Citation
Soundings

Material Information

Title:
Soundings
Uniform Title:
Soundings (Detroit, Mich.)
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Corps of Engineers. -- Detroit District
Place of Publication:
Detroit, MI
Publisher:
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Bimonthly[<Apr. 1984>-]
Monthly[ FORMER -<1983>]
bimonthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

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Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Numbering Peculiarities:
Not numbered: <, Apr. 1984>-
Statement of Responsibility:
US Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
15002090 ( OCLC )
ocm15002090

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Digital Military Collection

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PAGE 1

www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG 8 Employees of the Quarter First Quarter 2013Katie Schill Regulatory Oce Glenn Spence Real Estate Branch Glenn Spence, appraiser/ realty specialist, demon strated outstanding and timely execution of the real estate process neces sary for construction of a $14 million Customs and Border Protection, CBP, facility in Detroit. Spence communicated and coordinated effectively with CBP, the property the city of Detroit. His knowledge of Corps and CBP real estate processes as well as his familiarity with the Detroit market enabled the Corps to secure the necessary property in time for construction to commence this spring. Katie Schill, regulatory project manager, conducted a permit review in a timely and professional manner for an emergency dredging of the St. Joseph River in southwest Michigan. A fall storm caused severe shoal ing in the harbor. No federal funds were available, so a concrete manufactur ing company arranged to pay for dredging to enable vessels to reach its facility. Schills communication with the applicant and the state, along with her grasp of the technical issues, helped promptly secure the necessary Corps of Engineers permits for work to begin. Keith Kropfreiter, project engineer for the assistance in designing an innovative aluminum stop log to replace decaying timber stop logs in weirs ties, CDF. His design has become the new stan dard being implemented throughout the district. He also designed the new Mouilee CDF in Monroe County, Mich. Kropfreiters innovative abilities and his steadfast efforts to improve and streamline operations. Josh Hachey Contract Administration Branch Josh Hachey, mechani cal engineer, has taken on a heavy workload in the Contract Administration Branch and done course work on his own time to as a Contracting Acquisition Professional. He facilitated the Manistique Sea Lamprey Barrier Value Engineering Study, which resulted in $119,000 of potential savings. Hacheys initiative and contributions consistently projects. His performance great credit upon himself and the district. Keith Kropfreiter Detroit Area Oce SPRING 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG CORPS SPEAKS Sabrina Miller, project manager from the Regulaconference of the Michigan Association of County Drain Commissioners in Acme, Mich. Miller gave a presentation on the Corps regulatory program and Michigan drain projects. Her topics included the Corps regulatory jurisdiction, drain project components requiring permits, tips for submitting complete permit applications and the Corps permit evaluation process. Jeff Fritsma of the Lake Michigan Area OfMiller could meet contractors and consultants involved with municipal drainage projects. Pat Kuhne, chief of emergency management, spoke Feb. 21 to the monthly meeting of the Michigan Society of Professional Engineers, Capital Area Chapter in Lansing, Mich. He presented the USACE Emergency Management mission and the districts capabilities in all hazard response to FEMA events. Mike OBryan Services Division, and Dave Wright, chief of the Operarepresenting industry, lake carriers, ports, labor unions, local and state governments. OBryan also spoke at a March 1 webinar meeting of the Shallow Draft Stakeholders, hosted in conjunction with the Chicago and Buffalo districts. He discussed the Operations representatives from various congressional ofand regional interest groups. Jim Selegean, a hydraulic engineer with the of American Military Engineers, S.A.M.E., in Detroit. evaluate dam storage capacities. Deployment oers compelling assignments Pg. 4 District employees enjoy holiday party Pg. 5 Corps plays role in constructing jet fuel facility Pg. 6 Employees hone leadership skills

PAGE 2

cation and collaboration, participants were attached to each other by ropes as they navigated high up on the grid. During the eight-month program, LDP II participants are expected to complete individual assignments as well as one group project. The Leaders Guide to Radical Management by Stephen Denning is required reading for all par ticipants. Participants also read a book of their choice on leadership, then pres ent a summary and describe how they can apply what theyve learned. A current participant, Jan Smith of the Management Support Branch, is read ing Tribes: We Need You to Lead Us think about the opportunities you have to lead in your daily life, Smith said. have to be a supervisor or manager. She said she enjoys LDP II and looks forward to the remainder of the program. a Difference Project, in which each participant develops a plan and implements an improvement in his or her of Non-supervisory employees with at least one year at the Corps may apply for LDP II, which is a competitive proaged to continue developing their leadership capabilities. DISTRICT ENGINEER Lt. Col. Robert J. Ells PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER Lynn Rose EDITOR / LAYOUT Soundings is an authorized newspaper of the Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District. It is published quarterly, under supervision of the Public Affairs prepared using desktop publishing Soundings is also available on the Internet at http://www.lre.usace.army.mil/ Circulation: per issue and circulate them to employees, retirees, and anyone requesting a copy in writing. Contents: Views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the Department not endorse any product or service that may be advertised or mentioned in this publication. News copy is prepared in accordance with All photos are U.S. Army photos unless otherwise indicated. Submission: opinions about the information published in Soundings. News tips, ideas, suggestions and articles may be mailed to Soundings, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District: E-mail: Lynn.M.Rose@us.army.mil. For general information, call toll COVER: Tina Stonemetz of the Bualo District navigates a high ropes course at the Base Camp Challenge Center in Flint, Mich., as part of the Leadership Development Program II. The exercise helps employees build condence and encourages teamwork. (Photo by Lt. Col. Robert J. Ells) 2 7Lt. Col. Robert J. EllsCommanders ColumnLeadership training challenges employees www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG SPRING 2013 SPRING 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG By Tom Black Public Aairs Oce strives to develop good leaders to make it a thriving, successful organization. Leadership Development Pro gram II, LDP II, is intended to cultivate leaders who will inspire their colleagues to reach their potential and advance the Corps missions. how to improve, said Cindy Jarema, a hydraulic engineer who serves on the LDP II steer different qualities and strengths they bring to an organization and it is up to them to determine which ones to improve and which ones are assets to making them great leaders. ercises designed to challenge participants, facilitate Detroit, Chicago and Buffalo districts recently gathered at the Base Camp Challenge Center in Flint, Mich. course. In an exercise intended to increase communi want to take the op portunity in this edi tion to highlight an ongoing national and USACE priority effort: an emphasis on the promotion of Science, ing and Mathemaatics, gram goals are to: Foster/motivate increased awareness ogy, Engineering and Math among underrepresented inner-city students Foster an increased underrepresent ed minority presence in the nations mission supported by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other fed Lay the framework for an increase in the representation of underrepre sented minorities within the Corps of Engineers and other federal agen future applicant pool. As the nations premier engineering organization, USACE plays a vital role in supporting this effort to encourage more people to pursue engineering and The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recognizes the critical role that Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education plays in enabling the U.S. to remain the economic and technological leaders of the global marketplace, and enabling the Department of Defense and Army in the security of our nation. We are committed to teaming with others to strengthen STEMrelated programs that inspire current and future generations of young people to pursue Bostick highlighted the task at hand, our challenge. By the year 2020, we will need a million more engineers, so we have to start early. America. And, many of those engineers go back to their home countries. be a part of this effort. Your involve ment can be as simple as giving a presentation to a class, interacting with a boy or girl scout group, acting as a judge for a science competition or vol unteering to work a shift in the USACE booth at the Detroit Boat Show. Or, it can be as complex as volunteer ing to coordinate with a school or com munity to hold a large-scale awareness program utilizing the Blanket Purchase Agreement USACE has developed. I encourage everyone in the District to the youth in your local communities and support this ongoing program. & Structures Branch. He is a member of of his many tasks is reporting Detroit events, please contact him. efforts can be found at the following websites: http://www.usace.army.mil/stem.aspx awareness-program-components you do on a daily basis. I continue to be amazed at the talent we have within our ranks. Keep up the great work!Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Corps employees watch co-workers climb the faux rock wall at the Base Camp Challenge Center in Flint, Mich. Photo by Lt. Col. Robert J. Ells A happy visitor shows o her Kids Dont Float T-shirt decal at the Duluth Boat, Sport and Travel Show in Duluth, Minn.Photo by Mary T. GeorgeBoat shows oer district outreach opportunities Employees recently interacted with enthusiastic crowds at the and the Duluth Boat, Sport and chures, stickers, toss rings, coloring books and other materials promoting water safety, and answered questions about the Corps of Engineers and its missions. Employees also distributed Regulatory outreach brochures and permit applications. Visitors to the Detroit exhibit frequently asked questions or commented about cellent opportunity to connect with the public, said Maj. James provide an avenue for teaching young adults and children the importance of water, ice and Corps structure safety. with the public, Booth said, was Bosticks emphasis on Science, the concepts behind how the Soo Locks operate. all employees who volunteered their time to support these events, Booth said. visited the Duluth show, the sponsoring associations said.

