Aug. 31. Several dredging projects were ongoing as of mid-August, including the Detroit River, Saginaw River/ Bay, the Saginaw River turning basin emergency dredging and Manistee Harbor. Approximately a dozen other dredging projects had been awarded by mid-August or were scheduled to be awarded in the coming weeks. Last winter, Congress approved a relief package for areas affected by Hurricane Sandy. The legislation included $2.6 million for seven Detroit District dredging projects intended to eliminate shoaling in storm-affected navigational channels. The state of Michigan also ap proved $5.9 million for dredging seven harbors. Due to the addition of Hurricane Sandy projects, emergency dredging in the Saginaw River and the seven state of Michigan dredging projects, ing program has turned out to be much more robust than anticipated, Mahoney said. She added the district has been pleased with the dredging proposals received this year. They have been competitively priced and have al lowed us to use our limited dredging dollars more effectively. Continued from Page 10 The Manitowoc crane barge removes part of the catwalk structure from the Indiana Harbor pier in East Chicago, Ind.Photo by Joe Kane Team Detroit, in keeping with the tradition of highlighting one of my priorities I want to take the opportunity in this edition to focus on my priority of People. All of you do amazing work on a daily basis in support of our mission to maintain the Great Lakes Navigation System. But, one recent event is worthy of highlighting because of the incredible teamwork and pro fessionalism of the folks involved the recovery of the tug Hammond Bay on July 3. For those of you not familiar with the event, on the morning of July 1, the tug Billmaier was underway from Duluth, Minn., to Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., towing three barges and the unmanned Hammond Bay. At about 3:30 a.m., while Billmaier crew members shortened the tow in prepa ration for traveling through the Soo Locks, they lost sight of the Hammond Bay. After securing its barges, the Billmaier and crew at tempted to locate the lost tug. During the search, an oil sheen was observed and a life ring from the Hammond Bay was found and recovered. The crew immediately USCG, at Sector Sault Ste. Marie. The federal navigation channel was closed and the USCG marked the location and established a safety zone around the Hammond Bay. immediately jumped into action. The survey vessel Bufe was disa USCG helicopter deployed to provide support during the search. The Bufe located the Hammond Bay ting in about 37 feet of water inside the federal channel. The team used its remotely operated underwater camera equipment to conduct an initial investigation of the tug as it lay on the bottom of the federal channel. They discovered no clear indicators of why the Hammond Bay sank. The next day the crane barge Harvey was loaded with dive equipment and mobilized to the site along with the derrick barge Nicolet in preparation for the salvage. On the morning of July 3, with the derrick barge Schwartz mobilized, the contracted divers and a marine pollution control consultant on site, the team in place and both the U.S. and Canadian Coast Guards stand ing by to provide assistance, the consolidated team began its sal vage operation. In preparation for raising the tug, the team deployed oil contain ment booms around the work area, plugged one fuel vent and attached a hose running to the surface to the other fuel vent in order to success fully control spillage from the fuel tanks. Utilizing the divers to rig Crews pull the sunken tug Hammond Bay to the surface July 3 in the St. Marys River near Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.Photo by Kevin SpragueBy Charlie Simon Regulatory Oce has seen a notable spike in permit applications. From December 2012 through May 2013, applications were up 66 percent compared to the four-year average for the same time period, said John Konik, Chief of the Permits are required from the Corps for all work in navigable wa ters and for the discharge of material in U.S. waters, including wetlands. In the previous four years, Regula tory averaged over 1,650 applica tions a year. In 2013, 1,300 appli six months. The increase in permit applications seems tied to low water levels on the Great Lakes, according to Regulatory staff. that 49 percent of recent applications have been for dredging. This com pares to about 28 percent in previ ous years. Requests for other types of work remain stable, but shore protection applications are below average. We started to see the number of applications creep up last De cember, Konik said. There was a dramatic increase in applications in January through April this year. Municipalities, marinas and home owners recognized that water levels could affect boat access, and applied for dredging permits. Konik commended the Regulatory staff for keeping up with the in creased workload. Staff has stepped up to the challenge, and our permit evaluation time frames remain ex cellent, he said. Rise in permit applications tied to low water levels Brian Romsek, a civil engineer LMAO, was awarded the Steel Order of the de Fleury Medal, presented to junior soldiers and civilians within the Engineer Regiment who have made sig butions to Army Engineering. Romsek is consistently valued for work accomplished in a timely and His outstanding performance as on-site project engineer was instrumental in the successful completion of the challenging Fort Custer Army Reserve Center near Augusta, Mich. He now serves as project engineer on the VA Medical Center projects in Battle Creek, Mich. Brian always brings an excel lent attitude to the workplace, and he is a pleasure to work with, said LMAO Area Engi neer Tom OBryan. His hard work and dedication are much appreciated. RomsekEngineer receives Order of de Fleury Medal

