Citation
The outpost

Material Information

Title:
The outpost
Uniform Title:
Outpost (Yuma, Ariz.)
Creator:
Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) -- Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Yuma, AZ
Publisher:
U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, Public Affairs Office
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Biweekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 43 cm

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases -- Newspapers -- Arizona -- Yuma ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Newspapers -- Yuma Proving Ground (Ariz.) ( lcsh )
Arizona -- Yuma ( fast )
Arizona -- Yuma Proving Ground ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )

Notes

Numbering Peculiarities:
Numerous numbering irregularities.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
639929322 ( OCLC )
ocn639929322

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sidewinder (Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz.)

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Digital Military Collection

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Full Text

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THE OUTPOST MONDAY, F EBRUARY 16, 2015 1By Mark Schauer A popular public YPG attraction is temporarily off-limits to facilitate an important new construction land from the ravages of construction equipment and vehicles. The Wahner Brooks Display Area will be closed for several months while a new 1,320 square foot visitor center is erected behind the existing exhibit. A response to a recent regulation change that requires military visitor centers to be located outside post boundaries, the construction project will employ between 80 and 100 people and be built with Though passersby will miss the opportunity to get up close and personal with historic military platforms like the M43 Sherman tank and Sergeant York 40 millimeter Anti-Aircraft Weapons System for the duration of the construction, planners feel the completed project will be worth the temporary inconvenience. We looked at a number of locations around YPG to locate this, and this was really the best spot, said Mark Hanley, Engineering, Plans, and Services Division chief. This is going to relieve a great deal of frustration for visitors. They can sit comfortably while the process is worked instead of waiting in line in their vehicle at an entrance gate. Locating the center behind the interpretive display will also save construction costs by utilizing the existing gravel parking lot. However, two handicapped parking spaces will be paved, and a 300 foot-long concrete sidewalk leading to the centers front door will be constructed. Anyone who is handicapped will have accessibility, said Ernesto Elias, Army Corps of Engineers project supervisor. Though the interpretive display will be closed to the public for the duration of the construction, planners are making efforts to minimize disruption Road, most notably by boring beneath the road rather than trenching through it to accommodate power and sewer connections. They are also actively restricting access to the adjacent land that once was Many who have heard of or read about Camp Laguna as a historic property dont really understand that nothing was permanent, said K.D. Tyree, archaeologist. The only permanent things we have found are concrete pads for a kitchen area and a few located broken cans, Coke bottles, various walkways and unit insignia. An archaeologist will be on site throughout construction to ensure that historic areas are not disturbed. There is a possibility that something could be found, but not a high probability, said Tyree. The recent historic artifacts versus true Camp Laguna objects. Camp Laguna will be resurrected in a sense, however, with an interpretive wall display planned for the interior of the new center. The display will be curated by Heritage Center director Bill Heidner and Tyree. Tyree. The team effort that has gone into this is outstanding. Construction planners aim to complete the new structure by summer. is that everyone got what they want, said Hanley. Everybody involved with the construction is happy, and we were able to get it done under the statutory dollar limit. This is really a win-win. Published for the employees and families of Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma Test Center, U.S. Army Garrison Yuma, Cold Regions Test Center and Tropic Regions Test CenterU.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, Arizona 85365 Volume 41 No. 4 Monday, February 16, 2015 Civilian tester of the year drawn to YPG /Page 3 Petroleum analysis facility upgraded /Page 4 ATEC Commander says YPG integral to Army success /Page 6 Y1New visitor center coming soon Construction crews dig trenches to prepare for plumbing that will be laid at the new Yuma Proving Ground Visitor Center which will be built behind the existing Wahner Brooks Display Area exhibit. (PHOTO BY MARK SCHAUER)

