Citation

Material Information

Title:
The outpost
Uniform Title:
Outpost (Yuma, Ariz.)
Creator:
Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) -- Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Yuma, AZ
Publisher:
U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, Public Affairs Office
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Biweekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 43 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases -- Newspapers -- Arizona -- Yuma ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Newspapers -- Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) ( lcsh )
Arizona -- Yuma ( fast )
Arizona -- Yuma Proving Ground ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )

Notes

Numbering Peculiarities:
Numerous numbering irregularities.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
639929322 ( OCLC )
ocn639929322

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sidewinder (Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz.)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

Full Text

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U.S. ARMY YuYU M aA PROVING GG RO uU ND, YuYU M aA ARIZON aA 85365 | VV OL uU ME 67 NN O. 6 MOND aA Y M a A RCH 20, 2017 Job and benets counseling for retiring Soldiers /Page 3 Seen around YPG /Page 5 YPG employee is new Sea Cadet commander /Page 15 Y1By Mark Schauer Mars may be Earths next door neighbor in cosmic terms, but it is a long trek away for humans. Short of a warp drive from a take nine months one-way. Once humans have arrived on the red planet-and NASA hopes they will by the end of the 2030s-the intrepid Earthlings will have to stay about one year before conditions are right for the nine month return home. Its a long time and distance, and precision is a matter of life and death. We dont want to simply head were not prepared, said Dr. Stanley Love, astronaut. Theres no way to come back early. If your life support system breaks halfway to Mars, youll have the rest of your life to time. Its a daunting feat, and the step toward achieving it. With the as two years away, NASA hopes to return to the moon, using the lunar surface as both a training and launching site for an eventual Mars mission. However far from home the capsule travels, astronauts aboard the Orion capsule will count on the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) to land them safely back on Earth. Each of the systems three main parachutes have canopies made YPG testing has cosmic reachYPG recently completed the second of eight planned evaluation tests of the Capsule Parachute Assembly System on the Orion Space Capsule. With the capsules rst manned ight as little as two years away, NASA hopes to return to the moon, using the lunar surface as both a training and launching site for an eventual Mars mission. (US Army photo)SEE N asaASA page 8 By Mark Schauer A small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Recent local efforts to endow, open, and sustain a childrens museum have proved this dictum. The reason I joined was because of all the work Jim and Kevin Burge had done, said Anna Chaulk, APS community relations manager and board member for the Childrens Museum of Yuma County. If not for them, I would have been far less involved. The way his fellow board members speak, you might think Jim Larson, president, works full time on the volunteer effort. In reality, the mechanical engineers primary job is in YPGs Combat and Automotive Systems Division, where he has worked for seven years. During this time he has tested everything from Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles to the Bradley Fighting Vehicle, along with smaller projects in between. Ive performed just about every SEE M usUS E uU M page 2Employee helps make Yuma childrens museum a reality