PAGE 3

FALL 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG FALL 2013 10 3By Tom Black Public Aairs Oce The Detroit District and partnering organizations are ahead of schedule on a dredged material disposal facility, DMDF, promising Restoration of the Cat Island chain in Green Bay, Wis., will create a DMDF for placement of non-contaminated material dredged from Green Bay Outer Harbor. At the same time, it will recreate eco logically vital wetlands for and natural vegetation. Additionally, the wave barrier portion will help protect the shoreline from erosion. Completion is expected in early summer 2014 about six months earlier than projected, with be less than $20 million, much lower than expected. This project is the benchmark by which all future dredged disposal material facilities shall be measured, said Corps Project Manager Steve Check. The cooperation between commercial and envi ronmental interests was paramount to the suc cess of the project. Workers are construct ing a 4.3-mile-long, eight-foot-high stone perpendicular dikes, called legs, that will separate three cells for disposal of dredged material. Barges will transfer dredged material from Green Bays outer harbor either by hydraulic A gravel road on top of the dike will enable truck transport or pipeline place ment of the dredged mate rial to the cells. Over a pe riod of time, the dredged materials will build up the new islands. Material the Corps dredges from the Green Bay Inner Harbor and inner bay channel will continue to be placed in posal Facility on the east shore of the bay. The original Cat Island chain, consisting of Cat, Willow and the Bass Islands, was washed away in the 1960s by high water levels, waves and ice. This effectively wiped out over 1,400 acres of marshland. The new islands will help coastal marsh areas and underwater plants to thrive and provide 1,440 acres of wildlife species, accord ing to the project spon sors, which include Brown County, Wis., the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.Cat Island construction project ahead of scheduleAn aerial shot of the Cat Island wave barrier and legs that will enclose dredged materials reveals remnants of the original Cat Island in the lower cell. USACE Photo Commanders Column (Continued from Page 2)the Hammond Bay to the Harvey, the team successfully raised the sunken vessel. When the tug was back at the surface, the team pumped out all the water, conducted a walkthrough of the vessel and determined it was seawor thy. The team secured the Hammond Bay and towed it The salvage operation was completed in about four hours. A board of investigation, BOI, was established by the Great Lakes and Ohio River Division, and the team lead, John Cheek, observed the salvage operation. He praised the team and said it was one of the most professional, well planned/executed operations of this type he has seen. The BOI determined that material failure led to leaks in the tug. The good news is there were no injuries, the Hammond Bay was salvaged, repaired and put back in service about three weeks later. This is just another example of the incredible work done by the Detroit District and serves to highlight one of the many ways our district plays a critical role in the Great Lakes. Thank you all! By Tom Black Public Aairs Oce Summertime in the Great Lakes region is busy not just for marine navigation; its also prime time for dredging and maintenance of navi gational infrastructure. The Manitowoc crane barge and its accompanying tugs, the Racine and Kenosha, are regularly deployed do work in the Detroit District and adjacent Chicago District in south ern Lake Michigan. Recently its nine-member crew completed breakwater maintenance at Milwaukee Harbor in Milwaukee, Wis., and Calumet Harbor in Chi cago, Ill. At Milwaukee Harbor, workers placed armor stones along the north wall a 700-foot section of the four-mile-long breakwater, said Joe Kane, captain of the Manitowoc. A few weeks later, the crew rebuilt 1,150 feet of the Calumet Harbor breakwall in South Chicago. This included re charging 50-foot segments enclosed and partitioned by sheet piling, called cells by placing core stone in each cell. After placing core stone (crushed limestone) into the cells, crews placed cut stones, each weighing up to nine tons, along the top of the cells. Then they added armor stone along the sides. The crew also shored up the sheet piling on the sides of the breakwall. Next sum mer, the crew will devote consider able time to grouting the Calumet Harbor breakwalls. On July 31, the Manitowoc crew arrived at Indiana Harbor in East Chicago, Ind., to begin dismantling a decaying steel superstructure from atop the pier. The catwalk-like struc ture, 2,300 feet long, was corroded Crews stay busy with maintenance, dredging The Manitowoc crane barge, operated by Mark Dreifuerst, lays down a cut stone at the Calumet Harbor breakwater in Chicago, Ill. Continued on Page 11Photo by Joe Kane As our Quality Management System matures, we grow from focusing on standardizing business processes to a wider range of con tinuous improvement, CI, tools. CI goals are achieved in many ways: from employee suggestions; audits identifying issues that are analyzed to determine root causes; planning and executing of corrective ac tion plans to correct the issues; and back-checks to ensure that issues are One approach you will hear more about is the use of Lean Six Sigma, LSS. In the past two years, USACE has trained LSS practitioners to lead teams in improvement of product removal of the causes of defects. LSS practitioners use a wide range of statistical and analytical tools to quantify targets and expected results that support decision making. Proj steps and have calculated and quan could spend $2,000 in labor on an LSS project with $250,000 potential cost savings over two years a clear savings worthy of investment. Decisions to initiate LSS projects are supported by data including Three common LSS project im provement targets are reducing pro cess lead or cycle time, decreasing process costs and increasing custom er satisfaction. Six Sigma doc trines assert that CI efforts to achieve stable and predictable process results are of vital importance to business suc cess; business processes have characteristics that can be measured, analyzed, controlled and improved; and achieving sustained quality improvement requires commitment from the entire organization. The Lean Six Sigma approach is set apart from other quality im provement initiatives by a clear fo cus on achieving measurable/quanti emphasis on strong management leadership and support; a special infrastructure of practitioners to lead, implement and follow through on the LSS approach; and a clear leadership commitment to make able data/statistical methods, rather than assumptions and guesswork. A recent LSS project in the Louis ville District examined small, low risk military construction projects projects involving rehabilitation of existing structures rather than new construction. The district compressed the for merly lengthy project delivery process cycle time from about 6 months to 42 days by reducing non-value added steps, saving about $442,000 annually. If you have any suggestions for improvement, please let a member of the Quality Team know. Thanks to Joyce Hess for providing thoughts for this article.Scott Thieme, deputy district engineer for project management, is the Detroit District Quality Champion. Scott Thieme Lean Six Sigma plays key quality management role Ells family enjoys Coast Guard FestivalPhoto by Randy Riksen Detroit District Engineer Lt. Col. Robert Ells and his wife Danica wave to the crowds Aug. 3 during the Coast Guard Festival Parade in Grand Haven, Mich., while their daughter distributes plastic toss rings to spectators. The event, which featured tours of Coast Guard vessels, oered an opportunity for The Detroit District to build relationships with Coast Guard stakeholders.

