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The outpost

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Title:
The outpost
Uniform Title:
Outpost (Yuma, Ariz.)
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Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) -- Public Affairs Office
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Yuma, AZ
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U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, Public Affairs Office
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regular
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English
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 43 cm

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Military bases -- Newspapers -- Arizona -- Yuma ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Newspapers -- Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) ( lcsh )
Arizona -- Yuma ( fast )
Arizona -- Yuma Proving Ground ( fast )
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Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )

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Numerous numbering irregularities.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
639929322 ( OCLC )
ocn639929322

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sidewinder (Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz.)

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Digital Military Collection

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Full Text

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U.S. ARMY YUMA PROVING GROUND, YUMA, ARIZONA 85365 | VOLUME 49 NO. 17 MONDA Y, S EPTEMBER 28, 2015ATEC commander shares thoughts with entire commandDate burned into our memory commemorated /Page 4 Hispanic culture shared with workforce /Page 2 Army recruits wowed by YPG visit /Page 6 By Mark Schauer Maj. Gen. David Karbler, commander of the Armys Test and Evaluation Command (ATEC), addressed personnel across the command via video teleconference in mid-September. More than 200 members of the YPG team were present in the Post Theater to hear his vision for the command and ask questions. Karbler has found the ATEC team to be smart, dedicated, hard-working professionals who are tremendously talented and possess unique skill sets. He was frank about the likelihood of continuing budget constraints in the years ahead, saying that determining are critically important to meet the mission. I value those who are adaptable different way, he said. Yet, he was quick to emphasize that equipment evaluations have earned from Army leaders over the decades any way. We might not have as much capacity to do testing, but I would rather keep he said. Karbler took time to recognize a variety of recent high-visibility tests across the command. At YPG, he singled project to study wing-tip vortices from C-17 aircraft that impact Army parachutists, an validation test of a M284 cannon tube used on Paladin self-propelled howitzers, and the recent test of the parachute system on NASAs Orion space capsule. He also discussed a recent evaluation of the Army-Navy Transportable Multipurpose Radar (AN/TPQ-53) and at YPG. ATEC Command Sgt. Maj. Andrew Connette, a 30-year veteran of Army times during his career, also shared initial impressions of the command. I previously had no idea what a piece of equipment goes through before a Soldier gets it, he said. Its incredible. I represent hundreds of thousands of Soldiers who ATECs work every day. Above all, Karbler was keen to impart his personal motto of, integrity, discipline, conduct, emphasizing the contributions of everyone across the command, Soldier and civilian. Your contributions matter, are taken seriously, and make a difference, he said. All of you are part of the ATEC team and family. Editors Note: Maj. Gen. Daniel Karbler assumed command of the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, June 15, 2015, where he serves as the Commanding General of the Armys sole independent test and evaluation enterprise. He is responsible for the planning and execution of innovative test and evaluation processes as the Army continues to integrate and mature new and existing capabilities into Army systems. ATEC reports the results of these unbiased assessments to Army acquisition decision makers. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree in 1987 from the United States Military Academy at West Point where he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Air Defense Artillery Branch. His military education includes Air Defense Courses; the Command and General Staff College; and the National War College. Following promotion to Lieutenant Colonel, Karbler commanded 3-43 ADA BN (Patriot), 32d AAMDC at Fort Bliss, Texas. Following promotion to Colonel, Karbler returned to the Pentagon to serve as the Chief of the Air Defense Division in the Force Development Directorate in the Army G-8. In 2008, Karbler was assigned to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, where he commanded the 31st ADA BDE, 32d AAMDC and deployed to Qatar during OIF. After command, Karbler served as the Fort Sill Chief of Staff. After promotion to Brigadier General, he served as the Air Defense Artillery Commandant, and in 2012, he was assigned to Fort Shafter, Hawaii, where he commanded the 94th AAMDC. In 2014, Karbler returned to the Pentagon to serve as the Director, Joint and Integration, in the Army G-8. His awards include the Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, and the Israeli Air Force Combat Operations Badge.

