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The outpost

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Title:
The outpost
Uniform Title:
Outpost (Yuma, Ariz.)
Creator:
Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) -- Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Yuma, AZ
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U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, Public Affairs Office
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regular
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English
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volumes : illustrations ; 43 cm

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Military bases -- Newspapers -- Arizona -- Yuma ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Newspapers -- Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) ( lcsh )
Arizona -- Yuma ( fast )
Arizona -- Yuma Proving Ground ( fast )
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Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )

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Numerous numbering irregularities.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
639929322 ( OCLC )
ocn639929322

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sidewinder (Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz.)

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Digital Military Collection

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U.S. ARMY YUMA PROVING GROUND, YUMA, ARIZONA 85365 | VOLUME 65 NO. 12 JUNE 13, 2016 Major archaeology sites protected at proving ground /Page 2 Draftee Remembers 1950s at Yuma Test Station /Page 4 YPG depends on volunteers /Page 11 Y1By Chuck Wullenjohn Geographically speaking, U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground is one of the largest military installations in the entire western world. With a workforce numbering 2400, it boasts a respectable number of workers, too. Most of these employees are civilians, however, with fewer than 175 Soldiers and other uniformed personnel stationed at the proving ground. In the world of formal military colors guards, large installations often have designated personnel this duty on a full time basis to handle the large volume of requests that come in each year. YPG does not have this luxury, however, for everyone is fully employed executing the proving grounds demanding test workload. Nonetheless, a large number the year, both winter and summer, for the YPG color guard to participate in Yuma community events. Because YPG does not enjoy saying no to these requests, arrangements are made whenever possible. How exactly is this done when no formal YPG color guard exists? The answer is that each request is considered and Soldiers from YPGs Airborne Volunteers create YPG color guard on own time By Mark Schauer When Soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan were imperiled by the destructive power of improvised explosive devices, a variant of the armored Stryker combat vehicle sporting a specially-designed blast-diffusing hull saved countless lives. Particularly suited for transporting infantry in urban environments, the Stryker has become popular among Soldiers in the most dangerous and rugged areas overseas, who describe the vehicle as quiet, reliable, and easy to maintain and repair. The vehicles stellar performance is doubtless related to the extensive evaluation it has undergone at Yuma Proving Ground and its three subsidiary test centers since 2002, including a six month stint in the jungles of Suriname in 2008. Recently, a new variant of the vehicle wrapped up a winter of extreme use at U.S. Army Cold Regions Test Center. Boasting an upgraded chassis and drivetrain along with a variety of mechanical, electrical and digital improvements to enhance its performance, the latest Stryker variant was subjected to more than 3,000 miles driving across rugged terrain in extreme cold. It looks like a regular Stryker, but it isnt, said Richard has a larger engine that horsepower and torque. It has a much greater diagnostic capability that integrates subsystems. This gives operators a greater awareness of vehicle SEE COLOR GUARD page 7A color guard made up of volunteer Soldiers from YPGs Airborne Test Force played a prominent role in two Yuma community Memorial Day remembrance ceremonies last month. Aside from giving up part of their holiday, the Soldiers practiced for hours to ensure they presented a sharp, professional appearance. From left to right: Staff Sgt. Nathan P. Newey, Staff Sgt. Jesse C. Robbins, Staff Sgt. Cliff M. Warner, and Staff Sgt. Richard Gilmore. Alaska extreme cold challenges Stryker vehicle SEE STRYKER page 8

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2 JUNE 13, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY2 THEOUTPOST News may be submitted to: The Editor, Outpost, Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, AZ, 85365. Phone: (928) 328 or DSN 899. Visit our website at: www.yuma.army.mil or email to: mark.a.schauer.civ@mail.milCommander: Col. Randy Murray Public Affairs Ofcer: Chuck Wullenjohn Public Affairs Specialist/Editor: Mark Schauer Technical Editor, Cold Regions Test Center: Clara Zachgo Marketing Specialist: Teri Womack Visual Information Manager: Riley Williams The Outpost is an unofcial publication authorized under provisions of AR 360. The Outpost is published every two weeks by the Public Affairs Ofce, Yuma Proving Ground. Views and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Army. This newspaper uses material credited to ATEC and ARNEWS. While contributions are solicited, the PAO reserves the right to edit all submitted materials and make corrections, changes or deletions to conform with the policy of this newspaper. Major archaeology sites protected at proving ground PHOTO BY MARK SCHA UER Coming in various shapes, sizes, and depths, some of the natural water tanks within this undulating volcanic rock have impressive stone formations rising from the center of the ponds.PHOTO BY MARK SCHA UERAndy Laurenzi, southwest eld representative of Archaeology Southwest, views a petroglyph-inscribed canyon wall. This is one of the most signicant archaeological sites in Arizona, he said. The military has done a great job of stewardship here by recognizing the importance of White Tanks and others like it.