PAGE 4

FALL 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG FALL 20134 9Employees and families enjoy Corps DayA diving save Painting camouage Photo by Sara-Rose Melby Photo by Cassandra Kardeke Enough to feed an armyPhoto by Ricardo J. GarciaBy Tom Black Public Aairs Oce The U.S. Customs and Border Protection recently broke ground on a new $17 million Border Patrol Sta tion, BPS, on the east side of Detroit, a project being overseen by the Detroit District. Last December, the district awarded a $13.6 million contract to Turner Construction Co., Washington, D.C., to design and construct the facility. The district will provide proj ect and construction management services. The Detroit District is proud to do its part to help Customs and Border Protection execute its primary homeland security mission, said Lt. Col. Robert Ells, district engineer. The Corps strategic part nership with Customs and Border Protection deliv ers critical tactical infrastructure and facilities to secure our nations borders for years to come. The state-of-the-art facility, to be located on a 10.7-acre tract at the intersection of East Jefferson and Terminal Street, will replace the current station at 1331 Atwater St., about 4 miles to the west. The project includes the design, construction and commissioning of a 100-agent BPS, parking garage and combined short-stay kennel facility, covered parking and uncovered parking. The BPS will have an approximately 49,000square-foot building footprint with a 2,600-squarefoot equipment platform. The single-story facility processing and holding areas, training facilities, locker rooms, restrooms, and storage for agents gear and arms. This station has been a requirement for some time, said Michael J. Fisher, chief of the U.S. Bor der Patrol. I want to thank the leadership within Congress on the House and the Senate sides for un derstanding that for the men and women who each and every day put service above self, the least we can do is provide them with a sense of comfort and security in a Border Patrol Station. The new station is projected for completion by Sep tember 2014, with full occupancy expected several months later. Gathering with Fisher and Chief Patrol Agent Mario Martinez to break ground on the new station Aug. 28 were a variety of Scott Thieme, the Corps deputy district en gineer for project management; Jerry Moses, project manager for Turner Construction Co; and Mark Cone, project architect for Smith Group JJR, the Detroit-based architecture The Detroit Sector BPS is responsible for 70 miles of international border made up of the Detroit River and Lake St. Clair. U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the uni Homeland Security charged with the man agement, control and protection of our nations borders On a sunny, mild day at Lake St. Clair Metropark in Macomb County, Mich., Detroit District employees, families and retirees gathered for Corps Day a relax ing day of food, fun, games and fellowship. The Aug. 15 event featured plenty of tasty sandwiches (hamburgers, hot dogs and veggie burgers) plus chicken and cold drinks. Softball, kickball, horseshoes and a nature center tour were among the activities. Lets give it a ride Photo by Tom Black Photo by Michele RossEyeing the snakeBorder Patrol breaks ground on new Detroit facility Photo by Kevin GangeCrowds watch the Dennis Sullivan, a replica of a Great Lakes schoo ner, in the Parade of Sails July 25 at the Tall Ships Duluth festival. The ship operates as a oating classroom and goodwill ambassador for the state of Wisconsin, oering educational day sails and private charters from May through September. An estimated 250,000 people attended the ve-day festival, and the Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center hosted nearly 25,000 people the weekend of July 27-28.Tall ships visit Duluth-Superior Harbor U.S. Customs and Border ProtectionAn architects rendering of the new $17 million Border Patrol Station now under construction on the east side of Detroit.

