Citation

Material Information

Title:
The outpost
Uniform Title:
Outpost (Yuma, Ariz.)
Creator:
Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) -- Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Yuma, AZ
Publisher:
U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, Public Affairs Office
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Biweekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 43 cm

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases -- Newspapers -- Arizona -- Yuma ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Newspapers -- Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) ( lcsh )
Arizona -- Yuma ( fast )
Arizona -- Yuma Proving Ground ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )

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Numbering Peculiarities:
Numerous numbering irregularities.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
639929322 ( OCLC )
ocn639929322

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sidewinder (Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz.)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

Full Text

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U.S. ARMY YuYU M aA PROVING GG RO uU ND, YuYU M aA ARIZON aA 85365 | VV OL uU ME 67 NN O. 15 A uU G usUS T 7, 2017 YPG testing critical to development of GPS /Page 2 The Civil Air Patrol: A quiet, professional group of volunteers /Page 6 Small business opportunities highlighted /Page 11 Y1By Chuck Wullenjohn Americas population varies in many ways, and different people have different opportunities. It depends on where one lives, cultural inputs, quality of education, economic conditions, and much more. In the Yuma area, U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground has established an active program that encourages young people to get the technical education needed to qualify them as adults to take advantage of the high tech opportunities offered at the proving ground and at other technical organizations around the nation. Southwest Arizonas economy has been based on agriculture for generations and YPGs encouragement of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) activities in young people is meant to both broaden viewpoints and excite. Iris Espinoza has functioned as YPGs STEM outreach coordinator and advisor since 2011, working to expose STEM to Yuma community children as young as the third grade with the purpose of lighting a number of engineers at the proving ground who visit school classrooms throughout the year to demonstrate fun, but meaningful, projects. Early exposure to STEM tells a young person that there is more out Expanding work horizons for young peopleSEE sS TEM page 7By Mark Schauer $100 million is a lot of money. Such was the sum raised by private donations that in the mid-2000s turned the National World War I Memorial and Museum in Kansas City, Mo., originally dedicated in 1926, from a stolid memorial with a tower and two modest galleries into a 32,000 square foot multimedia extravaganza that overwhelms the senses and sears the soul. and even airplanes are present in abundance, but so are the songs, the speeches, and the stories of the common and famous alike, from all SEE MEMORI aA L page 8 World War I Memorial and Museum a stirring reminder of American values YPG Munitions and Weapons Test Ofcers Adam Rinne (shown) and Richard Bloomeld represented the Army Test and Evaluation Command by traveling to Leesburg, Va., this summer to lead an expo workshop examining the trajectory motion of water balloons. The intent of the workshop was to teach kids about the mathematics of projectile motion and the effect of angles on it. (Loaned photo)

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2 AUgGUStT 7, 2017 THE OUUTPOSSTY2 THEOUtTPoOStT News may be submitted to: The Editor, Outpost, Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, AZ, 85365. Phone: (928) 328 or D S S N 899. Visit our website at: www.yuma.army.mil or email to: mark.a.schauer.civ@mail.milCommander: Col. Ross Poppenberger Public Affairs Ofcer: Chuck Wullenjohn Public Affairs Specialist/Editor: Mark S S chauer Technical Editor, Cold Regions Test Center: Clara Zachgo Marketing Specialist: Teri Womack Visual Information Manager: Riley Williams The Outpost is an unofcial publication authorized under provisions of AR 360. The Outpost is published every two weeks by the Public Affairs Ofce, Yuma Proving Ground. Views and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Army. This newspaper uses material credited to ATEC and ARNEW S S While contributions are solicited, the PAO reserves the right to edit all submitted materials and make corrections, changes or deletions to conform with the policy of this newspaper. by Mark Schauer Technological change alters the world and becomes so common that radically transformative inventions eventually are taken for granted. The Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) system is at such a point. Currently comprised of 32 satellites in orbit around the Earth, the GPS constellation allows anyone with a handheld receiver to pinpoint their exact geographic location with astonishing accuracy. Today, the technology is used not only by military personnel and testers at U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), but by millions of civilian consumers around the world as a navigational aid in automobiles, aircraft, and boats, by owners as a means of tracking lost pets wearing a GPS-enabled collar, and even by hikers and casual participants in treasure hunting game that utilizes GPS coordinates. Few, if any of these users realize YPG tested GPS from the earliest days of its existence. It was the biggest single project the proving ground was Support Directorate, said in a 1994 interview. It paid a lot of bills for YPG was the home of GPS testing from 1974 through 1990. YPG testers attracted the program by demonstrating their ability to collect more data at a lower price than other test ranges. Whereas other test ranges of the period gathered position, acceleration, and trajectory data of test items with electro-optical trackers called Cinetheodolites, recently completed testing of the AH-56 Cheyenne attack helicopter had given YPG an edge: The proving ground owned and used a then-state-of-the-art laser tracker that had a far greater range and comparable accuracy to a battery of Cinetheodolites. Further, engineers at the proving ground had adapted room-sized 1960s vintage IBM computers with specialized software that allowed them to collect test data from range instruments and onboard telemetry devices in real time, a groundbreaking advancement that dramatically reduced the time and YPG testing critical to development of GPS PHOTOSS THISS PAGE: YPG workers use modern GPSS receivers to pinpoint the location of a mortar round that impacted safely within a designated area of the Kofa Firing Range. YPG was the home of GP SS developmental testing from 1974 to 1990. (Photos by Mark S S chauer)