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THE OUTPOST JUNE 13, 2016 3Y3By Mark Schauer As a military installation, U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground has a proud history dating back to the 1940s. Part of Gen. George S. Pattons Desert Training Center/CaliforniaArizona Maneuver Area during World War II, 20 divisions of men trained here for combat, and ten of these liberated Nazi concentration camps in Europe. From the 1950s forward, the proving ground has tested virtually every piece of equipment in the ground combat arsenal for the most impressive military in world history. Technologies like the global positioning satellite (GPS) system were pioneered here, and today cutting edge commodities like unmanned aerial systems are put through their paces prior to being But the installation, larger than the state of Rhode Island is also home to history that is far more ancient. A crossroads for native people for at least seven thousand years, there sites within the modern boundaries of YPG. The stewardship of these irreplaceable sites is a high YPG priority, with the proving ground performing painstaking ground surveys of between 12,000 and 15,000 acres annually. Some of the sites are isolated: vestigial remnants of ancient trails with the occasional arrowhead or potshard strewn on the ground. Others are awe inducing: White Tanks is a canyon studded with natural rock cisterns that retain rainwater year-round. Some crevices within this undulating volcanic rock have impressive stone formations rising from the center of the ponds. The water itself may not be palatable by modern civilizations standards: it is still and brackish, of algae across the top. Bees hover near the water, their low drone one of the most audible sounds in the silent canyon. But to a parched desert traveler of hunter-gatherer times the water was life-saving. Across the millennia, passers-through decorated the canyon walls with hundreds of intricate petroglyphs that remain to this day, a faded but stirring testimony to the importance of this natural wonder to unknown numbers of travelers. archaeological sites in Arizona, said Andy Laurenzi, southwest dedicated to exploring and protecting the places of the past throughout the American Southwest. You have this relatively undisturbed landscape with quite a concentration of petroglyphs and indications of human occupation similar places along major river systems, but not very often in arid area is its association with Malcolm Rogers, one of the pioneering archaeologists in the Southwest: Remnants of his camps in the White Tanks are present today. Along the top of the canyon are small caves, some of which have ancient pot sherds and other artifacts, all suggesting human habitation. People were living here, said Laurenzi. Maybe not year-round, but certainly for sizable periods of time. If youre going to go to the trouble of carrying in pottery, it suggests you have plans to stay awhile. Despite the fact that trespassing on military land is both unsafe and a violation of federal law, people still occasionally slip in to White Tanks and other cultural sites intending to loot or vandalize. Though site surveys over the past two decades show the site is relatively unchanged, YPG personnel want to be proactive in preserving the site for generations to come. In addition to upgrading gates, the likeliest long-term solution is a site stewardship program comprised of YPG employees willing to volunteer their weekend time for periodic site inspections. Part of our job is advocating for the preservation of cultural resources, said Laurenzi. The military has done a great job of stewardship here by recognizing the importance of White Tanks and others like it. The designation of White Tanks Management area by YPG helps minimize intrusions, and thats good news.Major archaeology sites protected at proving ground PHOTO BY MARK SCHA UER Trespassing on military land is both unsafe and a violation of federal law, and paths to White Tanks are exceptionally rugged even for the best four-wheel drive vehicles. The area is surrounded by signs and gates, but unscrupulous people still occasionally slip in intending to loot or vandalize. This aweinducing canyon is studded with natural rock cisterns that retain rainwater year-round, a life-saving feature to parched desert travelers of hunter-gatherer times. Also found throughout the site are petroglyph-laden rocks.PHOTO BY MARK SCHA UER

