Citation
The outpost

Material Information

Title:
The outpost
Uniform Title:
Outpost (Yuma, Ariz.)
Creator:
Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) -- Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Yuma, AZ
Publisher:
U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, Public Affairs Office
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Biweekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 43 cm

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases -- Newspapers -- Arizona -- Yuma ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Newspapers -- Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) ( lcsh )
Arizona -- Yuma ( fast )
Arizona -- Yuma Proving Ground ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )

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Numbering Peculiarities:
Numerous numbering irregularities.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
639929322 ( OCLC )
ocn639929322

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sidewinder (Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz.)

UFDC Membership

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Digital Military Collection

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Full Text

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U.S. ARMY YUMA PROVING GROUND, YUMA, ARIZONA 85365 | VOLUME 65 NO. 9 MA Y 2, 2016 Potential dangers require extensive safety program /Page 4 Y1By Chuck Wullenjohn No group in society is safe no race, no religion, no economic group. Age plays no role. And it has been a societal problem since the dawn of civilization. Were talking about sexual assault, which is being highlighted nationally this month. Sexual assault is different from nearly every other type of crime, for only one of every three such incidents are reported to law enforcement. There has long been a stigma associated with sexual assault that prevented victims from speaking out. This stigma has somewhat gone away, said Diane Umphress, executive director of family advocacy center Amberlys Place, to a large group gathered this morning at Yuma Proving Ground. There is much more compassion for sexual assault victims than just a few years ago. According to Umphress, when sexual assault cases were reported in the past, much of the responsibility was placed on the victim. Intrusive questions were frequently asked: Did you say no? Did they hear you say no? What were you wearing? Did you do something to lure the person? Did you kiss the person? Tell me how youre not responsible? By Mark Schauer Deployed Soldiers are constantly loaded down with gear, but nowhere more so than when operating in a cold weather environment. In addition to their conventional weapons, Soldiers need to utilize heavy equipment such as space heaters, cooking stoves, fuel, and heavy duty thermal tents in order to survive in brutal cold. To effectively conduct dismounted operations in the these environments, a sled is the only practical means of transporting all of this equipment, and it needs to be rugged enough to carry not only the aforementioned items, but even a wounded Soldier across many miles of the worlds most dangerous and unforgiving terrain. Enter the Ahkio sled, a venerable The heartbreak of sexual assault brought to lifeSled to transport equipment tested in Alaskan coldTo effectively conduct dismounted operations in a cold environment, a sled is the only practical means of transporting all the equipment Soldiers need. The Ahkio sled Soldiers in this brutal environment depend on was recently put through its paces at U.S. Army Cold Regions Test Center across many miles of the worlds most dangerous and unforgiving terrain. (PHOTO BY SEBASTIAN SAARLOOS) SEE HEARTBREAK page 3 SEE SLED page 2Earth Day celebrated at YPG /Page 6 YPG recognizes Military Children /Page 7

