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Title:
The outpost
Uniform Title:
Outpost (Yuma, Ariz.)
Creator:
Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) -- Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Yuma, AZ
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U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, Public Affairs Office
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English
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volumes : illustrations ; 43 cm

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Military bases -- Newspapers -- Arizona -- Yuma ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Newspapers -- Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) ( lcsh )
Arizona -- Yuma ( fast )
Arizona -- Yuma Proving Ground ( fast )
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Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )

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Numerous numbering irregularities.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
639929322 ( OCLC )
ocn639929322

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sidewinder (Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz.)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

Full Text

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U.S. ARMY YuYU M aA PROVING GG RO uU ND, YuYU M aA ARIZON aA 85365 | VV OL uU ME 67 NN O. 10 M aA Y 15, 2017 VCC employees make visitors feel welcome /Page 5 Once prominent, now forgotten: In the desert they sleep /Page 8 Encountering what made us what we are /Page 12 Y1By Mark Schauer YPGs vast size includes nearly 2000 square miles of restricted airspace, a vast holding used for extensive testing of a variety of unmanned aerial system (UAS) platforms. The proving ground seems as close to an ideal venue for UAS testing as can possibly exist, boasting clear, stable air and an extremely dry climate where inclement weather is rare. As UAS proliferate in use, a RQ-20A Puma UAS system has support testing. With an eight-foot wingspan and weighing about 15 pounds, the craft carries a day-night camera with thermal capability and a laser illuminator. In theater, Army convoys use it for spotting, but at YPG it will be used to support a variety of test missions. Ultimately, the platforms day/night camera with thermal capability and a laser illuminator may be used for scoring targets and other applications. Search and rescue is another application of this vehicle, said Scott Myers, pilot. If you set up a search pattern, the aircraft will orbit and keep following that search pattern on its own, and you can focus on controlling the camera without aircraft. have been training on the system Flying Puma enhances YPG capabilitiesHeavy combat team lead Cesar Ramirez launches a RQ-20A Puma unmanned aircraft system at YPG during a recent training session. The Puma will be used to support a variety of test missions at the proving ground. (Photo by Mark Schauer)SEE PU MM A page 2 By Mark Schauer It was exactly the same, yet totally different. The key landmarks from then-Sgt. Thomas Zielinskis tenure at YPG were still mostly present, though occasionally with different uses and cosmetic changes. here then, but the theater and school were, and the street they lived on is still called Hardy, even if it has new houses on it. Today, the former post headquarters is YPGs Heritage Center, and in early May former Sgt. Thomas Zielinski, accompanied by wife Joan and their friend from YPG days Mary Donnelly, visited the post, getting special tours of the Heritage Center and YPGs police station. This has really been an incredible experience, he said. Many people dont appreciate how important this is. Im proud of it. What a difference nearly half a century makes. for duty at Yuma Proving Ground in the late spring of 1969, nearly half a million of his countrymen SEE VI sS IT page 6 Former military police ofcer visits YPG after 46 years

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2 mayMAY 15, 2017 THE OUTPOSTY2 THEOUtTPoOStT News may be submitted to: The Editor, Outpost, Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, AZ, 85365. Phone: (928) 328 or DSN 899. Visit our website at: www.yuma.army.mil or email to: mark.a.schauer.civ@mail.milCommander: Col. Randy Murray Public Affairs Ofcer: Chuck Wullenjohn Public Affairs Specialist/Editor: Mark Schauer Technical Editor, Cold Regions Test Center: Clara Zachgo Marketing Specialist: Teri Womack Visual Information Manager: Riley Williams The Outpost is an unofcial publication authorized under provisions of AR 360. The Outpost is published every two weeks by the Public Affairs Ofce, Yuma Proving Ground. Views and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Army. This newspaper uses material credited to ATEC and ARNEWS. While contributions are solicited, the PAO reserves the right to edit all submitted materials and make corrections, changes or deletions to conform with the policy of this newspaper.since shortly after its arrival at the proving ground. The craft is handusers set up a communications mast to maintain contact with the airborne system. Though it can be launched consists of two: a mission operator on a laptop computer, and a vehicle controller. Though lightweight, the airframes Kevlar composite fuselage is tough. about 5,000 revolutions per minute, and powers the aircraft to up to 50 miles per hour. The craft has no landing wheels: Snap screws hold the eight-foot-spanning wings to the fuselage, and are designed to detach them when the aircraft lands bellyeither manually or automatically. Additionally, the propeller blades and tail pull back when the engine stalls to prevent damage to these components. So far, the fuselage despite landing in the rugged desert of YPGs ranges multiple times. Its a tough airframe, said PUMAFROM PAGE 1 Tipping the scales at under 15 pounds, the RQ-20A can be assembled and hand-launched by a single individual. The RQ-20A sprints at over 50 miles per hour, but normally operates at half that speed. Its lithium ion battery, the heaviest component aboard the airframe, powers it for about two hours of ight. The carbon-ber propeller spins at about 5,000 revolutions per minute, but, lacking landing gears, the Puma needs an assist from a strong arm to get airborne.