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4 JUNE 13, 2016 THE OUTPOSTwas proof that I was related to Anna Rosenberg, he said. Arriving at Yuma Test Station was another culture shock, though in a different way. The test station was an informal place, he said. You did things you never would have done at Fort Sill or elsewhere in the Army. Everyone was Rosenbergs primary job at Yuma Test Station was to reimburse incoming test teams for their travel mileage and per diems. The typical rate was 6 cents per mile and the per diem was calculated in quarter days. to do with accounting or auditing, the things I had been trained to perform, he said. The test teams traveled all kinds of ways, but the mileage and rate of pay was calculated by using railroad mileage tables. The only time I ever saw them was when they came to collect their money. Yet Rosenberg didnt lack for things to do. He recalled that testing only occurred during the hottest summer months, leaving the post a relaxed duty station the remainder of the year. During his stay, he acted in a lavish production of Moss Harts Broadway play Light Up the Sky at the posts outdoor theater and hitchhiked to Los Angeles as often as possible on weekends. Like many of his fellow Soldiers, he also spent time at the post recreation center, located in the main post building that later served as commissary. During Rosenbergs tenure, a contest was held to name the building, with a suitcase, sports shirt and pair of pants as prizes. I submitted several names and thought the winning entry, the Test Rest, was the worst of them, Rosenberg said with a laugh. Nonetheless, he won, and a reference to him in an issue of the post newspaper, then called The Sidewinder, included Test Rest as his nickname. The prizes for his winning entry were donated and presented by noted Yuma department By Mark Schauer The median age in the United States is 37 years, which means the last time retired lawyer Herbert Rosenberg set foot on what became YPG was 25 years before half the population had been born. The year was 1954: Dwight Eisenhower was president, Rear Marilyn Monroe was a popular idol. The population of Yuma numbered 15,000. The memories came Rosenberg when he approached the proving grounds main gate for the There was a curve on the highway coming in we called the Coca Cola curve, he recalled. A Coca-Cola truck had overturned on it not long before I arrived. Many of the buildings of the era still stand, albeit remodeled and with different uses. The barracks Rosenberg once slept in still exists as Cantonment Area. The dining hall, which no longer stands, was a short walk away. Some guys wouldnt walk to the dining hall, they had to drive, Rosenberg said with a smile. These were Californians who didnt know how to walk. The regular Army of that time was quite different before becoming an all-volunteer force in the early 1970s. Young men who werent in college were eligible to be drafted, a position in which Rosenberg found himself after earning his Bachelors Degree in Business Administration in 1952. With the Korean War still in progress, he was sent to basic training at Fort Sill, Okla. in December of that year. At that time, the Undersecretary of the Army was Anna Rosenberg, Undersecretary Rosenberg, not related to Pvt. Rosenberg, was a human resources expert whose World War II-era manpower recommendations had earned her the Presidential Medal of Freedom. She had, however, been branded a communist sympathizer by Sen. Joseph McCarthy in an effort to derail her nomination to the position in 1950. The attempt failed, but McCarthys smear campaign had tarnished her. Also, the presence of a Jewish woman in the position was not popular with some in the Army. At Fort Sill, Rosenberg wasnt as common a name as in other parts of the country, said Rosenberg. They were convinced we had to be related, and they despised her. I had a rough time. His degree in business administration resulted in his being professional personnel, a category where orders were sent directly from Washington, DC. When he graduated from basic training, Rosenberg was the only individual from his group assigned to Yuma Test Station. half the people in the battalion it Y4 Draftee Remembers 1950s at Yuma Test Station PHOTO BY MARK SCHA UER Rosenberg returned to YPG 56 years after serving here, accompanied by wife Janet. Here, the couple looks at a vintage overhead photo of Yuma Test Station as he remembered it at the YPG Heritage Center as curator Bill Heidner looks on. Reds Bird Cage SaloonLocated in the heart of Historic Downtown Yuma231 Main St. 928-783-1050Mon-Fri 9am 2:30am Open Sat & Sun 6am Come And Join Us!

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THE OUTPOST JUNE 13, 2016 5was proof that I was related to Anna Rosenberg, he said. Arriving at Yuma Test Station was another culture shock, though in a different way. The test station was an informal place, he said. You did things you never would have done at Fort Sill or elsewhere in the Army. Everyone was Rosenbergs primary job at Yuma Test Station was to reimburse incoming test teams for their travel mileage and per diems. The typical rate was 6 cents per mile and the per diem was calculated in quarter days. to do with accounting or auditing, the things I had been trained to perform, he said. The test teams traveled all kinds of ways, but the mileage and rate of pay was calculated by using railroad mileage tables. The only time I ever saw them was when they came to collect their money. Yet Rosenberg didnt lack for things to do. He recalled that testing only occurred during the hottest summer months, leaving the post a relaxed duty station the remainder of the year. During his stay, he acted in a lavish production of Moss Harts Broadway play Light Up the Sky at the posts outdoor theater and hitchhiked to Los Angeles as often as possible on weekends. Like many of his fellow Soldiers, he also spent time at the post recreation center, located in the main post building that later served as commissary. During Rosenbergs tenure, a contest was held to name the building, with a suitcase, sports shirt and pair of pants as prizes. I submitted several names and thought the winning entry, the Test Rest, was the worst of them, Rosenberg said with a laugh. Nonetheless, he won, and a reference to him in an issue of the post newspaper, then called The Sidewinder, included Test Rest as his nickname. The prizes for his winning entry were donated and presented by noted Yuma department store owner and state senator Harold G. Giss, who later became majority leader. I was aware that Giss was a Yuma, but I didnt know the details of his impressive political career, said Rosenberg. A number of his buddies went on to distinguished careers in the civilian world. One, Paul Caponigro, became a noted landscape photographer. photographer who won an Army award while we were at Yuma Test Station, Rosenberg said. He gave His work sells for big bucks now. Though Rosenberg enjoyed his time at Yuma Test Station, he wanted to return to civilian life. When the Korean War ended, the Army allowed draftees to leave a two year term up to three months early, Rosenberg recalled. I took them up on it. I would have been promoted to sergeant in another week, but it was okay. was a whirlwind, though. My most eventful day occurred in my last week, Rosenberg said. In the morning, I was a witness in a divorce case in town, at noon I had to talk myself out of a court-martial for being away without leave and at 1700 hours I was best man at a wedding at the post chapel. The groom was Rosenbergs buddy Bill Kimball, who was marrying Jean The marriage was not only a major event on a post that experienced few weddings but had great longevity: Rosenberg and his wife were surprise guests at the Kimballs 50th wedding anniversary in 2004. Back in the civilian world, Rosenberg graduated from Columbia Law School and practiced law until retiring in 1999. He married his wife, Janet, in 1962, and they had two children. Though he has led an eventful life, Rosenberg said the experience of serving with a diverse group of Soldiers at Yuma Test Station was valuable to his personal development. I loved it there. I had come from a very religious Eastern European family and my whole world had been New York, Rosenberg said. For me, serving at Yuma Test Station was an extraordinary learning experience. I grew up there. Y5 Draftee Remembers 1950s at Yuma Test Station Herb Rosenberg came to Yuma Test Station in 1952 after being drafted during the Korean War. For me, serving at Yuma Test Station was an extraordinary learning experience, he said. I grew up there.LOANED PHOTO

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6 JUNE 13, 2016 THE OUTPOST Y6COLOR GUARD Next Outpost deadline is noon June 16thSexual Assault Hotline: 920-3104Report Domestic Violence: 328-2720 VIEWPOINTSThe weather is heating up in Yuma!Do you prefer an extremely hot or extremely cold environment?Kelly York, Property Book Ofcer: After spending a few months in Normandy in the military where the temperature was 20 to 30 degrees below zero and with the 10th Mountain Division in Fort Drum, New York, this warmer weather is the nicest weather to have. I can deal with the hot weather here much better than the cold weather anywhere else.Denys Jarvis-McKee, Budget Analyst: Having lived in both climates, including Germany and Rock Island, Illinois, I say living in the heat is far better than the cold. Cold brings snow and ice, and I hate having to scrape car windows and shovel sidewalks and driveways! By David J. Horn Our kids. They do the darndest things. When theyre born, you count all their toes and hope that theyre healthy. When theyre toddlers, you hope theyll walk and talk. When they start day care, you hope that theyll get along with others. When they start school, you hope theyll make friends and get good grades. When theyre young teenagers, you hope that they stay off drugs and out of jail. When theyre old teenagers, you hope that they can move out of your house and make it in college. And when they graduate from college, you hope that they your house. Over the years youve celebrated their victories, and when theyve struggled, youve hurt more than they will ever know. And in the blink of an eye theyre all grown up. When they get out on their own, youre now in the background with they make their own choices theyll make the right ones based on that foundation that you worked so hard to lay down. And when they do make those choices, you have to let them live their own lives. I raised my daughter Sarah up in Minnesota. I just got back from a trip up to the Midwest, where I watched her get her college diploma from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. I am so proud that she landed a great job to launch her real career. I got to see her new apartment, and meet her newroommate. Since Ive been living here in Yuma, I hadnt spent much time with Sarah years of college. So on that recent visit, I had to be tolerant and accepting as I learned all over again about the true person who she was inside, including the new choices she was now making in her life. When it was time, she asked me to sit on her sofa in preparation for the big announcement she was waiting to make. Even though I tried to prepare myself, it still rocked me to my core when she said, DadI have to tell you thatIve starting rooting for the Green Bay Packers.Ron Basolet, Supply Technician: I like the heat and enjoy it much better being in a hot environment versus being in a cold environment. Ive been in an extremely cold places when I was in the Marine Corps, such as Norway and Japan. I lived in New York growing up, so being in such a cold environment was extremely intolerable especially in the winter time. Since being in Yuma, Ive welcomed the heat with open arms. SHOOTING THE BREEZEKids do the darndest things... 93645 Catch the WAVE & $ AVE

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THE OUTPOST JUNE 13, 2016 7Test Force, Health Clinic and other organizations volunteer whenever possible. It doesnt mean light duty, though, for they have to practice as a group on their own time to develop the crisp precision expected of a military color guard. In the most recent case, two commemoration ceremonies that occurred in downtown Yuma early this past Memorial Day, the four-person color guard appeared on a holiday, requiring each individual to give up what would otherwise have been private time. Not only that, but the members of the color guard practiced for hours after their normal work day in the weeks leading up to the holiday. Soldiers from the Airborne Test Force have most often volunteered to be on the color guard and they are only 17 in number, said YPG Command Sgt. Maj. Sean Ward. Sometimes requests the work schedule or come in too late, but theyre enthusiastic and do whatever they can to help. Ward says Soldiers are happy to take part, even when personal part in the color guard represents something bigger than themselves and they feel it is part of their duty, he explained. But YPGs Soldiers volunteer for more than just the color guard. YPG participates in numerous events in the Yuma community each year, from displaying equipment and photo displays to marching in parades and visiting school classrooms. When Ward asks for two or three Soldiers to march in a local parade, such as the annual Veterans Day or Silver Spur Rodeo parades, seven or eight people typically come forward. Staff Sgt. Richard Gilmore was one of the color guard volunteers this past Memorial Day and said he was happy to participate in tribute to his grandfather who served during World War II and as a remembrance of all Soldiers who have fallen in defense of the nation. The others enjoy being here to pay this same respect to the fallen, too, he said. The pool of Soldiers at YPG is relatively small, and for guys to have a full time job and take the time to do this is awesome, commented Ward. Y7 CUSTOMER SERVICE IS MY #1 PRIORITY rfnttbt rffntbrfntbt btff fffft ttbtbbtbtftftt bfbtft fttttft Call me today for a FREE Comparative Market Analysis, or with any of your real estate questions or needs!btb w94465 COLOR GUARDFROM PAGE 1 Kids do the darndest things...

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8 JUNE 13, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY8 health and potentially improves situational awareness during the actual mission in the vehicle. In the worlds most frigid environments, cold starts can be harrowing even for the most rudimentary vehicles. For a complex system like the Stryker, every components ability to function in extreme cold is crucially important, and was subjected to keen evaluation at CRTC in temperatures far below freezing. Like automotive trends in general, we have much greater reliance on computer systems in these vehicles, said Reiser. Those computer systems and sub-systems integrated into the hull depend on a great deal of computer software and hardware. Though a vehicles performance characteristics are similar in cold temperature can degrade performance of any number of a vehicles components. Stopping distance and acceleration shouldnt change profoundly in this environment, explained Reiser. The real issues tend to be related to rapid temperature differentials. Each subzero temperature threshold tends to Given this, the testers went to great lengths to test in potential failure conditions. For example, after a long drive on the range the day before a particularly nasty drop in temperature is forecasted, the testers used fans connected to long tubes snaking into the engine compartment and other vital areas of the vehicle to blow frigid air onto the components overnight. This enabled the team to record the equivalent of cold chamber test activity in the natural environment. We adjust to capture things and be ready for those colder temperatures on short notice, said Reiser. Its a small crew and its easy to make STR YKERFROM PAGE 1PHOTO BY MARK SCHA UER Boasting an upgraded chassis and drivetrain along with a variety of mechanical, electrical and digital improvements to enhance its performance, the latest Stryker variant was subjected to more than 3,000 miles driving across rugged terrain in extreme cold. Cross country miles accumulate slowly in this environment, said Reiser. PHOTO BY MARK SCHA UER A new variant of the Stryker Combat Vehicle underwent a winter of extreme use at U .S. Army Cold Regions Test Center earlier this year. It looks like a regular Stryker, but it isnt, said Richard Reiser, test ofcer. It has a larger engine that signicantly increases horsepower and torque.

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THE OUTPOST JUNE 13, 2016 9take advantage. Throughout the test, the Army evaluators utilized the same vehicle that had the previous summer been subjected to punishing hot weather testing at Yuma Test Center, Arizona. CRTC personnel travelled to Yuma to take part in the testing and instrumented the vehicle in a both climates. It provides not only continuity in the instrumentation process, but helped our technician get it done quicker while supporting Yumas effort as well, said Reiser. The test was more than just endless driving. The performance of every special feature the vehicle boasts, from its communications suite to adjusts tire pressure as the vehicle is in motion, was scrutinized in subtests across the winter. Cross country miles accumulate slowly in this environment, said Reiser. We didnt have consistently cold weather, so we were able to move what sub-test activity we were doing based on its environmental relevance. If it is something thats not so much impacted by extreme cold, we moved that to the less-cold times. The Stryker also lent itself to ingress and egress testing with the participation of Soldiers from Fort Wainwrights 25th Infantry Division who were assisting in a concurrent test. The Soldiers entered and exited all hatches of the vehicle wearing the full complement of armor and Arctic battle dress, ensuring everything in the vehicle could be touched and reached without snagging their bulky gear. It was great coordination between the two tests to pick the appropriate miserable day to get the Soldiers to do some limited ingress-egress testing, said Reiser. When this have the new body armor, well already know it isnt an issue for ingress and egress. The multi-month test was completed ahead of schedule and under budget, which Reiser attributes self-contained six-person crew. The drivers, for instance, were from CRTCs maintenance shop, and were able to troubleshoot and repair problems that cropped up without lengthy downtime at a maintenance shop many miles from the test range. We were able to eliminate delay times when we went into maintenance because maintenance was right here, said Reiser. If we had a vehicle issue, they just changed hats and researched from a different vantage point what they had to do to solve the problem, which was a huge cost savings. In todays world, anything we can do to trim costs and maintain the quality of the end product is what matters, said Reiser. Im very, very proud of the crew for stepping up to the plate. Y9 PHOTO BY SEB ASTIAN SAARLOOS The crew adds chains to the Strykers tires prior to a run in brutally cold and icy conditions. The multi-month test was completed ahead of schedule and under budget, which Reiser attributes to the exibility of the rugged, self-contained six-person crew. PHOTO BY MARK SCHA UER After a long drive on the range the day before a signicant drop in temperature is forecasted, the testers used fans connected to long tubes snaking into the engine compartment and other vital areas of the vehicle to blow frigid air onto the components overnight. This enabled the team to record the equivalent of cold chamber test activity in the natural environment.

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10 JUNE 13, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY10 www.primecareyuma.com(928) 341-4563 90880

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THE OUTPOST JUNE 13, 2016 11Y11 T OP LEFT : YPG depends on volunteers for things like youth sport programs and support for the Heritage Center museum, and recognized the dedicated efforts of these individuals in a ceremony in late May. ABOVE: The time donated by YPG volunteers was worth more than $60,000, and YPG Volunteer of the Year Vince Lacey (center) was responsible for more than $35,000 of time given in support of the Heritage Center. LEFT : May is Asian Pacic Islander month, and YPG Soldiers and personnel celebrated with a food tasting at the Michaels Military Housing Ofce late in the month. The menu included favorites like kimchi, japche, wonton soup, and roast pork, and was enjoyed by all. BOTTOM LEFT : Late May was also graduation season, and YPG commander Col. Randy Murray delivered the commencement address to 48 graduating seniors at Harvest Preparatory Academy. BELOW: Welcomed to the podium by school director Dr. Mario Ybarra, Murrays rousing speech gave graduates practical wisdom on success in life. Do not chase after money, but focus on your purpose, because your gifts and talents will make room for you, he said. I certainly have found this to be true with my life.YPG Faces and Places PHOTOS BY MARK SCHA UER

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12 JUNE 13, 2016 THE OUTPOST Y12 TLC MANAGEMENT Themis & Paul Cavanagh928.726.5557670 E 32nd St, Ste 9WWW.TLCMANAGEMENT.NETFind the Rental Home YOU Deserve AS A VETERAN,PAUL UNDERST ANDS THE NEEDS OF RELOCA TING MILIT ARY F AMILIES AND IS DEDICA TED TO ASSISTING ALL F AMILIES IN LOCA TING THEIR NEXT RENT AL HOME. HE IS ALSO A RETIRED PEACE OFFICER WHO IS VERY SENSITIVE TO THE PARTICULAR NEEDS OF PLACING LA W ENFORCEMENT AND THEIR F AMILIES. RESPONSIVE CONCERNED RELIABLE HERE FOR YOU! CHAPLAINS CORNERWhat do we remember?Submitted by Chaplain (Maj.) Steven D. SmithAfter the tears, the only thing a person can do is remember. When the war is over, the remembering continues. Somehow, the memories give life, as if remembrance is a form of resurrection. Memory does bring life. Just recently we celebrated Memorial Day. I remember as a child looking forward to Memorial Day weekend because it marked the swimming pools and Kings Island opened up in Cincinnati, Ohio. We go through life remembering all the things that make life so special. Right at this very moment, you are doing just that, going through your thoughts. You are remembering. You are thinking back through your life. Think about that word, remember. To re-member is to bring back together that which has been dismemberedto put the pieces together again. To re-member is also to re-unite one who has been separatedto bring them back into membership, into community. The Hebrew word for remember adds to our understanding: Its ancient root means, to mark so as to be recognized. In other words, to be remembered is to be made known. When someone mentioned the name of a dead person, that persons being became real in that moment. What a sacred thing it is to remember the fallen Soldiernot because all Soldiers are necessarily heroes, not because all who give their lives die for a good cause, but because in handling the memory of God-given lives, we participate with God in the healing of the world. To re-member is to put the broken pieces back together, to make members again of those who were missing. Remembrance is resurrection! Remembering the Soldiers of any war -friends and enemies alike -calling out their names, singing their songs, or just thinking about the fact that they fought -does make again. The voices of the dead cry out to us for peace. What do you remember? Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in our nations service. Lets not forget to remember that freedom isnt free, it was paid with a high price. Please come and join the Oasis (Post) Chapel congregations: Catholic services at 0930 Sunday; Protestant services at 1100. Its a shorter drive! Recently, everyone has been working to bring their HAZCON programs into compliance with the newer Global Harmonized System (GHS). From the GHS training you completed in December 2013, you remember that the next major milestone is June 1, 2016. Employers must update alternative workplace labeling and hazard communication program as necessary, and provide additional employee training on hazards. Heres what this next June 2016 deadline means to Soldiers and civilians at YPG All MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) binders must be relabeled SDS (Safety Data Sheets). ALL MSDSs in binders must be replaced with safety data sheets (SDS). Obtain updated SDSs for all items from the vendors of the material. Train your employees on the new labeling and SDS requirements. Provide basic GHS training to new employees who never received the initial 2013 training. Submitted by Paul J. Kilanski Family Advocacy Program Manager Stress affects everyone at times handle. Hopefully, this article will help you understand what causes stress and how to best manage it together. Stress is a reaction to demands that feel overwhelming. Stress can cause unpleasant feelings. When stressed, you may feel tense, insecure or irritable. You may feel fearful or powerless. You may also have physical reactions to stress such as headaches, upset stomach or back pains. People under stress may see themselves as less capable and overwhelmed. Stress can make it hard to do well in life and in relationships. In a relationship, one persons stress affects both partners. Stress can be work problems or illness. But stress can also come from positive life experiences such as getting married or getting a promotion at work. Stress causes you to be different from usual. Some changes caused by stress are: a change in mood from being comfortable to being upset or very quiet, a switch from solving problems to constant complaining, a shift from active to being tired and sleepy, less interest in interactions with your partner or feeling bad about oneself. Stress can cause partners to turn against each other. Partners can get angry with each other about small issues. You may criticize and You may stop discussing issues and solving problems together. You may avoid each other and feel apart and alone. Stress can be outside or inside the relationship. Outside stress can be about work, family, money, health or legal problems. Long absences (such as travel for work or military service) can also create stress. Inside stress can be about one partner not feeling respected or appreciated. Some couples experience stress if there is not enough love and intimacy. Sometimes the cause of the stress is not clear to the person who feels it. Help reduce the stress! Declare the stress as OUR stress, even if it is only one of you who is stressed. Listen carefully and allow your partner to vent their feelings. Be supportive and encouraging. Tell your partner that they are loved. Reassure your partner that this stress is temporary and that you can overcome it as a team. Strengthen yourselves for future stress. Practice talking and solving problems together. Share physical activities. Dance, hike or take a bike ride. Being active Be playful and funny. Laughter reduces stress. Support each other in healthy eating, getting enough sleep and taking time for relaxation. Learn from past experiences. If you did well with stress, build on your successes. If you had a hard time, try to problem solve what you can do differently the next time. Be appreciative. Show affection. People who feel valued and loved are better able to handle stress. Managing stress in a relationship

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THE OUTPOST JUNE 13, 2016 13Y13 SAFETY CORNERHazard communication updates dueRecently, everyone has been working to bring their HAZCON programs into compliance with the newer Global Harmonized System (GHS). From the GHS training you completed in December 2013, you remember that the next major milestone is June 1, 2016. Employers must update alternative workplace labeling and hazard communication program as necessary, and provide additional employee training on hazards. Heres what this next June 2016 deadline means to Soldiers and civilians at YPG All MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) binders must be relabeled SDS (Safety Data Sheets). ALL MSDSs in binders must be replaced with safety data sheets (SDS). Obtain updated SDSs for all items from the vendors of the material. Train your employees on the new labeling and SDS requirements. Provide basic GHS training to new employees who never received the initial 2013 training. New changes to the Occupational Safety and Health Administrations (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard are bringing the United States into alignment with the Globally Harmonized System of Chemicals (GHS), further improving safety and health protections for Americas workers. Building on the success of OSHAs current Hazard Communication Standard, the GHS is expected to prevent injuries and illnesses, save lives and improve trade conditions for chemical manufacturers. The Hazard Communication Standard of 1983 gave the workers the right to know, but the new Globally Harmonized System gives workers the right to understand. The new standard covers over 43 million workers who produce or handle hazardous chemicals in is expected to prevent over 500 workplace injuries and illnesses and 43 fatalities annually. Major changes to the hazard communication standard1. Hazard Chemical manufacturers and importers are required to determine the hazards of the chemicals they produce under the new, updated standard address health and physical of chemical mixtures.2. Chemical manufacturers and importers must provide a label that includes a signal word, pictogram, hazard statement, and precautionary statement for each hazard class and category. 3. The new format sections, ensuring consistency in presentation of important protection information.4. To facilitate understanding of the new system, the new standard requires that workers be trained by December 1, 2013 on the new label elements and safety data sheet format, in addition to the current training requirements.If you need any assistance with acquiring SDSs or training on the new GHS standard, please contact the Safety Ofce. The Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center has a wealth of information on GHS at http://safety.army.mil/ON-DUTY/Workplace/GloballyHarmonizedSystem(GHS).aspx. there is not enough love and intimacy. Sometimes the cause of the stress is not clear to the person who feels it. Help reduce the stress! Declare the stress as OUR stress, even if it is only one of you who is stressed. Listen carefully and allow your partner to vent their feelings. Be supportive and encouraging. Tell your partner that they are loved. Reassure your partner that this stress is temporary and that you can overcome it as a team. Strengthen yourselves for future stress. Practice talking and solving problems together. Share physical activities. Dance, hike or take a bike ride. Being active Be playful and funny. Laughter reduces stress. Support each other in healthy eating, getting enough sleep and taking time for relaxation. Learn from past experiences. If you did well with stress, build on your successes. If you had a hard time, try to problem solve what you can do differently the next time. Be appreciative. Show affection. People who feel valued and loved are better able to handle stress. Managing stress in a relationship

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THE OUTPOST JUNE 13, 2016 15Y15 FREE Estimates N N N N N N O O O O O O O W W W W W W CLASSIFIEDS To place your ad call 928-783-4433

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