PAGE 3

ment and lighting. not based on one or two agencies or contractors working individually but rather the group as a whole, served as project engi onboard to produce a quality end product. He said personnel of knowledge in con tracting, mechanical and electrical systems, and general construc tion which allowed the project to move forward in a quality manner. have someone double check your calculations. It even extends to things like picking up a piece of trash off the slips and falls. Along with the documentation of our critical are following the latest process, correcting in mind with everything you do. all strive to make sure everything we do is our best work, it will go a long way toward ensuring that the Detroit District is walk ing the quality walk, and not just talking the talk. Once it becomes a regular part of how you work, it wont seem like a big step to ensure quality products. everything you do. Scott Thieme, deputy district engineer for project management, serves as the Detroit District Quality Champion. I just wanted to take a few minutes today to share my Reports, Opportunities for Improvement, etc. are not all we do. process. It is a way of thinking and a personal commitment to doing the right things, the right ten process to tell you how to execute every part of your mission in a quality way. It will be one of the tools you use, but there may not be not prevent you from doing a quality job. Having quality as an ingrained part of who you are means that you will do your best on everything you touch. It may be as simple as catching a spelling mistake on a colleagues document or taking the extra step to 6 3Quality: A way of thinking, commitment to do right thing Scott Thieme Jet fuel station completed at Duluth Air National Guard BaseTank trucks unload jet propulsion fuel at the new Petroleum, Oil and Lubricants facility at Duluth Air National Guard base in Duluth, Minn. SPRING 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG SPRING 2013 By Tom Black Public Aairs Oce fuel facility thanks in part to the efforts of the Army Corps of Engineers. and Lubricants, POL, complex will (Duluth, Minn., and Fort Crook, fuel depot that was demolished. heated parking building for the base refueler trucks that transport fuel to Charles HagelSecretary of Defense U.S. Department of DefenseGen. Raymond T. OdiernoChief of Sta of the Army, U.S. Department of the Army John M. McHughSecretary of the Army U.S. Department of the ArmyLt. Gen. Thomas P. BostickChief of Engineers U.S. Army Corps of EngineersBrig. Gen. Margaret W. Burcham Commanding General Great Lakes and Ohio River Division Lt. Col. Robert J. EllsDistrict Engineer, Detroit District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Barack H. ObamaPresident of the United States of America Detroit District Chain of Command Left, a Detroit Area Oce work crew prepares to conduct an emergency condition survey of the Rouge River turning basin in Dearborn, Mich., after part of the riverbank collapsed. Above, a portable conveyor used by a steel company to ooad and stockpile taconite pellets is sunken into the collapsed bank. Detroit Area Oce crew conducts Rouge River condition survey Photo by Keith Kropfreiter Photo by Keith Kropfreiter Photo by Corey Weston U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District

PAGE 4

runways, an electrical power sta tion, barracks and warehouses. ment, deployment lacks some of the advantages of being at home, Sallans acknowledged. In particu lar, the ability to move about freely without security concerns. security precautions are normal, and travel by car and visit people and places without concern. Sallans has also served as a project engineer in Baghdad, Iraq in civil works contracts and several military construction contracts. he helped clear roads of debris to eliminate potential insurgent hiding places. Prior to his Iraq deployment, he responded to domestic disasters Hurricane Katrina. Sallans noted hes extremely grateful for the numer variety of cookies, coffee, candy, soap, toothpaste and shampoo. For more information on deployment opportunities contact Bob Jarema in the Emergency Management 4 5 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG SPRING 2013 SPRING 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG By Tom Black Public Aairs Oce Rich Sallans has thoroughly enjoyed his deployments, which include two stints in Afghanistan, one in Iraq and several in other American states. great, great experience, said Sallans, a project engineer the country and travel across the world. Ive made a lot of friends and really enjoyed the work. employee, has deployed to Virginia and Mississippi. Afghanistan in 2010 was near the eastern border with Pakistan. As a resident engineer, he helped build an airport runway, helicopter pad, roads and buildings at two Afghanistan National Army bases. Sallans said he treasures the friendships he developed with Afghani contractors and Romanian soldiers who helped with construction. He stays in touch with them and other friends hes made along the way. During 2012, Sallans served at Shindand Airbase in Herat Province near Afghanistans western border water facility, ordnance mutations storage area, airport Well-traveled Sallans nds deployment rewarding Low Great Lakes water levels impact the nation Lakes role as a conduit for transporting commodities vital to the American economy and way of life, including iron ore, coal and grain. Commercial cargo vessels are car than they did in the late 1990s under higher water level conditions to avoid having their hulls scrape channel bottoms, according to the passed along in the form of higher prices for automobiles, electricity and food. below their long-term average water levels, according to the Corps. For Huron registered their lowest water level since the Corps began recordlakes are connected at the Straits of Mackinac and are regarded as one body of water for hydrologic pur poses. Lakes Superior, Michigan and Huron have been below average for Rich Sallans and an Afghan construction worker check out the wiring in a light pole at Shindand Air base in Afghanistan. Photo by Lutfullah Saraj Employees gather for holiday celebration 14 straight years. Drought conditions throughout the excessive evaporation, and snowfall was below average in the winter of ed to remain below the long-term average for the next six months. and assess the impacts of low water Lakes water levels, log onto the Detroit District home page. www.lre.usace.army.mil Employees enjoy themselves at the Detroit District holiday party, Dec. 13 at the Doubletree Hotel in downtown Detroit. Clockwise from top left, Maj. James Booth steadies his daughter; Angelique Bartreau and Mary Weidel check in attendees; Evan Lu concentrates on maintaining his beat as nearby co-workers compete in cornhole, a bag-tossing game; Renee Thomas, Mike Allis and Tim Smith enjoy watching colleagues John Goetgeluck and Matt McClerren engage in the friendly competition between supporters of two Michigan universities; and Alaa Jafar socializes with retirees George Fedynsky and Surendra Sukhtankar. About160 people attended the festivities.Photos by Ricardo J. Garcia

PAGE 5

runways, an electrical power sta tion, barracks and warehouses. ment, deployment lacks some of the advantages of being at home, Sallans acknowledged. In particu lar, the ability to move about freely without security concerns. security precautions are normal, and travel by car and visit people and places without concern. Sallans has also served as a project engineer in Baghdad, Iraq in civil works contracts and several military construction contracts. he helped clear roads of debris to eliminate potential insurgent hiding places. Prior to his Iraq deployment, he responded to domestic disasters Hurricane Katrina. Sallans noted hes extremely grateful for the numer variety of cookies, coffee, candy, soap, toothpaste and shampoo. For more information on deployment opportunities contact Bob Jarema in the Emergency Management 4 5 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG SPRING 2013 SPRING 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG By Tom Black Public Aairs Oce Rich Sallans has thoroughly enjoyed his deployments, which include two stints in Afghanistan, one in Iraq and several in other American states. great, great experience, said Sallans, a project engineer the country and travel across the world. Ive made a lot of friends and really enjoyed the work. employee, has deployed to Virginia and Mississippi. Afghanistan in 2010 was near the eastern border with Pakistan. As a resident engineer, he helped build an airport runway, helicopter pad, roads and buildings at two Afghanistan National Army bases. Sallans said he treasures the friendships he developed with Afghani contractors and Romanian soldiers who helped with construction. He stays in touch with them and other friends hes made along the way. During 2012, Sallans served at Shindand Airbase in Herat Province near Afghanistans western border water facility, ordnance mutations storage area, airport Well-traveled Sallans nds deployment rewarding Low Great Lakes water levels impact the nation Lakes role as a conduit for transporting commodities vital to the American economy and way of life, including iron ore, coal and grain. Commercial cargo vessels are car than they did in the late 1990s under higher water level conditions to avoid having their hulls scrape channel bottoms, according to the passed along in the form of higher prices for automobiles, electricity and food. below their long-term average water levels, according to the Corps. For Huron registered their lowest water level since the Corps began recordlakes are connected at the Straits of Mackinac and are regarded as one body of water for hydrologic pur poses. Lakes Superior, Michigan and Huron have been below average for Rich Sallans and an Afghan construction worker check out the wiring in a light pole at Shindand Air base in Afghanistan. Photo by Lutfullah Saraj Employees gather for holiday celebration 14 straight years. Drought conditions throughout the excessive evaporation, and snowfall was below average in the winter of ed to remain below the long-term average for the next six months. and assess the impacts of low water Lakes water levels, log onto the Detroit District home page. www.lre.usace.army.mil Employees enjoy themselves at the Detroit District holiday party, Dec. 13 at the Doubletree Hotel in downtown Detroit. Clockwise from top left, Maj. James Booth steadies his daughter; Angelique Bartreau and Mary Weidel check in attendees; Evan Lu concentrates on maintaining his beat as nearby co-workers compete in cornhole, a bag-tossing game; Renee Thomas, Mike Allis and Tim Smith enjoy watching colleagues John Goetgeluck and Matt McClerren engage in the friendly competition between supporters of two Michigan universities; and Alaa Jafar socializes with retirees George Fedynsky and Surendra Sukhtankar. About160 people attended the festivities.Photos by Ricardo J. Garcia

PAGE 6

ment and lighting. not based on one or two agencies or contractors working individually but rather the group as a whole, served as project engi onboard to produce a quality end product. He said personnel of knowledge in con tracting, mechanical and electrical systems, and general construc tion which allowed the project to move forward in a quality manner. have someone double check your calculations. It even extends to things like picking up a piece of trash off the slips and falls. Along with the documentation of our critical are following the latest process, correcting in mind with everything you do. all strive to make sure everything we do is our best work, it will go a long way toward ensuring that the Detroit District is walk ing the quality walk, and not just talking the talk. Once it becomes a regular part of how you work, it wont seem like a big step to ensure quality products. everything you do. Scott Thieme, deputy district engineer for project management, serves as the Detroit District Quality Champion. I just wanted to take a few minutes today to share my Reports, Opportunities for Improvement, etc. are not all we do. process. It is a way of thinking and a personal commitment to doing the right things, the right ten process to tell you how to execute every part of your mission in a quality way. It will be one of the tools you use, but there may not be not prevent you from doing a quality job. Having quality as an ingrained part of who you are means that you will do your best on everything you touch. It may be as simple as catching a spelling mistake on a colleagues document or taking the extra step to 6 3Quality: A way of thinking, commitment to do right thing Scott Thieme Jet fuel station completed at Duluth Air National Guard BaseTank trucks unload jet propulsion fuel at the new Petroleum, Oil and Lubricants facility at Duluth Air National Guard base in Duluth, Minn. SPRING 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG SPRING 2013 By Tom Black Public Aairs Oce fuel facility thanks in part to the efforts of the Army Corps of Engineers. and Lubricants, POL, complex will (Duluth, Minn., and Fort Crook, fuel depot that was demolished. heated parking building for the base refueler trucks that transport fuel to Charles HagelSecretary of Defense U.S. Department of DefenseGen. Raymond T. OdiernoChief of Sta of the Army, U.S. Department of the Army John M. McHughSecretary of the Army U.S. Department of the ArmyLt. Gen. Thomas P. BostickChief of Engineers U.S. Army Corps of EngineersBrig. Gen. Margaret W. Burcham Commanding General Great Lakes and Ohio River Division Lt. Col. Robert J. EllsDistrict Engineer, Detroit District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Barack H. ObamaPresident of the United States of America Detroit District Chain of Command Left, a Detroit Area Oce work crew prepares to conduct an emergency condition survey of the Rouge River turning basin in Dearborn, Mich., after part of the riverbank collapsed. Above, a portable conveyor used by a steel company to ooad and stockpile taconite pellets is sunken into the collapsed bank. Detroit Area Oce crew conducts Rouge River condition survey Photo by Keith Kropfreiter Photo by Keith Kropfreiter Photo by Corey Weston U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District

PAGE 7

cation and collaboration, participants were attached to each other by ropes as they navigated high up on the grid. During the eight-month program, LDP II participants are expected to complete individual assignments as well as one group project. The Leaders Guide to Radical Management by Stephen Denning is required reading for all par ticipants. Participants also read a book of their choice on leadership, then pres ent a summary and describe how they can apply what theyve learned. A current participant, Jan Smith of the Management Support Branch, is read ing Tribes: We Need You to Lead Us think about the opportunities you have to lead in your daily life, Smith said. have to be a supervisor or manager. She said she enjoys LDP II and looks forward to the remainder of the program. a Difference Project, in which each participant develops a plan and implements an improvement in his or her of Non-supervisory employees with at least one year at the Corps may apply for LDP II, which is a competitive proaged to continue developing their leadership capabilities. DISTRICT ENGINEER Lt. Col. Robert J. Ells PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER Lynn Rose EDITOR / LAYOUT Soundings is an authorized newspaper of the Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District. It is published quarterly, under supervision of the Public Affairs prepared using desktop publishing Soundings is also available on the Internet at http://www.lre.usace.army.mil/ Circulation: per issue and circulate them to employees, retirees, and anyone requesting a copy in writing. Contents: Views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the Department not endorse any product or service that may be advertised or mentioned in this publication. News copy is prepared in accordance with All photos are U.S. Army photos unless otherwise indicated. Submission: opinions about the information published in Soundings. News tips, ideas, suggestions and articles may be mailed to Soundings, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District: E-mail: Lynn.M.Rose@us.army.mil. For general information, call toll COVER: Tina Stonemetz of the Bualo District navigates a high ropes course at the Base Camp Challenge Center in Flint, Mich., as part of the Leadership Development Program II. The exercise helps employees build condence and encourages teamwork. (Photo by Lt. Col. Robert J. Ells) 2 7Lt. Col. Robert J. EllsCommanders ColumnLeadership training challenges employees www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG SPRING 2013 SPRING 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG By Tom Black Public Aairs Oce strives to develop good leaders to make it a thriving, successful organization. Leadership Development Pro gram II, LDP II, is intended to cultivate leaders who will inspire their colleagues to reach their potential and advance the Corps missions. how to improve, said Cindy Jarema, a hydraulic engineer who serves on the LDP II steer different qualities and strengths they bring to an organization and it is up to them to determine which ones to improve and which ones are assets to making them great leaders. ercises designed to challenge participants, facilitate Detroit, Chicago and Buffalo districts recently gathered at the Base Camp Challenge Center in Flint, Mich. course. In an exercise intended to increase communi want to take the op portunity in this edi tion to highlight an ongoing national and USACE priority effort: an emphasis on the promotion of Science, ing and Mathemaatics, gram goals are to: Foster/motivate increased awareness ogy, Engineering and Math among underrepresented inner-city students Foster an increased underrepresent ed minority presence in the nations mission supported by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other fed Lay the framework for an increase in the representation of underrepre sented minorities within the Corps of Engineers and other federal agen future applicant pool. As the nations premier engineering organization, USACE plays a vital role in supporting this effort to encourage more people to pursue engineering and The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recognizes the critical role that Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education plays in enabling the U.S. to remain the economic and technological leaders of the global marketplace, and enabling the Department of Defense and Army in the security of our nation. We are committed to teaming with others to strengthen STEMrelated programs that inspire current and future generations of young people to pursue Bostick highlighted the task at hand, our challenge. By the year 2020, we will need a million more engineers, so we have to start early. America. And, many of those engineers go back to their home countries. be a part of this effort. Your involve ment can be as simple as giving a presentation to a class, interacting with a boy or girl scout group, acting as a judge for a science competition or vol unteering to work a shift in the USACE booth at the Detroit Boat Show. Or, it can be as complex as volunteer ing to coordinate with a school or com munity to hold a large-scale awareness program utilizing the Blanket Purchase Agreement USACE has developed. I encourage everyone in the District to the youth in your local communities and support this ongoing program. & Structures Branch. He is a member of of his many tasks is reporting Detroit events, please contact him. efforts can be found at the following websites: http://www.usace.army.mil/stem.aspx awareness-program-components you do on a daily basis. I continue to be amazed at the talent we have within our ranks. Keep up the great work!Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Corps employees watch co-workers climb the faux rock wall at the Base Camp Challenge Center in Flint, Mich. Photo by Lt. Col. Robert J. Ells A happy visitor shows o her Kids Dont Float T-shirt decal at the Duluth Boat, Sport and Travel Show in Duluth, Minn.Photo by Mary T. GeorgeBoat shows oer district outreach opportunities Employees recently interacted with enthusiastic crowds at the and the Duluth Boat, Sport and chures, stickers, toss rings, coloring books and other materials promoting water safety, and answered questions about the Corps of Engineers and its missions. Employees also distributed Regulatory outreach brochures and permit applications. Visitors to the Detroit exhibit frequently asked questions or commented about cellent opportunity to connect with the public, said Maj. James provide an avenue for teaching young adults and children the importance of water, ice and Corps structure safety. with the public, Booth said, was Bosticks emphasis on Science, the concepts behind how the Soo Locks operate. all employees who volunteered their time to support these events, Booth said. visited the Duluth show, the sponsoring associations said.

PAGE 8

www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG 8 Employees of the Quarter First Quarter 2013Katie Schill Regulatory Oce Glenn Spence Real Estate Branch Glenn Spence, appraiser/ realty specialist, demon strated outstanding and timely execution of the real estate process neces sary for construction of a $14 million Customs and Border Protection, CBP, facility in Detroit. Spence communicated and coordinated effectively with CBP, the property the city of Detroit. His knowledge of Corps and CBP real estate processes as well as his familiarity with the Detroit market enabled the Corps to secure the necessary property in time for construction to commence this spring. Katie Schill, regulatory project manager, conducted a permit review in a timely and professional manner for an emergency dredging of the St. Joseph River in southwest Michigan. A fall storm caused severe shoal ing in the harbor. No federal funds were available, so a concrete manufactur ing company arranged to pay for dredging to enable vessels to reach its facility. Schills communication with the applicant and the state, along with her grasp of the technical issues, helped promptly secure the necessary Corps of Engineers permits for work to begin. Keith Kropfreiter, project engineer for the assistance in designing an innovative aluminum stop log to replace decaying timber stop logs in weirs ties, CDF. His design has become the new stan dard being implemented throughout the district. He also designed the new Mouilee CDF in Monroe County, Mich. Kropfreiters innovative abilities and his steadfast efforts to improve and streamline operations. Josh Hachey Contract Administration Branch Josh Hachey, mechani cal engineer, has taken on a heavy workload in the Contract Administration Branch and done course work on his own time to as a Contracting Acquisition Professional. He facilitated the Manistique Sea Lamprey Barrier Value Engineering Study, which resulted in $119,000 of potential savings. Hacheys initiative and contributions consistently projects. His performance great credit upon himself and the district. Keith Kropfreiter Detroit Area Oce SPRING 2013 www.lre.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District BUILDING STRONG CORPS SPEAKS Sabrina Miller, project manager from the Regulaconference of the Michigan Association of County Drain Commissioners in Acme, Mich. Miller gave a presentation on the Corps regulatory program and Michigan drain projects. Her topics included the Corps regulatory jurisdiction, drain project components requiring permits, tips for submitting complete permit applications and the Corps permit evaluation process. Jeff Fritsma of the Lake Michigan Area OfMiller could meet contractors and consultants involved with municipal drainage projects. Pat Kuhne, chief of emergency management, spoke Feb. 21 to the monthly meeting of the Michigan Society of Professional Engineers, Capital Area Chapter in Lansing, Mich. He presented the USACE Emergency Management mission and the districts capabilities in all hazard response to FEMA events. Mike OBryan Services Division, and Dave Wright, chief of the Operarepresenting industry, lake carriers, ports, labor unions, local and state governments. OBryan also spoke at a March 1 webinar meeting of the Shallow Draft Stakeholders, hosted in conjunction with the Chicago and Buffalo districts. He discussed the Operations representatives from various congressional ofand regional interest groups. Jim Selegean, a hydraulic engineer with the of American Military Engineers, S.A.M.E., in Detroit. evaluate dam storage capacities. Deployment oers compelling assignments Pg. 4 District employees enjoy holiday party Pg. 5 Corps plays role in constructing jet fuel facility Pg. 6 Employees hone leadership skills