Citation
The outpost

Material Information

Title:
The outpost
Uniform Title:
Outpost (Yuma, Ariz.)
Creator:
Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) -- Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Yuma, AZ
Publisher:
U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, Public Affairs Office
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Biweekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 43 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases -- Newspapers -- Arizona -- Yuma ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Newspapers -- Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) ( lcsh )
Arizona -- Yuma ( fast )
Arizona -- Yuma Proving Ground ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )

Notes

Numbering Peculiarities:
Numerous numbering irregularities.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
639929322 ( OCLC )
ocn639929322

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sidewinder (Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz.)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

THE OUTPOST MARCH 21, 2016 1Y1 U.S. ARMY YUMA PROVING GROUND, YUMA, ARIZONA 85365 | VOLUME 50 NO. 25 MONDA Y, MARCH 21, 2016ATEC Commanding General makes his rst site visit to CRTC /Page 7 By Mark Schauer Stars shone on U.S. Army Cold Regions Test Center in late February as Army Test and Evaluation Command (ATEC) commander Maj. site visit. Accompanied by Capt. William Viegas and ATEC Command Sgt. Major Andrew Connette and escorted by CRTC commander Lt. Col. Michael Kovacs and technical director Jeff Lispcomb, Karbler made a whirlwind tour of CRTC, visiting test ranges, support shops, and CRTCs automotive test track. I wanted to get a good sense for all that testing involves and all the lessons that testing helps teach us, he said. Although this winter was considered relatively warm by interior Alaska standards, the mercury dropped to -25 degrees Fahrenheit the morning of Karblers visit. I was impressed by the dedication of the workforce here to the mission of making sure the equipment we are going to give our Soldiers is thoroughly and rigorously tested in this very extreme environment, he said. Testing of the Stryker Combat Vehicle and M109A7 Paladin 155 mm Artillery System was in progress as Karbler visited the ranges, and he rode in the former vehicle across some of CRTCs rugged road courses. Its very, very hard to drive something in a conditioning chamber. You can certainly chill it down to a certain temperature, but thats about the extent of it. When you want to put it in operation, put loads on it, and use it in the whole of the environment, it is totally different: a cold chamber has a place in initial testing, but once you put something into operation, you have to take it out into the environment. Though impressed by the scope of testing conducted at CRTC, Karbler had particular kudos for the test centers leadership. The leadership up here is phenomenal, said Karbler. You dont have a happy workforce in an extreme environment like this if you dont believe in what youre doing and if you dont have great leaders who are motivating you every day to do well.ATEC commanding general impressed by CRTC As part of the cold weather effects cold chamber demonstration, Maj. Gen. Daniel Karbler and Command Sgt. Maj. Andrew Connette observed the properties of various materials (here 30 weight motor oil) at room temperature, and then at -50 degrees Fahrenheit. (Photo by Sebastian Saarloos)Local Yuma youth prepare for future careers /Page 4 YPG testing critical to development of GPS /Page 6

PAGE 2

2 MARCH 21, 2016 THE OUTPOSTBy Teri Womack Ruth Krasnosky, YPG Resource Management Director, has a passion career and personal life. Starting out realized that what really piqued her with dollar signs, which caused her to change career paths. Starting as a GS-04 budget clerk, she took advantage of job development programs and night school to earn undergraduate and graduate degrees while juggling a full time job and raising a family. Her across the Department of Defense. She has found it to be an extremely rewarding experience. My job is never boring and provides me the opportunity to learn and grow, she said. As a GS-12, part of her leadership development program included mentorship, which at the time, she this would bring. Having a mentor was one of the greatest experiences in my career, Krasnosky said. It gave me vast experience. This, along with education and service, has been great for me. As a manager, she believes in a strong, team-oriented work culture with employee input on decision-making processes to ensure everyones involvement. I feel that teamwork through sharing of ideas, in workgroups is an effective way to accomplish any task, she said. Its all about working together toward achieving mission success. faced in the resource management policies that must be strictly obeyed, combines with repeated budget cuts, are a constant challenge to do more with less. Krasnosky was born on Yap Island, Micronesia, and moved to New York City with her parents when she was 12 years old and staying until she graduated from high school. She continues to satisfy her passion for wanderlust by taking opportunities to travel to foreign countries as she loves meeting new people and experiencing their cultures. Shes checked quite a few off her bucket list including Germany, Holland, Austria, Mexico, Dominique Republic, Belize, Okinawa, and Seoul Korea. For young folks entering the job market today, Krasnosky advises that earning a college education, a trade or other special skills can provide a competitive edge. She also encourages people to take advantage of development programs New Resource Management Director a believer in teamworkY2 THEOUTPOST News may be submitted to: The Editor, Outpost, Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, AZ, 85365. Phone: (928) 328/6189 or DSN 899. Visit our website at: www.yuma.army.mil or email to: yolanda.o.canales.civ@mail.milCommander: Col. Randy Murray Public Affairs Ofcer: Chuck Wullenjohn Public Affairs Specialist/Editor: Yolanda Canales Public Affairs Specialist: Mark Schauer Technical Editor, Cold Regions Test Center: Clara Zachgo Marketing Specialist: Teri Womack Visual Information Manager: Riley Williams The Outpost is an unofcial publication authorized under provisions of AR 360. The Outpost is published every two weeks by the Public Affairs Ofce, Yuma Proving Ground. Views and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Army. This newspaper uses material credited to ATEC and ARNEWS. While contributions are solicited, the PAO reserves the right to edit all submitted materials and make corrections, changes or deletions to conform with the policy of this newspaper. It is scholarship season at Arizona Western College and students can apply for scholarships right now. The deadline to apply for scholarships is Friday, March 25th. Scholarship opportunities are available to both incoming new students and continuing AWC students. To apply, please visit the AWC Foundation at http://foundation.azwestern.edu/ scholarships.html In addition to the scholarship application, all students must complete and submit the 20162017 FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) to be considered for scholarships. Please contact the AWC Financial Aid Department with any questions regarding FAFSA. Click on the Application Process button for helpful information and detailed instructions on the application process. Since 1963, the Arizona Western College Foundation has been dedicated to empowering people to reach their educational and career aspirations by enhancing access to learning opportunities. As part of this mission, the AWC Foundation provides scholarships to students attending Arizona Western College. All available scholarship opportunities are posted on our website at www.foundation. azwestern.edu under the scholarship tab. Contact the AWC Foundation Renee SmithDirector of Institutional Advancement Arizona Western College Phone: (928) 344-1723 Renee.Smith@azwestern.eduApply today for Scholarships at AWCSEE TEAMWORK page 3 Ruth Krasnosky is an advocate of the Army internship program and encourages everyone to take advantage of these type of career enhancement programs. (Photo by Teri Womack)

PAGE 3

THE OUTPOST MARCH 21, 2016 3Y3 85831 YPG kicked off the fundraising season for the Army Emergency Relief with a rally in the atrium of the Range Operations Center on March 8th with the theme Leave No Soldier Behind, raising $350 in donations. Since 1942, AER has assisted active duty Soldiers, Retirees, and Army National Guard and Reserve members and their Families on continuous AD orders for more than 30 consecutive days. Among other things, AER provides interest free hardship loans, grants, and scholarships. Here, Spc. Diamond DeWindt (right) discusses the AER program with Management and Program Analyst Lorra Greene at the kick-off. (Photo by Mark Schauer) on the job. She is an advocate of the Army internship program, and wishes she had taken the time to learn more about it when she was younger because she believes that it develops and enables young people in reaching career goals. Asking to be cross-trained on the job and taking ownership and pride in your workmanship, she says will build your reputation and status. Focusing on the future, Krasnoskys goal is to achieve and maintain a balanced life style by making time for the things important to her career, family, health, friends (fun), and spiritual serenity. Many people have heard, There is no I in Team. With her belief in what a dedicated team can accomplish, youll is no I in Ruth Krasnosky either.TEAMWORKFROM PAGE 2AER fundraising season begins Next Outpost deadline is noon March 10thSexual Assault Hotline: 920-3104 Report Domestic Violence: 328-2720

PAGE 4

4 MARCH 21, 2016 THE OUTPOST By Chuck Wullenjohn Career success in todays world involves grit and determination, as in past decades, but many modern careers require education and skill achievements never before necessary. In an effort to expose Yumas young people to careers in the technical engineering, and mathematics (STEM), four busloads of local high school and college students made a four hour visit to U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in early March. An intensive tour took them to multiple work places to meet with technical workers in a variety of skill to electricians and data gathering specialists. Students were able to see and touch a wide variety of things, from sitting at the controls of helicopters and examining inert models of rockets to viewing video taken with multi-million dollar high speed cameras. Though engineering is an important aspect of YPGs mission, event organizers were careful to introduce the students to YPG personnel from a wide range of STEM positions. Its important to teach young people that there is more to STEM than just engineering, said Col. Randy Murray, YPG commander. We have environmental scientists, folks who do resource management and information technology work. It was also important to point out women females we have in those areas. Y4 TLC MANAGEMENT Themis & Paul Cavanagh928.726.5557670 E 32nd St, Ste 9WWW.TLCMANAGEMENT.NETFind the Rental Home YOU Deserve AS A VETERAN,PAUL UNDERSTANDS THE NEEDS OF RELOCATING MILITARY FAMILIES AND IS DEDICATED TO ASSISTING ALL FAMILIES IN LOCATING THEIR NEXT RENTAL HOME. HE IS ALSO A RETIRED PEACE OFFICER WHO IS VERY SENSITIVE TO THE PARTICULAR NEEDS OF PLACING LAW ENFORCEMENT AND THEIR FAMILIES. 00084989RESPONSIVE CONCERNED RELIABLE HERE FOR YOU! Local Yuma youth prepare for future careers Sitting in the cockpit of a helicopter with the controls in front of you for the rst time is exciting for everyone, but having an engineer at your side explaining things is always better. (Photo by Teri Womack) Local high schoolers listen to U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground Test Ofcer Noe Caro (center) discuss testing as YPG engineers Ross Gwynn and Quang Ho (right) look on. (Photo by Mark Schauer)

PAGE 5

THE OUTPOST MARCH 21, 2016 5aspect of YPGs mission, event organizers were careful to introduce the students to YPG personnel from a wide range of STEM positions. Its important to teach young people that there is more to STEM than just engineering, said Col. Randy Murray, YPG commander. We have environmental scientists, folks who do resource management and information technology work. It was also important to point out women females we have in those areas.Y5 Central Location284 W. 32nd Street Yuma AZ 85364 928-341-4563 Open 7 Days A Week 6:00am-11:00pm Valley Location2377 S. 22nd Drive Yuma AZ 85364 928-343-0488 Monday-Friday 7:00am-7:00pm Foothills Location11142 S. Scottsdale Dr. Yuma AZ 85367 928-345-6830 Open 7 Days A Week 7:00am-7:00pm 2377 S. 22nd Drive | Yuma AZ 85364 | 928-343-0488 Monday Friday: 5:00pm-11:00pmSaturday Sunday 9:00am-3:00pm www.primecareyuma.com You put your familys health rst. We do the same. ( 928 ) 341-456300084347 Other locations to serve youPediatrician on-site during clinic hours NEWLY REMODELEDCall for Holiday Hours Local Yuma youth prepare for future careersLocal high schoolers listen to U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground Test Ofcer Noe Caro (center) discuss testing as YPG engineers Ross Gwynn and Quang Ho (right) look on. (Photo by Mark Schauer)

PAGE 6

6 MARCH 21, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY6By Mark Schauer Technological change alters the world and becomes so common that radically transformative inventions eventually are taken for granted. The Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) system is at such a point. Currently comprised of 31 satellites in orbit around the Earth, the GPS system allows anyone with a handheld receiver to pinpoint their exact geographic location with astonishing accuracy. Today, the technology is used not only by military personnel and testers at Yuma Proving Ground, but by millions of civilian consumers around the world as a navigational aid in automobiles, aircraft, and boats, by owners as a means of tracking lost pets wearing a GPS-enabled collar, and even by hikers and casual participants in the pastime called geocaching, a treasure hunting game that utilizes GPS coordinates. Few, if any of these users realize YPG tested GPS from the earliest days of its existence. It was the biggest single project the proving ground was ever involved in, Bob Mai, then Associate Director of the Range Support Directorate, said in a 1994 interview. It paid a lot of bills for YPG for a long time. Yuma Proving Ground was the home of GPS testing from 1974 through 1990. YPG testers attracted the program by demonstrating their ability to collect more data at a lower price than other test ranges. Whereas other test ranges of the period gathered position, acceleration, and trajectory data of test items with electro-optical trackers called Cinetheodolites, recently completed testing of the AH-56 Cheyenne attack helicopter had given YPG an edge. The proving ground owned and used a then-state-of-the-art laser tracker that had a far greater range and comparable accuracy to a battery of Cinetheodolites. Further, engineers at the proving ground had adapted room-sized 1960s vintage IBM computers with specialized software that allowed them to collect test data from range instruments and onboard telemetry devices in realtime, a groundbreaking advancement that dramatically reduced the time and cost of testing. YPG didnt have supercomputers, said Bill Heidner, curator of YPGs Heritage Center. We had sharp people writing algorithms for handme-down computers that made realtime data reduction possible. We pushed the state-of-the-art, added retired Air Force Maj. Jim Bybee, who worked on the GPS program from 1975 to 1982 and testing at YPG. YPG was already ahead of the state-of-the-art, which is why the Air Force came here. That they had laser trackers integrated into real time was a tremendous cost savings. When the evaluations began in GPS satellite was more than a year away, and, like today, a GPS user needs coordinates from four satellites to get an accurate location reading. YPG testers coped with this by creating an inverted range made up of satellite simulators located in ground-based shelters at four different places. Ground tests of the infant technology were conducted trucks, and aircraft used for testing the bottom of aircraft to pick up simulated signals from the ground receivers. The earliest GPS systems were so large that a UH-1 helicopter, which carried as many as 14 troops at a time when used in Vietnam, could only accommodate a pilot and two passengers when carrying a GPS device. By September 1977 over 70 F-4, P-3, and C-141 airplanes had been conducted. The UH-1 and the C-141 were real workhorses for us, said Bybee. But the C-141 cargo plane was contractor systems inside, so we got a lot of bang for the buck with them. As the Air Force began to launch GPS satellites, evaluators took their positions from the satellites instead of the inverted range receivers. This created new challenges for testers, however. The satellites gradually change position, said Bybee. As they launched more satellites, we had a pretty good test period for three or four hours per day. But every two weeks we had to move back our testing by half an hour. We went around the clock at least three times in the time I was here. Though the continual changing scores of range workers involved with the testing, YPGs vaunted YPG testing critical to development of GPS In the early years of GPS testing at Yuma Proving Ground, then U.S. Senator Barry Goldwater looks at a man-portable GPS device under test. An antenna for the heavy backpack necessary to use the device can be seen above the Soldier on Goldwaters right. (US Army photo) SEE GPS page 7

PAGE 7

THE OUTPOST MARCH 21, 2016 7gave testers the opportunity to make the most of the situation. This was accomplished even as another monumental program, the Apache Longbow attack helicopter, began testing at the proving ground in the late 1970s. The satellites being available for only a few hours a day gave us an urgent requirement to test whenever we could, said Bybee. We also didnt have to compete for range space at YPG. The ranges at other locations were consistently tied up, but at YPG we always had top priority. By the early 1980s, GPS technology had been miniaturized to the point that a man portable backpack weighing a mere 25 pounds began testing with Soldiers at the proving ground. This testing was conducted in addition to that involving aircraft, all at a fast pace despite the fact there wasnt an active war in progress. We had a good group of people at YPG and in the said Bybee. There was a lot of high level interest in the program and everyone was pretty attuned to how important the project was. Testing at Yuma Proving Ground was critical to the development of the GPS technology so commonly used today. Just as YPGs testing prowess was put to good use then, it continues this same way today and will continue to serve the nation in the future. A YPG worker uses a modern GPS receiver to pinpoint the location of a mortar round that impacted safely within a designated area of the Kofa Firing Range. YPG was the home of GPS developmental testing from 1974 to 1990. (Photo by Mark Schauer) GPSFROM PAGE 6 Y7away, and, like today, a GPS user needs coordinates from four satellites to get an accurate location reading. YPG testers coped with this by creating an inverted range made up of satellite simulators located in ground-based shelters at four different places. Ground tests of the infant technology were conducted trucks, and aircraft used for testing the bottom of aircraft to pick up simulated signals from the ground receivers. The earliest GPS systems were so large that a UH-1 helicopter, which carried as many as 14 troops at a time when used in Vietnam, could only accommodate a pilot and two passengers when carrying a GPS device. By September 1977 over 70 F-4, P-3, and C-141 airplanes had been conducted. The UH-1 and the C-141 were real workhorses for us, said Bybee. But the C-141 cargo plane was contractor systems inside, so we got a lot of bang for the buck with them. As the Air Force began to launch GPS satellites, evaluators took their positions from the satellites instead of the inverted range receivers. This created new challenges for testers, however. The satellites gradually change position, said Bybee. As they launched more satellites, we had a pretty good test period for three or four hours per day. But every two weeks we had to move back our testing by half an hour. We went around the clock at least three times in the time I was here. Though the continual changing scores of range workers involved with the testing, YPGs vaunted YPG testing critical to development of GPSSEE GPS page 7 ATEC commander Maj. Gen. Daniel Karbler (foreground) and Command Sgt. Maj. Andrew Connette ride in a Stryker Combat Vehicle under test at CRTC. The Stryker test was one of 14 undertaken at CRTC this winter. (Photos by Sebastian Saarloos) ATEC commanding general impressed by CRTC Maj. Gen. Daniel Karbler discusses CRTC test activities with CRTC commander Lt. Col. Michael Kovacs. The leadership up here is phenomenal, said Karbler. You dont have a happy workforce in an extreme environment like this if you dont believe in what youre doing and if you dont have great leaders who are motivating you every day to do well.

PAGE 8

8 MARCH 21, 2016 THE OUTPOSTSubmitted by Safety Ofce Its probably happened to most of us. That momentary lapse of inattention thinking about a personal problem or distracted by an activity that ends in a slip, trip or fall. A stumble down a stairway. A trip over an uneven surface. It can lead to a variety of regrettable events ranging from a simple bruised shin to an extremely serious injury. Its just one of a variety of conditions and situations that set the stage for slips, trips and falls in the workplace. In FY15, almost half of all losttime personnel injuries at YPG were the result of a slip, trip, or fall. Most of these injuries could have been prevented by maintaining three points of contact when mounting or dismounting vehicles / equipment & keeping the work area free from clutter. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, slips, trips and falls make up the majority of general industry accidents, which account for: Fifteen percent of all accidental deaths per year, the second-leading cause behind motor vehicles About 25 percent of all reported More than 95 million lost work days per year about 65 percent of all work days lost In general, slips and trips occur due to a loss of traction between the shoe and the walking surface or an moveable object which may lead to a fall. Here are six guidelines to help you create a safer working environment for you and your employees. Create good housekeeping practices If your facilitys housekeeping habits are poor, the result may be a higher incidence of employee injuries, ever increasing insurance costs, and regulatory citations. Reduce wet or slippery surfaces Walking surfaces account for reported by state agencies. Traction on outdoor surfaces can change considerably when weather conditions change. Those conditions can then affect indoor surfaces as moisture is tracked in by pedestrian Avoid creating obstacles in aisles and walkways Proper housekeeping in work effective control measure in avoiding the proliferation of these types of hazards. This means having policies or procedures in place and allowing time for cleaning the area, especially where scrap material or waste is a byproduct of the work operation. Create and Maintain Proper Lighting Poor lighting in the workplace is associated with an increase in accidents. Wear proper shoes The shoes we wear can play a big part in preventing falls. The slickness of the soles and the type of heels worn need to be evaluated to avoid slips, trips and falls. Employees are expected to wear footwear appropriate for the duties of their work task. Control individual behavior Avoid distractions and use three points of contact This condition is the toughest to control. It is human nature to let our guard down for two seconds and be distracted by random thoughts or doing multiple activities. Being in a hurry will result in walking too fast or running which increases the chances of a slip, trip or fall. Taking shortcuts, not watching where one is going, using a cell phone, carrying materials which obstructs the vision, jumping from vehicles and equipment, not using handrails, and speed are common elements in many on-the-job injuries. Y8 928.210.9575 Rob Turner CUSTOMER SERVICE IS MY #1 PRIORITYReady to Work for You with Cutting Edge ServiceHello my name is Rob, Ive lived in Yuma 29 years and have a Broad knowledge of the Area and Community we live in. Im a Full time Agent Dedicated to Educating clients on the Blue Print of a Successful Real Estate Transaction. I will work Diligently to provide you the most up to date Real Estate information for you to Sell/Buy your home. Having a strong knowledge of todays shifting market and Working with a Strong Team of Agents with knowledge of todays market. I am 00085937 ynhawaiian1@gmail.com Community Strengths, Themes Assessment Guidelines to prevent workplace slips, trips and falls VIEWPOINTSToni Johnson, administrative ofcer: The wide open spaces with less people. There is a ramp on the highway near North Pole, Alaska as you drive from Fairbanks where the whole sky opens up in front of you: thats it right there. You feel like you can see forever. I would never leave Delta Junction.Dace Hoffman, test program management ofcer: Living in Alaska. In my opinion, there are no downfalls to living here. What I tell people is, never let the temperature dictate what you doif you want to do it, go out and do it. There are over 600,000 square miles in the state, and I want to see all of them before I die.Sebastian Saarloos, photographer: For me, Alaska is home. I like the fresh air, no pollution, the wildness of it. Id stock shelves at the grocery store before I moved somewhere else. For those from the lower 48 states, a life in a harsh climate like Alaskas might seem unimaginable, yet nearly 750,000 hardy people call the state home. We asked members of the CRTC workforce what they feel is the best part of living in Alaska. By Mark Schauer

PAGE 9

THE OUTPOST MARCH 21, 2016 9Avoid distractions and use three points of contact This condition is the toughest to control. It is human nature to let our guard down for two seconds and be distracted by random thoughts or doing multiple activities. Being in a hurry will result in walking too fast or running which increases the chances of a slip, trip or fall. Taking shortcuts, not watching where one is going, using a cell phone, carrying materials which obstructs the vision, jumping from vehicles and equipment, not using handrails, and speed are common elements in many on-the-job injuries. Submitted by Connie Everly, YPG Health Promotion Ofcer Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) will be deploying a Community Strengths and Themes Assessment (CSTA) by March 31. The assessment may be open from one to three months, depending upon how long it takes responses to the assessment. Our goal is to achieve 100 percent participation! Current Army Regulations (AR 600-63 and AR 40-5) directs installations to assess communities for health risk factors and needs on an annual basis. No Personal Health Information (PHI) will be collected. All U.S. Army Public Health Center (USAPHC) surveys meet the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) enacted by Congress in 1996. The Vice Chief of Staff of the Armys (VCSA) Gold Book Healthcare providers must engage in an interdisciplinary approach, comprised of several lines of effort, with an aim to: (1) increase effectiveness of health surveillance, detection and response efforts to identify, refer and treat Soldiers and Families at risk; (2) reduce cultural stigma associated with seeking behavioral healthcare; and (3) develop resiliency, coping skills and encourage help-seeking behavior among our Soldiers and Families. The CSTA is a holistic approach to assessing the community for needs. It is designed to capture the pulse of the community members feelings on quality of life, health, safety, and satisfaction within the environment of an Army installation. This assessment will establish a baseline for health promotion. assessment are many. One is to and Resilient program, i.e., physical, social, family, emotional, and spiritual. Others are: for the YPG health and wellness education, issues; be able to assess strengths and weaknesses based upon the data for making improvements where needed; acknowledging best practices; Subjects include but are not limited to: Tobacco free living; nutrition; sleep physical activity, support for nursing mothers, weight management, stress management, depression, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, signs, symptoms and emergency response to heart attack and stroke, occupational health and safety, vaccine-preventable diseases, occupational supports, worksite background information, etc. Assessment intended audience is Active Duty Soldiers, DA Civilians, Family members, retirees and contractors. In other words, anyone that lives and/or works at YPG, to include tenant units. From the assessment, the Senior in turn tasks them to the Community Health Promotion Council (CHPC), which meets quarterly. This is a part of developing a strategic plan for health promotion. Data will be determined by the host of the web site, USAPHC. Participants will be able to take the assessment in a variety of ways. By using the link in this article, HousingGram, Facebook, Twitter, email, etc. The Army Substance Abuse Program (ASAP) Manager will give servicemembers and DA civilians credit for one hour of ASAP training. If you are interested, please contact Chris Lee at 328-2249 or email to christopher.a.lee24.civ@mail. mil, once you have completed the assessment. To take the assessment, please go to: https://usaphcapps. amedd.army.mil/Survey/ se.ashx?s=2511374566FF1DCF. For more information, contact Connie Everly at 928-328-2167 or email to Connie.f.everly.civ@mail. mil. Y9 w84982 Reds Bird Cage SaloonLocated in the heart of Historic Downtown Yuma231 Main St. 928-783-1050Mon-Fri 9am 2:30am Open Sat & Sun 6am Come And Join Us! 79210 Community Strengths, Themes Assessment

PAGE 10

10 MARCH 21, 2016 THE OUTPOST Y10 Local Dealers Local Buys Local ServiceCars, Trucks, Boats, RVs, Offroad! Search online. Find your next vehicle. Kick the tires. Drive it home.00084870 www.elliotthomes.com Elliott Homes Solar Communities: Sunset Terrace Townhomes 6171 E. Overlook Ln Just west of 24th St & Araby Rd 928-317-9701 Araby Crossing Araby & 32nd St 928-317-9701 Las Barrancas 12310 Grand View Dr Frontage Rd & 44th St 928-345-1623 Model Homes Open M-F 10am-5pm Weekends 11-5pm ROC #246945 ROC# 244491 VA Approved Builder Solar homes with a wealth of energy-saving, water-saving and money-saving features Excellent warranty from an experienced builder Close to MCAS Base Value prices range from the mid $100,000s to the high $300,000s Preferred lender assistance. Staff available to coordiante VA salesGo online! elliotthomes.com or facebook.com/elliotthomesyuma THREE new home communities with something for everyone. From upscale, low-maintenance townhomes at Sunset Terrace (with clubhouse and pool) to luxury living at Las Barrancas at the View. Ask about seller paid closing costs for VA buyers!84963-2 Put your resume online!jobsinyuma.com Real Estate Acreage Business Services Directory Business Opportunities NewspaperDelivery RoutesAvailablefordependablepersonswith reliablevehicle*FoothillsArea:Ave3E-7E/32ndSt*FoothillsArea:Ave10E-PaysonDri32ndSt*FoothillsArea:Ave51/2E-32ndSt*WelltonArea ApplyinpersonattheYumaSun 2055SArizonaAve Home Services Directory Air Conditioning Heating SameDayServ.&Repairs24/7 Computer Services ComputerrepairSpecialist Did you know... Community newspaper s are shared with more than two people? Concrete Bobcat&Excavating Sidewalk Patio RockSpreading andLeveling Hauling StumpRemoval FreeEstimates Landscaping Services Industrial-Comm-Residential ChainLink,Wood,Gates, WroughtIron,Lawn Maintenance,Mowing,Tree Trimming,Sprinklers,Pavers, Irrigation,Rockhauling,Rock spreading,Weeding,Concrete. "BuildingtheBest &RepairingtheRest"(928)257-9636Lic./Bonded/Ins.ROC#216954 Newspapers deliverthe mostcrucial newsoftheday, insightfulopinion and fairminded analysis. Plumbing Roofers FREE Estimates Didyouknow? Byorderof JuliusCaesar, around59BC, adailybulletinof announcements waspublished carvedinstoneormetal anddisplayed inpublicplaces. CLASSIFIEDS To place your ad call 928-783-4433

PAGE 11

THE OUTPOST MARCH 21, 2016 11 Y11 Local Dealers Local Buys Local ServiceCars, Trucks, Boats, RVs, Offroad! Search online. Find your next vehicle. Kick the tires. Drive it home.00084870 www.elliotthomes.com Elliott Homes Solar Communities: Sunset Terrace Townhomes 6171 E. Overlook Ln Just west of 24th St & Araby Rd 928-317-9701 Araby Crossing Araby & 32nd St 928-317-9701 Las Barrancas 12310 Grand View Dr Frontage Rd & 44th St 928-345-1623 Model Homes Open M-F 10am-5pm Weekends 11-5pm ROC #246945 ROC# 244491 VA Approved Builder Solar homes with a wealth of energy-saving, water-saving and money-saving features Excellent warranty from an experienced builder Close to MCAS Base Value prices range from the mid $100,000s to the high $300,000s Preferred lender assistance. Staff available to coordiante VA salesGo online! elliotthomes.com or facebook.com/elliotthomesyuma THREE new home communities with something for everyone. From upscale, low-maintenance townhomes at Sunset Terrace (with clubhouse and pool) to luxury living at Las Barrancas at the View. Ask about seller paid closing costs for VA buyers!84963-2 When we read the Passion account in the Bible, Ive never been as interested as to what comes after say everything hinges on the story of Jesus as the resurrected Christ. Some even say its all one thing, the resurrection, and later, the appearances. You cant lose the end parts without changing the meaning of the whole thing. All of Jesus teachings foreshadow this moment, His death. His teachings on love, grace, and forgiveness inform all that He will rise again in three days. He points to the violence and hate and aggression that will happen saying, No one has a love greater than this when they lay down their life for their friends. Easter also requires a response to all who believe. I imagine that even on Saturday, the words It from the cross, were still ringing in the ears of those who loved and followed Him. to redeem mankind. It was over. The chaos of yesterday over. The hope for tomorrow over. Saturday was a day of silence and not knowing. A day of grief and despair. Hope had been hung from a tree and sealed away in a tomb. We can all identify with grief and despair in life and even loneliness. I think we all can. Life brings with it tough times. Tough times can bring depression and fear and loneliness a false sense of a life lacking in love. But folks, let me remind you that Sunday is coming. Easter reminds every one of the hope, the promise that Jesus said in John 2:19, Jesus answered and said unto them, destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up. You see, when we say Sunday is coming, it tells us something very important it tells us love wins. parts of this life: the hurt and the loss and the pain and the grief and the death Easter reminds us that: Sunday is coming! Jesus is Alive for Ever More! Even in the silence, love was waiting for us, reaching out to us, ready to roll away the stones which entomb each of us. Jesus loves you, and that is the Easter message. We are here for you, we have children programs and adult Bible studies. Please join us on Easter. Service schedules are: Catholic 0930; Protestant 1100. Jesus: An Easter ThoughtSubmitted by Chaplain (Maj.) Steven Smith CHAPLAINS CORNER

PAGE 12

12 MARCH 21, 2016 THE OUTPOSTY12