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2 maMARcCH 20, 2017 THHE OUTPOSTY2 THEOUtTPoOStT News may be submitted to: The Editor, Outpost, Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, AZ, 85365. Phone: (928) 328 or DSN 899. Visit our website at: www.yuma.army.mil or email to: mark.a.schauer.civ@mail.milCommander: Col. RR andy Murray Public Affair s Ofcer: Chuck Wullenjohn Public Affairs Specialist/Editor: Mark Schauer Technical Editor, Cold Regions Test Center: Clara Zachgo Marketing Specialist: Teri Womack Visual Information Manager: RR iley Williams The Outpost is an unofcial publication authorized under provisions of A RR 360. The Outpost is published every two weeks by the Public Affairs Ofce, Yuma Proving Ground. Views and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Army. This newspaper uses material credited to ATEC and A R R NEWS. While contributions are solicited, the PAO reserves the right to edit all submitted materials and make corrections, changes or deletions to conform with the policy of this newspaper.test out here on wheeled vehicles you can do, he said. Civic-minded since his youth in the Midwest, Larson and his wife were interested in getting involved in their new community. The father of build a childrens museum in Yuma immediately attracted his attention. It has a lot to do with my kids he said. Yuma has many great things to do, but there can always be more. The thing we love about Yuma is that it is a tight-knit community that always tries to get better. He joined the board three years ago. Now the president and serving with nine other members that include teachers and engineers, Larson and his colleagues dedicate countless hours to the cause. Its a lot of hard work. We consider ourselves a working board since were so new. Were progressing toward being a traditional board of directors, but were not there yet. In addition to fundraising and marketing, Larson has gotten handson by helping to design and build exhibits, knowing they have to be educational, fun, and kid-tough. Inspired by the large tower crane utilized to build the Yuma Regional Medical Centers new emergency replica children could rotate 360 degrees and use to lift and place large foam blocks to make their very own buildings. The portable crane can be set up at heights of eight and 14 feet, and was exhibited with YRMC displays at the Yuma County Fair and the Yuma Civic Center last year. It was such a hit that the Yuma Art Center offered the group free space to serve as a temporary home last summer. The group eagerly accepted, then faced the daunting task of creating exhibits. From the time we found out it was available and signed the contract, we had six weeks to plan all of the exhibits, raise funds for the materials, and build them. I thought we were all nuts, and to a certain degree we probably were, but we all dug in and pulled through to get it done. A wide variety of people in the community, prominent and obscure, pitched in with money and time. Some board members pulled allnighters building the exhibits and materials. It opened on-time with three large galleries of interactive exhibits, and drew nearly 10,000 visitors during the six weeks it was open. Larson is pleased that a similar arrangement has been made with the Yuma Art Center for this summer, albeit with some slight differences. For example, the temporary museum space will be available for birthday parties and other special events after normal visiting hours. Last year there was no charge for admission. This year were charging a small $2 admission fee to cover some of the costs for the exhibits and to get a better picture in terms of Convinced of the viability of the endeavor, Larson is optimistic that a permanent home for the childrens museum is coming in the near-tomidterm. Were hoping for two years. Weve done some great work as a group and were going to start new fundraising efforts soon. To have a certain amount of operation time paid for and in the bank prior to opening permanently: Were in this for the long haul. The group has recently hired an executive director and has had encouraging success with various fundraising efforts, from corporate donations to dinners and point-ofsale solicitations at local business franchises. This community never ceases to amaze me in their willingness to help and get involved. Its humbling to be involved. MUSEUMFRROM PAGE 1 Inspired by the large tower crane utilized to build the Yuma RRegional Medical Centers new emergency room, the museums rst exhibit was a working replica children could rotate 360 degrees and use to lift and place large foam blocks to make their very own buildings. The portable crane can be set up at heights of eight and 14 feet, and was exhibited with Y R R MC displays at the Yuma County Fair and the Yuma Civic Center last year. (Loaned photo) Jim Larson, mechanical engineer in YPGs Combat and Automotive Systems Division, is currently the president of the board of the Childrens Museum of Yuma County. A temporary museum, seen here, drew nearly 10,000 visitors in the six weeks it was open last summer, and will return again this year. (Photo by Mark Schauer)

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THHE OUTPOST ma MARcCH 20, 2017 3Y3By Mark Schauer All good things come to an end. Even a successful career serving ones country in the military must eventually close with retirement. But Americas debt doesnt end when veterans transition back to civilian life. A variety of sector programs are available to honorably discharged veterans making this major transition. have earned from their service, said Rosa Dayton, transition assistance manager for YPGs Army not something they should feel uncomfortable seeking. Still, many veterans and soon-tobe separated Soldiers may cringe at the thought of bureaucratic hurdles and endless red tape in obtaining service entitles them. Soldiers and veterans at YPG, however, have access to the helping hand of Milton Hawk Hawkins, disabled veterans outreach specialist for the Arizona Department of Economic Security. We provide a broad spectrum of services not only to active duty personnel, but primarily to veterans, he said. Our main goal is to get veterans employed in a retainable position or career. Hawkins says the Vow to Hire Heroes Act, signed into law in 2011, to place veterans and spouses of active duty service members into good jobs. Under those hiring authorities, there are a lot of opportunities for separating, recently separated, or veterans to gain federal employment. Many people dont know about that: there is so much cover everything that is available in transition classes. Further, there are private sector programs that help veterans in their job search. For example, a program offered by the Hilton hotel chain provides complimentary hotel stays for veterans who need lodging to attend an out-of-town job interview A veteran himself, Hawkins has made biweekly visits, every other Wednesday, to YPG for over six years to assist veterans and Soldiers close to retirement. Hawkins stresses that he can assist any retiring Soldier or veteran, even if they are not Arizona natives. If coming to see him during his regular visits is not possible, Soldiers and veterans can contact him at (928) 247-8747 to schedule an appointment at another time. He will even address an entire unit of Soldiers at the proving ground if requested. Were seeing a lot more of our older veterans coming to our assistance in any aspect, we can help them or refer them to a partner agency for that assistance. Hawkins adds that the help he offers goes beyond helping retiring An employed veteran may need assistance enrolling in the Veterans Administration (VA) health system, for example, or obtaining education Soldiers in need of employment, he not only has information about job opportunities in both the public and private sector, but offers advice on creating a resume, engaging in a successful job interview, and developing marketing skills. Veterans have a lot more skill sets than most non-veterans do and thats what employers look for. Our resume and interview workshops help veterans sell themselves and the valuable skills they possess to a civilian employer. Hawkins encourages YPGs veterans and Family members to inquire about services available to them, even if they have had negative experiences in years past. Theres a lot more out there than there was 10 years ago to assist veterans transitioning into the private sector. In Arizona, different programs have been established to help veterans get employment. In the private sector, there are many major companies that have made a commitment to hire veterans. Soldiers and veterans at YPG have access to the helping hand of Milton HH awk HH awkins, disabled veterans outreach specialist for the Arizona Department of Economic Security, for assistance with nding civilian employment and applying for benets. A veteran himself, H H awkins has made biweekly visits, every other Wednesday, to YPG for over six years to assist veterans and Soldiers close to retirement. (Photo by Mark Schauer) fundraising efforts, from corporate donations to dinners and point-ofsale solicitations at local business franchises. This community never ceases to amaze me in their willingness to help and get involved. Its humbling to be involved. Hassle-free job and benets counseling offered to Soldiers, veterans Inspired by the large tower crane utilized to build the Yuma RRegional Medical Centers new emergency room, the museums rst exhibit was a working replica children could rotate 360 degrees and use to lift and place large foam blocks to make their very own buildings. The portable crane can be set up at heights of eight and 14 feet, and was exhibited with YRRMC displays at the Yuma County Fair and the Yuma Civic Center last year. (Loaned photo)

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4 maMARcCH 20, 2017 THHE OUTPOSTY4 Black Hawk upA View Without A Point Next Outpost deadline is noon March 23rdSexual Assault Hotline: 920-3104Report Domestic Violence: 328-2720 By Teri Womack Ive worked at YPG for over three decades, so its not unusual to see a tank or large vehicle on a test course or to glance up to the sky to see people jumping out of perfectly good airplanes and parachuting gracefully any more when a loud boom shakes today, I still get excited to go on a In mid-January, I was looking forward to being part of a group escorting visitors to the Joint Experimentation Range Complex (JERC) site. I recall in the early years the initial planning and development them almost daily as construction quickly proceeded. I watched and documented on my computer screen as capabilities increased and that initial site expanded with new and diverse test facilities that turned into the multi-faceted complex that stands today. But I never got to see it with my own eyes until this year. I arrived at YPG at an early hour me smacking my alarm for the second or third time. After getting in the government vehicle and driving to meet the visitors in Yuma, we immediately convoyed out to the JERC site. On the drive, while enjoying the sunrise and scenery and trying not to let the rhythmic sounds of the road lull me to sleep, I gained a huge respect for people who travel that long route daily to spend their When we reached the site, I was the to see with my own eyes what I had previously only seen on screen in not give it the justice it deserved and When I heard and saw a helicopter approaching, I remember thinking in all caps IS THAT A BLACK HUGE fan of the movie Black Hawk Down. Ive watched it countless times and love everything about it, from the acting to the action and the special effects. I needed no movie magic to feel completely thrilled that As folks de-helicoptered, I spotted Joyce Gordon and immediately decided right then and there that I was going to do everything possible to ensure my ride home would be on a When the tour concluded, Joyce onboard. As it turns out, jumping onboard was not as easy as it sounded, and I needed a push to get on. As everyone buckled seat belts, I scrambled to locate mine and then required assistance to get strapped in properly. I was so excited, I had to make absolutely sure that I couldnt I watched as the pilot, that guy with my life in his hands, performed around as the other passengers settled into their seats to check their calendars and email messages on their phones. I glanced over at Joyce, who gave me the thumbs up and as I enthusiastically returned the gesture, I just knew both of us were packing the I remembered that I am desperately afraid of heightsbut that thought was quickly replaced by, Now, THIS

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THHE OUTPOST ma MARcCH 20, 2017 5Y5 (Left, top to bottom) Lt. Kilipaki HH arris, training ofcer, and Sgt. Steven HH oull, trafc investigator, meet with residents of YPGs travel camp as part of a safety day sponsored by YPGs Directorate of Emergency Services in early March. YPGs new Chief of Police, Don Lucas, is committed to building positive community relations with events of this type; Lt. Col. James DeBoer (left), Yuma Test Center commander, pins an award on the chest of Maj. Joseph Gross, staff judge advocate, as he gets ready to depart the proving ground for the nal time in mid-March. Gross rst joined the Army in 1994; Col. R R andy Murray, YPG commander, and Command Sgt. Maj. Christopher Prosser helped celebrate the 75th anniversary of Army Emergency R R elief (AE R R ), a nonprot organization, with a cake-cutting ceremony. Wherever in the world Soldiers and Families are, AE R R stands ready to assist with things like emergency grants and loans, food aid, and college scholarships. (Above) The Sexual H H arassment Assault R R esponse and Prevention Ofce sponsored an early-morning yoga in the park event entitled Exhale to Inhale at Cox Field as part of its H H ealing H H earts program of quarterly events. (Photos by PAO staff)Seen around YPG

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6 maMARcCH 20, 2017 THHE OUTPOSTY6By Chuck Wullenjohn Our nations founding document, the U.S. Constitution, contains wording explicitly stating that the federal government maintain an Army for the purpose of defending the nation, which has been the case since our earliest days. Since the American people fund the government, they also fund the Army. This makes the Army a publicallyfunded institution that makes it the property of every American taxpayer. U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground knows this well and works to share its message throughout the year with members of the Yuma community, and with those even farther away. Thats why YPG actively participates in so many community events parades, exhibits at festivals, presentations to service organizations, and so much more, throughout the year. March 15th signaled the date of the 2016/2017 winter season, which counted ten in number. Each tour took place for full busloads of visitors numbering about 55 each time. Former YPG Commander Col. Robert Filbey (ret.) volunteered to assist in escorting each of the ten tours, relating stories about YPG while riding on the bus to and from Yuma. The best tour of my military career was the four years I spent at YPG, he said. I volunteer my time because I love to talk about the proving ground. He feels that tours help spread word about the national defense contribution of YPG. Almost uniformly, the comment I hear most often when people depart is, I had no idea of the level of activity at YPG, he said. They also frequently mention that they never knew how large a civilian operation it is, but they also leave understanding the military reasoning. value of the tours. People see the value, then they talk to others, and the more people who see what goes on here, we end up building the proving ground support base. Tour participants come from all over, so they develop support that is almost intangible. YPGs partner in organizing and operating the tours was the Yuma Visitors Bureau, which took registrations, arranged for bus transportation, and assisted in escorting each tour, though a YPG employee took over upon reaching the proving ground. Leslie Fain, executive assistant at the bureau, worked on many of the YPG tours and says they were among the most popular of all the tours handled by the Visitors Bureau. When tickets became available in November, she says they sold out within a week to ten days. We had people calling us in late would be available, she said. We get quite a mix, too, between outside visitors and locals, and there are always plenty of veterans. Many people dont know what goes on at YPG and are astonished by what they YPG completes busiest public tour schedule ever YPG Command Sgt. Maj. Christopher Prosser speaks to visitors on one of YPGs 10 public tours of the 2016-17 winter season. Each tour took place for full busloads of visitors numbering about 55 each time. (Photos by Chuck Wullenjohn)

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THHE OUTPOST ma MARcCH 20, 2017 7Y7 CUSTOMER SERVICE IS MY #1 PRIORITY rfnttbt rffntbrfntbt btff fffft ttbtbbtbtftftt bfbtft fttttft Call me today for a FREE Comparative Market Analysis, or with any of your real estate questions or needs!btb 117279 Spragues.com (Next to Lowes) Exclusive On New & Used Guns MILITARY/LAW ENFORCEMENT PRICING INDOOR RANGE IS OPEN From OVER 1800 GUNS Gunsmith On Duty $399 Too! Defense Testing.com Call Now (928) 726-5882 BUILD IT. TEST IT. FLY IT. YUMA COUNTYAIRPORT AUTHORITYCommercial Hangar Leases Furnished Office Rentals Build To Suit Opportunities 113532 YPG completes busiest public tour schedule ever see. About one-third of the tour participants are year-round Yuma residents. She hasnt heard any complaints coming from those who take part in the YPG tours, other than those coming from people who couldnt obtain tickets. Ive heard many kudos about the food quality in the Cactus Caf and I think it leads to people coming back to visit the Heritage Center and eating lunch out here on their own, she said. Though Fain spends most of her time at the Yuma Visitors the downtown area, she frequently visits the visitor center location at the Quartermaster Depot State Park, where visitors can obtain a variety of information about things to do in Yuma. We get lots of questions about Yuma Proving Ground, she said. I truly appreciate the efforts of the people out there who are so welcoming to people on the tours. It really emphasizes YPGs value to the Yuma community. Former YPG Commander Col. RRobert Filbey (right) has volunteered to assist in escorting each of the ten tours, relating stories about YPG while riding on the bus to and from Yuma. HHe feels that tours help spread word about the national defense contribution of YPG.

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8 maMARcCH 20, 2017 THHE OUTPOSTY8with 10,000 square feet of broadcloth nylon, and the rope that makes up the parachutes cord is made of Kevlar, body armor. The CPAS system is designed to deploy sequentially and pass through two stages prior to being fully open: after hurtling back into Earths atmosphere, two drogue parachutes deploy to slow the 10ton capsule prior to main parachutes decelerating the capsule from cosmic reentry speeds of 25,000 miles per hour to less than 20 miles per hour. The system is designed with redundancies meant to protect the safe landing of astronauts even if two parachutes fail. Parachutes are one of the absolutely critical, must-work safety parts of the spacecraft, said Dr. Stanley Love, astronaut. The back to Earth after weve been to space depends on these parachutes, so were going to test them very thoroughly in a lot of different ways to make sure they work properly. The parachutes must work even in the event the capsule doesnt make it to space. In the most recent evaluation test at YPG, the second in a series of eight, engineers sought to verify that the CPAS could decelerate the capsule to a safe landing speed if for some reason a mission was aborted shortly after launching. If you abort from the pad or as you are lifting off, you cant use the drogues: you dont have enough altitude, so you go directly to the mains, said Koki Machin, chief engineer for the CPAS system. At a certain time during the ascent, you transition to having enough altitude that you can do the gravity turn, come back down toward the planet and go through the entire drogue phase before you get to the mains. As the mock Orion capsule was dropped from a C-17 cargo aircraft to use a parachute that is not part of the CPAS system to slow the capsule to the appropriate speed for the test. Were using an extra-large programmer parachute, which is how we set up getting on test point, and were going to start the drogues off very slow, said Machin. There is a pretty broad range of conditions were asked to deploy CPAS in, and one of them is deploying the drogues at a very low velocity. This test is to NASAFRROM PAGE 1 The mock Orion capsule was dropped from a C-17 cargo aircraft ying at 25,000 feet. Testers needed to use a programmer parachute that is not part of the CPAS system to slow the capsule to the appropriate speed for the test, which sought to verify that the CPAS could decelerate the capsule to a safe landing speed if for some reason a mission was aborted shortly after launching. (US Army photo) Unlike the actual Orion capsule, the mock capsule used in the test has exterior panels made of easily sheered-off Styrofoam. The test item is the same width as the Orion, but several feet shorter to accommodate the clearance height of the cargo aircraft it is dropped from. (US Army photo) The capsules descent was observed by four ground-based Kineto Tracking Mount operators, and two chase planes and a chase helicopter ying at different altitudes with photographers on board. Its not necessarily just for graphics, but for data we can compare and contrast, said Chris Johnson, CPAS project manager. (US Army photo) RReady for its test, the mock-up of NASAs Orion space capsule waits inside the cargo bay of a C-17 for its drop. (Photo by Mark Schauer)

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THHE OUTPOST ma MARcCH 20, 2017 9Y9inform our modeling of that aspect. Given that the Orion capsule and CPAS system have already space, some may assume that the remainder of evaluation testing will be anticlimactic. NASA engineers, however, say this is not the case: the test vehicle with far more instrumentation and cameras than would be possible if it was coming from space, testing over land at YPG makes recovery and examination of the parachutes easier than when it lands in the ocean, as in a real space mission. They want to test it at a variety of speeds, altitudes, and other conditions so they can prove out the corners of the box, the most extreme conditions under which the parachutes might ever have to function, said Love. The idea is that somewhere in the center of that box is where well normally be operating. At the end of the day, putting these things out in the real environment, full scale, is the best way to understand their performance, added Chris Johnson, CPAS project manager. The drop test was captured from a variety of angles by YPG personnel. In additional to onboard telemetry data, the capsules descent was observed by four ground-based Kineto Tracking Mount operators, and two chase planes and a chase with photographers on board. Its not just for graphics, but for data we can compare and contrast, said Johnson. Once the capsule landed on one of YPGs isolated drop zones, personnel fanned out and carefully recovered the massive deployed parachutes workers gathered the fabric slowly and methodically: testers want to evaluate any damage that may have occurred to the parachutes, and know that it was not incurred from the recovery efforts. As the packed parachutes made the journey back to the Air Delivery Complex, where the parachutes were suspended from a high ceiling and carefully studied, workers from YPGs motor pool used a large crane to lift the massive test capsule onto a lowboy trailer for transport back to Yuma, utilizing a police escort and necessitating particular care through the construction zone around the Coyote Wash Bridge. This test is an important milestone said Love. Orion is an important step toward building the systems we need to practice going to Mars, and then actually go there. Once the drop was completed, personnel fanned out and carefully recovered the massive deployed parachutes and lines from the desert oor, as seen here. Testers want to evaluate any damage that may have occurred to the parachutes, and know that it was not incurred from the recovery efforts. (Photos by Mark Schauer) Each of the systems three main parachutes have canopies made with 10,000 square feet of broadcloth nylon, and risers made of Kevlar, the strong synthetic ber used in body armor. (US Army photo)

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10 maMARcCH 20, 2017 THHE OUTPOSTY10

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THHE OUTPOST ma MARcCH 20, 2017 11Y11 Families at Yuma Proving Ground will soon have access to a new Department of Defense (DoD) website designed to simplify and improve the child care request for care process. MilitaryChildCare.com (MCC) provides a single online gateway for families to access militaryoperated or military-subsidized child care options worldwide across all Services. The site enables families to child care searches, submit requests for care, and manage their requests at any time and from any location. The new DoD site which is being introduced worldwide in phases offers a more streamlined care, expedites placement through a standardized request process and waitlist management tools, and provides reports that help programs better plan for future placement needs. Through MilitaryChildCare.com, eligible families can search and request care for full day and part day options in facility-based and homebased programs for children from birth through age 12. Families may remain on a preferred programs waitlist even after being offered care or enrolling in another program. Families at YPG who are currently on waitlists will be automatically transitioned to the new web-based system. These families will retain the original date of their request(s) for care, and all program enrollment processes will remain the same. For additional information, go to MilitaryChildCare.com or contact the Help Desk by calling the toll free number, 855.696.2934 or emailing FamilySupport@MilitaryChildCare. com. Submitted by Paul J. Kilanski Your home is a busy place. People are always working, playing, cooking, washing, cleaning and moving things around. All that activity is perfectly normal, but it can release small particles and chemicals that build up in the air you breathe. Whether your home is large or small, old or new, the air inside may be causing breathing problems, especially for people with allergies and asthma. There are some simple things that you can do to clean up the air inside your home so that everyone can breathe easier. If you have allergies or asthma, you are sensitive to certain triggers. These triggers can set off a reaction in your lungs and other parts of your body. They can be simple things like cold air, tobacco or wood smoke, perfume, paint, hair spray, or any strong odors or fumes. Allergens such as dust mites, cockroaches, pollen, molds, animal dander and saliva from pets may also trigger your asthma or allergies. Its important to learn which triggers are a problem for you: Then you can learn to avoid them and help keep yourself healthy. Identifying your triggers isnt always easy. You can experiment with staying away from one suspected trigger at a time. You can also ask your doctor to help. Your doctor may suggest keeping an asthma diary or having a skin testing to test for allergies. Sometimes the air outdoors can trigger allergies and asthma. You may have to avoid outdoor air pollution, pollen and mold spores. Any time air pollution and pollen levels are high, its a good idea to stay indoors: The air at home is easier for you to control. Some people with asthma and allergies notice that their symptoms get worse at night. Trigger controls in the bedroom or wherever you sleep are the best place to start. Air conditioning can help: It lowers indoor humidity, which helps to control mold and dust mites. There are air cleaning machines that you can buy that may remove some of the triggers in your home, but they will not remove all of them. Some air cleaners use an electrical charge that makes ozone, which manufacturers claim will purify the air, but ozone can irritate the lungs and is especially a problem for people with asthma. Controlling the home environment is a very important part of asthma and allergy care. In addition to seeing a doctor regularly and taking prescribed medications you should also reduce or remove as many asthma and allergy triggers from your home as possible. Take control in your home environment and breathe easier.Department of Defense launches MilitaryChildCare.com at YPGControlling allergies and asthma

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12 maMARcCH 20, 2017 THHE OUTPOSTY12 TLC MANAGEMENT Themis & Paul Cavanagh928.726.5557670 E 32nd St, Ste 9 WWW.TLCMANAGEMENT.NET Find the Rental Home YOU Deserve AS A VETERAN,PAUL UNDERSTANDS THE NEEDS OF RELOCATING MILITARY FAMILIES AND IS DEDICATED TO ASSISTING ALL FAMILIES IN LOCATING THEIR NEXT RENTAL HOME. HE IS ALSO A RETIRED PEACE OFFICER WHO IS VERY SENSITIVE TO THE PARTICULAR NEEDS OF PLACING LAW ENFORCEMENT AND THEIR FAMILIES. RESPONSIVE CONCERNED RELIABLE HERE FOR YOU By Chuck Wullenjohn Fort Yuma was established Nov. 27, 1850, to protect the strategic Yuma Crossing of the Colorado River. Located on a promontory overlooking the river, the fort itself was nothing more than a ramshackle collection of huts and tents at the Army provided the funding necessary to make Fort Yuma into a proper outpost. in its early years. Food supplies and construction materials were shipped by water from San Diego to the mouth of the Colorado River, but transferring the goods to wagons and moving them to Yuma was backbreaking and time consuming. As a result, life at the post was hard and the militarys resolve to maintain a garrison vacillated. It was only two years later -in August 1852 -that temporary Camp Yuma became permanent Fort Yuma, and the Army resolved to stay for good. Fort Yuma remained an active post until 1883 -33 years after its formation. During that time, Soldiers at the fort maintained peace with the local Indians and kept watch over activity on the Colorado River. River crossing point for wagon trains carrying settlers and prospectors to California, particularly after large deposits of gold were discovered in 1849. The Colorado River was untamed during those pre-dam years, with miles of the wide river virtually impassible due to vast areas of mud and quicksand. The narrow rock gorge through which the river passes in Yuma made the location an excellent, safe year round crossing point. Over 60,000 people crossed at Yuma in 1850 under the protective guns of the fort. Most of these settlers followed the Gila River across Arizona to where it joined the Colorado above Yuma. They then moved south along the river toward the crossing. As locals know, Yuma can be unbearably hot during the summer. In 1858, a Soldier stationed at the fort wrote home, The houses and quarters are built of sun-dried bricks, with every effort and provision for making the summers heat bearable. Still, the post is but seven years old and is garrisoned by only two gives mute testimony of a most unhealthful climate. Fort Yuma was well known in Army circles as the hottest post in the country. The forts surgeon once Fort Yuma marks rst Army presence in Yuma Fort Yumas commanding ofcers quarters used to face the forts parade ground, which, in the years since the Army moved-out, was re-purposed by the Quechan Indian Tribe into a paved parking lot. The well-built quarters remain today, though it is no longer occupied and close inspection reveals the ravages of time. (Photo by Chuck Wullenjohn)

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THHE OUTPOST ma MARcCH 20, 2017 13Y13 Reds Bird Cage SaloonLocated in the heart of Historic Downtown Yuma231 Main St. 928-783-1050Mon-Fri 9:30am 2:30am Open Sat & Sun 6am Come And Join Us! reported that his pocket watch felt like a hot boiled egg in my pocket. During the American Civil War, the fort served as base for Union troops that blocked a Confederate thrust through the southwest pointed stayed on the heels of the invading Confederate army as it retreated to Texas. The most famous military action in Arizona occurred near Tucson at Picacho Peak, where scouting parties from the opposing armies ran across each other and exchanged shots. The California Column ended Confederate designs for control of the southwest. Fort Yuma is now part of the Quechan Indian Reservation. Numerous buildings remain from the military period and can easily be seen today. Fort Yuma marks rst Army presence in Yuma Its Pi Day! The Army rst came to Yuma in 1850 to establish Fort Yuma on the Colorado RRiver. This fanciful drawing shows the fort during the 1860s or 1870s. One might wonder about the size of that ag (Loaned image) Stefanie Jacobs, operations research analyst, serves pie to event-goers at YPGs rst annual Pi Day celebration. An annual celebration of the mathematical constant Pi (3.14159...) which we all learned about in school, the day occurs each year on March 14, which is 3/14 in the month/day date format. The lunchtime guests enjoyed over 25 different forms of pie, from decadent sweets to pizza. As Yuma Countys premier scientic workplace, the mathematical constant is vital to many different facets of the proving grounds mission, from weapons test planning and data reduction to weather forecasting. (Photo by Mark Schauer) First built in 1864, Fort Yumas adobe guardhouse continued in operation until recent years. Note the air conditioner and telephone lines. (Loaned photo)

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14 maMARcCH 20, 2017 THHE OUTPOST Y14 Local Dealers Local Buys Local ServiceCars, Trucks, Boats, RVs, Offroad! Search online. Find your next vehicle. Kick the tires. Drive it home.00113319 Acreage Antiques Collectibles Home Services Directory Appliance Repair Electricians Pest Control Plumbing Pool Service Roofers Roofers Jewelry Repair

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THHE OUTPOST ma MARcCH 20, 2017 15 Y15 E l l i o t t H o m e s c o m Las Barrancas12310 Grand View Drive S. Frontage Rd. & Ave. 15 E 928-503-2781Starting at $274,950 Sunset Terraces at The View 6021 E. Morning Lane Araby Rd. & 26th Street 928-317-9701Starting at $231,950 Araby Crossing 6630 E. 35th Street Araby Rd. & 32nd Street 928-783-1800 Starting at $189,950 MOVE-IN READY!Brand New 3-5 bedroom Solar homes with a wealth of energy-saving, water-saving, and money-saving features. *Monthly Mortgage Payment as low as $1, 436.94 Monthly utility as low $91.00 (based on yearly average) Seller will pay up to 3% of closing costs with preferred Lender 4 move in ready homes; 3-60 day move in ready homes; 6 move in ready this summer. ROC #246945 | ROC #244491 Starting at $189,950 $10,420 DISCOUNT Energy Smart Homes to Suit Every Lifestyle Local Dealers Local Buys Local ServiceCars, Trucks, Boats, RVs, Offroad! Search online. Find your next vehicle. Kick the tires. Drive it home.00113319 1350 E. 32nd Street 928-314-3400 Come by and ask about our new Special Military Discounted Prices. Increased Trade-In Values. Complimentary 12 Month/12,000 Mile Limited Warranties. Additional Discount On Parts & Labor. Other Special Rewards. Free Pickup & Delivery On Service. Bill AlexandersFLIGHT-LINErrrfntbtrrrfntt Lt. j.g. John Bacon (right), weapons maintenance test team lead, assumes the command of Yumas chapter of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps from Lt. j.g. Tim R R illey in a recent ceremony. The corps, consisting of the Sea Eagle Squadron for cadets ages 13 to 18 and the Training Ship B.W. Sandburg with cadets ages 10 to 14, has in been existence for two years. Prior to assuming command, Bacon served as operations ofcer, devoting at least 30 volunteer hours per week to the organization. Its just overwhelming to see the cadets getting excited and doing well, whether they are going into the military or not, Bacon said. Theyre a good group of kids that do a lot of service in the community on their own. (Loaned photo)YPG employee takes reins of local Sea Cadet Corps

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