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THE OUTPOST may MAY 15, 2017 3Y3Myers. When you see it hit the damage. Once airborne, the craft can stay up for about two hours, and ranges miles away from its controllers. You can optical-designate targets and it will track those targets automatically, which frees you up to do other mission-related tasks, said Myers. After members of the initial cohort to train on the aircraft amass 20 to attend a master trainer course that will enable them to teach others how Multiple individuals involved with the airframe predict it will have a sustained and growing importance to YPGs capabilities. Our impression so far is that theyre very capable for a small aircraft, said Myers. ABOVE LEFT: Cesar Ramirez serves as mission operator as mechanical engineer Justin Crouch operates the Puma with a controller. ABOVE RIGHT: The lightweight Puma has no landing wheels: when it lands belly-rst, the wings are designed to detach, and the propeller blades and tail partially retract to escape damage. It lands in full stall mode, said Myers. When you see it hit the rst time, you expect a lot more damage. The RQ-20A sprints at over 50 miles per hour, but normally operates at half that speed. Its lithium ion battery, the heaviest component aboard the airframe, powers it for about two hours of ight. The carbon-ber propeller spins at about 5,000 revolutions per minute, but, lacking landing gears, the Puma needs an assist from a strong arm to get airborne.

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4 mayMAY 15, 2017 THE OUTPOSTY4 By David J. Horn Well, as weve all noticed, summer is coming back. And so were backto our summer survival lifestyles. But while enduring hot desert summers is part of working here at YPG, so is visiting on the weekends, just a convenient drive over the hill, Yumas wonderful western suburbSan Diego! With my apologies to all the real San Diego experts out there, here are a couple of my recommendations on things to do over there while you enjoy those 80 summer afternoons: Balboa Park Arrive early so you can park near the Natural History Museum. After touring the museum, take a romantic stroll past all the old buildings on the way to the Air and Space Museum at the south end of the park. On your way back, take the pedestrian bridge to the arboretum east across the street, where you can see what that 2-foot Spanish Dagger plant in front of your Yuma house just might look like after 100 years. So your kidthe one who lives in so much stuff and is so messy that you cant remember what the color of the carpeting isis thinking about joining the Navy. Take them on a tour of the USS Midway! Just dont show them the enlisted sailors sleeping quarters. And on a related note, just up the street from the USS Midway is the San Diego Maritime Museum. Along with all the displays below the deck of the ship Star of India, make sure you check out the crew amenities aboard that old Soviet submarine. Sea Port Village Hey, if you have to shop, shop where you can stroll along the harbor. Along with visiting the specialty shops, set aside an hour or two to take a harbor cruise on one of those Seal Boats (part boat, part open bus) that are based there. You get a fun, narrated driving tour on the way to Shelter Island, where the vehicle slides into the water to take you on a harbor tour where you can see everything from dolphin pens to submarine pens, as it takes you to a place where you can get some real close up pictures of lots of sea lions. Old Town State Park A great place to eat and shop, among some of the original buildings of old San Diego. Speaking of eating, at the east end of the park, walk a block south on Twiggs Street, and at the end of the seafood restaurant. On the times Ive driven to the restaurant, during those times when they are busy and have valet parking, I always remind the valet parking guys to not take my 1993 Ford Ranger out and race the Ferraris on nearby Interstate 5 while Im dining. Coronado Island Get to the island by crossing over on the big blue bridge, and park on a side street a couple blocks north of the Del Coronado Hotel (dont try to park at the Del). Stroll on over to the Del, walking in the front door acting as if you are actually staying there. Find that hallway with the pictures of all the famous guests including Presidents that have stayed there over the years, then head out the back door to one of Americas best beaches. Before you leave the Del, check out that tree out in front of the hotel that was in one of Marilyn Monroes movies. And last, but not least, be a respectful visitor. feathers over there over the years, resulted in all of us getting the nickname Zonies. In other words, drive in such a manner that youre not a hazard on their freeways, conversation with one of the locals, its probably best to avoid any discussions about the Chargers. Have a great trip!Our wonderful western suburbShootin the Breeze