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2 SEPTEMBER 28, 2015 THE OUTPOSTY2 THEOUTPOST News may be submitted to: The Editor, Outpost, Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, AZ, 85365. Phone: (928) 328/6189 or DSN 899. Visit our website at: www.yuma.army.mil or email to: yolanda.o.canales.civ@mail.milCommander: Col. Randy Murray Public Affairs Ofcer: Chuck Wullenjohn Public Affairs Specialist/Editor: Yolanda Canales Public Affairs Specialist: Mark Schauer Technical Editor, Cold Regions Test Center: Clara Zachgo Marketing Specialist: Teri Womack Visual Information Manager: Riley Williams The Outpost is an unofcial publication authorized under provisions of AR 360. The Outpost is published every two weeks by the Public Affairs Ofce, Yuma Proving Ground. Views and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Army. This newspaper uses material credited to ATEC and ARNEWS. While contributions are solicited, the PAO reserves the right to edit all submitted materials and make corrections, changes or deletions to conform with the policy of this newspaper. Next Outpost deadline is noon October 1stSexual Assault Hotline: 920-3104 Report Domestic Violence: 328-2720Hispanic culture shared with workforceBy Yolie CanalesAmericas Hispanic heritage was celebrated at YPG in mid-September with an array of activities beginning with religious services at the post chapel on Sunday, followed by a Latin country poster contest at Price Elementary School. The students posters were displayed at Wednesdays 6th annual salsa tasting contest held in the atrium of the ROC bldg. Nearly one dozen types of salsa were available, ranging people crunched tortilla chips as they sampled the various refreshment, helped cool the tongue for those not familiar with spicy foods. Tasters voted for the best salsa and, when the votes were tallied, 1st place went to Pierre Bourque and 2nd to Isaac Rodriguez. On Sept. 17th, the weeklong observance culminated with a gala luncheon held at the Cactus Caf. The overall theme of the commemoration was Energizing Our Nations Diversity. It was attended by over 100 people including Arizona Western College staff members, Border Patrol agents, Price Elementary School staff and children, family members, and the YPG workforce. Maria Aguirre, Associate Dean of Continuing Education at Arizona Western College, was guest speaker. Kamyla Ruiz provided vocal performances. The U.S. Border Patrol participated with its color guard. performed traditional dances and the YPG committee chairperson prepared an while committee member Viviana Lopez prepared and donated the delicious desserts. It was a great week of events and a fun, meaningful luncheon!Arizona Western College student Kamyla Ruiz sings one of several songs at the recent Hispanic Heritage luncheon held at YPGs Cactus Caf. (Photos by Chuck Wullenjohn) Guest speaker Maria Aguirre, Associate Dean of Continuing Education for Arizona Western College, is presented a token of appreciation for her presentation entitled Conversations with my Father. Gordon Rogers, garrison manager, had the honors of presenting the award. SEE CULTURE page 7Bradley Fighting Vehicle upgrades tested at YPG

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THE OUTPOST SEPTEMBER 28 2015 3Y3 Catch the WAVE & $AVE Super Studios & 2 Bedrooms Pets Welcome Huge Swimming Pool Beach Club Apts. 2350 S. 8th Ave. | Phone (928) 782-7579 www.thebeachclubapts.comWe Support Our Troops!00069195 Reds Bird Cage SaloonLocated in the heart of Historic Downtown Yuma231 Main St. 928-783-1050Mon-Fri 9am 2:30am Open Sat & Sun 6am Come And Join Us! 00068477 Hispanic culture shared with workforceGuest speaker Maria Aguirre, Associate Dean of Continuing Education for Arizona Western College, is presented a token of appreciation for her presentation entitled Conversations with my Father. Gordon Rogers, garrison manager, had the honors of presenting the award. Bradley Fighting Vehicle upgrades tested at YPGBy Mark SchauerWhen it comes to mechanized infantry and armored cavalry combat, the Bradley Fighting Vehicle is second to none in The platform has proved itself to be lethal and survivable in multiple theaters Gulf War, only three of the more than 2,200 Bradley Fighting Vehicles that thundered into Iraq were lost to enemy a 25mm chain-driven autocannon, a 7.62 mm machine gun, and twin Tubelaunched, Optically-tracked, Wireguided (TOW) missiles, destroyed more armored Iraqi vehicles than did the M1 Abrams Main Battle Tank. In ensuing years, the threat faced by American Soldiers has mutated, but the Bradley has remained viable and relevant thanks to Army modernizaupgrades at YPG. The Bradley was built based on a set that mission, but as times evolved, so combat vehicles have evolved, their size pectations. They need additional power to sustain legacy requirements while supporting future technologies. As it is, the Bradley is hardly a relic of a bygone era. Thoroughly digitized and boasting technology like thermal imagers, nearly 7,000 Bradleys have platforms in the countrys ground combat arsenal. Changes to the latest variant and transmission common to that found in the Bradley, an interchangeability of components that makes the mission of Bradley will remain ready for battle for a long time to come. The Bradley is looking to be in decades with the upgrades now being worked on, said Obradovich. At present, YPG testers are wrapping up a software upgrade test on the Bradley that incorporates even more functionality into the platform. The purpose of the tests is to verify the system integration of software/hardware changes in ensuring functionality and performance without negatively impacting safe vehicle operation. When we do software tests, were looking for performance degradation from legacy software or if there are any performance characteristics of the vehicle that cant be met with the new also want to verify the safety systems built into the vehicle arent negatively impacted. Once this portion of the testing is complete, the Bradley is sent out for weeks of durability missions across YPGs range. This phase of the test is not a reliability test for the software, it is more going out and operating in a typical environment and seeing if anything comes up during normal operations. These simulated missions take the Bradley across scores of miles of road courses featuring various terrain conditions, from paved to gravel to punishing desert washboard that would severely rattle less robust vehicles. As they traverse these roads, test vehicle operators continually verify performance of all the platforms sophisticated electronics. Set points throughout these courses verify that the navigation system is The threat faced by American Soldiers has mutated since the Bradley Fighting Vehicle was rst elded in 1981, but the platform has remained relevant thanks to extensive testing of upgrades at YPG over the years. The Bradley is looking to be in service for at least the next couple of decades with the upgrades now being worked on, said Jacob Obradovich, test ofcer. Here, a Bradley negotiates one of YPGs punishing road courses. (Photo by Mark Schauer) SEE BRADLEY page 8

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4 SEPTEMBER 28, 2015 THE OUTPOSTY4 TLC MANAGEMENT Themis & Paul Cavanagh928.726.5557670 E 32nd St, Ste 9 WWW.TLCMANAGEMENT.NET Find the Rental Home YOU Deserve AS A VETERAN,PAUL UNDERSTANDS THE NEEDS OF RELOCATING MILITARY FAMILIES AND IS DEDICATED TO ASSISTING ALL FAMILIES IN LOCATING THEIR NEXT RENTAL HOME. HE IS ALSO A RETIRED PEACE OFFICER WHO IS VERY SENSITIVE TO THE PARTICULAR NEEDS OF PLACING LAW ENFORCEMENT AND THEIR FAMILIES. 00068714 RESPONSIVE CONCERNED RELIABLE HERE FOR YOU 00065299 $169 Date burned into our memory commemorated By Chuck Wullenjohn An older generation vividly remembers an early December Sunday morn ing -where they were, what they were our forces at Pearl Harbor. The world abruptly changed that day as the United States was dragged into World War II, the largest and most devastating armed For the current generation, a similarly calamitous event occurred 14 years ago when 3000 Americans were killed when terrorists crashed aircraft into New York Citys World Trade Center. The imme diate aftermath was shock and a sense of resolve that has persisted ever since. That date, September 11, 2001, has be come commonly known as Patriot Day Patriot Day 2015 was commemorated Sept. 10th at the proving grounds Heri tage Center Museum with a ceremony featuring two speakers Garrison Manager Gordon Rogers and Heritage Center Director Bill Heidner. Rogers began the ceremony with short remarks that summed up the meaning of the day. We Americans must remain forever vigilant to prevent something like this from occurring ever again, he said. Most current adults were around at that time and well remember this as a pivotal moment for our nation. It was a time of shock, surprise and anger. He pointed out that YPGs mission is to ensure that the weapons and muniare tested thoroughly and realistically, and are completely ready for battle. We work to ensure that our forces have the most effective equipment possible, he said. Without question, YPG testing contributed greatly to saving an untold number of American lives in the combat actions that later occurred in Iraq and Afghanistan. 25 minute illustrated overview of terrorist acts over the past forty years, beginning with the infamous Munich Olymthe entire Israeli Olympic team. ered on television and, for many Ameriterrorism, he said. The news coverage team, then negotiated with German authorities for passage out of the country. Many other terrorist incidents ensued in following years, including the terrorist bombing of the destroyer USS Cole in 2000. ing event, said Heidner, for we had before that. Among the many people who attended the ceremony was Ron Rodriguez, director of YPGs Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization, and Security. When the tragedy occurred in 2001, he remembers that he had spent the morning reading an after action report of the USS Cole bombing and an article detailing writings by Osama bin Laden related to this incident. As Rodriguez viewed television coverage of an airliner Bill Heidner, Heritage Center Director, presents an overview of terrorist acts over the past 40 years, beginning with the infamous Munich Olympics of 1972 that saw terrorists murder the entire Israeli Olympic team. (Photo By Chuck Wullenjohn)SEE MEMORY page 8

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THE OUTPOST SEPTEMBER 28 2015 5Y5 928.210.9575 Rob Turner CUSTOMER SERVICE IS MY #1 PRIORITYReady to Work for You with Cutting Edge ServiceHello my name is Rob, Ive lived in Yuma 29 years and have a Broad knowledge of the Area and Community we live in. Im a Full time Agent Dedicated to Educating clients on the Blue Print of a Successful Real Estate Transaction. I will work Diligently to provide you the most up to date Real Estate information for you to Sell/Buy your home. Having a strong knowledge of todays shifting market and Working with a Strong Team of Agents with knowledge of todays market. I am 00070253 ynhawaiian1@gmail.com TLC MANAGEMENT Themis & Paul Cavanagh928.726.5557670 E 32nd St, Ste 9 WWW.TLCMANAGEMENT.NET Find the Rental Home YOU Deserve AS A VETERAN,PAUL UNDERSTANDS THE NEEDS OF RELOCATING MILITARY FAMILIES AND IS DEDICATED TO ASSISTING ALL FAMILIES IN LOCATING THEIR NEXT RENTAL HOME. HE IS ALSO A RETIRED PEACE OFFICER WHO IS VERY SENSITIVE TO THE PARTICULAR NEEDS OF PLACING LAW ENFORCEMENT AND THEIR FAMILIES. 00068714 RESPONSIVE CONCERNED RELIABLE HERE FOR YOU Central Location284 W. 32nd Street Yuma AZ 85364 928-341-4563 7 days a week 6:00am-11:00pm Valley Location2377 S. 22nd Drive Yuma AZ 85364 928-343-0488 Monday-Friday 7:00am-7:00pm Foothills Location11142 S. Scottsdale Dr. Yuma AZ 85367 928-345-6830 Monday-Friday 7:00am-7:00pm 2377 S. 22nd Drive | Yuma AZ 85364 | 928-343-0488 Monday Friday: 5:00pm-11:00pmSaturday Sunday 9:00am-3:00pm www.primecareyuma.comYou put your familys health rst. We do the same. (928)341-456300070334 Other locations to serve youPediatrician on-site during clinic hours Bill Heidner, Heritage Center Director, presents an overview of terrorist acts over the past 40 years, beginning with the infamous Munich Olympics of 1972 that saw terrorists murder the entire Israeli Olympic team. (Photo By Chuck Wullenjohn) VIEWPOINTSBy Mark SchauerImagine for a second that you and your family could visit anywhere in the world for free. We asked members of the workforce what kind of dream vacation they would take if money were no object.Art Booth, Aviation Operations: I would go to Bora Bora. I would take my wife of 35 years and stay in one of the cottages on stilts over the water and just look at the ocean. Dan Schoenborn, Test Ofcer Ive been on a cruise in the Grecian islands and went ashore to see the Parthenon and the Temple of Athena Nike for a few hours, but it was rather quick. If money werent an object, Id go for maybe a month instead of seven days. Its beautiful: the water is nice, everything is just great. Reggie Willoughby, Senior Safety Specialist: I would have a destination family reunion with everybody in one place at the same time. Wed probably have it at a resort in Virginia where everybody could swim and have fun for a week or two.

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6 SEPTEMBER 28, 2015 THE OUTPOSTY6CULTURE Army recruits wowed by YPG visit By Mark Schauer The knowledge of newly enlisted recruits of the nature of Army service is most often secondhand. If theyre part of the lucky few, perhaps a parent or other close relative served. Others know of it entirely from television and movies. But 10 lucky enlistees from Yuma recently spent a morning at YPG watching members of the proving grounds Airborne Test Force (ATF) go about some of their routine duties. And what a morning it was. From seeing students of the Armys elite Military Freefall School participate in a high altitude, low opening freefall, to watching as ATF members performed static line parachute jumps from a lowa high impact look at a day in the life of a YPG Soldier. Many of these kids didnt even know that YPG was an Army base, said Staff Sgt. Cory Bunch, recruiter. Its nice to get them out here and see that this is where military freefall students are trained. Thomas Vasquez had been waiting for more than two months for his now fast-approaching date to report for basic training. He is going in as a mechanic, but has aspirations to do something with aviation, and paid rapt attention to advice from the uniformed parachutists he met. Its very interesting to see a guy who makes a living jumping out of a plane, he said. I kind of want to do it, but well see how far I get in the military. Soldiers like Sgt. Kyle Dunwiddie, who spearheaded the event, was giving the recruits a special tour of the shop where Soldiers rig all manner of parachutes, from individual personnel parachutes to cargo parachutes carrying and pieces of equipment. YPG riggers have packed and prepared some of the largest parachutes in the world for test drops. I thought the work of riggers was limited to packing chutes, rigging cargo and performing maintenance, said Dunwiddie. I got to YPG and it Staff Sgt. Brian Brown shows recruits a personnel parachute prior to a jump. Later in the morning, they saw rsthand the care ATF Soldiers take in packing every parachute. A group of recent Army enlistees from Yuma recently spent a morning at YPG watching members of the proving grounds Airborne Test Force (ATF) go about some of their routine duties. Here, the group takes time for a photo. (Photos by Mark Schauer)opened my eyes: Without coming here I never would have known the Army, let alone riggers, was involved in something like this. Following their tour of the shop and seeing ATF Soldiers pack personnel parachutes, the recruits got to try on packed parachutes for themselves while mask a Special Forces paratrooper would typically have. Following a question and answer session with YPG Command Sgt. Maj. Sean Ward, the recruits left, that much more determined to take on their rapidly approaching induction and basic training. Dunwiddie thought the visit was fruitful and hopes to host more recruits on similar tours in the future. Of those from this group who joined their option to pursue airborne as they advance through the ranks.

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THE OUTPOST SEPTEMBER 28 2015 7Y7 CULTUREFROM PAGE 2 Happily smiling at the guest speakers excellent presentation, as well as the overall event, is YPG commander Col. Randy Murray as he prepares to give closing remarks. (Photos by Chuck Wullenjohn) The audience is enjoying a performance by the YPG Folklorico dancers. Left to right: Rocio Fernandez, Martha Wright, Mireya Rodriguez and Vanessa Cuevas. The dance group spent three busy weeks coordinating their steps, turns and heel tapping. All acknowledged, they did an awesome job. Posting colors before the luncheon program begins are members of the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Honor Guard. (Photo by Yolie Canales) Staff Sgt. Brian Brown shows recruits a personnel parachute prior to a jump. Later in the morning, they saw rsthand the care ATF Soldiers take in packing every parachute. A group of recent Army enlistees from Yuma recently spent a morning at YPG watching members of the proving grounds Airborne Test Force (ATF) go about some of their routine duties. Here, the group takes time for a photo. (Photos by Mark Schauer) Salsa competition is one event the YPG workforce anxiously awaits for every year during Hispanic Heritage Observance!

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8 SEPTEMBER 28, 2015 THE OUTPOSTY8 working as it is supposed to and that the targeting system is giving accurate ranges, Obradovich said. YPG has the range space to conduct stationary and moving positions. the vehicle is moving, said Obradovich. it over a bumpy course to make sure the stabilization system is working prop erly. As a one-stop shop for sophisticated testing, YPG is poised to continue supporting Bradley testing for years to come. Its a testament to our folks, said Obradovich. We have really good their good work has developed this capability. BRADLEYFROM PAGE 3crashing into one of the twin towers, he had no doubt of the person behind it. It was Osama bin Laden, he said. He had declared a Fatwah (holy war) mind that this was an act of war. Command Sergeant Major Sean Ward was assigned to the 101st airborne division at the time, on a temporary training heard about the attack on his car radio. Thats no accident, he thought. One hour later his entire battalion was in formation being addressed by the at war, though it had not been declared, said Ward. He remembers a common sense of anger by the Soldiers, an eagerness to get back at the people who had performed this terrible act. Terrorist actions can occur anywhere, summed up Rogers. Its up to us to never forget what happened, to always remain aware.MEMORYFROM PAGE 4 Chaplains CornerBlessings in DisguiseBy Chaplain Steven D. SmithThere is indeed much to be thankful for this year. A few housewives got together and they came up with this list. They are thankful for: make it possible for us to get out of the kitchen before the family comes back in for their after-dinner snacks. jobs around the house because they usually make them big enough to call in the professionals. & clean up after themselves. Theyre such a joy you hate to see them go home to their own parents. an opportunity to learn a second language. know when the turkeys done. Perhaps we can do better than that. A heart of blessing begins with a Christ and the future that relationship makes possible. In the New Testament isolated from society with a terminal illness that would eventually lead them to a painful humiliating death. These men could no longer hold their children, caress their wives, participate in society, and were repulsive sights to behold as their bodies slowly rotted away. And commanded an act of obedience before He ignited His power. He told them to go to the priest as was prescribed by the law. The priest would then declare them healed and they would be allowed to re-enter society. As they responded Action fueled by faith resulted in healing. There is a real lesson to be learned here. Dont wait for God to change your life because He might just of faith. Dont make the mistake of waiting on God when God is waiting on you. If there is any command that you have not responded to, dont be surprised by a lack of transformational power. God wants to bring about change, but it is always done in response to our faith. The evidence of real faith is seen in our obedience. Faith demonstrated in action ignites transformational power. Ten lepers were healed and yet only appeared amazed by the ingratitude of the majority. We are a radically blessed people with every reason to give thanks. I dont know the circumstances of your life, but if you have been cleansed of sin through faith and and thankfulness. There are many suggestions as to why the other nine did not return but one idea is fear. They did not return for fear of what might to follow Him after receiving their miracle. Maybe their thought was, I have what I want; Im not about to go back because He might ask something of me that Im not willing to give. Many people today fear returning to submission. I pray that you will be like the Samaritan who threw caution to the wind and returned praising God with a loud voice and threw himself at the feet Catholic and 1100 Protestant. Oasis Chapel A Place of Refreshing! Language and Speech Disabilities These are among the most common learning problems and can be quite significant, because most learning is dependent on language. If your child has such a disability, it can affect his reading, spelling, writing, speech, and ability to understand what he hears or reads. It may also affect his memory or com-prehensionthat is, the ability to recall or understand information previously heard or read. Your child ing himself. These problems can not only affect his learning but also may impede his social interactions, which require good listening and speaking skills. As a result he may become embarrassed, confused, or quiet and withdrawn. He might even resort to acting out his feelings, thoughts, or frustrations with inappropriate behavior. Like children with other types of learning disabilities, children with writing problems may be bright and creative but on paper in a coherent manner. This may cause frustration or even a writing phobia. Since any written document is a semipublic, permanent display of ones work, embarrassed or self-conscious and often try to avoid writing assignments or dont make much of an effort when doing them. simultaneous use of many skills, including letter formation, grammar, vocabulary, spelling, the mechanics of writing (punctuation, capitalization), and organizing ideas into sentences and paragraphs.