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2 MA Y 2, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY2 piece of Army cold weather gear which was recently subjected to two weeks of punishing use by testers at U.S. Army Cold Regions Test Center (CRTC) with participation from Soldiers stationed at Fort Wainwright, Alaska. It is a system you use to move big loads across snow and arctic terrains in all seasons, said Isaac the test was to accumulate 45 miles on each sled, dragging it in the full spectrum of terrain encountered in the cold weather environment. Regardless of where you are in cold regions you will always encounter snowless terrain, so we really needed to see how the sled held up: One day we dragged it over seven miles of rocks. Over the course of the evaluation, testers were interested not only in the Ahkios durability across punishing terrain, but in how easily it could be packed in extreme cold and how much weight it could support. The days were long and exhausting, but testers tried to make them as fun as possible. For example, one day Soldiers and testers trekked to two stunning glaciers in the area around CRTCs ranges. That was in part a motivational thing for the Soldiers, said Howell. We needed deep snow, and thats where the deep snow was. Seeing something cool was the carrot at the end of the stick: the glaciers themselves were not a component of the test. In a typical squad of Soldiers the sled while others walk ahead in snow shoes to break a trail. On this day, four feet of virgin snow stood between the Soldiers and test team and their objective, seven miles away. That day was pretty daunting. The test team functioned as trailbreakers because we didnt have a full group of 10 Soldiers. Howell walked in the center, while two men behind him would put one of their steps within one of his footprints, ensuring the thinner trail the sled would be traversing would be the most densely packed. is cognizant of the Ahkios vital importance to cold regions Soldiers in all seasons of the year. It has applicability to the non-cold seasons, he said, It all depends on the terrain. One type of extreme terrain is that is particularly disliked by hikers is muskeg, Arctic bogs that from a distance look like short,grassy plains, but are in reality stagnant pools of waterlogged, spongy vegetation in various states of decomposition. Muskeg is interspersed with stunted trees and concealed ponds of acidic water that can trap unwary animals. I have walked in many different terrain types on this planet, and nothing has been harder than walking in muskeg, said Howell. You have these tussocks that rise two feet above the ground and its nearly impossible to traverse with a load on your back. All told, the Soldiers and test team dragged the sled 52 miles on foot in ten grueling days of evaluations. After each march the Soldiers and on the sleds performance. The test team saved the last day of testing for a destructive test, loading the Ahkio to 350 pounds of weight and dropping it from a forklift raised to different elevations onto its front, back, side, and bottom. 15 feet, the sleds aluminum frame bent at its impact point, but end to a punishing test of one of a cold regions Soldiers most vital accessories. THEOUTPOST News may be submitted to: The Editor, Outpost, Y uma Proving Ground, Y uma, AZ, 85365. Phone: (928) 328 or DSN 899. Visit our website at: www.yuma.army.mil or email to: mark.a.schauer.civ@mail.milCommander: Col. Randy Murray Public Affairs Ofcer: Chuck Wullenjohn Public Affairs Specialist/Editor: Mark Schauer T echnical Editor, Cold Regions T est Center: Clara Zachgo Marketing Specialist: Teri Womack Visual Information Manager: Riley Williams The Outpost is an unofcial publication authorized under provisions of AR 360. The Outpost is published every two weeks by the Public Affairs Ofce, Y uma Proving Ground. Views and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Army. This newspaper uses material credited to ATEC and ARNEWS. While contributions are solicited, the PAO reserves the right to edit all submitted materials and make corrections, changes or deletions to conform with the policy of this newspaper. STEM OutreachWhen more than 350,000 aspiring young scientists and engineers descended upon the USA Science and Engineering Festival in Washington, DC in April, YPG personnel Adam Rinne, Michael Dickerson, Paul Sears, and Iris Espinoza were on hand with a popular hands-on display to inspire the student visitors. YPGs booth featured a high speed camera array that displayed an up-close look at the ight characteristics of projectiles shot from colorful Nerf guns. Below, Dickerson explains to students the concept of projectile instability using a foam round from a Nerf gun. The engineers also discussed in depth YPGs real-world mission testing virtually every piece of equipment in the ground combat arsenal. Above, Rinne shows footage of a YPG artillery test to an interested patron. (US ARMY PHOTOS)SLEDFROM PAGE 1