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THE OUUTPOSST AU UGUSUST 7, 2017 3Y3cost of testing. YPG didnt have curator of YPGs Heritage Center. We had sharp people writing algorithms for hand-me-down computers that made real-time data added retired Air Force Maj. Jim Bybee, who worked on the GPS program from 1975 to 1982 and testing at YPG. YPG was already ahead of the state of the art, which is why the Air Force came here. That they had laser trackers integrated into real time was a tremendous cost When the evaluations began in GPS satellite was more than a year away, and, like today, a GPS user needs coordinates from four satellites to get an accurate location reading. YPG testers coped with this by creating an inverted range made up of satellite simulators located in ground-based shelters at four different places. Ground tests of the infant technology were conducted trucks, and aircraft used for testing the bottom of aircraft to pick up simulated signals from the ground receivers. The earliest GPS systems were so large that a UH-1 helicopter, which carried as many as 14 troops at a time when used in Vietnam, could only accommodate a pilot and two passengers when carrying a GPS device. By September 1977 testers with UH-1 helicopters and F-4, P-3, and C-141 airplanes. The UH-1 and the C-141 were But the C-141 cargo plane was contractor systems inside, so we got a lot of bang for the buck with As the Air Force began to launch GPS satellites, evaluators took their positions from the satellites instead of the inverted range receivers. This created new challenges for the testers, however. The satellites gradually change launched more satellites, we had a pretty good test period for three or four hours per day. But every two weeks we had to move back our testing by half an hour. We went around the clock at least three times Though the continual changing scores of range workers involved with the testing, YPGs vaunted gave testers the opportunity to make the most of the situation. This was accomplished even as another monumental program, the Apache Longbow attack helicopter, began testing at the proving ground in the late 1970s. The satellites being available for only a few hours a day gave us an urgent requirement to test whenever didnt have to compete for range space at YPG. The ranges at other locations were consistently tied up, but at YPG we always had top By the early 1980s, GPS technology had been miniaturized to the point that a man portable backpack weighing a mere 25 pounds began testing with Soldiers at the proving ground. This testing was conducted in addition to that involving aircraft, all at a fast pace despite the fact there wasnt an active war in progress. We had a good group of people at Bybee. There was a lot of high level interest in the program and everyone was pretty attuned to how important Testing at YPG was critical to the development of the GPS technology so commonly used today. Just as YPGs testing prowess was put to good use then, it continues this same way today and will continue to serve the nation in the future.PHOTO SS THI SS PAGE: In the early years of GP SS testing at Yuma Proving Ground, then UU S S S S enator Barry Goldwater looks atand lsitens to-a man-portable GPSS device under test. An antenna for the heavy backpack necessary to use the device can be seen above the SS oldier on Goldwaters right. ( USUS Army photos) CUSTOMER SERVICE IS MY #1 PRIORITY rfnttbt rffntbrfntbt btff fffft ttbtbbtbtftftt bfbtft fttttft Call me today for a FREE Comparative Market Analysis, or with any of your real estate questions or needs!btb 126798

