Citation
Military intelligence professional bulletin

Material Information

Title:
Military intelligence professional bulletin
Uniform Title:
Military intelligence professional bulletin
Alternate Title:
MIPB
Alternate Title:
MI professional bulletin
Creator:
U.S. Army Intelligence Center and Fort Huachuca
Place of Publication:
Fort Huachuca, AZ
Publisher:
U.S. Army Intelligence Center :
Fort Huachuca.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Quarterly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military intelligence -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Military intelligence -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Military intelligence ( fast )
United States ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Print began with vol. 20, no. 1 (Jan./Mar. 1994).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
on10270 ( NOTIS )
1027060632 ( OCLC )
2008230761 ( LCCN )
2379-2167 ( ISSN )
on1027060632
Classification:
UB250 ( lcc )
355 ( ddc )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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FEATURES DEPARTMENTS 6 9 68

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2 Intelligence is Always Out Front

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3 CSM FORUM

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4 st Technical Perspective

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5

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7 did

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8 C4ISRNET

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9 Intelligence Figure 1. The Why and How of FM 2-0 Fighting a peer threat from a position of strategic disadvantage across contested domains with intelligence collection gaps necessitates fighting for intelligence Freedom of action is not guaranteed. Units must be prepared to fight for intelligence against enemy formations, a range of sophisticated threat capabilities, and many unknown conditions within the operational environment.Emphasis on Fighting for Intelligence How Need is Addressed Maintained the Fundamentals New Focus & Content Commander-driven intelligence Intelligence core competencies Intelligence process National to tactical intelligence Intelligence operations as part of information collection Key intelligence tasks like IPB and collection management Conduct large-scale combat operations Help the commander and staff drive intelligence Increase the G-2/S-2 and MI unit commanders chance of success Refocus tangible intelligence tasks like IPB and collection management Force critical thinking and problem solving to focus intelligence Provide details about MI unit capabilities and gaps by echelon Nest FM 2-0 with FM 3-0 Show the relationship of intelligence to the major constructs in FM 3-0 The challenge of peer threats Contested domains and multidomain operations Army strategic role The operational framework (consolidation areas) Positions of relative advantage Address intelligence collection gapsThe Urgent Need

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10 Figure 2. FM 2-0 Structure Set the Echelons (Chapter 4) Basic intelligence principles and role of the commander An cipated opera onal environment and threats Mul Posi ons of rela ve advantage Opera onal framework Intelligence sta ac vi es Intelligence opera ons (MI unit) Commander and sta involvement Cri cality of the intelligence architectureInforma on collec on planCurrent intelligence collec on gapsOvercoming those gaps Con nuous collec on Theater Army to brigade combat team Emphasis on large-scale combat Consolida on areas/consolidate gainsTheater Army to ba alionIntelligence collec on capabili es by echelonAl *Bold indicates the most signi cant doctrinal updates.Intelligence & the Armys Strategic Roles (Chapter 5) Set the Fundamentals (Chapters 1, 2 & 3) (Chapter 6)

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11 Figure 3. Intelligence and the Armys Strategic Roles8

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12

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13 EW SPF Windows of Opportunity Disrupt Enemy Cohesion Enable Other Domains from Land Space Cyberspace Air Land Maritime Space Cyberspace Air Land Maritime Decisive Point 18

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14 Figure 5. Key Aspects of the Operational Framework19Figure 6. IPB and Intelligence Analysis Support to Operational Framework Considerations23

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15 Figure 7. Leveraging National to Tactical Intelligence Capabilities26

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16

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17 Figure 8. FM 2-0 Logic Chart32 (Continued on next page)

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18 Figure 8. FM 2-0 Logic Chart

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19 Intelligence Intelligence Intelligence

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20 t Figure 1. Intelligence Core Competencies

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21 Intelligence

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22 MI Figure 2. Building Blocks of ISR and PED Architectures

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23 Figure 3. Army Strategic Roles and their Relationship to the Joint Phases2

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24 st Intelligence th th

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26 i

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29 Military Figure 1. Current Objective-T Pillars and MITS Tiers