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THE OUTPOST MA Y 2, 2016 3Y3 TLC MANAGEMENT Themis & Paul Cavanagh928.726.5557670 E 32nd St, Ste 9 WWW.TLCMANAGEMENT.NET Find the Rental Home YOU Deserve AS A VETERAN,PAUL UNDERST ANDS THE NEEDS OF RELOCA TING MILIT ARY F AMILIES AND IS DEDICA TED TO ASSISTING ALL F AMILIES IN LOCA TING THEIR NEXT RENT AL HOME. HE IS ALSO A RETIRED PEACE OFFICER WHO IS VERY SENSITIVE TO THE PARTICULAR NEEDS OF PLACING LA W ENFORCEMENT AND THEIR F AMILIES. RESPONSIVE CONCERNED RELIABLE HERE FOR YOU Law enforcement personnel are well trained today in dealing with these situations and their response is so much different, she said. When they start believing the words told by the victim, and he or she feels that, the walls start tumbling down. The victim provides more information simply because he or she feels believed. Last year, Amberlys Place experienced a 78 percent increase in calls from sexual assault victims in Yuma County. Amberlys Place personnel respond to YPG whenever called for sexual assault or domestic violence cases. Victims are transported to Amberlys Place in downtown Yuma where necessary medical examinations are conducted as well as any interviews. Overnight accommodations are provided at Yumas Safe House or in local motels when necessary. Umphress points out that the problem of sexual assault affects all age groups, noting that the oldest victim to ever use Amberlys Place services was 85 years old. She had been sexually assaulted by a man hired to retrieve Christmas decorations from a storage shed. Dina Mabry, YPGs Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, says a variety of activities are taking place at the proving ground throughout April to raise awareness of the sexual assault problem. Seeing and hearing it from individuals who have experienced the pain of sexual assault brings it to life, she said. Take the message seriously, take it to heart, said Col. Randy Murray, commander, before the YPG group dispersed. HEARTBREAKFROM PAGE 1 Next Outpost deadline is noon May 5thSexual Assault Hotline: 920-3104 Report Domestic Violence: 328-2720 Sexual assault victim Heather Grifth says the pictures of the physical violence -cuts, bruises and black eyes -she endured for several years will always haunt her. She says her abuser is now in jail, but adds that the justice system should have locked him up years ago. YPG commander Col. Randy Murray underscored the urgency of preventing sexual assaults-and reporting them when they occur-in remarks to the audience. Take the message seriously, take it to heart, he said. (PHOTOS BY CHUCK WULLENJOHN)

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4 MA Y 2, 2016 THE OUTPOST By Chuck Wullenjohn An unbelievable quantity of explosives are handled safely by Yuma Proving Ground workers in hundreds of test programs each year. These explosives hurl projectiles dozens of miles downrange and propel missiles at supersonic speeds. But what if something went awry? What if a powder bag functioned prematurely or a missile blew up in its launching pod? These are situations that would cause not just material damage, but could also take a life. Needless to say, the topic of safety is not taken lightly at the proving ground. As one of the largest and busiest test centers in the world, everyone at YPG comes to work with a safety mindset, said Roy Van Why, director of safety for YPG garrison activities. Our intention is to ensure that everyone is sent home safely at the end of each day. When it comes to explosive safety, Durred Francher in YPGs expert, says Van Why. He boasts of explosives and has become a model around the Army of the type should have. Ive been at YPG for eight years and there have been no explosive incidents at all that Im aware of, said Van Why. This and commitment of the people at YPG, but I also give credit to Durred Francher. one strictly for mission activities and another, Van Whys, to cover garrison activities. Mission activities take place on the huge test ranges, as well as at the ammunition magazines and the activities that occur there. Garrison activities include properties owned by the government, such as buildings and roads, and also water treatment facilities, and police and together, said Van Why. We meet frequently and reach out to each other whenever we need to. He points out that all drinking water at the proving ground comes treatment plants located at YPG. We recently spent millions of dollars to upgrade and modernize the plants, he explained. We have expert employees who constantly test and check the water to ensure safety each day. A challenge somewhat unique to YPG is caused by herds of wild burros and horses that call the area home. They frequently wander onto roads, including Highway 95, most often during the early morning or evening hours. They typically migrate many hours each day in search of food and water, and return to the same place at night, where they feel safe. Burros and horses most often travel to the same areas where they have located food or water in the past. There have been quite a few strikes and near misses over the years, said Van Why. Drivers need to keep a close look-out. He says he has experienced encounters with the animals himself. Its terrifying, he said, for burros and horses can do a huge amount of damage to a vehicle, aside from hurting you. Everyone needs to think about this. Signs have been erected along roads in many areas of YPG to Y4 w90757 Catch the WAVE & $ AVE Potential dangers require extensive safety program Garrison Safety Director Ron Van Why oversees all safety programs dealing with YPGs infrastructure, such as buildings and roads, but also much more. He keeps a particularly watchful eye on YPGs population of wild burros and horses, which can become major safety hazards when they cross roadways in search of food or water. (PHOTO BY CHUCK WULLENJOHN)SEE SAFETY page 5

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THE OUTPOST MA Y 2, 2016 5test and check the water to ensure safety each day. A challenge somewhat unique to YPG is caused by herds of wild burros and horses that call the area home. They frequently wander onto roads, including Highway 95, most often during the early morning or evening hours. They typically migrate many hours each day in search of food and water, and return to the same place at night, where they feel safe. Burros and horses most often travel to the same areas where they have located food or water in the past. There have been quite a few strikes and near misses over the years, said Van Why. Drivers need to keep a close look-out. He says he has experienced encounters with the animals himself. Its terrifying, he said, for burros and horses can do a huge amount of damage to a vehicle, aside from hurting you. Everyone needs to think about this. Signs have been erected along roads in many areas of YPG to Y5 ElliottHomes.com ROC #246945 ROC# 244491* Features, amenities & pricing subject to change without notice. Special pricing / special offers cannot be combined. Photos may not represent actual home for sale. 3-5 bedroom solar homes with a wealth of energy-saving, watersaving and money-saving featuresOpen floor plans within city limits, close to MCAS and shoppingPriced from $174,950 to $239,950Call 928-783-1800 or take a drive to 32nd Street and Araby Road. facebook.com/elliotthomesyumaGet moving!Elliott Homes Solar Communities:Araby Crossing NEW PLANS! Araby & 32nd Street 928-783-1800 Las Barrancas 12310 Grand View Drive 928-345-1623 Sunset Terrace Just west of Araby and 26th Street 928-317-9701 M-F 10am-5pm Weekends 11-5pm 928-317-9701 ElliottHomes.com ROC #246945 ROC# 244491* Features, amenities & pricing subject to change without notice. Special pricing / special offers cannot be combined. Photos may not represent actual home for sale. 3-5 bedroom solar homes with a wealth of energy-saving, watersaving and money-saving featuresOpen floor plans within city limits, close to MCAS and shoppingPriced from $174,950 to $239,950Call 928-783-1800 or take a drive to 32nd Street and Araby Road. facebook.com/elliotthomesyumaGet moving!Elliott Homes Solar Communities:Araby Crossing NEW PLANS! Araby & 32nd Street 928-783-1800 Las Barrancas 12310 Grand View Drive 928-345-1623 Sunset Terrace Just west of Araby and 26th Street 928-317-9701 M-F 10am-5pm Weekends 11-5pm ElliottHomes.com ROC #246945 ROC# 244491* Features, amenities & pricing subject to change without notice. Special pricing / special offers cannot be combined. Photos may not represent actual home for sale. 3-5 bedroom solar homes with a wealth of energy-saving, watersaving and money-saving featuresOpen floor plans within city limits, close to MCAS and shoppingPriced from $174,950 to $239,950Call 928-783-1800 or take a drive to 32nd Street and Araby Road. facebook.com/elliotthomesyumaGet moving!Elliott Homes Solar Communities:Araby Crossing NEW PLANS! Araby & 32nd Street 928-783-1800 Las Barrancas 12310 Grand View Drive 928-345-1623 Sunset Terrace Just west of Araby and 26th Street 928-317-9701 M-F 10am-5pm Weekends 11-5pm Elliott Homes Solar Communities:Araby Crossing NEW PLANS! Araby & 32nd Street 928-317-9701 Las Barrancas 12310 Grand View Drive 928-345-1623 Sunset Terrace Just west of Araby and 26th Street 928-317-9701Stop By Our Model Homes Today! M-F 10am-5pm Sat & Sun 11am-5pm SAFETY CORNERKeeping your eyes on the future is your jobFor more information on eye safety, call the YPG Safety Ofce at extension 2660. Remember, NOBOD Y GETS HURT.Nearly one million Americans have lost some degree of their eye sight due to injuries, and more than 700,000 Americans injure their eyes at work each year. In 2012, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported 40% of all non-fatal workplace eye injuries happen in manufacturing, construction, and mining. Workplace eye injuries send 300,000 people to the emergency room nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control. 20,300 workers had on-the-job eye injuries that forced them to take time off work in 2012, which cost an estimated $300 million in medical treatment, workers compensation and loss of productivity. Yet 90 percent of all workplace eye injuries are preventable with proper use of protective eye wear. The typical eye injuries were metal chips, dirt particles, and splinters, or by striking the eye. Chemical burns were second. Potential eye hazards can be found in nearly every industry. Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards require that employers provide workers with suitable eye protection. To be effective in preventing injury, the eyewear must be of the appropriate type for the hazard encountered, If you are required to wear safety glasses, please do so for your own protection. Eye glasses and contacts are not a substitute for safety glasses, splash goggles, or face shields. You only have two eyes: dont give one to the workplace. warn of wildlife crossings. Since burros and horses normally follow paths with which they are familiar, experts can identify areas in which they cross roads. Thats where the warning signs go up, said Van Why. We just dont put up these signs randomly we look for tell-tale paths. He says people sometimes chuckle or laugh when hearing it, but there has not been a day he hasnt wanted to come to work during his eight years at YPG. By far, this is the best place I have ever worked, said Van Why. People care about what they do and I have management support. Plus, theres no better satisfaction than knowing SAFETYFROM PAGE 4

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6 MA Y 2, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY6 By Mark Schauer At Yuma Proving Ground, every day is Earth Day. As a natural laboratory for testing virtually every piece of equipment in the U.S. Armys ground combat arsenal, YPG responsible ecological stewardship. Located within North Americas most diverse desert, the proving ground is home to a vast diversity of wildlife, including Sonoran pronghorn, desert tortoises and one of Arizonas healthiest populations of bighorn sheep. More than a hundred unique bird species pass through or call YPG home, and all are attracted by desert washes, whether wet or dry. The wash is really the focus of the desert ecosystem, said Daniel Steward, wildlife biologist. They only cover one or two percent of the desert surface, but they contain over 90% of the deserts biodiversity. Life goes where water To celebrate Earth Day, YPG school children took a special guided tour of a wash that meanders across the street from the post library, getting an up close and personal look at a rich natural world that exists unseen while they go about their daily activities. The youngsters trooped quietly through the wash, using binoculars to watch a turkey vulture soaring high overhead, a squirrel gathering food, and a variety of vocal birds perched in the washs vegetation. Steward pointed out burrows and animal scat as they went along, and taught the group a few bird calls. Im enjoying it and it looks like the kids are enjoying it, said Carolyn Izaguirre, who teaches Price Elementary School. Weve been watching eaglets grow on an Eagle Cam, so I think theyre really getting into observing and getting hands-on with things. Having learned that trees stabilize a washs channel and help prevent erosion, the students helped plant several mesquite and palo verde seedlings in a spot on the washs bank where tamarisk, an invasive species native to the Middle East, had until recently been growing. Theyre wonderful trees for the Middle East, but here they provide shelter for wildlife and no other resources, said Dr. Laura Merrill, natural resources manager. Insects cant live on them, so birds cant feed on the insects. They compete with native plants for water and accumulate salt in their leaves: when the leaves drop to the ground, it makes the soil so salty that nothing will grow. The new honey mesquite trees were donated by Yumas Greenheart Farms and Merrill is excited about it. Earth Day celebrated at YPG YPG commander Col. Randy Murray (right) kicked off the days activities by holding a talk with participating school children. We were given this Earth and are supposed to take care of it, he said. YPG wildlife biologist Daniel Steward (left) gives Price Elementary School students a guided tour of the rich natural world found in a desert wash as part of the posts Earth Day celebration. The Sonoran Desert is the most diverse desert in North America, he said. (PHOTOS BY MARK SCHA UER) As they quietly trooped through the wash, the students observed a wide variety of desert plants and wildlife, including this turkey vulture.(PHOTO BY MARK HANLEY)SEE EARTH DA Y page 7