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4 AUgGUStT 7, 2017 THE OUUTPOSSTY4 By David Vergun, Army News Service WASHINGTON -Over the past 15 years, the Army has rightly focused Maj. Gen. Wilson Shoffner, director During that time, however, the nations adversaries have invested in technologies in an attempt to gain parity. The rate of technological change has also encouraged the Army and sister services to stay ahead of any potential capabilities new approaches to these problems to ensure that the Army remains prepared for future challenges, Shoffner said at the Association of the United States Armys Hot Topics 29. include work on electronic warfare technologies, and positioning, navigation and timing, known as PNT prototypes for use in Europe later this year, he said. For instance, the 2nd Cavalry electronic warfare prototypes to carry spectrum. According to Shoffner, the regiment is now using a new as Counter UAS Mobile Integrated Capability. This technology involves taking adding electronic warfare capability to them, including the AN/TPQ-53 lightweight counter-mortar radar. The system can detect threats and counter them with an electronic attack, Shoffner added. These prototypes are not programs of record, he said, explaining why months. The prototypes are currently being tested by Soldiers until full capability can be achieved, and while they might not be a perfect solution, even an 80 percent solution is better than nothing, according to Shoffner. The concept of the test period is to place multiple small bets without spending a lot of money and be OK he said. amount of risk in whether or not a product works the way it is intended to work, Shoffner explained that the organization takes no risks when it comes to Soldier safety. Were using safety releases from the Army Test and Evaluation Command and urgent materiel releases from Army protocols followed to ensure were When Shoffner was in Europe three weeks ago, he observed leaders at the company and platoon levels thinking through how to employ the EMS and PNT equipment. These small-unit leaders are operating in a much more complex environment than they did in Iraq and Afghanistan, he said. They have to know what the threat is, where it is and what combination of capabilities to use in order to follow acquisition community as well as the operations community, Shoffner said. closely with program managers, sharing feedback from the Soldiers who use the prototypes in order to better inform the program managers current and future programs of record. We work with the program managers and life-cycle management commands as we go so theyre added. We understand that the prototypes will inform decisions and in some cases become programs of record, so its critical to think through the sustainment piece from the very beginning and partner with the logistics community working handCO is also partnering with the Defense Innovation Unit Experimental, or DIUx, to better understand what they have done in the realm of EMS, he said. the Department of Defense Strategic systems for the Army. Beyond PNT and EMS, Shoffner added that the Emerging could be developed to counter threat technologies that may be evolving or changing so that we dont get Autonomous and semi-autonomous systems are examples of current research, he said. Another area ripe for experimentation, he said, are systems that could defeat anti-tank guided missiles. What if theres a way to detect, disable or defeat them through electronic attack or directed an approach would not only mitigate risk, but would also ease logistics burdens since units would not have to haul around conventional munitions. Joshua Marcuse, executive director of the Defense Innovation Board, Compared to the entire defense evaluated against the products and capabilities that it produces. He added that it is of critical to protect and equip Soldiers against emerging threats.Army Rapid Capabilities Ofce prepares to face emerging threats The 2nd Cavalry Regiment in Europe is using an electronic warfare prototype known as Counter UU A S S Mobile Integrated Capability. The technology includes the AN/TPQ-53 lightweight counter-mortar radar, tested extensively at Yuma Test Center and Cold Regions Test Center, as seen here. ( US US Army photo)

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THE OUUTPOSST AU UGUSUST 7, 2017 5Y5By Teri Womack A few weeks ago, I was asked to develop a retirement presentation documenting the career of a very camera-shy employee who was departing the proving ground after a 30 year career. After looking for recent photos to include in the presentation and coming up empty, I thought I might have better luck if I looked back to her earlier years of employment. Focused on the task at hand, I started at the beginning of her career and didnt think anything of it as I began perusing though the archives of printed photos and past Outpost issues starting forward from the year 1986. After glancing through a few years of photos and articles, it struck me that I also began my own civil service career in that same year and it wasnt too long before I felt like I was starring in an episode of This is Every so often in normal conversation, someone will bring up a person or past event that occurred at the proving ground that stirs up a memory or a story in my mind. But looking back through three decades of time in one sitting stirred up something very different. It was like looking back at 30 continuous issues of my high school year book at one time. The view and perspective were both enlightening and somewhat overwhelming. In the early years, some of the photos and articles I paged by depicted a time when the words cut of a pair of scissors and a roll of tape and was not a function on a keyboard. Its interesting to see the recorded documentation in photos and words changes came that came about with the evolution of computers and cell phones. That is still true for all the changes in technology we see today. while moving through the years and timeline of my career, I realized that time can be elastic and by that I mean that one single moment can stretch out for what seems like days and will remain in your memory forever while some hours and days can pass by dredged in what seems like monotony with only certain relevant events sticking out. And as I found out, a thirty year career can go by in a blink. There have been so many people that have passed through the old and newly built YPG gates in thirty years. Looking back at photos, gave some of them made on me even if they were only here for a short time. Other snapshots left me wondering what came next for other people after they left the proving ground and where they were today. Theres some compelling and entertaining stories to tell about some of the more interesting and colorful characters who have spent their time working here! Undeniably, while taking this trek through time, there was no escaping those who passed away while on the job or after they transferred or retired. They all seemed way too soon. At the time its happening, its almost impossible to ascertain how people and their actions or even certain events, can change the course true when I hear employees calculate their time working at YPG by listing the number of Commanders they have worked for during their years of employment. Many of our leaders have left a strong legacy, others have left a smaller imprint, but all have had some type of effect on the proving ground of today. All of this nostalgia and reliving some of my not so glorious hair days of the 80s, has me remembering lyrics from a song by one of my Going back Army Rapid Capabilities Ofce prepares to face emerging threats A view without a point Next Outpost deadline is noon August 10thSexual Assault Hotline: 920-3104Report Domestic Violence: 328-2720

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6 AUgGUStT 7, 2017 THE OUUTPOSSTY6 Defense Testing.com Call Now (928) 726-5882 BUILD IT. TEST IT. FLY IT. YUMA COUNTYAIRPORT AUTHORITYCommercial Hangar Leases Furnished Office Rentals Build To Suit Opportunities 113586 STEMFROM PAGE 1 By Scott Myers The organization is not widely known or talked about, unless you hear about them in a news broadcast or newspaper article associated with a search or rescue operation, or a natural disaster relief mission. You might even hear about some event that the unit participates in, such as a local parade, airshow or sporting event. This unit, known as Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Squadron 508, is made up of highly motivated, quiet, professional adults who dedicate their time and energy to some of the best young people our country has to offer (two of which were recently accepted to attend college at the U.S. Air Force Academy). Though the squadron is made up of a relatively small group of individuals, roughly 0.013% of the population of the city of Yuma, it is incredibly active. For example, in what other community service organization aircraft and gliders; maintaining rescue operations; aerospace system design; building small unmanned aircraft simulators; designing, constructing, and launching rockets; learning astronomy, radio systems, and cyber-warfare skills; counterdrug operations; learning applied leadership skills, rigorous military directly supporting their city, state and nation? According to Global Since Civil Air Patrols formation during the earliest days of World War II, this vigilant organization of citizen Airmen has been committed to service to America. Founded on Dec. 1, 1941, as a way to protect the nations shorelines from invading German U-boats, CAP has evolved into a premier public service organization that still carries out emergency service missions when needed in the air and on the ground. As a Total Force partner and Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, Civil Air Patrol is there to search for times of disaster and work to keep the homeland safe. Its 56,000 members and expertise toward the well-being of their communities, while also through aerospace/STEM education and helping shape future leaders through CAPs cadet program. Civil Air Patrols missions for America are many, and todays adults and cadets perform their duties with the same vigilance as its founding members preserving CAPs 75-year legacy of service while maintaining its commitment to nearly 1,500 The next time you see a group of CAP adults and cadets at an airshow, parade, presenting a demonstration at a school, or participating in a community project, do not hesitate to approach them. Talk to them about why they do what they do, and why they have been doing so for almost 76 years. The next time you hear a about the Navy SEALs, Marines, many started their service at a much younger age wearing the uniform of a CAP Cadet. The Civil Air Patrol: A quiet, professional group of volunteers YPG pilot SScott Myers briefs Civil Air Patrol cadets about aircraft safety. The ofcial civilian auxiliary of the UUnited SStates Air Force, CAP serves as a supplement to search and rescue and drug interdiction missions, and provides aerospace education and cadet programs for youth ages 12 through 20. (Photo by Mark S S chauer)

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THE OUUTPOSST AU UGUSUST 7, 2017 7said Espinoza. Some children dont know what an engineer is and have never heard of the profession, she said. The whole purpose is to ignite There have been students who YPG has engaged with in middle school and again in high school who are now pursuing technical degrees in colleges and universities. One thing Espinoza particularly enjoys when a young person grasps a principle, successfully completes a project and feels a true sense of accomplishment. The overall Army has a similar interest in encouraging STEM activities in young people and has established a formal outreach program that sponsors an annual competition in grades six through 12 called the National Judging Engineering Expo (NJEE). YPG Munitions and Weapons represented the Army Test and Evaluation Command by traveling to Leesburg, Va., in late June to lead an expo workshop examining the trajectory motion of water balloons, the intent being to teach kids about the mathematics of projectile motion and the effect of angles on it. involved with YPG STEM activities for a number of years, 2017 was Ive supported a few past STEM He said he has found the Ive found kids here in Yuma to be anxious to learn, with a great as opening doors and that creates a Organizers of the NJEE competition were highly complimentary of YPGs workshop, for it was engaging, interesting, as well as, fun for the students, and well-demonstrated the necessity for accurate mathematic calculations in the ballistic world. The Armys interest in ensuring STEM outreach has grown greatly in recent years and will most likely continue to do so in the future. YPG is fully committed to the effort and has already made to plans to continue moving forward locally. Y7 Reds Bird Cage SaloonLocated in the heart of Historic Downtown Yuma231 Main St. 928-783-1050Mon-Fri 9:30am 2:30am Open Sat & Sun 6am Come And Join Us! STEMFROM PAGE 1The Civil Air Patrol: A quiet, professional group of volunteersYPG pilot SScott Myers briefs Civil Air Patrol cadets about aircraft safety. The ofcial civilian auxiliary of the UUnited SStates Air Force, CAP serves as a supplement to search and rescue and drug interdiction missions, and provides aerospace education and cadet programs for youth ages 12 through 20. (Photo by Mark SSchauer) The Armys interest in ensuring SSTEM outreach has grown greatly in recent years and will most likely continue to do so in the future. YPG is fully committed to the effort and has already made to plans to continue moving forward locally. Organizers of the NJEE competition were highly complimentary of YPGs workshop, for it was engaging, interesting, as well as, fun for the students, and well-demonstrated the necessity for accurate mathematic calculations in the ballistic world. Here, test ofcer Adam Rinne shows students how to accurately measure angles. (Loaned photos) Richard Bloomeld (left) and Iris Espinoza (right) help hold the slingshot as the young engineers prepare to launch their water balloon projectile at test ofcer Adam Rinne. The accuracy of their shot depended on their successfully application of the principles of angle and measurement.

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8 AUgGUStT 7, 2017 THE OUUTPOSSTY8 Graves later earned worldwide acclaim as a novelisthere in red letters on a wall panel with a photo of weary front line troops is a quote from his memoir Goodbye to All That: I only once refrained from shooting a German. While sniping from a knoll I saw him taking a bath in the German third line. I disliked the idea of shooting a naked sergeant with me. He got him, but Visiting the World War I Memorial and Museum is particularly poignant this year, the centennial of the beginning of American involvement World War I was the war of a great grandfather or great-great uncle. The last surviving American veteran Buckles, who lied about his age to enlist in the Army at age 16 and volunteered to drive ambulances after being told it was the quickest way to get to the front, died six years ago. Buckles was the last living American Soldier to have witnessed the incomprehensible carnage wrought by a dizzying litany of alliances, counter-alliances, realpolitik power plays and miscalculations. As fate would have it, he survived a grim side of the next World War, too: a middleaged Buckles was captured as an American civilian worker in the Philippines at the dawn of World War II and spent over two years interned by the Imperial Japanese Army. Later in his long and eventful life he became a tireless supporter of commemorating World War I in an appropriate way. The lavishly upgraded Kansas City museum is one result of his contribution. A World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C., slated for dedication next year, is another. World War I lasted over four years, and saw nearly 70 million troops from 15 nations and empires mobilized by land, sea, and air. By the close of hostilities in 1918, more than 9 million were dead, and another 20 million had been wounded. Nearly 8 million were declared missing in action. The civilian death toll exceeded 7 million. by the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, in June 1914. At the World War I Memorial, a 1910 9mm Browning pistol of the same model used in the in a low alcove where an adult of average height has to kneel to get a close look: every other artifact and interpretive sign-displayed on from the ceiling, and under glass in concealed handgun. was at hand. British newspapers assured the troops they would be home by Christmas. Kaiser Wilhelm declaimed that the German Empire would defeat France and its allies inside of six weeks. The reality, however, was far less into brutal trench warfare that no combination of modern weaponry could break. By the end of May 1915, chlorine gas choked the muddy trenches of Ypres, and British civilians were being bombed by intermittent German air raids. Yet in the United States, life proceeded destined to become the United States years Indianapolis 500. In rural Tennessee, Sunday school teacher MEMORIALFROM PAGE 1 Dedicated in 1926, the National World War I Memorial and Museum in Kansas City, Mo. is a stirring and comprehensive reminder of the debt of gratitude the nationand worldowes to the more than 4,000,000 American S S oldiers who served in the war to end all wars. 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of U U nited S S tates involvement in the conict. (Photo by Mark S S chauer)This French tank on display at the National World War I Memorial and Museum looks good for its 100 years, but the slight lean toward one tread is the result of a German 77mm artillery piece destroying a large chunk of its rear. (Photo by Mark SS chauer) Dedicated in 1926, the National World War I Memorial and Museum in Kansas City, Mo. is a stirring and comprehensive reminder of the debt of gratitude the nationand worldowes to the more than 4,000,000 American S S oldiers who served in the war to end all wars. 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of U U nited S S tates involvement in the conict. (Photo by Mark S S chauer)