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30 MTC Tie in to unit systems Scenario repository owner Dynamic scenario injects/MSELsFoundry Role players for SIGINT SIGINT scenario development for live trainingG-27 EDT/initial build HICON products OPORD RTW Threat OBUSAICoE Create tables/tiers in doctrine QA/QC evaluation process Identify scenario build tasks Develop initial top 5 scenarios Training Unit Mission statement Unit-specific training objectives Feedback on scenario build Systems to be trainedIEWTPT Universal scenario build MSEL injects Historical JRTC data Initial data dumps Geospatial injects Figure 2. Key Elements of MITS

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31 Military Military Intelligence Training Strategy Tier 4 nd ndnd thth

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32

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34 Intelligence Intelligence

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39 Lines of Effort and Desired End States

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40 Soldiers train on the PROPHET signals intelligence/electronic warfare system.U.S. Army photo by SGT Mark Miranda

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41 SGT Jacob Butcher, a squad leader in the 1st Infantry Division, troubleshoots a system during an electronic U.S. Army photo by SSG Tamika Dillard, 2nd BCT, 1st ID Public Affairs

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42 Strategy th

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43 st The Right Fit Mission Command in the Twenty-First Century CPT Franklin G. Peachey, 1st Battalion, 4th enemy situational template after a battle in exercise Combine Resolve 8, which took place 27 May 2017 to 12 June 2017 at the Joint Multinational Readiness Center in Hohenfels, Germany.Photo by SPC Naiomy Gaviria, U.S. Army

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44 Figure 1. Mission Command Philosophy

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45 Figure 2. A Typical Military Decision-Making Process Schedule during a Rotational Exercise

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46 t

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48 (

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49

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50 Figure 4. 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment Intelligence Mission Command Document Template

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51

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54 Intelligence

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55 st

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56 The st Provide Baseline Knowledge Ensuring Effective Support to Maneuver Forces Plan Intelligence Architecture Develop Realistic Training

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57 SPC Clayton P. McInnis, a human intelligence collector with 1st Battalion, 155th Infantry Regiment of the Mississippi Army National Guard, reviews reports in the units tactical operations center, at the National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA.Mississippi National Guard photo by SSG Shane Hamann, 102nd Public Affairs Detachment

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58 th 4th thth th

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60 The Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Division at the Combined Air Operations Center at al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, provides a common threat and targeting picture that is key to planning and executing theaterwide aerospace operations.Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force

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61 E i nd

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62

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63 Figure 1. BCTs Command Post Transition

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64 Figure 2. Data-First Approach

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65

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66 Actions to Increase Effectiveness The S-2X Works for the BCT S-2 Use Both Analog and Digital Systems Be Present during Planning and Wargaming Process Stay in Your Lane Coordinate Intelligence Contingency Funds Ensure CI Integration Visit Your OMT, HUMINT Collection Teams, and CI TeamsThe S2X Enables Opera onsMaintain Contact with Other 2X Stas Know the Governing Policies Integrate Early with Supported Units Know your BCTs Collection Capabilities

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67 nd th thrd th

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69 Accessible Driven Needs Analytical Equipment

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70 Improving Knowledge Personal Networks Professional Networks Exis ng Training

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71 Quarterly Military Intelligence thnd

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72

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73 Photo Credit: U.S. Army Signal Corps photographer, from the collections of the Imperial War Museums.Watched by two small boys, a member of the French Forces of the Interior poses with his Bren gun at Chteaudun.

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74 elect

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75 MI

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76 SPC Madeleine R. Rampona and LTC Nathan Lewis, Commander, 224th Military Intelligence Battalion, pose with the Army Aviation Association of America Soldier of the Year trophy.U.S. Army photo U.S. Army photo

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77 st ter

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78 st st Students from the RLDPP visit tour the Korea Expressway Corporation Headquarters on Sept. 28, 2017.Photo by CPT Joshua Taft

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79 SSG Larry Saunders waits for CPT Timothy Vandewalle to lay his dominoes during a game on Camp Savage, Iraq, Oct. 31, 2009.U.S. Army photo by PFC J. Princeville Lawrence

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80

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81 Kathleen Fitzpatrick, U.S. Ambassador to the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, Saran Kote Secondary School in Suai, Cova Lima Municipality, Southwest TimorLeste, June 18, 2018. U.S. Air Force photo by TSgt Benjamin W. Stratton

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