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THE OUTPOST SEPTEMBER 28 2015 9Y9 Local Dealers Local Buys Local ServiceCars, Trucks, Boats, RVs, Offroad! Search online. Find your next vehicle. Kick the tires. Drive it home.00062330 Common Learning Disabilities among childrenLanguage and Speech Disabilities These are among the most common learning problems and can be quite signif icant, because most learning is dependent on language. If your child has such a dis ability, it can affect his reading, spelling, writing, speech, and ability to understand what he hears or reads. It may also affect his memory or com-prehensionthat is, the ability to recall or understand informa tion previously heard or read. Your child ing himself. These problems can not only affect his learning but also may impede his social interactions, which require good listening and speaking skills. As a result he may become embarrassed, confused, or quiet and withdrawn. He might even re sort to acting out his feelings, thoughts, or frustrations with inappropriate behavior. Like children with other types of learning disabilities, children with writing problems may be bright and creative but on paper in a coherent manner. This may cause frustration or even a writing phobia. Since any written document is a semi public, permanent display of ones work, embarrassed or self-conscious and often try to avoid writing assignments or dont make much of an effort when doing them. simultaneous use of many skills, includ ing letter formation, grammar, vocabu lary, spelling, the mechanics of writing (punctuation, capitalization), and organiz ing ideas into sentences and paragraphs. While some children may master each of these skills separately, carrying all of them out at the same time may prove difmay have several causes, including visual, When youngsters have a weakness or disability in understanding visually presented information, it may affect their ability to read, spell, interpret, or remember the printed word, graphs, tables, illustrations, and maps. These are learning problems; the childrens vision is normal occur along with another weakness for writing. When that happens, the childs writing may be illegible. He may have or keeping numbers properly aligned in columns. He may write letters or numbers backward. This can affect not only his writing ability (including legibility and ematics, causing him to make miscalculations. Memory and Other Thinking As children move through elementary school, they are increasingly asked to remember, retrieve, and use more and more information rapidly. They need detailed manner, as well as to recall and assemble information in a creative and memory (called convergent) is useful in short answers or multiple-choice tests and in analytical, fact-oriented reasoning. The second, more general memory (divergent) is useful in essay writing, retelling a story, interpreting a poem, or describing a character in ones own way. Memory involves taking in information, classifying it, associating it with previously learned information, and consolidating it. Many children understand what they read or are taught but cant remember it later on, perhaps for a test, or they cant memory problem can be subtle and difachieving. Some youngsters have particular trouble remembering several pieces of sequential information, such as multiple instructions or a series of words or numbers (like a telephone number). As a result, a ing a three-step math problem, organizing events, learning the alphabet, remembering multiplication tables, or recounting a story in the proper sequence. A number of factors can make memory problems even worse. These include too rapid rate of incoming information. Attention problems, emotional disorders motivation, and fatigue (poor nutrition, level thinking as well. Some children have problems with a skill called abstract reasoning, meaning that they are unable to determine the general meaning of a particular word or symbolperhaps the symbol for an unknown quantity in a math problem. They also cannot make inferences by more general type of thinking. with organization and thus be unable to assemble information into a usable form. Good organizational skills can also help children associate newly learned informacan be more easily retrieved and utilized. Summarizing skills are another possible problem area. Children may have trouble taking a large amount of information and condensing it to a more manageable size so it is easier to remember and use. Youngsters with this skill are able to separate major facts and concepts from lesser ones, ascertaining which ones are most worthwhile. Inadequate Social Skills These often occur in conjunction with learning disabilities and usually result in or adults. Children with this problem may have trouble interpreting the messages or intentions of others and responding appropriately to others, even to parents and teachers who are trying to be helpful. ties are critical, because peer acceptance important to the youngster in middle childhood and greatly affect his selfimage and self-esteem.

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10 SEPTEMBER 28, 2015 THE OUTPOSTY10 homes unfurnished automobiles air conditioning heating cleaning services Didyouknow? Thisnewspaperismadeupof 75%recyclednewsprint. cleaning services concrete construction landscaping services painters plumbing roofers AlmodovaRoofing &Insulation FreeEstimatesCall928-782-2814 septic systems What's atwww.nieyuma.com? CLASSIFIEDS To place your ad call 928-783-4433 Not long after the announcement of the Yuma International Airport having had a record year in 2014, American Airlines (formerly US Airways) has committed to only has the airline committed to provide footprint inside the passenger terminal building. this new agreement and look forward to working with American Airlines in their travelers (commuters) throughout our region. said Gladys Wiggins, Airport Director. Their investment in our community shows with this new agreement as well as their recent remodel of the ticket the terminal. American Airlines is truly committed to providing the best air service

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THE OUTPOST SEPTEMBER 28 2015 11Y11 www.elliotthomes.com Elliott Homes Solar Communities: Sunset Terrace Townhomes 6171 E. Overlook Ln Just west of 24th St & Araby Rd 928-317-9701 Araby Crossing Araby & 32nd St 928-317-9701 Las Barrancas 12310 Grand View Dr Frontage Rd & 44th St 928-345-1623 Model Homes Open M-F 10am-5pm Weekends 11-5pm ROC #246945 ROC# 244491 VA Approved Builder Solar homes with a wealth of energy-saving, water-saving and money-saving features Excellent warranty from an experienced builder Close to MCAS Base Value prices range from the mid $100,000s to the high $300,000s Preferred lender assistance. Staff available to coordiante VA salesGo online! elliotthomes.com or facebook.com/elliotthomesyuma THREE new home communities with something for everyone. From upscale, low-maintenance townhomes at Sunset Terrace (with clubhouse and pool) to luxury living at Las Barrancas at the View. Ask about seller paid closing costs for VA buyers!00069183 American Airlines commits to Yuma AirportNot long after the announcement of the Yuma International Airport having had a record year in 2014, American Airlines (formerly US Airways) has committed to only has the airline committed to provide footprint inside the passenger terminal building. this new agreement and look forward to working with American Airlines in their travelers (commuters) throughout our region. said Gladys Wiggins, Airport Director. Their investment in our community shows with this new agreement as well as their recent remodel of the ticket the terminal. American Airlines is truly committed to providing the best air service for our community and in the industry, said Wiggins. the new name of the formerly known US Airways operations effective, October 2015. While American Airlines will continue to provide air service from Yuma that data received by the Federal Aviation International Airports record commercial airline passenger activity in 2014 will help open discussions for additional routes. Yuma is very fortunate to have one of the worlds largest airlines serving our market and as a legacy air carrier, we see an increase in passenger travel over look forward to a long-lasting supportive relationship with the local American Airlines team, Wiggins said. Free ights for WWII and Korean veteransWorld War II and Korean War veterans a vintage Boeing Stearman aircraft. On Friday, October 30, at 0800, the Ageless Aviation Dreams Foundation will bring its Air facility at Yuma International Airport. and is absolutely free. The foundation reside in a local long term care facility. Ageless Aviation Dreams Foundation President Darryl Fisher restored the Stearman, with the goal of recognizing veterans living in long-term care communities through providing a Bynum at 344-5221. The deadline for applicants is October 2. PREVENTION WEEK, OCTOBER 4-10Every bedroom needs a working smoke alarm. If you didnt know that, youre not alone. An online questionnaire distributed by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) showed that less than respondents did not know that a smoke alarm should be installed in each bedroom of the home. In an effort to better educate the public about this sleepy smoke alarm of Fire Prevention Week for more than Where You Sleep: Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm as the theme for this years Fire Prevention Week campaign, October 4-10. NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code, requires a smoke alarm in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home.

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12 SEPTEMBER 28, 2015 THE OUTPOSTY12 We Care About Eye Care... Youll See!Revolutionary Breakthrough In Cataract Surgery www.yumaeyedoctor.comTwo Ofces To Serve Your Needs275 W. 28th Street 11551 S. Fortuna Rd., Suite E928-782-1980Se Habla Espaol Scot Class, OD Patrick D. Aiello, MDElliott Snyder, OD F IRS TandONL YL enSX L aser Cataract Surgery in Yuma!00070335