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THE OUUTPOSST AU UGUSUST 7, 2017 9Y9inside of six weeks. The reality, however, was far less into brutal trench warfare that no combination of modern weaponry could break. By the end of May 1915, chlorine gas choked the muddy trenches of Ypres, and British civilians were being bombed by intermittent German air raids. Yet in the United States, life proceeded destined to become the United States years Indianapolis 500. In rural Tennessee, Sunday school teacher Alvin York, ultimately one of the most highly decorated American Soldiers of the war, was several months into a religious conversion that had led him to give up alcohol and gambling and foreswear violence in any form. At this time, he had never been more than 50 miles away from his birthplace. By the time the United States declared war on German in April 1917, France was devastated. 35,000 miles of trenches crisscrossed the obliterated and denuded Western Front. A third of the French male population between the ages of 18 and 30 had died in uniform. There was no certainty that France and Belgium could be saved: in fact, the highest councils of the German government did not anticipate the appearance of fresh American troops would make a noticeable difference in the war. American entrance is council, citing the nations small military and supposed lack of the German government assumed torpedo whatever ships brought American troops toward Europe. Their assessment was wrong. The United States military drafted nearly three million men into service in 1917, with another 500,000 to 1 million new civilian employees providing support. A massive public relations campaign encouraged Americans to economize their food and material consumption and buy spring of 1918, 10,000 new American troops were arriving in France per day. At Cantigny, Chateau-Thierry, and Belleau Wood the Americans and Allied Forces turned the tide against German attacks, and American participation in the Hundred Days Offensive decisively broke the armistice was signed at 11:00 a.m. on November 11, 1918. The United States militarys losses exceeded 100,000, with over 200,000 wounded and nearly 4,000 missing in action. Historians will debate for the rest of our collective lifetimes whether or not a war prosecuted to total German defeat could have prevented the even-more devastating Second World War. Yet American participation in the the nation as a global superpower, and, after decades, a world where the kind of grave mistakes of 1914 were less likely. To visit the museum great privilege and responsibility, Soldiers past, is particularly moving this year. American entrance into World War I in 1917 decisively turned the tide for the Allied forces. At the time, however, it was far from a foregone conclusion that France and Belgium could be saved from the grinding German onslaught. American entrance is nothing, opined the German war council. (Photo by Mark SSchauer) ABOVE: The UU nited SS tates militarys losses exceeded 100,000, with over 200,000 wounded and nearly 4,000 missing in action. BELOW: Among other horrors of trench warfare, S S oldiers had to contend with poison gas attacks as they fought amidst 35,000 miles of trenches crisscrossed the obliterated and denuded Western Front. (Loaned photos) This German 24.5 centimeter heavy trench mortar weighs over 1,600 pounds and had a range of over 3,000 feet. The Germans favored mortars for their economy in both manufacturing costs and use of powder. (Photo by Mark S Schauer)

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10 AUgGUStT 7, 2017 THE OUUTPOSSTY10 By Maj. Ronald Beltz A sage was passing through the capital city of the famous king. While he was walking, he noticed a single coin on the road. He picked it up. He and he had no use of that coin. So, he planned to donate it to the one who is in need of it. He strolled around the streets throughout the day but didnt the rest area and spent a night there. The next morning, he woke up for his daily activities and saw that a king was going for his invasion of another state with his war-ready army. When the king saw the sage standing, he ordered his army to stop. He came to the sage and said, Oh great sage, I am going to war to win another state so that my state can be expanded: Bless me to be After thinking, the sage gave the single coin to the king! The king was confused and annoyed with this: what use did he have for a single coin when he was already one of the richest kings? He curiously asked the sage, whats the meaning of this one The sage explained, Oh, Great King! I found this coin yesterday while strolling around the streets of your capital city. But I had no use of it. So, I had decided that I would donate it to someone needy. I strolled around till the evening in your capital, but found no one such. Everyone was living a happy life: It what they had. So I found no one to give this coin to. But today, the king of this state still has the desire to gain he already has. I felt you were in The king realized his mistake and gave up the planned war. I share with yall Philippians 4:11-13-: Not that I speak from want, for I have learned to be content in whatever circumstances I am. I know how to get along with humble means, and I also know how to live in prosperity; in any and every circumstance I have learned hungry, both of having abundance and suffering need. I can do all things Gods Peace and Blessings.The sage and the kingChaplains corner

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THE OUUTPOSST AU UGUSUST 7, 2017 11Y11 BRAND NEW HOMES FROM THE$120s rfnrrfntbt928.344.2550 tnbt928.342.3100 rnnnnn 124957 content in whatever circumstances I am. I know how to get along with humble means, and I also know how to live in prosperity; in any and every circumstance I have learned hungry, both of having abundance and suffering need. I can do all things Gods Peace and Blessings. Small business opportunities highlighted at Yuma Proving Ground forum Each year tens of millions of dollars are spent at UU S S Army Yuma Proving Ground on equipment, construction projects and much more to sustain the Armys mission. As the largest single employer of civilians and the countys primary high technology workplace, the contracting center at the proving ground is busy throughout the year acquiring, writing and processing government contracts for goods and services. SS mall businesses throughout Yuma County attended a Forecast Forum in late July highlighting contracting opportunities at the proving ground. The forum featured representatives from YPG units and the Mission and Installation Contracting Command who provided accurate, up-to-date information on anticipated opportunities for 2017 and 2018. In the rst photo, contracting specialist Iliana Grifth greets attendees at the brief. During the discussions, event goers heard from YPG commander Col. Ross Poppenberger (second photo) and Yuma Test Center commander Lt. Col. Timothy Matthews. (Photos by Teri Womack)