PAGE 5

www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG FALL 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG 8 Engineers Day 2013 Length of Service AwardsLeadership Development ProgramLDP II Aaron W. Damrill Janice M. Smith Matthew A. McClerren Joshua J. Hachey Peter D. Sporte LDP III Michael K. Allis Emerging Leaders Focus Group Shawn S. Sanchez Charles R. Gould Emily R. Schaefer

PAGE 6

Innovation AwardKeith Kropfreiter and Blake Gerken Keith Kropfreiter, a project engineer with the and Blake Gerken, a civl design engi neer with Engineer ing and Construc tion, developed a standard, aluminum replacement stop log for weir structures at dredged material disposal facilities. It will replace timber stop logs that swell when wet, making them heavier, susceptible to rotting and in need of annual replacement. The aluminum stop logs, which are now in use at Sterling State Park near Monroe, Mich., will also be safer for Corps employees to install and remove. Distinguished Civilians of the Year Robert Erwin Wayne Schloop Darrell Pederson Robert Erwin retired in Oc tober 2010 after a distinguished career in Engi neering and Construction. Erwin was known as an old-school employee with a rock-solid work ethic; someone who could handle contractors. He helped bring formal partnering to the district as an effective tors to assess projects at the outset and resolve problems early on before they become major issues. He was also in strumental in developing the districts robust and successful participation in the EPAs Superfund program. Darrell Pederson retired from the Ke as assistant chief of operations in 1999. He was a versatile, tal ented employee who developed a reputation as the go-to guy with the technical expertise to get things done. He showed true teamwork and professionalism each and every day, and never failed to impart his knowledge and experience to co-workers so they could improve their skills and contribute to the Army Corps of Engineers. The Frankenmuth Fish Passage Value Engineer ing Team is overseeing a project that involves build ing a series of steps in the to spawn upstream of the Frankenmuth Dam, located in Saginaw County, Mich. The team completed the Value Engineer ing Study ahead of schedule, returning seven proposals with potential savings estimated at more than $1.4 million. Study completion preceded the engineering and design phases. Project Manager Carl Platz and Value Engi Ryckeghem lead the team, which also includes Hal Harrington, Cindy Jarema, Julie Udell, Adam Virga and Andy Wadysz. FALL 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG FALL 2013 6 7 Since the Continental Congress established the Army Corps of Engineers in 1775, the Corps has taken time to present recognition awards to its outstanding employees on Engineers Day. The Detroit District honors the following employees for their excellent work, achievements and innovations.Project Manager of the YearMaureen Mollie Mahoney Maureen Mol lie Mahoney serves as the Operations Project Manager in the Technical Services Her positive attitude, technical ex pertise and excellent communication skills help her successfully manage and coordinate $20 million worth of projects. These include dredging and various emergency response projects undertaken following natural disas ters. Always a team player, she has established positive working relation ships with other government agencies and stakeholders. Engineer / Scientist of the YearMichael Panik Michael Panik a civil engineer and the facility security veloped a reputation as a high-energy, take-charge person. He is dedicated to seeing facility maintenance. Panik has forged productive relationships with colleagues, other government agencies and stakeholders. He also volunteered for two deployments to Afghanistan and one to Iraq. Student of the YearMaria Schneider Maria Schneider started with the Corps in 2012 as a civil engineering co-op student. In May she was hired self-starter who provides exceptional service. Among her many contribu tions, she helped develop a Quality Assurance tracking spreadsheet and made sensible revisions to a payroll analysis form. Technician of the YearMichael Klomp Michael Klomp is lead construction representative for a $20 million boiler replacement project at the VA Medical Center in Battle Creek. He has not backed down from non-stop challeng es in what is a very complex project. Through diligence, a commitment to quality and a dedication to safety on the job, Klomp has earned the respect of his colleagues. Administrative Employee of the YearDaniel Clark Daniel Clark, an the Lake Michigan proved himself to be versatile, dependable and productive. He promotes water safety as the Bob ber the Water Safety Dog mascot, and performs key administrative tasks. Clark consistently reminds coworkers to wear proper safety equipment.Leader of the YearJohn Laitinen III John Laitinen III is master of the derrick boat Nicolet in the Soo Area OfSection. A positive at titude, strong work ethic and leadership are his hallmarks. Fol lowing the grounding of the freighter Paul R. Tregurtha in the St. Marys River in August 2012, Laitinen and his crew put in long hours to remove shoals that built up while crews freed to resume within one day. Professional Specialist of the YearCarole Bell Carole Bell, an accountant with the Resource Manage worthy, always gives her best effort and is consistently kind and helpful to coworkers. She man ages the Corps of Engineers Financial Management System, CEFMS, for the district, and oversees CEFMS training and the government travel card pro gram. Her ideas have been adopted divisionwide to improve operational MaintainerBoater of the YearLeigh Schwartz Leigh Schwartz, a deckhand with the established a reputation as being proactive and willing to go the extra mile to help the district achieve its missions. He also underwent training on his own time to earn a master license qualifying him to operate up to 100-ton vessels.District honors Employees of the Year for their valuable contributions An engineers depiction of the planned Frankenmuth sh pas sage, a design sometimes referred to as a rock ramp. Wade Trim Engineering Consultants Schneider Panik Klomp Clark Bell Schwartz Pederson Schloop Laitinen Gerken Erwin Platz Harrington Jarema Wadysz Udell Virga Mahoney Ryckeghem Kropfreiter Wayne Schloop worked 36 years for the Detroit District, retiring in September 2011 as Chief of the During his career, Schloop oversaw nearly 200 employ ees at headquarters aged major repair and rehabilitation projects on Soo Locks hydropower facilities. He retired having built close ties with American and Canadi an government agencies, stakehold ers and the marine community. Team of the Year honored for Value Engineering project