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2 MONDAY, F EBRUARY 16, 2015 THE OUTPOSTY2By Yolie Canales Ever since Heather Goyette, YPG Librarian, been an avid reader all my life and found reading fascinating and adventurous, said Goyette, who has been at YPG since July 2013. She said she loved reading so much that while in high school, she took a job at the library where she had ample time to read during breaks. While in college, she was a history major which kept her in the library doing research. The more decided to pursue a Bachelors in Library Science and then went back to receive my Masters, she said. from West Point in New York, where she served as cataloging librarian. Coming to work for a and my duties are more in the administrative and their requests are as unique as the proving ground. Each day, there is something new and different. Goyette said that at the Military Academy at West Point she dealt primarily with cadets and faculty. The building was a six story facility with a library volume of 50,000, which kept her extremely busy. have more hands-on time in every aspect of the library---from administrative to crafts and other programs, she said. As with many jobs, there are challenges along the way. Goyette says the biggest challenge she faces at YPG are the low number of patrons and acclimating to the difference between an academic library and a community library. Here, youve got Goyette s goal is to get the word out to the community that the library is open to all residents of YPG, active and retired military personnel, and members of the workforce to include contractors as from our library, just let us know and we will do everything we can to accommodate your requests, we have 10 computers that are available for use by patrons; we have electronic books available that can be obtained online through AKO or through the librarys website. Come by and visit us. Goyette said that besides reading, she enjoys Olympics and had the best time ever. She said that meeting and talking to patrons from so many inquiries, it brings great satisfaction to me. Hours of operation for the library are as follows: Tuesday thru Thursday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Goyette anyone is interested, please call her at 3282558 or come by the library.Love of reading attracted Heather Goyette to career in libraries THEOUTPOST The Outpost is an unofcial publication authorized under provisions of AR 360. The Outpost is published every two weeks by the Public Affairs Ofce, Yuma Proving Ground. Views and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Army. This newspaper uses material credited to ATEC and ARNEWS. While contributions are solicited, the PAO reserves the right to edit all submitted materials and make corrections, changes or deletions to conform with the policy of this newspaper. News may be submitted to: The Editor, Outpost, Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, AZ, 85365. Phone: (928) 328/6189 or DSN 899. Visit our website at: www.yuma.army.mil or email to: yolanda.o.canales.civ@mail.milCommander: Col. Randy Murray Public Affairs Ofcer: Chuck Wullenjohn Public Affairs Specialist/Editor: Yolanda Canales Public Affairs Specialist: Mark Schauer Technical Editor, Cold Regions Test Center: Clara Zachgo Marketing Specialist: Teri Womack Visual Information Manager: Riley Williams Heather Goyette is busy preparing materials for one of many special programs the library offers to families at Yuma Proving Ground. (PHOTO BY YOL IE CANALES)

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THE OUTPOST MONDAY, F EBRUARY 16, 2015 3Y3 Local ServiceCars, Trucks, Boats, RVs, Offroad! Search online, Find your next vehicle, Kick the tires, Drive it home. 00050536 By Mark Schauer Proving ground and magnet. Yuma Proving Grounds mission of testing nearly every piece of equipment in the ground combat arsenal requires the skill of hundreds of talented engineers who hail from all parts of the country. Many rise to distinction within the test community and spend entire careers here, even if they never imagined working and living in one of the worlds most extreme desert environments. who is earning plaudits for his work as team lead for the proving grounds evaluations of the Joint Lightweight Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) that will ultimately replace the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV). YPGs competition phase of testing evaluated three vehicles and involved the efforts of about 150 workers who devoted in excess of 340,000 labor hours to the tests. He is hard working and keeps his team informed, said Zack ElAnsari, combat automotive branch chief. He is detail-oriented, calm, and he always focuses on providing a good, on-time product for his test customer. Association recognized Rodriguez and the JLTV effort when they recently named him government civilian tester of the year. This program was very demanding with an aggressive schedule, and we had to deal with sequestration and budget concerns, executed very well and did a top notch job. Rodriguez, a native of El Paso, Texas, was always mechanically minded. Rodriguez. My dad is a really good mechanic and he always had me help him out working to maintain our An outreach program from the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) sparked his interest in engineering. He ended up earning a degree in mechanical engineering, but was slow to declare a major. with basic classes and then hopefully While a student at UTEP, he learned about Yuma Proving Ground at a job fair recruiting booth, and his friend Juan Cuevas, now chief of YPGs simulation branch, ended up taking a job there. Meanwhile, Rodriguez worked his way through school as a draftsman El Paso, then worked for a larger ventilation systems for commercial and industrial buildings. He was married and assumed he would stay in his hometown until Cuevas told him of YPGs intense need for robust test schedule during the most violent insurgent days of Americas By this time we had purchased really for informational purposes. The nature of the work deeply intrigued him, though. to see new things and experience new technologies. After deep deliberations with his wife, he took a position offered in June 2006, relocating to Yuma. Prior to working on the JLTV program, Rodriguez tested such platforms as the all-terrain variant of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) and mine-clearing vehicles. sure we get the right product to the in a safe manner here. These days, Rodriguez is even busier than usual as part of the proving grounds aspiring leaders program, the major facet of which is earning a Masters degree in program management from the University of Arizona. Rodriguez plans on making the command a career. Civilian tester of the year drawn to YPG Combat Automotive Systems Division team lead Isaac Rodriguez was recently named Government Civilian Tester of the Year by the National Defense Industrial Association. At YPG for nearly nine years, Rodriguez plans to make the command a career. I like the variety and learning new things and technologies.(PHOTO BY MARK SCHAUER)