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THE OUTPOST may MAY 15, 2017 5Y5 Coronado Island Get to the island by crossing over on the big blue bridge, and park on a side street a couple blocks north of the Del Coronado Hotel (dont try to park at the Del). Stroll on over to the Del, walking in the front door acting as if you are actually staying there. Find that hallway with the pictures of all the famous guests including Presidents that have stayed there over the years, then head out the back door to one of Americas best beaches. Before you leave the Del, check out that tree out in front of the hotel that was in one of Marilyn Monroes movies. And last, but not least, be a respectful visitor. feathers over there over the years, resulted in all of us getting the nickname Zonies. In other words, drive in such a manner that youre not a hazard on their freeways, conversation with one of the locals, its probably best to avoid any discussions about the Chargers. Have a great trip!Our wonderful western suburb By Mark Schauer YPG hosts thousands of test engineers and other support personnel every year, both military and civilian, all of whom must check in at the range pass desk inside the posts Visitor Control Center (VCC) before conducting their vital work. Inevitably, these folks are helped by the duo of Bobbye Dorris and Janet Hamby. YPG, said Dorris. We should be friendly and make them feel welcome here. According to dozens of customer feedback slips left by customers every week, the courteous and that, day in and day out. Theyre natural at customer service, said Barb Gardner, chief of range planning and safety. They have made this visitors center a seen them have 30 or 40 visitors at a time and zip right through them. Both of the longtime YPG employees love their jobs, for where else do so many different people come to see you? I love to meet people from all over, said Dorris. We dont get people from just the United States, we literally meet people from all over the world. The security requirements of visiting a test site at YPG are strict and can be cumbersome to those out the appropriate visit request documentation. We know everybody has come here for a reason, and were not going to be the roadblock, said Hamby. We will do what we can to help them get on here. There are multiple stories of the VCC personnel going to great lengths to obtain missing as a prospective test visitor waits. Nonetheless, the VCC personnel remind folks that these sorts of delays can be prevented with a proactive phone call to them prior to your arrival. Call before you get here to make sure we have everything, said Dorris. If we dont, they can call their people before they come. If we have the appropriate requests and documents, I would say 90% of everything is done before they get here. Hamby has worked in the same position for nine years. Dorris has worked at YPG for seven years all told, three of them in the VCC. Her familiarity with the installation goes back decades before this, however: her father, Jim Williams, was part of the original HALO project at thethen Yuma Test Station in the late 1950s, ultimately staying on as a test The VCC issues range passes from 6:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The phone number is (928) 328-7335. Bobbye Dorris (left) and Janet Hamby check in the thousands of YPG visitors who visit the proving ground annually to conduct testing. They have made this visitors center a pleasant place and very efcient, said Barb Gardner, chief of range planning and safety. They are naturals at customer service. (Photo by Mark Schauer)Visitor center employees make visiting test personnel feel welcome Next Outpost deadline is noon May 18thSexual Assault Hotline: 920-3104Report Domestic Violence: 328-2720

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6 mayMAY 15, 2017 THE OUTPOSTY6 in Vietnam as a deeply polarized American public watched the war on television.When I came here, I was told point blank, in three months youre going to Vietnam, said Zielinski. So, every month wed wait for the levy from Washington. The hardest part about it was the waiting and anxiety: that year we lost 6,000 or 7,000 people, and the year before that we had 16,000 or 17,000 casualties. Shortly after he arrived, Joan gave birth to their eldest son at what was then called Parkview Baptist Hospital in Yuma, and was hospitalized with complications for several days. I was awaiting orders, I had a wife and child, and was unsure of what was going to happen day to day, he said. It was conscription that had made Zielinski, a South Bend, Ind. native recently graduated from Indiana State University with an accounting degree, a Soldier. He was sent to basic training at Fort Bragg, which was a culture shock in terms of its sheer size, but not for its military discipline. I was raised by Catholic nuns and a policeman father, so I was ready for the discipline, he said with a laugh. He completed basic training and was assigned his military occupational specialty. I called my dad and told him I was going to be a 95-Bravo, and he said whats that? I told him, military policeman, and there was silence. My dad didnt want me to be a policeman, and growing up with a policeman I understand why he didnt want me to be one. He felt like an unlikely candidate for service as a military policeman, but at YPG found that many of his colleagues were in similar circumstances. One of the guys I was stationed with had a PhD in history, and they made him an MP, he said. Another MP, Daniel Donnelly, was a teacher who, along with wife Mary, would become lifelong friends with the Zielinskis. He was on duty one day and he and his partner in the truck got a call comment was, youd better call the police! Yet such calls were rare at YPG. Zielinski recalls his primary duties as patrolling downrange and monitoring Imperial Dam Road for speeders. The YPG MP shop had 15 to 20 men on duty at a given time, and as each month passed without Zielinski or Donnelly getting deployed to Vietnam, the friendly couples settled in to life at a small, relatively informal Army post with an important mission. Joan got a job in the post nursery, and Mary, recently graduated as a registered nurse, worked at Parkview Baptist Hospital. I learned obstetrics here, she said. The doctors took you under their wing and showed you what was acceptable. After duty hours, Tom moonlighted Never paid much, the young couples strived to survive on their $100 a month in BAQ and food money they received. We all had little red clickers with white knobs and wed go to the store and make sure we didnt go over $25 a week, said Joan. Even our older son remembers the little red clickers. As a treat, sometimes the young couples splurged for dinner at longtime Yuma icon Chretins, still the best Mexican restaurant they have ever eaten at. We palled around with other people in the same situation and fed off each other, said Joan. We had a good time. When his enlistment was up in 1971, Tom and Joan returned to Indiana. They had another son, and Tom worked for various companies visit YPG again and have a sense of closure from the hard feelings many former Soldiers experienced from their civilian fellow citizens in the tail end of the Vietnam era. In retrospect, it was a real education, he said of his time in uniform. I think meeting so many people of different backgrounds different educations, different cultures, different raceswas probably one of the biggest things I got out of the service. VISITFROM PAGE 1 From left, former Sgt. Thomas Zielinski, his wife Joan, and their friend Mary Donnelly show Heritage Center curator Bill Heidner the former locations of their post housing when they were stationed at YPG from 1969 to 1971. Their recent visit to the proving ground was their rst in 46 years. (Photos by Mark Schauer) Capt. David Woods, YPG police supervisor, shows Zielinski YPG police memorabilia on display at the station. This has really been an incredible experience, Zielinski said of his visit. Many people dont appreciate how important this is. Im proud of it.

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THE OUTPOST may MAY 15, 2017 7Y7 From left, former Sgt. Thomas Zielinski, his wife Joan, and their friend Mary Donnelly show Heritage Center curator Bill Heidner the former locations of their post housing when they were stationed at YPG from 1969 to 1971. Their recent visit to the proving ground was their rst in 46 years. (Photos by Mark Schauer)

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8 mayMAY 15, 2017 THE OUTPOSTY8 By Chuck Wullenjohn The bright Arizona sun relentlessly beats down on the ruins of adobe and stone buildings that once bustled with life, attracting visitors from around the nation to the healthful waters of a bountiful hot spring. Agua Caliente, Spanish, for hot water, lies barely outside the Yuma County line, 12 miles north of isolated Sentinel on Interstate 8, forgotten by most but boasting a rich historical legacy that began hundreds of years ago when the natural spring was discovered by local Native Americans. Emitting hundreds of gallons of heated mineral-rich water each day, Agua Calientes springs were savored by Indians who found the waters soothing and healing. Later, when people of European stock came to call Arizona their own, they took notice and made a point of venturing there. The area was undeveloped during these early years, with visitors soaking in pools of water and sleeping in tents or buckboard wagons. In 1897, a 22 room adobe hotel was built to cater to travelers, many of whom arrived by train from nearby Hyder, which was served by several daily eastbound and westbound trains. The was harnessed around this time, with pipes leading to a large outdoor pool where people could easily enjoy the therapeutic liquid. The resort remained a popular destination for many years and Agua Caliente was prominently listed on road maps and in visitor guides. It is said that President Franklin Roosevelt visited the resort, as did numerous Hollywood movie stars. Transcontinental passenger trains Railroad stopped in Hyder each day, with the railroads nationally distributed timetables pointing out that Agua Caliente was located nearby. Railroad passenger service continued serving Hyder until the late 1950s. An upsurge of activity came with World War II, as the Army established two training camps in the bare hills outside Hyder at which thousands of soldiers prepared for duty overseas. Purposely situated in a rough environment to prepare soldiers for the unforgiving conditions of combat, the camps featured no electricity, refrigeration or running water. Everyone lived in tents. Camps Hyder and Horn were established in the fall of 1943. They were two of 15 desert camps built to harden and train troops in what became known as the CaliforniaArizona Maneuver Area. The desert training center was a simulated theater of operations that included portions of California, Arizona, and Nevada. A total of 13 infantry and seven armored divisions plus numerous smaller units trained in the harsh environment. Major units stationed at Camps Hyder and Horn were the 77th, 81st and 104th Infantry Divisions. Troops assigned to Camps Hyder and Horn arrived mostly by train either in Hyder or nearby Sentinel, which consisted of a yellow clapboard railroad station, a few adobe and board structures, and a corral clustered around spindly trees arrivals went into action to establish the camps shortly after their arrival in April 1943, clearing vegetation, blading roads, erecting tents, digging latrines, and much more. and other training courses. They drilled a well near the Hyder railroad 120,000 gallons of fresh water per day. A huge shower facility went up nearby. Eventually, over 13,000 men came to call Camps Hyder and Horn their temporary home, though summer temperatures rose far higher than most were accustomed to. The camps spread over several miles on either side of town. Large-scale maneuvers, foot marches, night patrols, and rugged individual training took place amid Once prominent, now forgotten: In the desert they sleep As World War II wound to a close, Camps Hyder and Horn were abandoned. The 1897 hotel in Agua Caliente went out of business in the 1950s. Nearby guest quarters constructed from stone and adobe have crumbled into ruins, though some walls and foundations remain. During World War II, over 13,000 Soldiers trained at Camp Hyder and Camp Horn, sprawling tent and cinder block encampments that covered several miles on either side of the town. Farmland has long since reclaimed most of the land. (Loaned photo)

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THE OUTPOST may MAY 15, 2017 9the out-of-the-way landscape. Soldiers found the standard Army ration of one quart of water per day far too little in the harsh conditions and quickly learned to take advantage beneath any desert cliff face or shrub. One of the problems in the early months was the woeful scarcity of recreational activities. Urban destinations were miles away and many became discouraged during the long weeks of high heat they were forced to endure. An outdoor theater programs featuring baseball and boxing were formed. Post exchanges stocked beer and soft drinks, along with limited amounts of ice to cool them. A newspaper went into constructed clubs out of adobe bricks for their own use. And the relaxing hot spring waters at Agua Caliente, used for hundreds of years, were visited and enjoyed by all. As the war wound to a close, Camp Hyder and Camp Horn were abandoned. Little remains today, as active farming has reclaimed the land. The 1897 hotel in Agua Caliente went out of business in the 1950s after the hot spring waters bubbling to the surface diminished and reappeared only intermittently. Some say it resulted from dozens of wells drilled by farmers to irrigate agricultural plumbing system, while others claim it was the ill use of dynamite blasting. Agua Calientes whitewashed hotel remains today, baking in the sun. A caretaker lives in back and the windows have been carefully closed, as if someday to reopen. Nearby guest quarters constructed from stone and adobe have crumbled into ruins, though some walls and foundations remain. A busy farm directly across the road hosts various animals and years. Little more than one-half mile away on a raised mound along the side of the main road is the old towns cemetery. A brief stroll among the 46 gravesites, all of which are ringed with desert stones, causes somber visitors to think of the lives of the brave people who once lived in this remote portion of Arizona, as well as contemplate their own personal mortality. Here are the graves of infants who lived only months, as well as fathers and mothers who passed away between 1900 and the mid-1980s. Most of the individual crosses and markers have vanished or deteriorated over the years, such that most graves are marked only by a sun-baked ring of stones. One granite marker from 1974 reads, Came to Hyder in but didnt leave alive. Another grave named Placer Mike who was killed at Yuma Countys King of Arizona mine. Agua Caliente today is haunted by desert winds that blow through from the many miles of deserted terrain around it. Hyder is a community hanging on for existence, on the verge of becoming a ghost town itself. But it is well to remember the past of those who came before and those who helped win the biggest war in human history and save the world from fascist rule. If you ever visit the ruins of Agua Caliente or any other ghost town, treat it reverently. The people who once walked there were just like you and me. What you witness is what their dreams have become. Y9which consisted of a yellow clapboard railroad station, a few adobe and board structures, and a corral clustered around spindly trees arrivals went into action to establish the camps shortly after their arrival in April 1943, clearing vegetation, blading roads, erecting tents, digging latrines, and much more. and other training courses. They drilled a well near the Hyder railroad 120,000 gallons of fresh water per day. A huge shower facility went up nearby. Eventually, over 13,000 men came to call Camps Hyder and Horn their temporary home, though summer temperatures rose far higher than most were accustomed to. The camps spread over several miles on either side of town. Large-scale maneuvers, foot marches, night patrols, and rugged individual training took place amid Once prominent, now forgotten: In the desert they sleep During World War II, over 13,000 Soldiers trained at Camp Hyder and Camp Horn, sprawling tent and cinder block encampments that covered several miles on either side of the town. Farmland has long since reclaimed most of the land. (Loaned photo) Little more than one-half mile away on a raised mound along the side of the main road is the old towns cemetery. A brief stroll among the 46 gravesites, all of which are ringed with desert stones, causes somber visitors to think of the lives of the brave people who once lived in this remote portion of Arizona. Here are the graves of infants who lived only months, as well as fathers and mothers who passed away between 1900 and the mid-1980s. Most of the individual crosses and markers have vanished or deteriorated over the years, such that most graves are marked only by a sun-baked ring of stones.In 1897, a 22 room adobe hotel was built to cater to travelers, many of whom arrived by train from nearby Hyder, which was served by several daily eastbound and westbound trains. The outow of water from the springs was harnessed around this time, with pipes leading to a large outdoor pool where people could easily enjoy the therapeutic liquid. (Photos by Chuck Wullenjohn)

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10 mayMAY 15, 2017 THE OUTPOST Y10 Mr. Wizard of YPGNick McColl, YPG chief meteorologist, is happy to share his love of science with children as part of YPGs Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math outreach program, but wont go before kids emptyhanded. An electrostatic generator struck him as the most crowd-pleasing for the youngesters: I always like having demos, he explained. Last year I took some Styrofoam and charged it up and held a metal pie plate on top of it. It wasnt reliable and didnt work out as well as I had hoped. Hoping for a big spark to show the students his next time around, McColl went back to the drawing board and spent two weeks of his spare time to construct the Wimshurst Machine seen here out of Plexiglas, leaves of aluminum foil, metal rods, and some heavy-duty rubber bands recycled from bunches of asparagus. Turning the crank rapidly, the capacitors generate a visible spark and a piercing zap that so far has delighted six school groups. (Photo by Mark Schauer)

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THE OUTPOST may MAY 15, 2017 11 Y11 The concluding event of Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention month, a fun run, took place in late April during the early morning hours and attracted a large crowd of runners and walkers. Kicked off by an address on the importance of preventing sexual assault, YPG commander Col. Randy Murray and Command Sgt. Maj. Christopher Prosser then led participants through a gauntlet of cheering color-throwers stationed at strategic points along the race route, having fun while raising awareness for an important cause. (Photos by Teri Womack)Walk-run concludes Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention month

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12 mayMAY 15, 2017 THE OUTPOST By Chuck Wullenjohn I am sitting in front of a silent artillery piece at the apex of what was once a formidable Union defensive line on Gettysburgs Cemetery Ridge, near a clump of tall trees. On one of our nations most fateful days, July 3, 1863, over 12,000 Confederate soldiers directed a massive attack at this point. Around me are dozens of concrete and bronze monuments, low gray rock walls and more 12-pound seen gathered in one place. On that sultry afternoon, 154 years ago, the Confederacy reached its high water mark and began to recede. It was here, on the ground on which I sit today and tap away on a laptop computer, that a Confederate assault, now known as Pickets Charge, was bloodily and violently hurled backwards. It was here that General Robert E. Lee, commander of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, discovered, to his horror, that his men, who had emerged victorious from nearly every previous engagement, were not invincible. It was behind these low stone walls that Union artillery roared and soldiers troops advancing in neatly dressed lines across nearly a full mile of gently rolling, sloping terrain. The As I drove into Gettysburg, Pa., this morning, I noticed a peculiar mix of tawdry tourism and serious history. Much of Gettysburgs present economy is wrapped-up things I saw on the outskirts of town was a miniature golf course catering to tourists who crowd the area on weekends and in summer. Souvenir shops abound. After driving a bit further, I was struck by the numerous artillery pieces, protective stone walls and dozens of monuments that mark the area. And when I walked along the crest of Cemetery Ridge, near the clump of trees upon which the Confederate assault converged, I could truly feel the eerie presence of many valiant men who suffered and died. Despite great courage that day, the attackers were moved down by devastating Union musket and heaps. It became a bloody and savage affair, one which left the slopes of this ridge writhing with wounded men laying amidst those who would never rise again. It was on these slopes that the Confederacys hope of independence was sealed forever. Amid the swirling smoke, the anguished human cries and the hellish thunder of artillery, our nation was saved. Our union of states the United States of America was to be preserved for all time. Over 50,000 Americans became casualties during this epic three day struggle. The Confederate army that staggered back to Virginia was physically and spiritually exhausted. Never again would it attempt an offensive operation of this magnitude. Cemetery Ridge, as is all Gettysburg National Military Park, is now quiet. A parklike quality prevails. Children play on the artillery pieces and picnickers spread their lunches and relax beneath lush shade trees. But the memories remain. If we are foolhardy enough to overlook countrymen, we would be willingly surrendering a vital part of ourselves. The American deeds that took place throughout our history, which are so palpable on this ridge, must be reverently remembered and honored. It was they who gave of themselves so that we could enjoy the blessings of the present. Gettysburg is symbolic of what men and women in uniform have freely given throughout our history to stand up for American values and interests. Were about to commemorate Memorial Day and will soon be and our independence on July 4th. During this time, all of us should sit Y12 Encountering what made us what we are The sacrice that took place at Gettysburg is symbolic of what men and women in uniform have freely given throughout our history to stand up for American values and interests. As we get ready to commemorate Memorial Day, Flag Day, and Independence Day, all of us should sit back, reect and give thanks. Cemetery Ridge at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It was on these slopes in 1863 amid swirling smoke, anguished cries, and the hellish thunder of artillery that our nation was saved. Our union of states the United States of America was to be preserved for all time. (Photos by Chuck Wullenjohn)

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THE OUTPOST may MAY 15, 2017 13Submitted by Paul J. Kilanski, Family Advocacy Program Manager Listening to a crying baby can be very frustrating, but it is comforting to know that infant crying patterns are predictable and do eventually come to an end. Common infant crying patterns include: peak around two-three months of age the evenings periods of time, 30-40minutes, for no apparent reason not necessarily mean that your infant is in pain. Although it looks the same, babies often cry when theyre not in pain soothing efforts of caregivers and go REMEMBER: If your otherwise healthy baby cries often, it doesnt mean there is something wrong with the baby or you. Even the most kind and loving caregiver can feel frustrated by a crying baby. These feelings dont make you a bad parent or caregiver. Feeling frustrated is very normal. If you feel yourself losing control, put the baby in a safe place and take a moment to take care of yourself. REMEMBER: No healthy baby has ever died from crying, but they have died from being shaken. Caring for a baby can be a wonderful experience, but it can also be very frustrating when a baby wont stop crying. The following tips can be used to comfort your crying baby. running water radio or CD player walk in the fresh air REMEMBER: These tips wont work every time. Find other ideas and ask help if you need it. Babies are resilient, but infants and young children have certain qualities that can make shaking particularly damaging. Some of these characteristics include: difference between victim and perpetrator the head to whip back and forth, causing blood vessels in the brain and eyes to tear and bleed. Possible consequences of shaking a baby or young child include: The injuries of Shaken Baby Syndrome occur when a child is violently shaken. Everyday handling of a child, playful acts, or minor household accidents do not cause the forces necessary to create these injuries. Shaking injuries are NOT caused by: over bumps NEVER SHAKE A BABY! are foolhardy enough to overlook countrymen, we would be willingly surrendering a vital part of ourselves. The American deeds that took place throughout our history, which are so palpable on this ridge, must be reverently remembered and honored. It was they who gave of themselves so that we could enjoy the blessings of the present. Gettysburg is symbolic of what men and women in uniform have freely given throughout our history to stand up for American values and interests. Were about to commemorate Memorial Day and will soon be and our independence on July 4th. During this time, all of us should sit Y13 Encountering what made us what we are Enjoy your baby

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