PAGE 7

www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG FALL 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG 8 Engineers Day 2013 Length of Service AwardsLeadership Development ProgramLDP II Aaron W. Damrill Janice M. Smith Matthew A. McClerren Joshua J. Hachey Peter D. Sporte LDP III Michael K. Allis Emerging Leaders Focus Group Shawn S. Sanchez Charles R. Gould Emily R. Schaefer

PAGE 8

FALL 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG FALL 20134 9Employees and families enjoy Corps DayA diving save Painting camouage Photo by Sara-Rose Melby Photo by Cassandra Kardeke Enough to feed an armyPhoto by Ricardo J. GarciaBy Tom Black Public Aairs Oce The U.S. Customs and Border Protection recently broke ground on a new $17 million Border Patrol Sta tion, BPS, on the east side of Detroit, a project being overseen by the Detroit District. Last December, the district awarded a $13.6 million contract to Turner Construction Co., Washington, D.C., to design and construct the facility. The district will provide proj ect and construction management services. The Detroit District is proud to do its part to help Customs and Border Protection execute its primary homeland security mission, said Lt. Col. Robert Ells, district engineer. The Corps strategic part nership with Customs and Border Protection deliv ers critical tactical infrastructure and facilities to secure our nations borders for years to come. The state-of-the-art facility, to be located on a 10.7-acre tract at the intersection of East Jefferson and Terminal Street, will replace the current station at 1331 Atwater St., about 4 miles to the west. The project includes the design, construction and commissioning of a 100-agent BPS, parking garage and combined short-stay kennel facility, covered parking and uncovered parking. The BPS will have an approximately 49,000square-foot building footprint with a 2,600-squarefoot equipment platform. The single-story facility processing and holding areas, training facilities, locker rooms, restrooms, and storage for agents gear and arms. This station has been a requirement for some time, said Michael J. Fisher, chief of the U.S. Bor der Patrol. I want to thank the leadership within Congress on the House and the Senate sides for un derstanding that for the men and women who each and every day put service above self, the least we can do is provide them with a sense of comfort and security in a Border Patrol Station. The new station is projected for completion by Sep tember 2014, with full occupancy expected several months later. Gathering with Fisher and Chief Patrol Agent Mario Martinez to break ground on the new station Aug. 28 were a variety of Scott Thieme, the Corps deputy district en gineer for project management; Jerry Moses, project manager for Turner Construction Co; and Mark Cone, project architect for Smith Group JJR, the Detroit-based architecture The Detroit Sector BPS is responsible for 70 miles of international border made up of the Detroit River and Lake St. Clair. U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the uni Homeland Security charged with the man agement, control and protection of our nations borders On a sunny, mild day at Lake St. Clair Metropark in Macomb County, Mich., Detroit District employees, families and retirees gathered for Corps Day a relax ing day of food, fun, games and fellowship. The Aug. 15 event featured plenty of tasty sandwiches (hamburgers, hot dogs and veggie burgers) plus chicken and cold drinks. Softball, kickball, horseshoes and a nature center tour were among the activities. Lets give it a ride Photo by Tom Black Photo by Michele RossEyeing the snakeBorder Patrol breaks ground on new Detroit facility Photo by Kevin GangeCrowds watch the Dennis Sullivan, a replica of a Great Lakes schoo ner, in the Parade of Sails July 25 at the Tall Ships Duluth festival. The ship operates as a oating classroom and goodwill ambassador for the state of Wisconsin, oering educational day sails and private charters from May through September. An estimated 250,000 people attended the ve-day festival, and the Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center hosted nearly 25,000 people the weekend of July 27-28.Tall ships visit Duluth-Superior Harbor U.S. Customs and Border ProtectionAn architects rendering of the new $17 million Border Patrol Station now under construction on the east side of Detroit.

PAGE 9

FALL 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG FALL 2013 10 3By Tom Black Public Aairs Oce The Detroit District and partnering organizations are ahead of schedule on a dredged material disposal facility, DMDF, promising Restoration of the Cat Island chain in Green Bay, Wis., will create a DMDF for placement of non-contaminated material dredged from Green Bay Outer Harbor. At the same time, it will recreate eco logically vital wetlands for and natural vegetation. Additionally, the wave barrier portion will help protect the shoreline from erosion. Completion is expected in early summer 2014 about six months earlier than projected, with be less than $20 million, much lower than expected. This project is the benchmark by which all future dredged disposal material facilities shall be measured, said Corps Project Manager Steve Check. The cooperation between commercial and envi ronmental interests was paramount to the suc cess of the project. Workers are construct ing a 4.3-mile-long, eight-foot-high stone perpendicular dikes, called legs, that will separate three cells for disposal of dredged material. Barges will transfer dredged material from Green Bays outer harbor either by hydraulic A gravel road on top of the dike will enable truck transport or pipeline place ment of the dredged mate rial to the cells. Over a pe riod of time, the dredged materials will build up the new islands. Material the Corps dredges from the Green Bay Inner Harbor and inner bay channel will continue to be placed in posal Facility on the east shore of the bay. The original Cat Island chain, consisting of Cat, Willow and the Bass Islands, was washed away in the 1960s by high water levels, waves and ice. This effectively wiped out over 1,400 acres of marshland. The new islands will help coastal marsh areas and underwater plants to thrive and provide 1,440 acres of wildlife species, accord ing to the project spon sors, which include Brown County, Wis., the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.Cat Island construction project ahead of scheduleAn aerial shot of the Cat Island wave barrier and legs that will enclose dredged materials reveals remnants of the original Cat Island in the lower cell. USACE Photo Commanders Column (Continued from Page 2)the Hammond Bay to the Harvey, the team successfully raised the sunken vessel. When the tug was back at the surface, the team pumped out all the water, conducted a walkthrough of the vessel and determined it was seawor thy. The team secured the Hammond Bay and towed it The salvage operation was completed in about four hours. A board of investigation, BOI, was established by the Great Lakes and Ohio River Division, and the team lead, John Cheek, observed the salvage operation. He praised the team and said it was one of the most professional, well planned/executed operations of this type he has seen. The BOI determined that material failure led to leaks in the tug. The good news is there were no injuries, the Hammond Bay was salvaged, repaired and put back in service about three weeks later. This is just another example of the incredible work done by the Detroit District and serves to highlight one of the many ways our district plays a critical role in the Great Lakes. Thank you all! By Tom Black Public Aairs Oce Summertime in the Great Lakes region is busy not just for marine navigation; its also prime time for dredging and maintenance of navi gational infrastructure. The Manitowoc crane barge and its accompanying tugs, the Racine and Kenosha, are regularly deployed do work in the Detroit District and adjacent Chicago District in south ern Lake Michigan. Recently its nine-member crew completed breakwater maintenance at Milwaukee Harbor in Milwaukee, Wis., and Calumet Harbor in Chi cago, Ill. At Milwaukee Harbor, workers placed armor stones along the north wall a 700-foot section of the four-mile-long breakwater, said Joe Kane, captain of the Manitowoc. A few weeks later, the crew rebuilt 1,150 feet of the Calumet Harbor breakwall in South Chicago. This included re charging 50-foot segments enclosed and partitioned by sheet piling, called cells by placing core stone in each cell. After placing core stone (crushed limestone) into the cells, crews placed cut stones, each weighing up to nine tons, along the top of the cells. Then they added armor stone along the sides. The crew also shored up the sheet piling on the sides of the breakwall. Next sum mer, the crew will devote consider able time to grouting the Calumet Harbor breakwalls. On July 31, the Manitowoc crew arrived at Indiana Harbor in East Chicago, Ind., to begin dismantling a decaying steel superstructure from atop the pier. The catwalk-like struc ture, 2,300 feet long, was corroded Crews stay busy with maintenance, dredging The Manitowoc crane barge, operated by Mark Dreifuerst, lays down a cut stone at the Calumet Harbor breakwater in Chicago, Ill. Continued on Page 11Photo by Joe Kane As our Quality Management System matures, we grow from focusing on standardizing business processes to a wider range of con tinuous improvement, CI, tools. CI goals are achieved in many ways: from employee suggestions; audits identifying issues that are analyzed to determine root causes; planning and executing of corrective ac tion plans to correct the issues; and back-checks to ensure that issues are One approach you will hear more about is the use of Lean Six Sigma, LSS. In the past two years, USACE has trained LSS practitioners to lead teams in improvement of product removal of the causes of defects. LSS practitioners use a wide range of statistical and analytical tools to quantify targets and expected results that support decision making. Proj steps and have calculated and quan could spend $2,000 in labor on an LSS project with $250,000 potential cost savings over two years a clear savings worthy of investment. Decisions to initiate LSS projects are supported by data including Three common LSS project im provement targets are reducing pro cess lead or cycle time, decreasing process costs and increasing custom er satisfaction. Six Sigma doc trines assert that CI efforts to achieve stable and predictable process results are of vital importance to business suc cess; business processes have characteristics that can be measured, analyzed, controlled and improved; and achieving sustained quality improvement requires commitment from the entire organization. The Lean Six Sigma approach is set apart from other quality im provement initiatives by a clear fo cus on achieving measurable/quanti emphasis on strong management leadership and support; a special infrastructure of practitioners to lead, implement and follow through on the LSS approach; and a clear leadership commitment to make able data/statistical methods, rather than assumptions and guesswork. A recent LSS project in the Louis ville District examined small, low risk military construction projects projects involving rehabilitation of existing structures rather than new construction. The district compressed the for merly lengthy project delivery process cycle time from about 6 months to 42 days by reducing non-value added steps, saving about $442,000 annually. If you have any suggestions for improvement, please let a member of the Quality Team know. Thanks to Joyce Hess for providing thoughts for this article.Scott Thieme, deputy district engineer for project management, is the Detroit District Quality Champion. Scott Thieme Lean Six Sigma plays key quality management role Ells family enjoys Coast Guard FestivalPhoto by Randy Riksen Detroit District Engineer Lt. Col. Robert Ells and his wife Danica wave to the crowds Aug. 3 during the Coast Guard Festival Parade in Grand Haven, Mich., while their daughter distributes plastic toss rings to spectators. The event, which featured tours of Coast Guard vessels, oered an opportunity for The Detroit District to build relationships with Coast Guard stakeholders.

PAGE 10

FALL 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG FALL 2013 2 11Commanders ColumnCorps employees demonstrate teamwork and professionalismLt. Col. Robert J. Ells Continued on Page 3DISTRICT ENGINEER Lt. Col. Robert J. Ells PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER Lynn M. Rose EDITOR / LAYOUT Thomas M. BlackSoundings is an authorized newspaper of the Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District. It is published quarterly, under supervision of provisions of Army regulation, AR-360-1. It is prepared using desktop publishing and printed by offset press. The Soundings is also available on the Internet at http://www.lre.usace.army.mil/ Circulation: We print 400 copies per issue and circulate them to employees, retirees, and anyone requesting a copy in writing. Contents: Views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the Department of the Army. The U.S. Army does not endorse any product or service that may be advertised or mentioned in this publication. News copy is prepared in accordance with Associated Press, AP Style Guide. All photos are U.S. Army photos unless otherwise indicated. Submission: welcomes comments and opinions about the information published in Soundings. News tips, ideas, suggestions and articles may be mailed to Soundings, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District: 477 Michigan Ave. Detroit, MI 48226. Fax: 313-226-5993 E-mail: Lynn.M.Rose@us.army.mil. For general information, call toll free: 1-888694-8313 COVER: Detroit District Engineer Robert Ells and Deputy District Engineer James Booth congratulate Michael OBryan, chief of the Engineering and Technical Services Division, for his 40 years of service to the district. The Commander honored outstanding employees and participants in the Leadership Develop ment Program. (Photo by Tom Black)and coming loose from some of its attachments to the concrete pier. Crews removed the structure in pieces which they loaded onto the Manitowoc The Corps worked out an arrangement with a local scrap metal company to take possession of the metal, thus eliminating disposal concerns. Itll be a win-win for both of us, Kane said. On the dredging front, several key projects were recently completed, said Mollie Mahoney, project man include Green Bay, Wis., and the Michigan harbors of Holland, Muskegon, St. Joseph and New Buffalo. Grand Haven Harbor was slated to be done by Aug. 31. Several dredging projects were ongoing as of mid-August, including the Detroit River, Saginaw River/ Bay, the Saginaw River turning basin emergency dredging and Manistee Harbor. Approximately a dozen other dredging projects had been awarded by mid-August or were scheduled to be awarded in the coming weeks. Last winter, Congress approved a relief package for areas affected by Hurricane Sandy. The legislation included $2.6 million for seven Detroit District dredging projects intended to eliminate shoaling in storm-affected navigational channels. The state of Michigan also ap proved $5.9 million for dredging seven harbors. Due to the addition of Hurricane Sandy projects, emergency dredging in the Saginaw River and the seven state of Michigan dredging projects, ing program has turned out to be much more robust than anticipated, Mahoney said. She added the district has been pleased with the dredging proposals received this year. They have been competitively priced and have al lowed us to use our limited dredging dollars more effectively. Continued from Page 10 The Manitowoc crane barge removes part of the catwalk structure from the Indiana Harbor pier in East Chicago, Ind.Photo by Joe Kane Team Detroit, in keeping with the tradition of highlighting one of my priorities I want to take the opportunity in this edition to focus on my priority of People. All of you do amazing work on a daily basis in support of our mission to maintain the Great Lakes Navigation System. But, one recent event is worthy of highlighting because of the incredible teamwork and pro fessionalism of the folks involved the recovery of the tug Hammond Bay on July 3. For those of you not familiar with the event, on the morning of July 1, the tug Billmaier was underway from Duluth, Minn., to Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., towing three barges and the unmanned Hammond Bay. At about 3:30 a.m., while Billmaier crew members shortened the tow in prepa ration for traveling through the Soo Locks, they lost sight of the Hammond Bay. After securing its barges, the Billmaier and crew at tempted to locate the lost tug. During the search, an oil sheen was observed and a life ring from the Hammond Bay was found and recovered. The crew immediately USCG, at Sector Sault Ste. Marie. The federal navigation channel was closed and the USCG marked the location and established a safety zone around the Hammond Bay. immediately jumped into action. The survey vessel Bufe was disa USCG helicopter deployed to provide support during the search. The Bufe located the Hammond Bay ting in about 37 feet of water inside the federal channel. The team used its remotely operated underwater camera equipment to conduct an initial investigation of the tug as it lay on the bottom of the federal channel. They discovered no clear indicators of why the Hammond Bay sank. The next day the crane barge Harvey was loaded with dive equipment and mobilized to the site along with the derrick barge Nicolet in preparation for the salvage. On the morning of July 3, with the derrick barge Schwartz mobilized, the contracted divers and a marine pollution control consultant on site, the team in place and both the U.S. and Canadian Coast Guards stand ing by to provide assistance, the consolidated team began its sal vage operation. In preparation for raising the tug, the team deployed oil contain ment booms around the work area, plugged one fuel vent and attached a hose running to the surface to the other fuel vent in order to success fully control spillage from the fuel tanks. Utilizing the divers to rig Crews pull the sunken tug Hammond Bay to the surface July 3 in the St. Marys River near Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.Photo by Kevin SpragueBy Charlie Simon Regulatory Oce has seen a notable spike in permit applications. From December 2012 through May 2013, applications were up 66 percent compared to the four-year average for the same time period, said John Konik, Chief of the Permits are required from the Corps for all work in navigable wa ters and for the discharge of material in U.S. waters, including wetlands. In the previous four years, Regula tory averaged over 1,650 applica tions a year. In 2013, 1,300 appli six months. The increase in permit applications seems tied to low water levels on the Great Lakes, according to Regulatory staff. that 49 percent of recent applications have been for dredging. This com pares to about 28 percent in previ ous years. Requests for other types of work remain stable, but shore protection applications are below average. We started to see the number of applications creep up last De cember, Konik said. There was a dramatic increase in applications in January through April this year. Municipalities, marinas and home owners recognized that water levels could affect boat access, and applied for dredging permits. Konik commended the Regulatory staff for keeping up with the in creased workload. Staff has stepped up to the challenge, and our permit evaluation time frames remain ex cellent, he said. Rise in permit applications tied to low water levels Brian Romsek, a civil engineer LMAO, was awarded the Steel Order of the de Fleury Medal, presented to junior soldiers and civilians within the Engineer Regiment who have made sig butions to Army Engineering. Romsek is consistently valued for work accomplished in a timely and His outstanding performance as on-site project engineer was instrumental in the successful completion of the challenging Fort Custer Army Reserve Center near Augusta, Mich. He now serves as project engineer on the VA Medical Center projects in Battle Creek, Mich. Brian always brings an excel lent attitude to the workplace, and he is a pleasure to work with, said LMAO Area Engi neer Tom OBryan. His hard work and dedication are much appreciated. RomsekEngineer receives Order of de Fleury Medal

PAGE 11

FALL 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG 12 Employees of the QuarterThird Quarter 2013 CORPS SPEAKS Lt. Col. Robert Ells, Detroit District Engineer, spoke in May to members of the Great Lakes Maritime Task Force, discussing the shipping communitys request for an extension to the Soo Locks operating season. Ells also spoke in June at a meeting of the Harbor Technical Advisory Committee, HTAC, in Duluth, Minn. He discussed low lake levels, dredging, dredged material management, the Soo Locks and St. Clair River compensation. Another key topic was the 21st Avenue pilot project in Duluth. reuse materials from maintenance dredging over the next three years. Sabrina Miller, project manager Team, spoke in May to about 50 people during a meeting of the Huron Beach Civic Association in Ocqueoc, Mich. Afterward, the audience had questions on topics including Michigans beach grooming law, and whether a permit is needed to remove boulders from near-shore areas. John Allis and Keith Kompoltowicz of the Great 30 at a University of Michigan seminar and panel discussion, Low Great Lakes water levels: Understanding the causes and potential consequences. The presentation was offered before a live audience and as a webinar. Kompoltowicz also spoke about Great Lakes water levels to the Port Huron Rotary Club on June 13 at the Masonic Lodge in Port Huron, Mich.; and at the Michigan Water Environment Association annual meeting on June 26 at Boyne Mountain Resort in Boyne Falls, Mich. On June 29, Kompoltowicz staffed a USACE information booth during Engineers Day festivities at the Soo Locks, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. He reported answering many questions about Great Lakes water levels. Allis gave a Great Lakes water levels overview June 28 to the environmental group Green Drinks in Battle Creek, Mich.James Lewis Great Lakes Oce of Hydraulics and Hydrology Justin Proulx Soo Area Oce Crystal Kelley Operations Oce Engineers Day awards recognize employeesInnovator of the Quarter Nathan Schulz Lake Michigan Area Oce Justin Proulx demonstrated exceptional per formance as construction representative with the the success of a project to replace a compressed air bubbler system that keeps ice away from miter gates in the locks, and a project involving roof and masonry repairs to the North Main tenance Support Building. Proulxs performance and dedication are exemplary himself, the Detroit District and the Corps of Engineers. James Lewis, lead water level forecaster in the Watershed Hydrology Branch, developed new and im proved graphics for use in speaking engagements and media interviews pertaining to Great Lakes water lev els and the nature of water presentation slides explain things in easy-to-understand terms and have been wellreceived by technical and non-technical audiences alike. Lewis innovation, hard work and dedication self and the entire Corps of Engineers. Crystal Kelley, senior program analyst in the districts environmental compliance coordinator, is recognized for her initia tive, can-do attitude and leadership qualities. She helped revamp the districts compliance program for the Environmental Review Guide for Operations, establishing a team to ensure Detroit District facilities are in accord with this initia tive. Kelleys dedication to great credit upon herself, the district and the Corps. Nathan Schulz, a biolo gist with the Lake Michigan automated wetland deter mination data form. His synthesis and integration of various key components into an automated form ed to the districts mission. Wetland determinations are observations. Schulzs innovation and dedication great credit upon himself, the district and the Corps of Engineers.