Citation
The outpost

Material Information

Title:
The outpost
Uniform Title:
Outpost (Yuma, Ariz.)
Creator:
Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) -- Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Yuma, AZ
Publisher:
U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, Public Affairs Office
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Biweekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 43 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases -- Newspapers -- Arizona -- Yuma ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Newspapers -- Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) ( lcsh )
Arizona -- Yuma ( fast )
Arizona -- Yuma Proving Ground ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )

Notes

Numbering Peculiarities:
Numerous numbering irregularities.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
639929322 ( OCLC )
ocn639929322

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sidewinder (Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz.)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

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This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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U.S. ARMY YuYU M aA PROVING GG RO uU ND, YuYU M aA ARIZON aA 85365 | VV OL uU ME 65 NN O. 18 sS E pP TEMBER 19, 2016 CRTC conducts tests on new goggles /Page 2 Popular YPG speaker series resumes soon /Page 3 YPG hosts Arizona Commanders Summit /Page 11 Y1By Mark Schauer By turns somber and passionate, Yuma Proving Ground remembered the 15th anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks in a Patriot Day ceremony early this month. Over 100 members of the workforce participated in kilometer remembrance walk-run in the quiet early morning hours prior to the start of the work day to a formal mid-morning ceremony and 9/11 history seminar at YPGs Heritage Center Museum. In remarks at the ceremony, Col. Randy Murray, YPG commander, grim day. On September 11, 2001, our memories and consciences were seared by the sight of mighty buildings burning and collapsing, and the bitter knowledge that more than 3,000 of our fellow citizens, people like you and me going about their daily business, were cruelly murdered, he said. Murray gave particular credit to the heroism displayed by the more than killed in a valiant effort to save others that day. We mourn their loss and honor and pride in the knowledge that there who would, without hesitation, do the exact same thing, he said. That This sentiment was vigorously endorsed by Lt. Sean Underhill of the YPG Police Department, who served as part of the event color guard. On September 11, 2001, he was a college Training Corps. An Army veteran today, he says he didnt imagine back then that 15 years later he would be serving the nation in another uniform. Its the same mentality in the military, law enforcement, and in we run toward it, he said. Even if we knew a building was about to Dedication and devotion: YPG marks 15 years since 9/11SEE paPA TRIOT D a A Y page 6 YPG commander Col. Randy Murray delivers poignant and resolute remarks at YPGs commemoration of Patriot Day earlier this month. Since 9/11, thousands of Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, and Airmen have made the ultimate sacrice to defend our nation and values, he said. But thousands I repeat, thousands-more of our troops were saved from death and injury by the work performed by our dedicated employees at Yuma Proving Ground. (Photo by Chuck Wullenjohn)

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2 sSEpPTEmbMBErR 19, 2016T THEE OUTTPOSTTY2 THEOUtTPoOStT News may be submitted to: TT he E E ditor, Outpost, Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, AZ, 85365. Phone: (928) 328 or DSN 899. Visit our website at: www.yuma.army.mil or email to: mark.a.schauer.civ@mail.milCommander: Col. Randy Murray Public Affairs Ofcer: Chuck Wullenjohn Public Affairs Specialist/Editor: Mark Schauer Technical Editor, Cold Regions Test Center: Clara Zachgo Marketing Specialist: T T eri W omack Visual Information Manager: Riley Williams TT he Outpost is an unofcial publication authorized under provisions of AR 360. TT he Outpost is published every two weeks by the Public Affairs Ofce, Yuma Proving Ground. Views and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Army. TT his newspaper uses material credited to A TETE C and ARN E E WS. While contributions are solicited, the PAO reserves the right to edit all submitted materials and make corrections, changes or deletions to conform with the policy of this newspaper. Next Outpost deadline is noon September 22ndSexual Assault Hotline: 920-3104Report Domestic Violence: 328-2720 By Mark Schauer Soldiers depend on every piece of equipment issued to them so they can work anywhere in the world. This holds especially true in extreme climates, and applies even to equipment that the ordinary person wouldnt think about, including goggles. participated in a trial in subzero temperatures to replace the current standard issue goggles at U.S. Army Cold Regions Test Center (CRTC), Alaska. Eye protection is critically important in combat conditions, particularly in extreme cold weather, where ambient temperatures are usually far below that of the human body. Fogged-up lenses are an irritant in any situation, but could be deadly in combat. Once the lenses fog, if you lift the goggle away from your face, the introduction of the very cold temperatures freezes the fog into an Once they are iced up, they are a You have to be able to see. Aside from subjective things like discover facets of the goggles that could make them unsuitable for combat operations in extreme cold conditions. Are dual-pane goggles Soldiers unique needs? Do the goggles interfere with a Soldiers ability to properly sight a weapon, or impact visual acuity while driving a combat vehicle? How practical conditions where re-charging impossible? To answer these questions, CRTC personnel and Soldiers from Fort Wainwrights 25th Infantry Division in Alaska put the goggles through their paces over the course of several weeks. Rotating teams of 10 Soldiers participated in daily two multi-mile road marches while wearing the eyewear. The length of time it took each Soldier to remove and put on a pair of goggles in temperatures well below zero was measured, as well as the length of time to remove and store them. For their part, participating Soldiers appreciated the ability to become standard Army issue. been involved in something like this before, said Spc. Michael Hernandez. I think putting our input in will make an impact.I can see! Testing goggles in Alaskas frozen interior EE ye protection is critically important in combat conditions. With the participation of Soldiers from Fort Wainwrights 25th Infantry Division, CR TT Cs multi-week test of ve candidates to serve as the Armys new standard-issue goggles sought out facets of each that could make them unsuitable for combat operations in extreme cold conditions. (Photo by Sebastian Saarloos)

