Citation
The outpost

Material Information

Title:
The outpost
Uniform Title:
Outpost (Yuma, Ariz.)
Creator:
Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) -- Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Yuma, AZ
Publisher:
U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, Public Affairs Office
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Biweekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 43 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases -- Newspapers -- Arizona -- Yuma ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Newspapers -- Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) ( lcsh )
Arizona -- Yuma ( fast )
Arizona -- Yuma Proving Ground ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )

Notes

Numbering Peculiarities:
Numerous numbering irregularities.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
639929322 ( OCLC )
ocn639929322

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sidewinder (Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz.)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

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Full Text

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U.S. ARMY YuYU M aA PROVING GG RO uU ND, YuYU M aA ARIZON aA 85365 | VV OL uU ME 65 NN O. 21 OO CT OO B ERER 31, 2016 YPG impresses at Yuma community event /Page 3 AWC offers assistance to Soldiers, Families /Page 5 Recognizing Fire Prevention Week /Page 7 Y1By Mark Schauer The UH-1 Iroquois helicopter, better known as the Huey, has been retired from Army service after a distinguished career spanning six decades. eleven served until the very last at U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground. occurred on October 20th, with YPG commander Col. Randy Murray and Yuma Test Center commander Lt. Col. James DeBoer piloting two of the proving grounds four Hueys. Two of the aircraft ferried passengers on a ceremonial pass above YPGs three cantonment areas, while the other two carried parachutists from the Airborne Test Force onto Philips drop zone as spectators from YPG watched from a nearby shade structure. An iconic airframe of the Vietnam War, the Huey has served as workhorse of the decades. The same airframe that supported testing of the Global Positioning System at YPG in the late 1970s was still used for state-ofby Mark Schauer For Soldiers deployed in a war zone, the natural environment can be as formidable an adversary as one on U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground conducts testing in three of the worlds most punishing extreme climates, but tropic testing has gained additional relevancy: American military policy has evolved to in recent years, and tropical locales are home to more than half of the worlds population, comprising nearly 40% of the planets land surface. The necessity of testing equipment the United States foreign partners. The German army has tested a variety of equipment at YPG and its test centers in the recent past, from the PzH 2000 155mm self-propelled howitzer to the MG5 machine gun. Earlier this year, the German army End of an era: Proving ground bids farewell to long-serving Huey helicoptersGerman soldiers test sniper rie in tropics after departing Yuma Proving GroundSEE RIFLE page 2 SEE H uU EY page 6 An iconic airframe of the Vietnam War era, the Armys nal 11 UH-1 Iroquois helicopters, better known as Hueys, were retired in October. The nal four airframes in YPGs eet had their last ight on October 20th, ferrying Airborne Test Force parachute jumpers and YPG dignitaries for one nal ight across parts of the range. (Photo by Mark Schauer)

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2 OCTOBER 31, 2016 THE OUTPOSTin the desert of Yuma, followed by a week-long test at a tropic test facility frequently utilized by U.S. Army Tropic Regions Test Center. Swiss-made .338 Lapua Magnum round, which is far more accurate typical infantrymen. Weighing nearly 18 pounds and sporting a 10 round 1500 meters, which the German army wanted to test in a realistic but needed to expand the range to accommodate the testing. We had an 800 meter range, but the test requirements called for a 1200 meter range, said Joris van to explore our options on how to get those extra 400 meters, and eventually the only viable option was to build a tower on the top of the hill behind the 800 meter range. The test was prepared on a tight timeline, which challenged the crew which is a tall order, said van de to get up on the hill, for there is no road. We had to cut a very narrow path, and most of the construction materials had to be hand-carried up the hill. We had to carry sand, gravel and cement, added Terry Barton, deputy program manager. That took a long time, as you can imagine. Over days, the crew hauled 160 bags of sand, 180 bags of gravel, and 20 bags of cement, all to construct a perfectly level cement pad and a 12foot tall steel pipe platform atop it. We cleared the hilltop and installed the platform there, said van de Pavoordt. Luckily the hilltop was only covered with brush, so we didnt have to cut any big trees: we always try to avoid that. Fresh off similar testing in Yuma, the German soldiers spent a week on the ground utilizing TRTC facilities such the rigorous manpack course, beneath a triple canopy of vegetation, suffused with thorny vines bordering a slick, muddy trail. The soldiers used special systems through the manpack course, said overnight in a very humid bunker and the soldiers tested their night and thermal vision scopes on the range at night. The platform at the head of the expanded range is a permanent piece of infrastructure that can accommodate future testing on even shorter notice. All we need now is some light maintenance, said van de Pavoordt. and on the hilltop, but that would only take a couple of days to clear. Y2 THEOUtTPoOStT News may be submitted to: The Editor, Outpost, Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, AZ, 85365. Phone: (928) 328 or DSN 899. Visit our website at: www.yuma.army.mil or email to: mark.a.schauer.civ@mail.milCommander: Col. Randy Murray Public Affairs Ofcer: Chuck Wullenjohn Public Affairs Specialist/Editor: Mark Schauer Technical Editor, Cold Regions Test Center: Clara Zachgo Marketing Specialist: Teri Womack Visual Information Manager: Riley Williams The Outpost is an unofcial publication authorized under provisions of AR 360. The Outpost is published every two weeks by the Public Affairs Ofce, Yuma Proving Ground. Views and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Army. This newspaper uses material credited to ATEC and ARNEWS. While contributions are solicited, the PAO reserves the right to edit all submitted materials and make corrections, changes or deletions to conform with the policy of this newspaper. RIFLEFROM PAGE 1 The bolt-action G29 rie recently tested at U.S. Army Tropic Regions Test Center res a Swiss-made .338 Lapua Magnum round, which is far more accurate and precise than ries carried by typical infantrymen. Weighing nearly 18 pounds and sporting a 10 round magazine, the rie has a range of 1500 meters. (Loaned photos) In addition to an expanded ring range, German soldiers testing the G29 sniper rie also had access to the rigorous manpack course, a treacherously steep jungle trail beneath a triple canopy of vegetation, suffused with thorny vines bordering a slick, muddy trail.

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THE OUTPOST OCTOBER 31, 2016 3By Mark Schauer Despite a history in Yuma dating back to the mid-19th century, some in the local community are surprised to learn that Army Soldiers are stationed in Yuma. For more than 1,500 people who attended Yumas Getting Arizona Involved in Neighborhoods event in mid-October, however, the communitys Army presence was clear. Eight Soldiers from YPGs Airborne Test Force and Health Clinic were accompanied by YPG Prosser, who spent three hours interacting with a steady stream of eventgoers. I love talking with kids, said Prosser. Them having exposure to us and seeing we are real people, great opportunity. Its also a great opportunity for Soldiers to talk to the public about what they do and the great things Yuma Proving Ground contributes to the community and nation. YPGs exhibit consisted of a M119A2 105 mm howitzer, a High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle, an ambulance from YPGs Health Clinic, a YPG Police vehicle, and table displays of parachute packs, helmets, and other gear used by Soldiers, as well as medical equipment used by the Health Clinic. The Soldiers themselves, however, were the star attraction. There were kids interested in of good questions, said Staff Sgt. Jesse Robbins of YPGs Airborne Test Force. Not being a recruiter I cant give them all the answers, but if thats something they want to do, I think its pretty awesome. YPG personnel participate in a throughout the year, from the Yuma Air Show to the Yuma County Fair and others. YPG Soldiers will march in the upcoming Veterans Day Parade and be a noted presence at historic downtown Yumas Military Appreciation Day celebration in early December. I love to volunteer for the community, said Robbins. Im very proud of this uniform and what we doany chance I get to show our presence, I volunteer. Y3 Next Outpost deadline is noon November 3rdSexual Assault Hotline: 920-3104Report Domestic Violence: 328-2720 YPG impresses at Yuma community event Sgt. Kevin Storey of YPGs Health Clinic shows event-goers equipment YPGs medics use, along with some examples of desert insect life found in the environs of YPG. (Photos by Mark Schauer) Staff Sgt. Jesse Robbins talks with a youngster at Yumas annual Getting Arizona Involved in Neighborhoods event as Staff Sgt. Kyle Dunwiddie and Sgt. 1st Class Steven Fief look on. I love to volunteer for the community, said Robbins. Im very proud of this uniform and what we do. In addition to an expanded ring range, German soldiers testing the G29 sniper rie also had access to the rigorous manpack course, a treacherously steep jungle trail beneath a triple canopy of vegetation, suffused with thorny vines bordering a slick, muddy trail.

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4 OCTOBER 31, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY4 Yuma college offers assistance to Soldiers, FamiliesYPG employees teach part time at AWCSoldiers and Families who take classes at AWC might see some familiar faces while they are on campus. According to the American Association of University Professors, about half of college faculty in the United States are part time employees of their respective schools. A substantial percentage of these individuals have full time two per semester.Given that YPG is the largest employer of civilians in Yuma County and part of the community since 1951, it shouldnt be a surprise that both current and former YPG personnel have taught part time at Arizona Western College across the schools 54 year history. Among the current crop of YPG employees who teach part Charles Beasley, welder Jason curator Bill Heidner, program analyst Tina Villalobos and public affairs specialist Mark Schauer.Trepanier has taught tungsten arc welding on Thursday nights experience. AWC did a lot for me, he said. I went to AWC from high school on a welding scholarship, and the YPG. Its kind of a way to give back it feels good to help the students learn a new skill. A sense of giving back is a commonly cited reason for teaching part time despite the By Mark Schauer The Army provides up to $4,500 per year in tuition assistance for active duty Soldiers and many Army Spouses are eligible for a My Career Advancement Account Scholarship of up to $4,000. That money could go a long way toward paying for an associate degree at an Arizona community college, yet many eligible Soldiers and Families dont take advantage of these valuable coordinator for Yumas Arizona Western College, believes the hassle of paperwork to apply for aid and to register for classes may be a deterrent, and wants to help ease the burden. We will sit down with them for hours if needed and go over it step by step, she said. If they are intimidated by signing up for classes on their own, we can do registration all the forms: we want them to be able to go to school. Another frequent stumbling block is the inconvenience of sending away Families relocate frequently, they may have high school or college credits at multiple schools, which sometimes transcripts. I can look at those and classes I believe are going to transfer over and get a student signed up right away based off that initial assessment. sent, evaluated, and posted, but it wont hold them up from getting registered. Rosenblum is committed to resuming monthly visits to the YPG Education Center to serve as a one-stop shop for enrollment or registration needs for Soldiers and their dependents. Anything the main campus can do, I can do for them right here. Ill do placement testing, I can help them with their transcripts, I can help them go over their military transcripts and have an idea of what will give them credit at AWC. AWC has held college classes at YPG in the past and would do so among the YPG population. Even in the absence of on-post classes, AWC has more to offer Soldiers and Families than classes at the main campus. For students who need has a variety of online classes, as well as classes that are a hybrid of online and in-person. The school has multiple extension sites throughout Yuma County as well. AWCs willingness to grant college credit for some Department of Defense training courses they may have taken in the course of their service. We can take up to 30 credits off of their Joint Services Transcript and apply it toward a degree. If you are looking at a general associate degree, that is nearly half of your degree done before you even take one class. Thats very military-friendly. Arizona community colleges have some of the lowest in-state tuition rates in the country AWC currently charges $80 per credit hourand Soldiers and Families in Arizona on military orders are considered Arizona residents for tuition purposes. Retiring Soldiers can even keep their in-state tuition for a time after leaving the service, even if they move to another state. Further, Rosenblum says Soldiers may be eligible for the same need-based federal grant money that civilians use, which would supplement the costs of textbooks and fees.Though active duty Soldiers can use their Post 9/11 GI Bill of Rights Rosenblum says it is far more valuable for Soldiers to save this whether for themselves or their dependents. When they use their tuition assistance on active duty to get their education, Soldiers can pass their GI Bill onto their dependents when they leave the service, or use it to continue on with their own education. You shouldnt pass up on tuition assistance that is available while you are on active duty. Rosenblum can be reached at azwestern.edu.

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THE OUTPOST OCTOBER 31, 2016 5Y5 YPG employees teach part time at AWCSoldiers and Families who take classes at AWC might see some familiar faces while they are on campus. According to the American Association of University Professors, about half of college faculty in the United States are part time employees of their respective schools. A substantial percentage of these individuals have full time two per semester.Given that YPG is the largest employer of civilians in Yuma County and part of the community since 1951, it shouldnt be a surprise that both current and former YPG personnel have taught part time at Arizona Western College across the schools 54 year history. Among the current crop of YPG employees who teach part Charles Beasley, welder Jason curator Bill Heidner, program analyst Tina Villalobos and public affairs specialist Mark Schauer.Trepanier has taught tungsten arc welding on Thursday nights experience. AWC did a lot for me, he said. I went to AWC from high school on a welding scholarship, and the YPG. Its kind of a way to give back it feels good to help the students learn a new skill. A sense of giving back is a commonly cited reason for teaching part time despite the rigors of full time work at the proving ground. I think everybody wants to leave a billions of people on the face of the earth and there have been billions of people in the past, and we remember leaves a small, but real legacy after theyre gone. The part time instructors also tend of an audience of students for hours at a time. Its hard to fall asleep on Thursday nights after class is over, Trepanier said with a smile. Its hard to wind down. YPG public affairs specialist Mark Schauer teaches an evening class at Yumas Arizona Western College. For students who need exible school schedules, the college has a variety of online classes, as well as classes that are a hybrid of online and in-person. The school has multiple extension sites throughout Yuma County as well. (Photo by Alex Gale Ochoa)

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6 OCTOBER 31, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY6 Hueys has been remarkably well maintained and the platforms retirement is bittersweet to YPG pilots and military aircraft enthusiasts throughout the country, particularly those who served missions aboard them during the Vietnam era. Ralph Arnold, who has accumulated was kind of hoping it would be the blade popping on a Huey is quite distinctive. in our generation, this was a modern pilot with 38 years of experience. Its a wonderful aircraft and a lot of With capable maintenance personnel and a dry desert climate, working home of venerable military equipment. From Korean War-era M101 howitzers to the Vietnam era O-2 Skymaster observation airplane, a variety of rugged platforms have had productive second lives supporting YPGs test mission long after having been eclipsed on the Eventually, however, a system that no longer has an Army-wide parts system or support structure must be phased out: It happened to the O-2 aircraft nearly seven years ago, and The arrival of UH-60 Black Hawks heralded the ultimate end of the Hueys career at the proving ground. Im sorry to see them go, said Arnold. They served our mission here very, very well. They are test programs we support. The Blackhawk is a very capable aircraft, The purpose of YPGs helicopterssupporting testsmeans airframe are necessary to meet the airworthiness evaluation and releases to ensure the aircraft functions safely, a time-consuming process. From specialized equipment racks inside the airframe to camera and sensor personnel over the years made more brought out fond memories from Soldiers who conducted parachute I was supposed to be on leave, be a part of this, said Chief Warrant YPGs Airborne Test Force. I wouldnt let my team go out on this without my being involved. HUEyYFROM PAGE 1 The UH-1s retirement is bittersweet to YPG pilots and military aircraft enthusiasts throughout the country, particularly those who served missions aboard them during their heyday. Theres nothing like ying a Huey: the sound of a rotor blade popping on a Huey is quite distinctive, said Ralph Arnold, who has accumulated over 4,000 hours ying UH-1s. (Photo by Chuck Wullenjohn) Castle Dome has seen its share of UH-1 formations over the past six decades, but wont again after the airframes last ight on October 20th. Its a wonderful aircraft and a lot of fun to y, but its day has come, said pilot Gerald Fijalka. (Photo by Mark Schauer) Soldiers from YPGs Airborne Test Force (ATF) prepare for one nal jump from the UH-1. I was supposed to be on leave, but I signed back in just so I could be a part of this, said Chief Warrant Ofcer 3 Brian Perinon, ATF chief. I wouldnt let my team go out on this without my being involved. (Photo by Mark Schauer)

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THE OUTPOST OCTOBER 31, 2016 7Y7 his earliest days in Army Airborne. Perinon. You get to sit on the edge, your feet are dangling, it seems like time you ever do it and you have that anxiety going. Then you get off, and it is the best feeling everyou want to do it again and again and again. The Hueys are departing YPG, All four of the aircraft will have active retirements after distribution by the Defense Logistics Agencys police agencies in places like Orange County, California and Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The Hueys are departing YPG, but not ying off into the sunset. All four of the aircraft will have active retirements after distribution to police agencies by the Defense Logistics Agencys Law Enforcement Support Ofce.Theyre fun to y and really easy to take care of, too, said Michael Wertepny, crew chief. (Photo by Chuck Wullenjohn) The same airframe that supported testing of the Global Positioning System (GPS) at YPG from the 1970s into the early 1990s was still used for state-of-the-art testing up to the rst weeks of October. In this photo form the early 1980s, a UH-1, anked by a Jeep; M113 armored personnel carrier; and Soldier with a man portable GPS receiver on his back, is ready to y a GPS test mission. (US Army photo) In recognition of Fire Prevention Week, YPGs Fire Department set up a large display of equipment on YPGs Cox Field in mid-October, familiarizing children and adults alike in the equipment used to ght and prevent res. Here, re protection specialist Jackie Bailey (right) invites family support division chief Mardy Clark to hoist an axe reghters use. The reghters on hand stressed the importance of changing your homes smoke detectors at least every 10 years. (Photos by Teri Womack) YPG reghters share re prevention information

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8 OCTOBER 31, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY8 A mid-October ceremony in the Range Operations Center atrium recognized the contributions of YPGs Non-Commissioned Ofcers of the third and fourth quarters, and mission and mission support civilians of the third quarter. From top, YPG commander Col. Randy Murray awarded NCO of the third quarter to Sgt. 1st Class Michael Wooley, NCO in charge of the YPG Health Clinic, for excellence in the performance of his duties and for teaching several of his fellow Soldiers how to swim during his off-duty time. Yuma Test Center Commander Lt. Col. James DeBoer and YPG Command Sgt. Maj. Christopher Prosser looked on. YPGs NCO of the fourth quarter is Sgt. Kevin Storey, medic at YPGs Health Clinic, who has represented YPG at various public events in his time here. Aviation Systems Branch test ofcer Walter Lopezs steadfast dedication to duty was displayed in successfully resolving a safety concern during a test project, and Herb Kiser of the Engineering Support Branch was recognized for work on the range radar replacement program. (Photos by Mark Schauer)Accomplishments recognized

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THE OUTPOST OCTOBER 31, 2016 9Y9 Submitted by Paul J. Kilanski Family Advocacy Program Manager Love relationships are wonderful, but they can be hard at times. Developing a good relationship is a great achievement. The tips here will help you create a better and happier connection with your partner. Become a team. In a committed relationship, two people unite to create a new team. Remember that there are now two valid and different ways to do anything. Respect each others choices and negotiate your new way together. Support your partner. Whatever upsets or pleases one of strength of having a loving partner by your side. Be a good communicator. Communicating well is essential to a healthy relationship. Listen carefully to what your understand what he or she said and meant. Ask what you can do to please your partner and if possible, do so. Tell your partner what you need and be thankful when they provide it. Talk to each other every day for at least 20 minutes. Support each others goals. relationship is support. You can help each other to achieve personal goals. Tell each other your lifes dream. Create a plan of how you can support each other in reaching your goals, such as taking turns in working and going to school. Support each other in staying on the goal path, even Remember that two personally stronger and happier couple. Fighting stresses both partners and frightens children who witness it. they feel hurt. When you get upset, explain to your partner what bothers you-not what they did wrong. Try to understand your partners feelings, ideas and needs. It shows to your partner that you do not want out how to agree. Keep the courtship going. Life for couples quickly becomes busy. To balance their lives, couples need to keep their romance alive. Continue to court each other with fun Be physically and verbally affectionate. Be playful, laugh and relate well. Cherish your partner. All people need to feel valued. Your partner wants to know that they matter to you. Thank your partner for whatever they do to improve your daily life, including simple chores. Ask (and thank) your mate for their opinions. Use your partners advice as often as possible. Talk with your partner about decisions that involve both your individual and shared life. Take your loved ones feelings seriously and help ease their pain. Regularly tell your partner how attractive and pleasing they are to you and how lucky you feel to be in this relationship. Following these tips can help you and your partner grow closer and build a strong, healthy family together.Keeping your relationship strong

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10 OCTOBER 31, 2016 THE OUTPOST Y10 Acreage Park Models Home Services Directory Carpet Rug Cleaner Construction Flooring Painters Plumbing Pool Service Roofers Roofers

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THE OUTPOST OCTOBER 31, 2016 11Y11

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12 OCTOBER 31, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY12