Citation
The outpost

Material Information

Title:
The outpost
Uniform Title:
Outpost (Yuma, Ariz.)
Creator:
Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) -- Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Yuma, AZ
Publisher:
U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, Public Affairs Office
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Biweekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 43 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases -- Newspapers -- Arizona -- Yuma ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Newspapers -- Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) ( lcsh )
Arizona -- Yuma ( fast )
Arizona -- Yuma Proving Ground ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )

Notes

Numbering Peculiarities:
Numerous numbering irregularities.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
639929322 ( OCLC )
ocn639929322

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sidewinder (Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz.)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

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This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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THE OUTPOST MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015 1 Published for the employees and families of Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma Test Center, U.S. Army Garrison Yuma, Cold Regions Test Center and Tropic Regions Test CenterU.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, Arizona 85365 V olume 41 No. 8 Monday, April 13, 2015 Y1Y1 Holocaust survivors describe past horrors By Mark Schauer Discriminatory laws. Forced labor camps. Execution chambers that killed with deadly gas. These were the escalating tools of terror the Nazi regime of Adolf Hitler used in a pathological bid to eliminate Jews and others deemed inferior from the face of the Earth. At the height of Hitlers 12 depraved years in power, more than six million people, representing one-third of the Jewish people in the world and two-thirds of those in Europe, were systematically murdered in concentration camps that spread across the continent. Particularly heinous was the fact that these atrocities claimed the lives of over 1.5 million innocent children. A fortunate few made it through, however, and survivors Annique Dverin and Pauline Brull recently spent a day at YPGs Heritage Center discussing their experiences as children in concentration camps during the Holocaust. They spoke individually in the morning and led a panel discussion about the Holocaust and related topics with audience members in a lengthy afternoon session. The frank talk about religion, minority status, race, and remembrance had particular resonance being held at YPG, the last active Army installation within the famed Desert Maneuver Area in which 20 Army divisions underwent harsh training during World War II in preparation for combat. Many of the divisions landed at Normandy in June 1944 and fought their way across Nazioccupied Europe, liberating 10 concentration camps prior to Reich. Many members of the YPG workforce who, throughout the day, were keenly aware of the special opportunity the visit represented. The window of opportunity to interface with people who were actually there is quickly closing, said Gordon Wiborg, plans and operations chief for the proving grounds Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security and the son of a World War II combat veteran. Its important for us to take the opportunity or were going to miss it, and with knowledge, and experience these people have. After that it is just reading it in a history book, and thats very, very different. In recollections presented during the afternoon discussion, Brull said many decades passed before survivors like her were able to talk about their trauma. For years, survivors were not telling their stories, until their children, who were by then grown up, started demanding from their parents to hear what had happened, she said. Why were there no grandparents? Why were there no family photos? People were afraid because it opens up a about. Nonetheless, even after nearly seven decades the memories are ever-present. If I have a fever or have a tough day, its hard to sleep because thoughts keep running through my mind, said Dverin. During the lengthy conversation with audience members, all of the panelists by Post Traumatic Stress Disorder from their own solace and support talking to Holocaust survivors. I think there would be great merit in wounded warriors and Holocaust survivors sitting down together, because in terms of PTSD the wounded warriors could see that there is hope, said Dr. Gail Wallen, director of the Military Program for the Holocaust Survivors of Southern Arizona. You can go on. Further, Holocaust survivors would likewise gain comfort in the dialogue. Preventing it from happening again is part of telling the story, said Brull. I think it is the survival instinct From left, Dr. Gail Wallen, director of the military program for Holocaust Survivors of Southern Arizona, and Holocaust survivors Annique Dverin and Pauline Brull talk with appreciative YPG personnel during a panel discussion at the proving grounds Heritage Center. YPG mission highlighted at Yuma County Fair /Page 2 Yuma community rallies around supporting the military / Page 4 Ensuring the reliability of guided munitions /Page 6 Photo By Mark Schauer

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2 MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015 THE OUTPPOSTY2Y2 YPG mission highlighted at Yuma County Fair A visitor takes an up close look at the Silver Fox unmanned aircraft on display. The aircraft generated a huge volume of questions from the public. K.D. Tyree, archeologist, enjoys interacting with visitors stopping by the YPG exhibit. Yolie Canales, public affairs specialist, answered dozens of questions during her time at the fair, from explaining the proving grounds mission to describing career opportunities. Chuck Wullenjohn and Mark Schauer, are ready for the ood of visitors showing up on opening day, when admission tickets are discounted. (Photo By Mark Schauer) By Public Affairs Staff The annual Yuma County Fair brings out over 165,000 people each year, from all walks of life and age groups, to the Yuma County Fairgrounds for six days of fun, education and enjoyment. Yuma Proving Ground has participated in the event by showcasing the installations storied history with a large photographic exhibit of employees conducting a wide variety of test projects that take place throughout the year at the proving ground. This year, YPGs Air Combat Directorate contributed an actual Silver Fox unmanned aircraft to the display that was the focus of a number of questions from people who stopped by. Staffed and coordinated by YPG Public Affairs Center and a volunteer from the Environmental Sciences Division, the booth included a table display of vintage military memorabilia as well as copies of the Outpost newspaper and informational brochures.