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TTHEE OUTTPOSTT s SEpPTEmbMBErR 19, 2016 3By Chuck Wullenjohn Though we in the Yuma area continue to stoically put up with the high heat of the desert that always comes this time of year, it wont be too long before the temperature Southwest Arizona. After all, we locals know better than anyone that nothing can compare to the moderate weather of a Yuma winter! Yuma Proving Ground engages in a wide variety of Yuma community events each year and we in the busy making arrangements for many weeks. Highlights include an Army band concert of holiday music on December 7th, parade entries in both the annual Veterans Day and Silver Spur Rodeo parades, ten public tours held in conjunction with the Yuma Visitors Bureau, and a great deal more. A particular highlight of our winter outreach schedule deserves mention the presentations by YPG speakers to take place at the Yuma County Main and Foothills libraries. These presentations feature experienced speakers using PowerPoint slides to illustrate the topics each has researched himself. All the presentations are free and you are invited to attend. Tickets are not needed. Youre bound to interesting and fun. Following are the presentations on tap for the November 9, 2016; Presenter: Chuck Wullenjohn, YPG Public Affairs Ofcer The U.S. Flag and the U.S. Army Two Destinies Intertwined. The U.S. Army won and then protected Americas liberty throughout our history essentially, there would be no United States without the Army. Learn the colorful history important facts about Army life. 10 a.m. Foothills Library 3 p.m. Main Library November 30, 2016; Presenter: Bill Heidner, Director, Heritage Center and Museum From Patton to Victory Dynamic Army Training in the Southwest Helps Bring About World War II Victory. Perhaps the most War II, Gen. George S. Patton, established the Desert Training Center, with Yuma as its southern anchor. Over 1.5 million Army troops came to the Desert Southwest to train for battle. It was an amazing undertaking that helped shape the Army for victory. 10 a.m. Main Library 3 p.m. Foothills Library December 13, 2016; Presenter: Mark Schauer, The Outpost Editor UFOs? Cold War Frost in the Yuma Desert. In the 1950s, Yuma Test Station Soldiers reported seeing something in the night sky never intercontinental missile from the Soviet Union? Natural phenomenon? Spacecraft from another planet? 10 a.m. Foothills Library 3 p.m. Main Library January 24, 2017; Presenter: Bill Heidner, Director, Heritage Center and Museum You Never Knew -William Emory. The founding of the American West was possible largely to a group of Corps of Topographical Engineers. William Emory. Never heard of him? Come learn about this great explorer who gave early American pioneers so much knowledge of the Southwest. 10 a.m. Foothills Library 3 p.m. Main Library February 2, 2017; Presenter: Chuck Wullenjohn, YPG Public Affairs Ofcer Help Never Came The 75th anniversary of the early World War II Military Tragedy on Bataan and Corregidor. Early 1942 witnessed the largest surrender of U.S. forces in the history of our nation. At Bataan and Corregidor, upwards of 70,000 U.S. and Filipino troops held out for many months against overwhelming odds. The bitter and infamous Bataan Death March resulted, an event that became a battle cry for Americans throughout World War II. The story of what occurred is one of courage and tenacity that has been forgotten by many, but richly deserves remembering. 10 a.m. Foothills Library 3 p.m. Main Library February 15, 2017; Presenter: Mark Schauer, The Outpost Editor UFOs? Cold War Frost in the Yuma Desert. In the 1950s, Yuma Test Station Soldiers reported seeing something in the night sky never intercontinental missile from the Soviet Union? Natural phenomenon? Spacecraft from another planet? 10 a.m. -Main Library Y3 Beach Club Apts. 100395 Public YPG presentations coming to Yuma libraries Yuma Proving Ground engages in a wide variety of Yuma community events each year, including an annual series of presentations by YPG speakers that take place at the Yuma County Main and Foothills libraries. Here, a large audience listens to YPG public affairs ofcer Chuck Wullenjohn deliver a presentation at Yuma Countys main library last year. (Photo by Mark Schauer)

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4 sSEpPTEmbMBErR 19, 2016T THEE OUTTPOSTTBy David J. Horn Gooood Morrrrning Y.P.G!! You are tuned in to WYPG Radio, the Voiceof Yuma Proving Ground and northernDomeValley. You are listening to the Daves Desert Rat Morning Show, keeping you up to the minute on all events that shape your day at YPG. As always, Im going to start off the morning broadcast with the see hereonce everyone gets past that new bridge construction site, moving northbound on the right northbound lane is moving smoothly at about 55 mph. South bound southbound shoulder trying to avoid everybody in the southbound lane Whoa!!!!! In news headlines this morning, I want to make sure everybody knows about the upcoming Cholla Cactus Festival, to take place up on Main Street, in Yumas Historic North End. Just be sure to bring a pair of pliers with you in case you touch, accidently bump into, or step on anythingbut other than that, have a great time! All righttodays weather report is brought to you by the ACME Tank Corporation, currently in the middle of their 2016 model year end-ofsummer clearance sale. Stop in and talk to one of their professional tech reps, and tell them Dave sent you. Current temperatures around the area include 77 degrees in the ROC cafeteria, minus 20 degrees up in the cold chamber, and 102 degrees in my next door neighbors cubicle. Tomorrows weather will be sunny and hotter! Yes, get out there and enjoy the last of these wonderful days where the water in your backyard pool is at a nice and warm 85 degrees. Just make sure you always carry lots of water in your vehicle in case youre out running around off-road somewhere and you really do discover that the only real difference between two-wheel drive and four-wheel drive is how far you have to walk after you get stuck. Be sure to pass on this important safety tip to all the new folks in town who summer. Great news in regional sports today! We just received word that a major league baseball team may be relocating to Yuma! They would be setting up shop in our new sports complex off 16th Street, and in a move similar to the Arizona Cardinals, they will keep their same team name. So, lets all get out there and give our support to the YUMA MARINERS!!! Well, that brings me to the end of todays show. Have a great rest-ofthe-day and be sure to tune in here again tomorrowsame Bat Time same Bat Channel. Y4 When buying isnt an option THEMIS & PAUL CAVANAGH928.726.5557670 E 32nd St, Ste 9Go To www.tlcmanagement.net to find your new home or call#1Choice in RentalsYumas 100386 Now, dont touch that dial S hootHOOT I nN theTHE B reeREE Z eE James Knight (right), grocery manager at YPGs Defense Commissary Agency, helps a customer in the store recently. A 14-year veterans of the grocery business, Knight credits his father with instilling in him high standards of humility, kindness and the willingness to go the extra mile to help others, all of which help him in his chosen eld. He enjoys giving back and interacting with people in his personal life, refereeing basketball games and spending time with his family. (Photo by TT eri Womack)Attentive service

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TTHEE OUTTPOSTT s SEpPTEmbMBErR 19, 2016 5Y5 You put your familys health rst.We do the same.www.PrimeCareYuma.com | 3 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU PrimeCare Central928-341-4563 284 W. 32nd Street Yuma, AZ 85364PrimeCare Valley928-343-0488 2377 S. 22nd Drive Yuma, AZ 85364PrimeCare Foothills928-345-6830 11142 S. Scottsdale Drive Yuma, AZ 85367 97909

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6 sSEpPTEmbMBErR 19, 2016T THEE OUTTPOSTTY6PATRIOT DAy YFROM PAGEE 1 collapse, we would go in and try to get out as many people as possible. Every day we put on the uniform we know we may not go back home, and weve accepted that risk. Murray also asked the audience to remember the burden borne by our nations Soldiers and the key role YPG played in saving countless others from death and injury. Since 9/11, thousands of Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, and Airmen have defend our nation and values, he said. But thousands I repeat, thousands-more of our troops were saved from death and injury by the work performed by our dedicated employees at Yuma Proving Ground. Our workforce proved year after year that it will rise to any challenge if it involves protecting our nation and its troops. Murray said this important work could not have been accomplished without the longstanding support of the Yuma community, which YPG has enjoyed for the past 65 years. The citizens of Yuma County are the most patriotic and supportive of the military that I have encountered in my more than 26 years in uniform. Local government organizations like Yuma County and the City of Yuma have always given their utmost to help us carry out our vital mission. After the ceremony, attendees heard a presentation from Heritage Center Curator Bill Heidner that explored the complex, decades-long road to 9/11, hitting on historical Crisis of 1980 to the assassination From left, color guard members Sgt. Joshua Martinez of YPGs Airborne TT est F orce, Fireghter Luis Lopez of the YPG Fire Department, and Lt. Sean Underhill of the YPG Police Department, prepare to raise the ag. (Photo by Mark Schauer) TT he ag ew at half-staff in honor for those who perished that tragic day 15 years ago Our nations enemies have seen that nothing can ever break the will of the American people to live in freedom and security, said Col. Randy Murray. TT ogether, the American people will always remain vigilant and will never falter. Let this day always be a reminder of that. (Photo by Chuck Wullenjohn) TT he color guard reverently raises the ag. T T he members of the color guard represented both Soldiers and civilian rst responders in honor of those lost on September 11, 2001. (Photo by Chuck Wullenjohn)

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TTHEE OUTTPOSTT s SEpPTEmbMBErR 19, 2016 7Y7of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat in 1981, among others. Heidner noted that eight emergency medical technicians from private ambulance responders killed in action that day, and that some of the valiant civilians killed saving others were Army veterans. There were other people responding that daypeople I like to call Soldiers for life, said Heidner. One example Heidner discussed was Rick Rescorla, a retired Army in the World Trade Center. Prior to suffereda truck bombing in 1993 the vulnerability of the building, to no avail. After security upgrades were made after the 1993 attack, Rescorla and his staff predicted that a future strike would come by air, and instituted frequent employee evacuation drills and education campaigns. When the planes struck the towers that fateful day, Rescorla led an evacuation of Morgan Stanley employees while other building occupants were being told to shelter in place. On 9/11, he saved nearly all of Morgan Stanleys 2,687 people from being killed, said Heidner. He wanted full accountability of his peoplehe was ever the Soldierand was last seen going back up the stairs. His remains were never found. Murray vowed to continue to September 11th attacks and urged others to live by the attacks important lesson. The effort to protect our country continues, said Murray. If 9/11 taught us one thing, it is that we can never take for granted that the victories won on behalf of freedom will endure -they must be vigorously defended by a new generation. Our nations enemies have seen that nothing can ever break the will of the American people to live in freedom and security. Together, the American people will always remain vigilant and never falter. TT he ag ew at half-staff in honor for those who perished that tragic day 15 years ago. Our nations enemies have seen that nothing can ever break the will of the American people to live in freedom and security, said Col. Randy Murray. TT ogether, the American people will always remain vigilant and will never falter. Let this day always be a reminder of that. (Photo by Chuck Wullenjohn) YPG Heritage Center curator Bill Heidner speaks about the long, complex road to the tragic events of September 11th in a thoughtful post-ceremony presentation. He noted that many acts of heroism at the World TT rade Center that day were performed by civilians with prior military service (Photo by Mark Schauer) Many members of the workforce began the day participating in a vigorous ve kilometer walk-run dedicated to the rst responders of 9/11. A formation of primarily Soldiers led by YPG commander Col. Randy Murray added an extra lap around the posts Howard Cantonment Area before crossing the nish line. (Photo by Mark Schauer) Audience members at the ceremony reect on the 15th anniversary of the nations deadliest attack. Im sure that everyone in this audience remembers exactly where they were and what they were doing when they rst heard the terrible, unbelievable news, said YPG Commander Col. Randy Murray. It was a grim watershed in our nations history. (Photo by Chuck Wullenjohn) Members of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers Border Lodge #2282 recently donated $1,500 to Yumas Cibola High School Swim and Dive TT eam. Were trying to help offset their costs and keep the kids active, said Rob Kimber. Here, heavy equipment mechanics (from left) Ben Bendele, Kimber, and Anthony Pegram, present the check to the teams booster club ofcials as the swimmers look on. (Loaned photo)Donation helps keep swim team aoat

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8 sSEpPTEmbMBErR 19, 2016T THEE OUTTPOSTTY8 Spragues.com (Next to Lowes) Exclusive On New & Used Guns MILITARY/LAW ENFORCEMENT PRICING INDOOR RANGE IS OPEN From OVER 1800 GUNS Gunsmith On Duty $399 Too! CUSTOMER SERVICE IS MY #1 PRIORITY rfnttbt rffntbrfntbt btff fffft ttbtbbtbtftftt bfbtft fttttft Call me today for a FREE Comparative Market Analysis, or with any of your real estate questions or needs!btb 101313 By D.L. Brown, YPG Chief of Police Yuma County Area Schools reopened their doors to students in the last few weeks, and with the congestion around the schools. Drivers are reminded to be more vigilant and more careful on the roads where students are present. To protect local kids, we recommend parents give themselves extra time in the morning to account for congested further reminded that speed limits in and around school zones drop down to 15 mph at the beginning and end of the school day. In Arizona, when approaching a school bus that is picking up or dropping off passengers you must come to a complete stop before reaching the bus, regardless of your direction of travel. A school lights and a mechanical stop-sign arm extended while passengers are entering or leaving the bus. You must remain stopped until the school bus moves ahead or until the stoplonger shown. You are not required to stop for a school bus when traveling in the opposite direction roadway is one in which the road is separated by physical barriers such as a fence, curbing or separation of the pavement. Roadway striping by itself does not constitute a physical separation of the roadway. All drivers should put cell phones and other handheld devices away so they cant be reached while driving. National Highway Transportation Safety Administration statistics show crashes in school zones skyrocket in September when kids have returned to school, and that most of these accidents are caused by distracted driving. YPGs police will be vigilant in and around school zones and crosswalks where children are present in an effort to deter unsafe driving in these areas and promote safe, patient and observant driving. Do your part to ensure the safety of and, most of all, be safe. C hiHI EF sS C ornORN E rR School is in session

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TTHEE OUTTPOSTT s SEpPTEmbMBErR 19, 2016 9Y9 Reds Bird Cage SaloonLocated in the heart of Historic Downtown Yuma231 Main St. 928-783-1050Mon-Fri 9:30am-2:30am Open Sat & Sun 6am Come And Join Us! CUSTOMER SERVICE IS MY #1 PRIORITY rfnttbt rffntbrfntbt btff fffft ttbtbbtbtftftt bfbtft fttttft Call me today for a FREE Comparative Market Analysis, or with any of your real estate questions or needs!btb 101313 Sleep is essential for your childs health, performance, and wellbeing. of sleep children get on a regular performance. Medical studies have shown that students with longer, and went to bed earlier than those with lower grades. better weight status in children and adolescents. Studies continue to emerge that link the relationship between length of sleep and being overweight or obese. are better sleepers. Recent studies have shown that less sedentary children not only fall asleep faster but sleep better throughout the night. enforcing a good sleep environment can help improve your childrens sleep quality. The Sleep Foundations American sleep poll found when parents took action to establish a sleep-friendly environment for their children, their children slept better. Establish a good sleep sure the room is quiet, dark, and at a comfortable temperature. Remove distractions from the room, such as a TV or computer. Hours of sleep needed for Age Hours per day 0 to 20 months 12 to 18 hours 3 to 1 1 months 14 to 15 hours 1 to 3 years 12 to 14 hours 3 to 5 years 1 1 to 13 hours 5 to 10 years 10 to 1 1 hours 10 to 17 years 8.5 to 9.25 hours Help your family develop better Maintain a regular sleep schedule with a consistent bed and wake-up time, including weekends. Avoid watching TV within an hour of bedtime. Place phones on silent before bed, and remove them from sleep areas. Create a relaxing wind-down routine to cue sleepiness, such as taking a warm shower or reading a book. Engage in regular physical activity each day, such as brisk walking or a bike ride. Do not eat heavier meals, such as dinner, two to three hours before bedtime. Hurt. Submitted by Paul J. Kilanski, Family Advocacy Program Manager Frequently, people who are in abusive relationships dont recognize the nature of their situation. Its easy to look past abusive tendencies when you love someone, but it is simply not safe or fair to anyone involved. No one deserves to be abused, yet many people are. Statistics show that between 36 and 50 percent of American women will be in at least one abusive relationship during her life. Fortunately, there is something you can do. Educate yourself on the signs and symptoms of abusive relationships and share this knowledge with your loved ones. Promise yourself never to accept abuse. You are worth more than that. There are many signs to look out for in an abusive relationship. One of the principal indicators is the characteristic jealousy. Most people get jealous or possessive on seen as a sign of how much they care for you. But if your partners jealousy is unfounded, persistent, or leads them to irrational and hurtful behaviors, you should re-evaluate the relationship. Possessiveness and controlling behavior go along with jealousy and are often the next step down the path to abuse. Watch out for partners who are very bossy and who expect you to heed their demands. Also, if your partner tries to isolate you by insisting that you cut off social contacts and friendships, pay attention, for that is a clear warning sign. Keep your eye out for other signs that your partner is abusive. Some of these include violent behavior (not necessarily against you), a short temper, drug or alcohol addiction, a history of bad relationships, and the tendency to pressure you to do things you are not comfortable with. An abusive person is also likely to blame you for his or her emotional state and to say that you deserve it when they hurt you. While these signs are indicators that something is wrong, there are other behaviors that actually constitute abuse. If your partner abuses you, get out of the relationship. Nothing else matters your life is on the line. Abusive people get more abusive as time passes. A partner that hits you today could kill you tomorrow. There are many different types of abuse. Physical abuse includes pushing, hitting, slapping, kicking and cutting. Emotional abuse includes threats to hurt you or people you love, and constant criticism and belittlement. Sexual abuse includes when someone forces you to have sex or take part in sexual acts when you dont want to. Just because you have sex sometimes doesnt mean that your partner is entitled to have sex with you anytime he or she wants to. If you feel that you might be in an abusive relationship, talk to someone immediately. Start with friends and family that you can trust and dont be afraid to see a counselor. There are also places you can call for help such as the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233. Abusive relationships: Know the warning signs saSA FE tyTY C ornORN E rR

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10 sSEpPTEmbMBErR 19, 2016T THEE OUTTPOSTTY10 Local Dealers Local Buys Local ServiceCars, Trucks, Boats, RVs, Offroad! Search online. Find your next vehicle. Kick the tires. Drive it home.00084870 Acreage Park Models Motorcycles Home Services Directory Appliance Repair Construction Construction Flooring Painters Pool Service

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TTHEE OUTTPOSTT s SEpPTEmbMBErR 19, 2016 11Y11 Local Dealers Local Buys Local ServiceCars, Trucks, Boats, RVs, Offroad! Search online. Find your next vehicle. Kick the tires. Drive it home.00084870 ROC #246945 ROC# 244491rfnf ftbffft ffffft rf ntbn Araby & 32nd Street 928-783-1800 12310 Grand View Drive 928-345-1623 Just west of Araby and 26th Street 928-317-9701 M-F 10am-5pm Weekends 11-5pm Elliott Homes Solar Communities:Araby Crossing 6630 E. 35th St. Araby & 32nd Street 928-783-1800 Las Barrancas 12310 Grand View Drive S. Frontage Rd. & 15E 928-345-1623 Sunset Terrace 6171 E. Overlook LN. Araby Rd. & 26th St. 928-317-9701M-F 10am-5pm Weekends 11-5pmGet moving!solar homesrfnrt nrfnrb ftr rtCall 928-783-1800 or take a drive to 32nd Street and Araby Road. fftfff 100379-1 YPG commander Col. Randy Murray (left photo) and Yuma TT est Center commander Lt. Col. James DeBoer (right photo) brief their peers at the biannual Arizona Commanders Summit held at YPG in early September. Approximately 35 individuals from throughout the state attended. In additional to military installation commanders, attendees included state ofcials, representatives of communities from around the state, and local Yuma ofcials. Held primarily for base commanders, the meetings allow senior ofcers to share information about common problems and learn about upcoming matters. TT he summit meets at military installations throughout Arizona on a rotating basis. (Photos by Chuck Wullenjohn)YPG hosts Arizona CC ommanders Summit

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12 sSEpPTEmbMBErR 19, 2016T THEE OUTTPOSTTY12