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4 MONDAY, F EBRUARY 16, 2015 THE OUTPOST Y4By Mark Schauer the chemists in YPGs material analysis lab are the clinicians. Using high tech equipment, these chemists help determine if a vehicles engine is on the road to a premature Theres any number of metals that indicate unusual wear inside an engine, said Steve Maurer, chemist. We use standard warning levels and insurgency, the combat automotive workload increased dramatically, with extensive and rapid testing of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle developed to protect American Soldiers from the destructive power of roadside bombs and other improvised explosive Joint Lightweight Tactical Vehicle, the successor to the high Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle, is another high priority project. Through it all, the material analysis lab vital to these tests has continued its mission in the same building built in the days of the Jeep. Originally designed as a vehicle maintenance building in the mid-1950s, the structure that has served as home to most of the labs activities ever since was repurposed in an era far different from our own. This building evolved into a laboratory by adding a few ventilation hoods, said Maurer. for a laboratory. Today, there are requirements for laboratories that this building cant meet, even with a major overhaul. Petroleum analysis facility upgraded VIEWPOINTSIts only February, but the warmer weather weve had lately makes a person think of summer and travel. We asked members of the workforce to share memories of their favorite vacations.Isaac Rodriguez Team lead Going to Legoland and Disneyland with my kids about a year ago. The trip really brought a smile to their faces, and we spent some good quality time places.Robert Trujillo Ammo plant Harley. We did about 2,900 miles over two weeks, enjoying the ride, visiting with family, and stopping whenever we wanted to. There are lots of things to see and neat little towns you never hear of in the mountains: we found all kinds of hidden treasures. Wayne Schilders Weapons operation chief Probably visiting my wifes family in South but spending two or three weeks on vacation is like a lot over the years, from rural to urbanized with any vacation with the kids when they were young was memorable: you have to enjoy the time with them while you can. YPG and Army Corps of Engineers ofcials recently joined building contractors in a ground-breaking ceremony for a new material analysis laboratory. (PHOTO BY MARK SCHAUER) NEXT OUTPOST DEADLINE IS NOON FEBRUARY 19THSexual Assault Hotline: 920-3104 Report Domestic Violence: 328-2720SEE FACILITY page 5

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THE OUTPOST MONDAY, F EBRUARY 16, 2015 5 Y5 ElliottHomes.com Some restrictions may apply. Features, amenities, special offers and pricing subject to change without notice. Special pricing / special offers cannot be combined. 3-5 bedroom solar homes with open floor plans and a wealth of energy-saving, water-saving and money-saving features priced from $174,950 to $239,950 For a limited time, buy a home at Araby Crossing and get an Entertainers Package FREE: Outdoor kitchen, fireplace, dining area (Value up to $10,000)* Seller will pay up to 3% in buyers closing costs when using builder-preferred Wells Fargo*Call 928-783-1800 or take a drive to 32nd Street and Araby Road. facebook.com/elliotthomesyumaLife doesnt get much better than this: Grand Opening! ROC #246945 | ROC# 244491DRE# LC656392000 Grand opening Saturday, January 31 11am 5pm Refreshments Rafes Enter to win a large screen TV and other great prizes 00055059 CHAPLAINS CORNERWords MatterBy Chaplain Douglas (Maj.) Thomison Good day Yuma Proving Ground. Recently many of us watched the Super Bowl. During the week that leads up to the Super Bowl a day is set aside entitled Media Day. On that day members of the media have the opportunity to interview the respective Super Bowl teams. Numerous players are questioned, which gives them the occasion to not only answer questions, but to convey whatever they wish to millions of fans. Some were quite good. The players were insightful on the upcoming game, and talked of their faith and family. Other players were seemingly limited in positive speech or insight. What struck me is this may be their one and only forum to convey something poignant to Media Day interviews were shown. Some were well presented while others were not. Some former players were seemingly embarrassed of what they had said in years past. So why do some players convey insightful words and player himself. adoring fans waiting to hear what we have to say. However, what we say really does matter. Words we convey to co-workers, family and friends are lasting. The Bible tells us, Let no corrupting talk come out of your mouths, but occasion, that it may give grace to those who hear (Ephesians 4:29). Proverbs 25:11 says, would say to the class, Think, and then speak. Lets do some discerning in using words worth conveying. Have a blessed day! recent weeks construction began on a new material analysis lab. Boasting 4400 square feet, three function, and modern laboratory fume hoods, the new laboratory means a 21st century building will activities. This new building was designed with modern chemical hygiene and ventilation guidelines in mind, said Maurer. Meanwhile, the building that currently houses the lab will remain open as a workshop for activities that dont require ventilation. The new laboratory should be ready for occupancy by July. Bracamonte, Director of Ground Combat Systems. Theyve been in the same building since 1955. FACI LITYFROM PAGE 4

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6 MONDAY, F EBRUARY 16, 2015 THE OUTPOSTBy Chuck Wullenjohn The Army Test and Evaluation Command (ATEC) stretches across the North American continent and incorporates installations numbering among the Armys largest. The impact of the commands mission is enormous, for it is to ensure that the weapons and munitions issued to Americas Soldiers function reliably all the time, in any weather and terrain condition, without fail. The mission workload has declined throughout the command in the years since the end of active combat operations in Southeast Asia, but remains much higher than just 15 years ago. ATECs Commander, Maj. Gen. Peter Utley, spent two nights earlier this month at Yuma Proving Ground viewing current test activities and meeting people on the range. He was impressed with what he saw. real power and capability this organization brings to the Army, said Utley. YPG possesses a unique capability whose contribution to the national defense is unmatched. Utley views all the test centers making up ATEC as part of a larger whole. Each center has a unique capability not replicated elsewhere, such as the extreme hot weather testing performed in Yuma. Any one of those test centers not being capable of performing its mission would have a serious impact on the Department of Defense, he said. As leader of the sprawling command, Utley sets time aside throughout the year to visit test centers scattered throughout the nation. Last visiting YPG about six months ago, during his recent visit he received test centers falling under the YPG umbrella Yuma Test Center, Cold Regions Test Center and Tropic Regions Test Center. Determinations on test projects for him to observe downrange centered on high visibility tests but also those that highlighted the breadth of testing that takes place at YPG. have eyes on the command, said YPG Commander Col. thing to read emails and see photos, and another to see it in person and meet the people doing the actual work. One particularly important recent YPG test took place in the latter half of December 2014 when 3300 155mm artillery rounds Y6 ATEC commander says YPG integral to Army success (PHOTO BY MARK SCHAUER)Sgt. 1st Class Dawit Gebregiorgis of Airborne Test Force at Yuma Proving Ground is presented the ATEC Non-commissioned Ofcer of the 1st Quarter award by Maj. Gen. Peter Utley. Joining in on the presentation is ATEC Command Sgt. Maj. Ronald Orosz. SEE COMMANDER page 7

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THE OUTPOST MONDAY, F EBRUARY 16, 2015 7Y7period from three cannon tubes on short notice test project that required short periods of maintenance, and Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Firing began with one shot exploding from the tube every three minutes every two minutes. Each round weighed 100 lbs. The successful completion of this test is an example of what makes the command great, said Utley. The workers were cool, calm professionals who executed the test safely and ahead of schedule. The results are enabling the Army to make decisions that ensure howitzers across the Army remain capable. YPG executed a total of 1.9 million direct labor hours in accomplishing its workload last year, which was down from the 2.4 million achieved three years before. Other test centers have experienced similar declines. Utley sees slight growth in future years because of modernization actions to come. The majority of the systems deployed today will be with us in the future, he said. The need for them to be improved and modernized to ensure they remain relevant will integral to this effort. prioritize the investments it makes, explained Utley. The testing of some of obvious importance, such as unmanned aircraft, are performed today and will be performed in the future at Yuma Proving Ground. Maj. Gen. Utley places the Armys Safety Excellence Streamer on the YPG Colors, which indicates YPG did very well on safety last year. Assisting are YPG Commander Col. Randy Murray (center) and Command Sgt. Maj. Sean Ward.(PHOTO BY CHUCK WULLENJOHN)COMMANDERFROM PAGE 6 Iris Espinoza, Civilian Training Manager, is presented the ATEC Civilian of the Year award by Maj. Gen. Utley. Espinoza received the recognition for the leadership programs she has developed and managed for YPG that are now used at other installations. During Maj. Utleys visit, he had the opportunity to view current test activities and meet people on the range. In this photo he is discussing the SR60 Robotic Steering System with Julio Dominguez (right) and Justin Canzonetta.

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8 MONDAY, F EBRUARY 16, 2015 THE OUTPOST Y8 Lettuce Days is proudly produced by Yuma Visitors Bureau in partnership with University of Arizona Yumas College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 00053690 LongRealtyYuma.com 10602 Camino Del Sol, Yuma, Az 85367 (928) 342-9851 THE YUMA EXPERTS We can make it happen00055050 SEE RESILIENCE page 10 By Paul Kilanski Building spiritual resilience involves understanding the concepts underlying spirituality: meaning, values, transcendence and connection. Meaning refers to making sense of situations that occur in life, and from those experiences gaining a life, you might witness or experience events that appear cruel, unjust or with your values and seem senseless, The Key Concepts of Spiritual Resiliencemaking the work you do seem futile. meaning in the event can help put disturbing incidents into perspective and give you a sense of purpose that can sustain you during adversity. Meaning may be found in a number of ways. For example, Assigning responsibility for the event, interpreting the experience through your philosophical or religious beliefs or believing that something positive has come from the event. Researcher Abraham found meaning in life were selfactualized. Self-actualized people and being the best they could be. They were able to reach their full potential. Values are cherished beliefs and standards that provide a moral compass to steer us toward right or ethical behavior. Values provide a personal belief system, such as principles to live by or an ethical path the foundation for our behavior, guiding and shaping our thoughts, actions and decisions. There is a difference between a perceived value and an actual value. Perceived is how you think something is and actual is how something really is. For example, a man might say that his family is the most important thing in his life; however, he spends little time with them and most of his time at work. The man has, in fact, a

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THE OUTPOST MONDAY, F EBRUARY 16, 2015 9 Y9 Lettuce Days is proudly produced by Yuma Visitors Bureau in partnership with University of Arizona Yumas College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 00053690 Black History Month, or National African American History Month, is an annual celebration of achievements by black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in U.S. history. The event grew out of Negro History Week, the brainchild of noted historian Carter G. Woodson and other prominent African Americans. Since 1976, designated the month of February as Black History Month. Other countries around the world, including Canada and the United Kingdom, also devote a month to celebrating black history. Origins of Black History Month The story of Black History Month begins in 1915, half a century after the Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery in the United States. That September, the Harvard-trained historian Carter G. Woodson and the prominent minister Jesse E. Moorland founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), an organization dedicated to researching and promoting achievements by black Americans and other peoples of African descent. Known today as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH), the group sponsored a national Negro History week in 1926, choosing the second week of February to coincide with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The event inspired schools and communities nationwide to organize local celebrations, establish history clubs and host performances and lectures. mayors of cities across the country began issuing yearly proclamations recognizing Negro History Week. By the late 1960s, thanks in part to the Civil Rights Movement and a growing awareness of black identity, Negro History Week had evolved into Black History Month Origins of Black History Month Historic Images of African American Life during the Depression: 1935-1944Migrant workers travel from Florida to New Jersey to harvest potatoes. African American were particularly devasted by the great depression when work and food were scarce. 1940A man stands in the colored area at a Durham, N.C. bus station. 1940Employees of African American health insurance company work in Chicago, Il. 1941Men shuck corn on Uncle Henry Harretts place in Talley Ho, N. C. 1939A woman working in Alabama elds. 1936SEE ORIGINS page 10 Did you Know? The NAACP was founded on February 12, 1909, the centennial anniversary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln.

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10 MONDAY, F EBRUARY 16, 2015 THE OUTPOST Y10 ORIGINSFROM PAGE 9RESILIENCEFROM PAGE 8 on many college campuses. President Gerald R. Ford History Month in 1976, calling upon the public to seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history. Since then, every American president has designated February as Black History theme. The 2013 theme, At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality: The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington, marks the 150th and 50th anniversaries of two pivotal events in African-American history.Stacey Faris was recently selected as the Yuma Proving Ground Military Spouse of the Year for 2015 by Military Spouse Magazine. More than 1,600 total nominations for the award were submitted from 197 installations across the country, including several from YPG. Candidates such as Faris have been selected to represent more than 170 bases and all nine Coast Guard districts. Americas military and their families have been at the ready throughout the past 13 years in which our nation was at war, said Kate Dolack, Editorin Chief of the magazine. The military spouses who maintained the home front during deployments and training missions have accomplished remarkable feats. Now, perhaps more than ever, it is important to recognize those stand out spouses and honor them for their achievements. Faris believes she was nominated at YPG because of her involvement in the community and her strong desire to see military families obtain all the resources they are due. Theres much more to being a military wife than just being a wife, she said. Many spouses have gone out of their way to volunteer with the goal of needs. Some are caregivers, others are mentors or project leaders. The goal, she says, is to improve the lives of all military families. The overall winner and 2015 Armed Forces of the Year for the entire nation will be revealed Washington, D.C. on May 8th.Stacey Faris honored as Military Spouse of the Year Spring is still more than a month away, but reptiles & other critters are already coming out of hibernation thanks to our warm winter. People working in or enjoying the outdoors need to be ready. Rattlesnakes usually hibernate until April, but might be active before then due to the recent pleasant temperatures. You soon could be seeing critters actively scooting across your test site or gun position, or even your favorite hiking trail or golf course, so be aware & prepared. Watch where you put your feet and your hands, wear heavy work gloves when moving material critters might be hiding when you are outside on a warm night. Dont forget to set out water buckets for bees if theyre active in your area! Contact YPG Safety at ext. 2660 or Environmental Sciences at ext. 2125 for more info about desert critters, and remember that at YPG...NOBODY GETS HURT!perceived value of his family, not an actual value of them. Transcendence refers to experiences and appreciation beyond the self. This can include an awareness of and appreciation for the vastness include an awareness of, or belief in, a force greater than oneself, whether this be a beings, or a cosmic force. One may accept the universe with its mystery, have faith in the unknown and feel like a vital component of some larger scheme. Connection is an increased awareness of a connection with the self and others. Being connected included the notion of involves working toward a greater good and a desire to help others. The quality of caring about others seems to be innate, or wired into our being. Even toddlers will give assistance if they perceive that someone needs help. Being connected can include: Sharing our lives; sharing our values; celebrating our symbols and ceremonies; singing, exercising, meditating or praying with others; participating in activities of mutual support and assistance.SAFETY CORNER

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THE OUTPOST MONDAY, F EBRUARY 16, 2015 11 Y11 YUMAS FUN CENTER Tue.-Fri, 9-6, Sat. 9-4 Sun. & Mon. Gone Ridin1999 Arizona Ave. 782-7580 www.libertymotorsports.com Side By Sides FULL LINE OF POWER EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS ON ALL BRANDS Financing Available! 2015 Polaris Slingshot ATVs For all ages 6+ Motorcycles00053685 I AM YOUR HOMETOWN REALTORWhether buying or selling, allow me to help you through the changes. Selling Yuma Real Estate since 1983.Carolyn McKelvey Malouff Home (928) 783-5507 00049431 An adult saguaro is generally considered to be about 125 years more and be as tall as 50 feet. The average life span of a saguaro is probably 150 175 years of age. However, biologists believe that some plants may live over 200 years The amount of life that the saguaro attracts is quite amazing. As well as the discovery of the unexpected such as a woodpecker variety, you will even get to see hummingbirds in action as they hover over the enormous, many generations of hummingbird ago that this example of the for the sky. Although they will in height, the saguaro does not old. The hummingbird here can be weighed in grams while the saguaro itself may weigh up to nine thousand kilograms. Thats some difference. Although the saguaro is the found in Mexico as well. The name comes from a combination of Spanish and the local American Nation language of the Tohono Oodham. They traditionally harvested the red fruit of the saguaro (pronounced sah-wah-roh) and it was an important source of food for them. So it is too with the visitors to the cactus such as this gorgeous Red-shafted Flicker a type of woodpecker who will not world but will, nevertheless, make itself quite at home here.Saguaros life span and uses

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12 MONDAY, F EBRUARY 16, 2015 THE OUTPOSTY12 www.yumaeyedoctor.comTwo Ofces To Serve Your Needs275 W. 28th Street 11551 S. Fortuna Rd., Suite E928-782-1980Se Habla EspaolWe Care About Eye Care... Youll See!Your vision means so much to so many.Look good and protect your eyes from harmful UV rays with quality, fashion sunglasses regular or prescription. Scot Class, OD Patrick D. Aiello, MDElliott Snyder, OD Eyeglass Packages00054172