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THE OUTPOST MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015 3 16 Craft Beers on Tap 59044712 S. 4th Ave.928-783-0260 Y3Y3 THEOUtTPoOStT News may be submitted to: The Editor, Outpost, Yuma P P roving Ground, Yuma, AZ, 85365. PP hone: (928) 328/6189 or DSN 899. Visit our website at: www.yuma.army.mil or email to: yolanda.o.canales.civ@mail.milCommander: Col. RR andy Murray Public Affair s Ofcer: Chuck Wullenjohn Public Affairs Specialist/Editor: Yolanda Canales Public Affairs Specialist: Mark Schauer Technical Editor, Cold Regions Test Center: Clara Zachgo Marketing Specialist: Teri Womack Visual Information Manager: RR iley Williams The Outpost is an unofcial publication authorized under provisions of A RR 360. The Outpost is published every two weeks by the P P ublic Affairs Ofce, Yuma P P roving Ground. Views and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Army. This newspaper uses material credited to ATEC and A R R NEWS. While contributions are solicited, the P P A O reserves the right to edit all submitted materials and make corrections, changes or deletions to conform with the policy of this newspaper. Photos and story by Yolie Canales YPG celebrated the Month of the Military Child with a gala, colorful parade Thursday April 2nd featuring children from the proving grounds child care center. Its an always anticipated Parade brings parents, grandparents and workforce out marching, celebrating!event because it brings about a great many smiles -as well as feelings of pride in numerous watching parents and grandparents! Col. Randy Murray, YPG commander, Gordon Rogers, Garrison manager, Chaplain (Maj.) Douglas Thomison and YPG Commander Col. Randy Murray (left center) and Gordon Rogers (right), Garrison, manager, prepare to march with the children from the Child Development Center in observance of Month of the Military Child. Just to keep things on the safe side, leading off the parade is good ol McGruff. Parents, grandparents and CDC staff take off on the parade route waving ags and pompoms, etc. marched alongside 40 children, who either walked, rode in strollers or were carried by their parents through a few blocks in the Howard Cantonment Area waving pom-poms, streamers and singing patriotic songs as they observed the event. By the time the children made their rounds and headed back to the center, they were pretty worn out. My son, Jack, was pretty tired and broke a sweat by the time we arrived at CDC. However, he had a ball as he waved his hands up in the air with a grin from ear to ear, and to see this makes me happy, said Amanda Quintero. I think every program that the CDC puts together for the children are the best and they only get better! from the Environmental Sciences Division, the booth included a table display of vintage military memorabilia as well as copies of the Outpost newspaper and informational brochures.

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4 MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015 THE OUTPPOST Reds Bird Cage SaloonLocated in the heart of Historic Downtown Yuma231 Main St. 928-783-1050Mon-Fri 9am 2:30am Open Sat & Sun 6am Come And Join Us! Y4Y4 Yuma rallies around supporting the military By Chuck Wullenjohn It is estimated that about one percent of Americans serve in uniform at any one time, making their protective services to the nation of inestimable value. Many communities throughout the country formed military support organizations in past decades to honor those who serve and defend individual bases from encroachment and other issues with potential negative impacts. military installations have publically stated many times, Yuma is outstanding when it comes to supporting military activities. The partnership that exists between community strong, pro-active and warm. A local organization being toward supporting and advocating for the two local military installations on a permanent basis. Called the Yuma 50, the organization will be a positive, permanent Yuma community voice to support local military interests. Written bylaws are being prepared now, as is appropriate registration with government agencies. Yuma 50 chairperson Ken Rosevear, who recently retired from the Yuma County Chamber of Commerce after 16 years, says when threats arise to local bases, the organization will go into action. We will be able to muster a total communication package showing the communitys position, he said. Email messages, phone calls and letters will result. Rosevear feels strongly about the military. The mission of Yumas two bases is absolutely necessary to the defense of our nation, he said. We cant let any organization or person encroach on that mission. Yuma is a premier military testing and training location. Though the Yuma 50 will focus its attention on protecting the two Yuma bases, their interests will extend throughout Southern Arizona. The Southern Arizona Defense Alliance is helping the Yuma 50 to form and will act as an umbrella organization to advocate for all the military installations in that area, such as Fort Huachuca, and DavisMonthan and Luke Air Force Bases. Bruce Dusenberry, current president of the alliance, has visited Yuma several times with others to help with the formation of the Yuma 50. Recently, a to Yuma to visit both local installations, as well as meet with board members of the Yuma 50. Our intention is to encourage support for the Yuma 50 and become partners, said Dusenberry. We know that 90 percent of Yuma County residents strongly support the military and there is a long history of that support. He intends for the alliance to support Yuma any way it is able, from public affairs efforts to advocacy in Washington, D.C. He points out that Southern Arizona offers numerous advantages to the military and, actually, is unique in the world. The land, airspace, weather, and vast ranges offer tremendous opportunities, he said. All the attributes come together into a whole that can be found nowhere else. He also says Arizona ranks in the top ten among all states for Department of Defense spending. Rosevear says Yuma community-members can look forward to a major kickoff celebration in coming months for the Yuma 50, and membership will be encouraged for individuals, businesses and other organizations. A web site and other contact tools are also in the works. Everyone on the Yuma 50 board today is a volunteer, and forming an organization takes time, he said. But things are going well and I know our efforts will be positive for the military and the community. Pat Franklin (left), explains Air Combat Directorate activities to members of the Southwest Arizona Defense Association during their recent two day visit to Yuma. (Photo by Chuck Wullenjohn)

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THE OUTPOST MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015 5 www.primecareyuma.com Scan with your smart phone to view website with more information.You put your familys health rst. We do the same. Foothills Location 11142 S. Scottsdale Drive Yuma, AZ 85367 928-345-6830 NEW SUMMER HOURS! 7am 7pm Monday Friday CALL FOR WINTER HOURS! (928)341-4563 Where parents can bring their sick children to be seen by a pediatrician. Valley Location 2377 S. 22nd Dr., Yuma, AZ 928-343-0488 Clinic Hours: 7am 7pm Monday thru Friday Prime Care Kids: Mon. Fri.: 5pm 11pm Sat. Sun. & Holidays: 9am 3pm 284 W. 32nd Street Yuma, AZ 85364 928-341-4563 6am-11pm 7 Days a Week Central Location Tue.-Fri, 9-6, Sat. 9-4 Sun. & Mon. Gone Ridin1999 Arizona Ave. 782-7580 www.libertymotorsports.com FULL LINE OF POWER EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS ON ALL BRANDS Financing Available! rfn tbf n00059223 Y5Y5

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6 MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015 THE OUTPPOSTY6Y6Ensuring the reliability of guided munitions By Mark Schauer Whenever the United States the reliability of that round was meticulously proven at U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground long before making it into the hands of Soldiers. For decades, YPG has been at the forefront of artillery test and evaluation, and the most impressive achievement in recent years has been the development precision-guided 155mm projectile. At long ranges, a conventional artillery round can land more than 250 meters away from a target, a potentially fatal outcome for both Soldiers and civilians. The push for more accurate artillery has resulted in the fully guided Excalibur round, accurate to approximately two meters of a target. This round underwent extensive testing at U.S. Army YPG during the last decade, and continues to return for lot acceptance testing that ensures reliability. Each time we produce a large quantity of ammunition, we perform a lot acceptance test at YPG to ensure the service member gets what we advertise, said Maj. Harlan McKinney, assistant product manager. The capability to reliably deliver munitions within two meters at very long distances doesnt exist in many other systems. Excaliburs guidance capability makes lot acceptance tests more complex than those of conventional artillery rounds. To put the precision round through At long ranges, a conventional artillery round can land more than 250 meters away from a target, but the fully-guided Excalibur round is accurate to within approximately two meters of a target. Here, testers enter an Excalibur rounds coordinates prior to a test re. (Photos by Mark Schauer) SEE RELI a A BILIT y Y page 7

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THE OUTPOST MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015 7Y7Y7its paces in as realistic a scenario as possible, YPG testers erect targets of various sizes and types. For example, in a recent test, Excalibur rounds targeted scrapped vehicle hulls one day, and a simulated parking wooden blocks the next. Whatever the target happens to be, video surveillance captures the rounds explosive impact as testers watch from trailers at the gun position. High speed cameras capture hundreds of frames of the projectile its target, it is tracked the entire way using optical tracking and telemetry systems. As each round is in howitzer take readings from pressure gauges inside the gun barrel. Lot acceptance testing, the testing of a sample of munitions in real-world conditions to ensure reliability and effectiveness, is an important part of YPGs munitions and weapons mission. This fact, combined with the proving grounds extensive institutional knowledge of the Excalibur round makes it an ideal test location. YPG has a long history with the program, said McKinney. The people here do a really good job supporting the tests and understanding requirements. There is a serious comfort level in what they do. BOTTOM RIGHT: YPG weapons operators prepare a propelling charge prior to a test re. Lot acceptance testing, where samples of munitions are red in real-world conditions to ensure reliability and effectiveness, is an important part of YPGs munitions and weapons mission. ABOVE: Test ofcer Richard Bloomeld radios other support personnel prior to a test re. YPG has a long history with the program, said Harlan McKinney, assistant product manager. The people here do a really good job supporting the tests and understanding requirements. ReRE LI aA BILI tyTY FR omOM P ageAGE 6 TOP RIGHT: YPG employee Michael Daniel uses a level to measure elevation prior to a lot acceptance test re. YPG extensively tested the Excalibur projectile extensively throughout its development.

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8 MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015 THE OUTPPOST LongRealtyYuma.com 10602 Camino Del Sol, Yuma, Az 85367 (928) 342-9851 THE YUMA EXPERTS We can make it happen Luxury Lifestyle...Affordable Excellence! ENERGY STARHomes + SolarElliott Homes Solar Communities: Araby Crossing NEW PLANS! Araby and 32nd Street 928-783-1800 Las Barrancas 12310 Grand View Drive 928-345-1623 facebook.com/elliotthomesyumaROC #246945 | ROC # 244491 | DRE # LC656392000* Some restrictions may apply. Features, amenities, special oers and pricing subject to change without notice. Special pricing/ special oers cannot be combined. Solar homes with a wealth of energy-saving, watersaving and money-saving features Private, gated community with clubhouse, pool and spa Open oor plans with mountain and valley views Close to shopping, restaurants and services Priced from $229,950 to $243,950 Call 928-317-9701 or take a drive to 24th Street and Araby Road.Buy before March 31, 2015 and well include a Private Spa in your own backyard! CHAPLAINS CORNERPLAY BALL!By Chaplain (Maj.) Douglas ThomisoGood day Yuma Proving Ground. Well, after several weeks of spring training (much of it took place here in Arizona), the regular Major League Baseball season has begun. Thus, let the games begin! If you are a fan of baseball or even if you are not, you may still appreciate the work, dedication, passion and heart that goes into striving to succeed in baseball. A new day, week or season brings about possibilities. The former Los Angeles Dodger Manager Tommy Lasorda once said, The difference between the impossible and the possible lies in a persons determination. I truly like thinking about what is possible in life, and the start of a new season opens the door for possibilities. The Holy Bible illustrates that we often limit ourselves and what is possible. The Bible says, And Jesus said to him, If You can? All things are possible to him who believes. demonstrates how they can move from whats impossible to what is possible. Inspiration, resolve and faith are important matters to achieve ones goals in life. Still thinking of baseball and famous quotes, Hall of Famer Babe Ruth once said, Never allow the fear of striking out keep you from playing the game. So as spring has sprung and a new season is at hand, are you starting this portion of the calendar year living with the cup half full or half empty? You cannot change what took place yesterday, but you can begin today as a day that has never been lived before. Remember, all things are possible! Have a blessed day YPG, and lets play ball!Y8Y8

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THE OUTPOST MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015 9 Luxury Lifestyle...Affordable Excellence! ENERGY STARHomes + SolarElliott Homes Solar Communities: Araby Crossing NEW PLANS! Araby and 32nd Street 928-783-1800 Las Barrancas 12310 Grand View Drive 928-345-1623 facebook.com/elliotthomesyumaROC #246945 | ROC # 244491 | DRE # LC656392000* Some restrictions may apply. Features, amenities, special oers and pricing subject to change without notice. Special pricing/ special oers cannot be combined.Solar homes with a wealth of energy-saving, watersaving and money-saving features Private, gated community with clubhouse, pool and spa Open oor plans with mountain and valley views Close to shopping, restaurants and services Priced from $229,950 to $243,950 Call 928-317-9701 or take a drive to 24th Street and Araby Road.Buy before March 31, 2015 and well include a Private Spa in your own backyard! demonstrates how they can move from whats impossible to what is possible. Inspiration, resolve and faith are important matters to achieve ones goals in life. Still thinking of baseball and famous quotes, Hall of Famer Babe Ruth once said, Never allow the fear of striking out keep you from playing the game. So as spring has sprung and a new season is at hand, are you starting this portion of the calendar year living with the cup half full or half empty? You cannot change what took place yesterday, but you can begin today as a day that has never been lived before. Remember, all things are possible! Have a blessed day YPG, and lets play ball!Y8 Y9 Y8 Y9Hula-hoop yourself to a healthier body By Yolie Canales The Armys Ready and Resilient Campaign integrates and synchronizes a wide variety of efforts that improve the readiness and resilience of the Total Army Soldiers, Civilians and Families. Physical exercise is an important part of the campaign and it offers more than a necessary chore. The following is a great example of how one can make exercising fun. How many out there have not touched a hula-hoop since childhood? How many have never even tried hula-hooping because of the possibility of embarrassment or not being able to keep the hoop above the hips? If this describes you, youre one of many. Dont despair; you can still do it as an adult, right here at YPG. Yes, right here. Beth Lumsden and her coworker, Amanda Quintero, both environmental specialists for North Wind Resource Consulting, have begun implementing hoop dance exercising during their half hour lunch break. They are looking for interested individuals who want to try the workout while having fun at the same time. Youd be surprised at the workout one gets Lumsden, who has been practicing since 2009. The hula-hoop is an extremely simple yet effective piece of workout equipment that can tone your thighs, abs, glutes, and arms. And its just as much fun as when you were a child. But dont despair, practice makes perfect. basic moves, such as around the waist, until they feel comfortable. After one feels ready they can step up to more advanced ones, mixing and matching tricks which she teaches along the way. Do any combination of calories per workout) three times a week for four weeks and youll lose three to six inches all over your body. Yep, belly included! Lumsden, who has built her own adult-sized hoops from irrigation tubing, says the heavier the hoop, the better the workout; some like to add sand or water inside the tubing for added weight. When I was visiting back home in Minnesota, I ran across a friend who taught me how to make the hoops, she said. Once I got it down, I began hula-hooping in Yuma with the help of online tutorials and became addicted. She believes anyone else can have fun, too. Beth is a great instructor, said Quintero. It took only one lesson for me to learn the basics. I found the movements to be very natural lunch break by running the Legacy Trail or going to the gym, and now weve added hooping to our routine. Its nice to change things up and hooping is a fun way to do that. improves your balance and posture, increases coordination and more like playing, than it is a set workout. Hooping is good for your entire body, good for the soul and puts a lasting smile on your face. Hooping has a spiritual side, also. As a perfect circle, the hoop is the ancient symbol for gnosis (knowledge with wisdom). It is the death and rebirth, and the change within the whole. The circle has long been used for delineating sacred space. If you ever catch them out hooping, feel free to join in for a lesson and some fun! Amanda Quintero and Beth Lumsden demonstrate hula-hopping during their 30-minute workout (Photo by Mark Schauer)

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10 MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015 THE OUTPPOST mfactured mobile homes automobiles VIEWPOINTSBy Mark SchauerWhether in comic books or the Sunday funnies, comic characters left an indelible imprint on the childhoods of many. We asked members of the workforce about their favorite comic strip characters when they were kids.Master Sgt. Brain Davis,Airborne Test FF orce NCO I I C:I didnt read comics that often, but when I did I think my favorite was Spider Man. I liked his powers and his alter ego, plus he could shoot webs from his wrists and climb a toy store and picked up one double pack with Spider Man and Wonder Woman. I have an old Superman comic in a wrapper put away, too.Raquel Overstreet, PP C repair technician:I liked Dennis the Menace in the Sunday comics, because he would always get in trouble and then somehow always get out of it. I liked all of the other characters in it, even Margaret. Unlike Dennis, I never wanted to get into trouble. Garnette Brunett-Dean, Quality Control Ofcer:I liked Archie, because you could relate to the characters. Back then you wanted to hurry and grow up so you could be a teenager. I liked Veronica-she just seemed cool. Jughead was crazy, if you wanted someone to pull a stunt you looked him up. Next Outpost deadline is noon April 16thSexual Assault Hotline: 920-3104 Report Domestic Violence: 328-2720

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THE OUTPOST MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015 11 www.yumaeyedoctor.comTwo Ofces To Serve Your Needs275 W. 28th Street 11551 S. Fortuna Rd., Suite E928-782-1980Se Habla EspaolWe Care About Eye Care... Youll See!Your vision means so much to so many.Look good and protect your eyes from harmful UV rays with quality, fashion sunglasses regular or prescription. Scot Class, OD Patrick D. Aiello, MDElliott Snyder, OD Eyeglass Packages00059213 Y11Y11

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12 MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015 THE OUTPPOSTY12Y12 00057359