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12 AUgGUStT 7, 2017 THE OUUTPOSSTY12 TO ADVERTISE IN THE OUTPOST PLEASE CONTACTDARLENE FIRESTONE AT (928) 539-6829NATIONALS@YUMASUN.COMYUMA SUN, INC.2055 S. ARIZONA AVE.YUMA, AZ 85364 TLC MANAGEMENT Themis & Paul Cavanagh928.726.5557670 E 32nd St, Ste 9 WWW.TLCMANAGEMENT.NET Find the Rental Home YOU Deserve AS A VETERAN,PAUL UNDERSTANDS THE NEEDS OF RELOCATING MILITARY FAMILIES AND IS DEDICATED TO ASSISTING ALL FAMILIES IN LOCATING THEIR NEXT RENTAL HOME. HE IS ALSO A RETIRED PEACE OFFICER WHO IS VERY SENSITIVE TO THE PARTICULAR NEEDS OF PLACING LAW ENFORCEMENT AND THEIR FAMILIES. RESPONSIVE CONCERNED RELIABLE HERE FOR YOU By Greg Dill, Medicare regional administrator A couple of years ago, my father, well into his 70s, bought himself a high-performance automobile. The kids and grandkids had all grown up, and heck, he had waited a long time to drive something fun. until my mother broke her hip, had surgery, and needed extensive outpatient physical and occupational therapy. Getting into and out of a sporty car isnt easy for someone using a walker and cane. So I got a phone call asking what could be done. But I told him he didnt need to take mom to a clinic or hospital. As receive most of the therapy in her own home. Medicare covers a variety of heath care services that you can get in the comfort and privacy of your home. These include intermittent skilled nursing care, physical therapy, speech-language pathology services, and occupational therapy. Such services used to be available only at a hospital or doctors more convenient, and usually less expensive when you get them in your home. To be eligible for home health services, you must be under a doctors care and receive services under a plan of care established and reviewed regularly by a physician. He or she also needs to certify that you need one or more home health services. In addition, you must be homebound and have a doctors homebound means leaving your home isnt recommended because of your condition, or your condition keeps you from leaving without using a cane, wheelchair or walker; special transportation; or getting help from another person. Also, you must get your services from a Medicareapproved home health agency. If you meet these criteria, Medicare pays for covered home health services for as long as youre eligible need them. Skilled nursing services are covered when theyre given on a part-time or intermittent basis. In order for Medicare to cover such care, it must be necessary and ordered by your Medicare does not cover full-time nursing care. Skilled nursing services are given by either a registered nurse or a licensed practical nurse under an direct care and teach you and your caregivers about your care. Examples of skilled nursing care include: giving IV drugs, shots, or tube feedings; changing dressings; and teaching about prescription drugs or diabetes care. Before your home health care begins, the home health agency should tell you how much of your bill Medicare will pay. The agency should also tell you if any items or services they provide arent covered by Medicare, and how much youll have to pay. One good way to look for a home health agency is by using Medicares tool, at www.medicare.gov/ It lets you compare agencies by the types of services they offer and the quality of care they provide. You can always get answers to your Medicare questions by calling 4227).How Medicare covers home health services

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THE OUUTPOSST AU UGUSUST 7, 2017 13Y13 TLC MANAGEMENT Themis & Paul Cavanagh928.726.5557670 E 32nd St, Ste 9 WWW.TLCMANAGEMENT.NET Find the Rental Home YOU Deserve AS A VETERAN,PAUL UNDERSTANDS THE NEEDS OF RELOCATING MILITARY FAMILIES AND IS DEDICATED TO ASSISTING ALL FAMILIES IN LOCATING THEIR NEXT RENTAL HOME. HE IS ALSO A RETIRED PEACE OFFICER WHO IS VERY SENSITIVE TO THE PARTICULAR NEEDS OF PLACING LAW ENFORCEMENT AND THEIR FAMILIES. RESPONSIVE CONCERNED RELIABLE HERE FOR YOU CLASSIFIEDS To place your ad call 928-783-4433 Submityour LettertotheEditor. letters@yumasun.com Agricultural & Land Antiques Collectibles Sport Utility Vehicles Home Services Directory Air Conditioning Heating Appliance Repair Pool Service Roofers Tile, flat, foam or shingle roofs.Small repairs to complete new roof systems. All 100% guaranteed.linesandlundgreen.comROC#069354C42. 070448L42. 928-783-9084 ROOFING & INSULATION, INC. Document Preparation How Medicare covers home health services Get the convenience of choices in how you receive news from the Yuma Sun. Have it delivered to the door in print or access news online on desktop or mobile devices. Local News. Anytime. Anywhere.Call 928-783-3333Email subscribe@yumasun.com

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14 AUgGUStT 7, 2017 THE OUUTPOSST Y14 Araby Crossing 6630 E. 35th St. Araby & 32nd Street 928-580-4310 Starting at $194,950 Sunset Terrace 6021 E. Morning Lane Araby Rd. & 26th St. 928-317-9701 Starting at $231,950 Las Barrancas 12310 Grand View Drive S. Frontage Rd. & 15E 928-503-2781 Starting at $280,950Get moving!Brand New 3-5 bedroom Solar homes with a wealth of energy-saving, water-saving, and money-saving features *Monthly Mortgage Payment as low as $1383.62 Monthly Electric as low as $100.42 (based on yearly average) Seller will pay up to 3% of closing costs with preferred LenderCall 928-580-4310 or take a drive to 32nd Street and Araby Road. E l l i o t t H o m e s c o mfacebook.com/elliotthomesyuma ROC #246945 ROC #244491M-F 10am-5pm Weekends 11am-5pmCome visit us Today! Model Homes OpenFeatures, amenities, and pricing subject to change without notice. Photos may not represent actual home for sale. These subdivisions are marketed exclusively by Alta Vista. L.L.C. *Disclosure: Monthly mortgage payment based on $265,051 loan amount on a 30 year xed VA loan. 4.25% interest rate, 4.489% APR as of April 17, 2017. Based on principal and interest only does not include taxes and insurance. Home Prices and Rates are subject to change. Conventional, FHA and Arizona Home Plus (down payment assistant) options also available. Stephenie Converse, NMLS Number 304542, Academy Mortgage, 1375 W 16th Street Suite B, Yuma AZ 85364 928-247-9089. BK 0904081 LO-0915756 Corp NMLS 3113. 124935 Back to school brigade gets readySexual Harassment Assault Response and Prevention Ofce open house Relocation Program Manager Rosa Dayton, Family SS upport Division Chief Mardy Clark, and SS exual Assault Response Coordinator Dina Mabry assist in unloading 100 backpacks and school supplies donated by the AZ Military Assistance Mission in late July. The Back 2 S S chool Backpack Brigade distributed the backpacks and supplies to the children of YPG S S oldiers at no cost to the service member on August 5th. (Photo by Teri Womack) YPGs S S exual Harassment Assault Response and Prevention ( S S HARP) Program Ofce held an open house in July inviting members of the workforce to tour their resource center, ask questions about their programs, and obtain information about the services and assistance they provide. Here, Melissa Gomez, victim advocate, discusses SS HARP programs with program analyst Rudy Rodriguez during the event. (Photo by Teri Womack)

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THE OUUTPOSST AU UGUSUST 7, 2017 15 Y15 Araby Crossing 6630 E. 35th St. Araby & 32nd Street 928-580-4310 Starting at $194,950 Sunset Terrace 6021 E. Morning Lane Araby Rd. & 26th St. 928-317-9701 Starting at $231,950 Las Barrancas 12310 Grand View Drive S. Frontage Rd. & 15E 928-503-2781 Starting at $280,950Get moving!Brand New 3-5 bedroom Solar homes with a wealth of energy-saving, water-saving, and money-saving features *Monthly Mortgage Payment as low as $1383.62 Monthly Electric as low as $100.42 (based on yearly average) Seller will pay up to 3% of closing costs with preferred LenderCall 928-580-4310 or take a drive to 32nd Street and Araby Road. E l l i o t t H o m e s c o mfacebook.com/elliotthomesyuma ROC #246945 ROC #244491M-F 10am-5pm Weekends 11am-5pmCome visit us Today! Model Homes OpenFeatures, amenities, and pricing subject to change without notice. Photos may not represent actual home for sale. These subdivisions are marketed exclusively by Alta Vista. L.L.C. *Disclosure: Monthly mortgage payment based on $265,051 loan amount on a 30 year xed VA loan. 4.25% interest rate, 4.489% APR as of April 17, 2017. Based on principal and interest only does not include taxes and insurance. Home Prices and Rates are subject to change. Conventional, FHA and Arizona Home Plus (down payment assistant) options also available. Stephenie Converse, NMLS Number 304542, Academy Mortgage, 1375 W 16th Street Suite B, Yuma AZ 85364 928-247-9089. BK 0904081 LO-0915756 Corp NMLS 3113. 124935

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