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THE OUTPOST MA Y 2, 2016 7Y7 They were grown from local seeds, she said. Its very important to get the same genotype as the area where you are planting: the plants are more likely to survive, and you arent introducing strange trees to the ecosystem. Earth Day event and efforts to into the foreseeable future. Our efforts were focused on the kids to try to develop in them an appreciation for the Earth and how important it is to take care of it so it stays around, said Gordon Rogers, garrison manager. Were going to reduce the amount of invasive species we have at YPG and replace them with native species, starting with todays celebration, added Angelica Bharat, director of public works. It is going to take time for things to grow, but in the long run it will be a better environment. Environmental protection specialist Donnett Brown (standing, right) helps students from YPGs Price Elementary School plant a tree seedling. At least one of the children cant wait for the tree to reach maturity: My favorite thing to do is to climb trees a lot, said Anthony DePriest, rst grader. EARTH DA YFROM PAGE 6 April is the Month of the Military Child, a time to recognize and appreciate military children for their sacrice in supporting their parents wherever in the world they serve. YPGs Child Development Center (CDC) celebrated with a morning of activities that encouraged parents and grandparents to join in the fun. Clockwise from top left: As parents watch, CDC staff lead the children in a celebratory chant of Red, white, and blue, we love you!; YPG commander Col. Randy Murray says hello to young Quinn Underhill, as dad Lt. Sean Underhill of the YPG Police Department looks on; Garrison Manager Gordon Rogers delights in the exuberance of a passing play car motorist; a group of parents gave it their all in a friendly tug-of-war match, but the laughing youngsters prevailed; there were all manner of games and activities, but nothing beats making a perfect bean bag toss as this young contestants reaction shows. (PHOTOS BY MARK SCHA UER) YPG recognizes Military Children

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8 MA Y 2, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY8 Spragues.com (Next to Lowes) Exclusive On New & Used Guns MILITARY/LAW ENFORCEMENT PRICING INDOOR RANGE IS OPEN From OVER 1800 GUNS Gunsmith On Duty $399 Too! VIEWPOINTSYPG personnel arrive at the proving ground from many different locations and walks of life. For this viewpoint, we asked What brought you to YPG?Jorge Barrientos, graphic designer: I grew up in Calexico, graduated from the Art Institute in San Diego, and was seeking employment in the private sector when my career counselor advised me to apply for a job though LinkedIn. I the government so close to home!Malissa Donato, library technician: My husband was transferred from New River, North Carolina to Marine to get back into civil service employment when I applied for this job and got it.Greg Skaggs, energy manager: A 2008 Hyundai Elantra, a promotion, and the desire to move from the east coast to be closer to family in California.

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THE OUTPOST MA Y 2, 2016 9 Y9 Spragues.com (Next to Lowes) Exclusive On New & Used Guns MILITARY/LAW ENFORCEMENT PRICING INDOOR RANGE IS OPEN From OVER 1800 GUNS Gunsmith On Duty $399 Too! By Teri Womack Ive travelled many roads throughout my life and some of them have been under construction. Right now, its the road I drive to work. With over 30 years of driving on U.S. Highway 95 from the Yuma Foothills to Yuma Proving Ground, my car almost knows the way by itself. Like others in the YPG workforce, Ive spent a lot of time going back and forth on that road. If math didnt hate me and I didnt know that engineers would be reading this, roughly 4,600 hours or 192 days). No matter how you count it, its a huge number of miles. A typical drive to work includes inserting my cup of Starbucks Columbia coffee in the cup holder, switching on my favorite tunes, turning on the car and heading east. Its almost a straight shot. With the recent construction, my straight shot to work has now been turned into a curvy path of concrete barriers, changing pavement surfaces and multiple changing speed limit signs. The sign that seems to always catch my attention is the one that states that the current speed limit is 45 mph. Right below that is an electric sign that calculates the current speed you are driving in bright yellow Now, on my daily drive, for competition with that sign. For absolutely no reason whatsoever, I have become single-mindedly determined to hit that 45 mph mark right on the money. Not 44 or 46. 45 right on the mark. Sometimes I am thwarted by a slow moving RV or an 18 wheeler making their way through the tight twists and turns and other times its that darn sign that betrays me by changing at the very last second right as I reach it. Skunked again! I havent hit it yet, but every day, theres always another chance to get it right on my return trip home at the end of the day. Since the construction on Highway 95 is not scheduled to be completed for many months, it looks like Im going to have a lot of chances. The Road Often Travelled Month-long Lean Six Sigma black belt training course concludesMaster Black Belt Tony Gingras of the ammunition management division instructs a four-week Lean Six Sigma (LSS) Black Belt training course in April. The LSS system has positively affected a variety of facets of YPGs workload, from minor projects that simplied the in-processing of new employees to major ones responsible for millions of dollars in cost avoidance. LSS doesnt just save money: it streamlines processes, which translates into more productivity and less hassle. YPG is the only Army location in the continental Western United States that holds this training course, which is open to everyone throughout the Army. If you are interested in taking a LSS Green Belt or Black Belt course at YPG, contact Moises Alvarez at (928) 328-6117.(PHOTO BY MARK SCHA UER)

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10 MA Y 2, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY10 928.210.9575 Rob Turner CUSTOMER SERVICE IS MY #1 PRIORITY rfnr tbbfrfbrr rtffbbr Call me to day for a FREE Comparative Market Analysis, or with any of your real estate questions or needs!b ynhawaiian1@gmail.com Acreage Park Models Business Services Directory Business Opportunities Home Services Directory Air Conditioning Heating Concrete Construction Landscaping Services Movers Painters Pest Control Pool Service Roofers Local Dealers Local Buys Local ServiceCars, Trucks, Boats, RVs, Offroad! Search online. Find your next vehicle. Kick the tires. Drive it home.00084870

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THE OUTPOST MA Y 2, 2016 11Y11 www.primecareyuma.com(928) 341-4563 w88592 928.210.9575 Rob Turner CUSTOMER SERVICE IS MY #1 PRIORITY rfnr tbbfrfbrr rtffbbr Call me to day for a FREE Comparative Market Analysis, or with any of your real estate questions or needs!b ynhawaiian1@gmail.com Local Dealers Local Buys Local ServiceCars, Trucks, Boats, RVs, Offroad! Search online. Find your next vehicle. Kick the tires. Drive it home.00084870 Summer is a wonderful time for outdoor activities with family and friends. For many people, a day at the beach, on the boat, or at a backyard barbecue will include drinking alcoholic beverages. But excessive drinking and summer activities dont mix. Drinking impairs both physical and mental abilities, and it also decreases inhibitionswhich can lead to tragic consequences on the water, on the road, and in the great outdoors. In fact, research shows that up to 70 percent of all water recreation deaths involve the use of alcohol. You might say to yourself, Its just harmless fun. But operating a boat while impaired is just as dangerous, and just as illegal, as drinking while driving a car. In the state of Arizona the legal limit for blood alcohol is .08 in both cases. According to research funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, alcohol may be involved in 60 percent of boating fatalities, including falling overboard. And a boat operator with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) over 0.1 percent (approximately 4 to 5 drinks) is 16 times more likely to be killed in a boating accident than an operator with zero BAC. The summer holidays are some of the most dangerous times of the year to be on the road. When on vacation, drivers may be traveling an unfamiliar route or hauling a boat or camper, with the added distraction of pets and children in the car. Adding alcohol to the mix puts the lives of the driver and everyone in the car, as well as other people on the road, at risk. In Arizona, as in most states the legal limit is still .08. Remember, heat and fatigue are factors that increase the effects of alcohol on your body. Be smart, drive to arrive alive. Summer will end, but consequences can endure You can have fun in the sun and still be safe. Avoiding beverages that cause mental and physical impairment while piloting a boat or motor vehicle is a good place to start. Be smart this summer, think before you drink, and make sure that you and your loved ones will be around to enjoy many summers to come. CHIEFS CORNERSummer FunSubmitted by By D. L. Brown, YPG Chief of Police

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12 MA Y 2, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY12