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The Intercom

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The Intercom
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United States -- Army. -- Corps of Engineers. -- Walla Walla District ( issuing body )
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Walla Walla, WA
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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District
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"Serving the military and civiliam members of the Walla Walla District".

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
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on10228 ( NOTIS )
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2018226635 ( LCCN )
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Vol. 38 No. 3 July September 2011 US Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District

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Lt. Col. David Caldwell, District Commander Mill Creek improves dam safety rating stor y by B ru ce e H en ri i ck so n (Above, left and below, right) Walla Walla District Commander Lt. Col. David Caldwell talks to public meeting attendees about the recently improved safety rating of Mill Creek Storage Dam near Walla Walla, Wash. in August. (Below, left) District Hydrology and Hydraulics Chief Mark Lindgren explains the new DSAC rating at the public meeting. INTERCOM 2July September 2011 3 ContentsLooking ahead to a great year F r o m W h e r e I S i t From Where I Sit I NTERCOM I’ve been asked many times this last year how I like being the District Commander. The answer is simple, I love it! The most important reason is YOU; the great employees of this District! You are professionals who care deeply about your part of the mission. I can see this through your dayto-day execution and how you act during unexpected situations. The second reason is our mission. We make a difference locally, nationally, and internationally every day, but our local mission is where we have the largest positive impact. This issue of the Intercom highlights a wide variety of accomplishments and it only scratches the surface. There are a few things I’d like to ask you to focus on as we enter the 2012 scal year: Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO), safety and program execution. OCO is still our number one mission in USACE. This District continues to answer the call to support our nation’s priority. Consider this opportunity and talk to your supervisor if you wish to deploy. Your supervisor will weigh the impacts against the mission and try to identify the right timing and make a recommendation—only I can decide not to deploy someone. Thank you for supporting each other during deployments, whether by back lling work in the District or taking care of families—both are critical to successful deployments. Safety is paramount throughout the upcoming year. We have a Safety Implementation Plan developed with input from across the District. This is a great opportunity to improve in the safety arena and have record-low safety incidents. The only way we can ensure this is if we all are willing to speak up if we see something and have a little humility and willingness to adjust our actions if we need to work on a safety issue. The added focus for safety this year is because you are the District’s most important asset and we can’t accomplish our mission as well if you aren’t a part of it. You may not be aware that FY11 was our biggest year of obligations ($220,721,182) and expenditures ($209,076,431) to date! More importantly, we bought down our risk, were instrumental in protecting people’s lives and property, and we’ve continued to improve in areas while sustaining the things that we’re great at. How did we do it? Teamwork and disciplined planning and execution. FY12 is off to an even better start thanks to so many people’s efforts since the 3rd quarter of FY11. I look forward to our best year of execution because I’m con dent we will accomplish what we set our minds to.FY12 is going to be an excellent year and I look forward to seeing this great District do more great things! Utility Worker Chris Ensley, left, and Power Plant Electrician Randy Wise respond to a “victim’s” broken leg at an annual emergency response drill at Lower Granite Lock and Dam near Colfax, Wash. I I I I I I I I N N N T T T E E E R R R C C C O O O M M M N N N T T T E E E R R R C C C O O O M M M UtilityWorker Ut il it y Wo rk er photos by Stephen Doherty 4 One Team EffortDistrict trains with regional partners to prepare for the worst 8 Fighting Floods See how preparation, coordination and teamwork led to regional ood ght success 11 Response to Irene Power team helps in Hurricane Irene recovery effort 12 All Hands in Corps works with regional partners on projects 14 Loud Ground Routine excavation allows archaeologists to discover stories by digging up the past 16 Under the Hazara Sun Ron Ashley re ects on Afghanistan deployments 18 Cost Dx (Part Two) Their mission is so extensive that we had to do a second article 20 Maintenance Business Check out how we are revamping maintenance ... because it’s your business too 22 What’s New? Check out what we’ve been up to The U.S. Arm y Co rp s of E ng ineers Walla W alla District shared information about th e r ecent ly i mp roved safe ty ratin g of the Mill C reek Stor ag e Dam in a p ublic meetin g in A u gu st near Walla Wall a, Wash The new rati ng was p art of an on go in g n ationwide “Dam Safe ty Action Classi ca t ion” (D SA C) safet y effort b y the Co rp s at each of its dams includi ng the two dams at t he Mill Creek p ro je ct—the diversion dam o n Mill Creek and the stor ag e dam that holds B ennin gt on Lake. Each Cor ps dam was initial ly ass ig ned a D SAC ratin g on a scale of I to V ( one to v e) with DSAC-I bein g least safe. An initial May 2008 DSAC rating assi g ned Mill Creek Storage Dam at D SAC-I or “urgent and compellin g ” ba se d o n a b ri ef r ecords-only review. The Corps headq uarters dam safety Senior Oversig ht G roup recentl y i mproved the Mill Creek Storage Dam DSAC r ating to DSAC-III or “high priority” based o n a completed Issues Evaluation Studies (IES) report and ongoing “interim risk reduc t i o n m e a su r es. ” “ Public safet y is our hi g hest priorit y and k eeping the public informed of our progress i n making our dams safer is an important part o f that effort ” said District Commander Lt. C o l. Dav id C al dw el l. T he storage dam’s initial 2008 rating was due primaril y to potential dam seepage and piping issue s wi thin t he f ou nd at io n of t he dam when Bennin g ton Lake is m ore than 17 p ercent full fo r an extended period of time In October 2009 the storage dam was upgraded t o DSAC-II or “urgent” a f t er additional data g atherin g and a preliminary I ES re p ort that sh ow ed t he r is k fo r da m fail u r e under normal operations w as not as high as originall y es timat e d. The District also began implementing a se ri es o f “int e rim r is k r e du c t io n m e a su r es ” in 2008 to improve public safet y. C or p s of cials held a series of p ublic m eetings about the storage dam and the di ve r s io n da m The Mill C re ek D iv er si on Dam has c arried a DSAC-II rating since its initial class i cation in Januar y 2009 and is under g oin g fu rt he r r e vi ew. For more information a bo ut t he DSAC process, click the “Dam safet y ” tab at www.nww.usace.army.mi l is an unof cial publication authorized by the provi sions of Army Regulation 360-1. It is published bimonthly by the Public Affairs Of ce, Walla Walla District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It has a distribu tion of 1,500 copies. Contents of the INTERCOM are not necessarily the of cial views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Walla Walla District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Commander Lt. Col. David A. Caldwell PA Chief Joe Saxon Editor PA Specialist Terri A. Rorke Stephen Doherty PA Specialist PA Specialist Gina Baltrusch Bruce HenricksonOn the coverphoto by Terri A. RorkeFor more information, contact: Public Affairs Of ce U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 201 N. Third Avenue Walla Walla, WA 99362 Phone: 509-527-7020 E-mail: cenww-pa@usace.army.mil website: www.nww.usace.army.mil

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Lucky Peak trains for emergency response Lucky Peak trains for emergency respo At the invitation of Ada County Marine Unit, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District and Idaho State Parks and Recreation joined St. Lukes’ Landing Zone Of cer training in May at Spring Shores Marina, a common spot for air ambulance responses at Lucky Peak Dam and Lake, Idaho. Participants learned the importance of many aspects of landing zone management, including how to handle ying debris and identifying hazards, with a strong emphasis on denying vehicle and pedestrian access through the landing zone. “In large part a re ection of joint training opportunities, open communication, and shared public safety missions, emergency responses at Lucky Peak are always a one-team drill,” Lucky Peak Natural Resource Manager Keith Hyde said. “We coordinate, contribute, and work closely together, so when misfortune knocks our Corps team, Boise and Ada county law enforcement of cers, re ghters, emergency medical services, state parks employees and other partners are looking out for each other, poised and ready to act,” he said. Besides Spring Shores Marina, landing zones Barclay Bay and Macks Creek often receive several life ight visits during the summer. In 2010, Lucky Peak had ve life ight visits for accidents and illnesses and four Bureau of Land Management chopper landings for re response, according to Lucky Peak Operations Manager Joyce Dunning. INTERCOM 4July September 2011 5 team effort S e e RE RE SP SP ON ON SE SE o o n n 7 7 ot t o os b y Te rr i A. R o or ke An employee’s pager buzzes at Lower Granite Lock and Dam. “EMERGENCY. Head to visitor center,” it reads. As a trained emergency medical responder volunteer, he swiftly grabs his trauma gear bag and rushes to the scene on the August afternoon. As he makes his way to the casualty, the clock is ticking. He knows that if the casualty is without oxygen, it will only take six minutes for him to die. Fortunately for today, the response is a drill. But the responder and his team react as expediently as if it were a real scenario. The fastest response times for local emergency medical services to arrive to the Walla Walla District’s most remote dams range from 12 to 45 minutes. That is why Lower Granite, located 25 miles away from the closest hospital in Colfax, Wash., holds yearly emergency response drills. During the past 11 years, Lower Granite has evolved its annual emergency response drill. “We started with a broken leg and worked up to head injuries,” said the dam’s Trauma Team Technical Advisor Sara White. As a prior search and rescue team member with the National Park Service, White coordinates the training along with Independent Emergency Response Trainer Mark Stevens. k c losely together, te am, Boise and re ghters, k s em ployees an d p oi se d y Ba y th e phot phot phot pho phot phot ot ph pho ph ph phot ot ho phot phot o phot phot t t t t phot p t p p phot t t o t ot os b os b os b os b os b os b sb b b b b b os os b os b b os b b os b os b os b b o o os b o o o os o os o sb o os b y Ke y Ke y Ke y Ke y Ke Ke y K yKe e e yK yK y y y y y y y y y y ith ith ith ith t th th h h t Hy Hyde Hyde Hyde Hyde yde Hyd de de Hyd d e H H d H st st or or y y an an d d ph ph o o An employee’s pager buzzes at Lo we and Dam. “EMERGENCY. Head to visitor c en reads. As a trained emergency medical responder vo teer, he swiftly grabs his trauma gear bag and rus he scene on the August aftern oo he makes his way to the ca clock is ticking. He kno w matter minutes When phot phot phot phot pho h phot ho phot ot hot phot t phot pho h phot os b osb os b os b os b os b os b o sb b os b os b sb b os b yKe y Ke y Ke y Ke y Ke y Ke y Ke y Ke yKe K yKe K K e e e e y Ke y Ke i ith ith i th ith ith ith h ith ith it h Hyde Hyde Hyde d d de Hyde d d Hyde Hyde Hyde Hyde Hyde de yde Hyde d Hyd Hyde Hyde Hyd Hyde e d Hyde h h phot ht ph ph ph p p ho pho ph ph h h t pho ph ph h phot t ph h t h phot h ot pho pho ph h h ot ot ot o t t pho p h h o o ot t t p p h h h h ho ho o o ot ot t t t phot p h hot ot t t t ph p ph p phot ph p h o o phot phot phot phot hot phot t ot pho phot ph o o ot t t t phot o phot os os s sb sb sb b b s b b b os b b os o b os b b b b b o o o o s s sb osb b osb osb osb o os os s sb osb osb osb os s os b os b os b os osb o osb os osb s b osb osb osb o sb s s sb sb s sb os b os b os b os b osb os b s b s b os b b b b os b os b b os s b yKe K K K K yKe yKe yKe yK K K yKe yKe yKe y K K yK yKe yKe yKe y yKe yK yK Ke K e yK K yK y yK y y yKe yK yK y Ke yKe y y y yK y y yK yK yK Ke y Ke y y Ke y Ke y Ke y Ke y Ke yK y Ke Ke K e e e y Ke y Ke y Ke y K K e y Ke y y y y y y ith ith ith ith t h h th ith i ith h it ith ith t it th h i it i it th h h t i ith i h i i i ith t th h ith i i i th t t t h i ith t th t th h h h h ith i t t h Hyde Hyde Hyd Hyd y d Hyde d Hyd yd e H H Hyde Hyde Hyde Hyd d Hyde y e Hyde y Hyde yde Hyd Hyd Hyd Hyde Hyde Hyd Hyde H Hyde Hyde Hyde Hyde Hyde H e e Hyde Hyde d d Hyd H Hyd Hyd Hyde Hyde Hy y yde y d de d y y y y y y y y y y y y y (Left page) Scenes from landing zone of cer training at Lucky Peak Dam and Lake in May. (Right page) From left to right: Power Plant Mechanic Sean Meyer, Maintenance Worker Greg Eickman and Power Plant Mechanic John Richter respond to “victims” in the annual emergency response drill at Lower Granite Lock and Dam near Colfax, Wash., in September.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District had a chance to participate in a week-long Hispanic Youth Exploring Engineering and Sciences Camp at Walla Walla University in August. The District was one of several community organizations that offered presentations on developing leadership skills. The camp’s focus was to inspire local area youth to pursue careers in engineering and sciences. District inspires students District Equal Employment Opportunity Specialist Andrew Dankel-Ibez speaks to students in a Hispanic Youth Exploring Engineering and Sciences Camp at Walla Walla University in August. About 15 Latino high school students participated in the camp from area schools.Previous District Deputy Commander Lt. Col. Decker Hains, Equal Employment Opportunity Specialist Andrew Dankel-Ibez and three engineers participated in the camp. Dankel-Ibez gave a presentation titled “Motivation: ¡Ganas!”. “As one of the major employers in the valley, the District recognizes its role in ensuring that talented, diverse students have access to gainful employment opportunities in our community,” Dankel-Ibez said. “Fortunately, by providing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs for our local underrepresented student populations, our community is cultivating the best talent from a diverse labor force while addressing the disparity of representation in STEM elds.” Student Mitzi Rodriguez said that the question and answer portion of the camp was very helpful to her. “By them telling us how they chose what they wanted to do in college made me more relieved about life after high school. They also talked about some major points that would help us to be successful,” Rodriguez said.The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District welcomed Maj. Rodney S. Baker as its new deputy District commander on Aug. 22. The Durand, Mich. native arrived to the District after most recently serving as the executive of cer for the Security Force Assistance Team, at the 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Maj. Baker offered initial impressions about his new assignment. “I’m excited to have the opportunity to work at Walla Walla,” he said. “This is my rst USACE assignment and I have learned quite a bit in the rst few weeks with much more to learn. I’m impressed with the strong relationships that have been built within the District and pleased to be a part of that. “My wife and I grew up in small rural communities in Michigan. Coming here after many years of living in big cities brings a sense of home to us. I look forward to continuing to work and learn from everyone and hope I can contribute to the team as much as my predecessor did.” Major Baker and his wife, Keyara, live in Walla Walla with their two daughters, Addison and Meriel. Maj. Baker’s background includes earning a Bachelor of Science degree with a civil engineering major in 1997 from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. In the same year, he was commissioned in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He also earned a Master of Science degree in civil engineering from the University of Missouri-Rolla in 2002. Maj. Baker is a registered Professional Engineer in the State of Missouri. His previous assignments include working in a variety of units including the 38th Engineer Company (Medium Girder Bridge), 130th Engineer Brigade in Hanau, Germany, with a deployment to Croatia. He was the assistant plans of cer and brigade maintenance of cer for the 130th Engineer Brigade, Hanau, Germany with a deployment to Albania. He also served in C Company, 8th Engineer Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division and deployed to Baghdad, Iraq. Welcome to the District Deputy Commander Maj. Baker Maj. Rodney Baker in Hispanic youth camp¡Ganas! Employee emergency responders are trained on everything from injury stabilization and medical and trauma care to childbirth and hazardous materials situations. An annual response drill follows their training. The 12-member team performs these drills to prepare for realworld, real-time, medical emergencies at the remotely located dam facility. “We train not only for all the general injuries and illnesses, but for industry-related types of emergencies,” White said. Every year, the team works closely with local community re and rescue squads, state and county law enforcement, regional helicopter and xed-wing medical evacuation support, and the regional emergency communications dispatch center. According to White, the drill not only promotes a close professional working relationship with regional agencies, but also facilitates a trained and well-equipped emergency medical team on site that can provide life-saving care until EMS arrives for advanced treatment and transport. “Minutes can cost lives if life support isn’t provided in a timely manner. Our goal is to keep them alive until help gets to us,” White said. With 28 years of emergency response training, Independent Trainer Mark Stevens said he was very pleased with the team’s motivation and commitment to the program. Lower Granite Technical Support Chief Benjamin Feider said, “The training was a good chance to interact with local emergency response services and was a reminder that it could be me getting hurt out there just as easily as someone else.” Since joining the emergency response team in December 2008, Feider has seen the training used in multiple real emergencies—everything from a back injury to a car accident. R ESPONSE, co o nt in u ue d fr om m 5 Three graduate from apprentice program Three students graduated from the Walla Walla District Hydropower Apprentice Program in June. Scott C. Stolz, an Army veteran from Kennewick, Wash., works at Lower Monumental Lock and Dam as a power plant mechanic. Robert D. Henderson, a Navy veteran from Lewiston, Idaho, works at Little Goose Lock and Dam as a power plant electrician. Matthew C. Huston, a Navy veteran from Hermiston, Ore., works at McNary Lock and Dam as a power plant electrician. The apprentice program, based at McNary Lock and Dam near Umatilla, Ore., develops trades and crafts journeymen to serve in District hydropower facilities. The program typically graduates three to four apprentices each year. Depending on prior education, or simultaneous enrollment in a related college education program, students can pursue a three or four-year program to become electrical, mechanical or operations journeymen. The rst year focuses on gaining general hydropower knowledge, after which each student pursues a dedicated craft that signi es the start of a new career. The next two to three years are spent under the guidance of journeymen and a rigid academic curriculum. Academic work includes textbook studies, computer-based training and a strong emphasis of hands-on training. During their apprenticeship, students gain work experience at all six hydroelectric facilities in the District before they join the workforce as craftspersons. “Across the Corps, we’ve recognized the need to plan for a sustainable workforce as a large percentage of our current workforce nears retirement eligibility. This program enables the District to better meet its future craftsman needs. Apprentices learn from the masters, rather than trying to glean that knowledge out of a book at a later time when the experts may not be here to help them,” said Pete McGuckin, Walla Walla District’s training of cer for the program. “This graduation ceremony serves to recognize the students’ efforts and welcome them to the ranks of journeymen, and to thank the craftsmen who coached them.” Robert D. Henderson by Gina Baltrusch Matthew C. Huston Scott C. Stolz ph oto by B en N e l son py p hoto b y Ton y Si j oh n photo by Tony Sijohn phot o by Bry ce T homp son photo by Bryce Thompson phot o by Lt. Col De e cker cker r r Ha Ha Ha Hai Hai H ns ns July September 2011 7 p hoto by Tony Si john

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1 3 5 2 se se se se se se se se se se se se s s e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL F F FL F F F F L F L OO OO OO OO OO OO OO OO OO OO OO O OO O O O O O D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D on on on on on on on n on on on n 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 pho ph p p p p h ph h ph ph ho h h o ot ot ot ot ot ot ot ot ot ot phot ph p p h h ph ph ph h ot ot t ot ot ot p p ph ph ph pho ot o o o t hot p p p pho p ph ph pho o o o ot t hot t t t p p p ph h pho o o ot t t t t ot p p p p p ph ph h o pho o ot t t t p p pho ph h ot p phot ph h t ph p h pho p h ho o p h o o ot p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p o by o b o b o b o o ob oby b b o b by b by by oby by by y by o by o o b b by by b y oby oby o b o b by by by b y y y y y y oby o by by y y y y y y y o o o o o b o o b o by by y y y y y o o by by o by b by y y o o o b by y y y y o o o o o o b by y y y y o o o b b by y y y y y by o o by y o o b y y y y y y y y y y y y y y Am Am Am A A A A A Am A Amb A A Amb Amb Amb Am Am Am m Amb Amb Amb Amb b Amb Amb Amb Am A Am Am Am mb Amb Amb Amb Am Am Am Am Am A A Am Am m mb m mb b Amb b b Amb mb Amb A A A A Amb m m m m b b b Amb b Amb b A A A m Am b b b b b b Am m Amb b b b b A A m m m mb b b b m Amb b b b b b Amb Amb Amb A A Am b b b b Amb Amb A A b b b A A A b b b b er L er L er L er L erL erL er L erL L er rL erL L rL L L L erL erL erL rL erL L L er e er er erL rL r r L L L L L L L er L e er e e er er r r r r er e e e e r r er r L L e e e er r r L L L L e e e er er L er r r e e e e e r er L r r L L er L erL e e erL r r r L e e r r L er L e e arse arse arse arse arse arse ar ar ar arse arse arse arse arse arse arse arse arse ars arse arse ars arse rse a ars a arse arse a rse s ars s rse e e e e e e e arse ar arse ars a ar rs rs e e e e a arse rs s e e e e r rs e e e ar ars arse a rs r r rs s rs s s s e ar ars rs r r r rs rs s s e e r rs s ars r r ars se e e e e e a a r n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n With record ooding all across the nation, 2011 had one of the most eventful ood seasons in recent history ... And the Paci c Northwest saw no exception. W ith record oodin g all across hihdfh 2 0 1 1 r e g i o n a l f l o o d f i g h t a s u c c e s s 2011 regional flood fight a success and respond to changes in dam releases and impacts to the area’s levee system, all while keeping the public informed of our respective efforts,” Ellis said. Hall said ood damages were also mitigated because of a little cooperation from the weather. “We were fortunate that it was a slow melting year,” he said. “As we look back, it could have been much worse.” The Corps took a proactive approach in early 2011 when it analyzed the amount of snowpack in the mountains and began discharging water in the reservoirs to make room for expected in ow. According to Idaho Bureau of Homeland Security Director Brig. Gen. Bill Shawver, the Corps’ resources and proactive approach to ooding made a difference. “Every time I talk to an emergency manager from one of those impacted counties they are quick to point out that the resources the Corps provided were instrumental in reducing ooding,” Shawver said. The Corps’ coordinated effort with multiple agencies such as Idaho’s Bureau of Homeland Security and Bureau of Reclamation made this year’s ood ght a success, according to District Commander Lt. Col. David Caldwell. “Because of pre-emptive measures, communities were prepared and we were successful in protecting the public,” Caldwell said. But well before any signs of an imminent ood event, the Corps was preparing for an emergency. District ooding preparation rst began in September 2010 when District Emergency Operations personnel performed a communications drill in Ada County, Idaho, for ooding along the Boise River. In February 2011, the District, state of Idaho and National Weather Service held ood ght awareness training sessions throughout Idaho, focused by the Idaho “Silver Jackets” cooperative group, a coalition of federal and state agencies that work together to develop comprehensive and sustainable solutions to Idaho’s ood hazard issues. In these sessions, Walla Walla District Disaster Response Manager Jeff Stidham helped regional of cials understand their roles and responsibilities before this year’s ood event. The ood courses trained local responders on ood response basics ranging from monitoring river and weather conditions to planning operations and lling and placing sand bags. “Preparation is key for any potential disaster, but especially so for ooding,” Stidham said. “That’s because any effective ood response takes time to ramp up.” “If you wait until the water is coming over the banks, it’s too late for anything but heading for high ground.” by by T er ri A A A A . Ro Ro R R rk e e photos by Amber Larsen and Ken Koebberling 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 The Walla Walla District assisted the following counties impacted by spring 2011 ood events: 1. Je erson County, Idaho 2. Madison County, Idaho 3. Bingham County, Idaho 4. Bear Lake County, Idaho 5. Teton County, Wyoming Th h e e U. U. S. S A A rm rm y y Co Co Co rp rp s of E n g in ee ee rs rs W a ll a Wa ll ll a a Di st s ri ri ct ct , th th h e e st s ates o f Id Id ah ah o an d Wy Wy om in g a a nd nd l l oc c al l c c ommu ni ti es s w w ere an d d W Wy om in g, g, a a nd nd l oc al al c c om mu ni ti es es w g he he st st ch h al al le ng g ed ed w w it it h h mi mi ti ti ga ga ti t n g the t hi rd d h h ig ig w w pa p p ck ck k k s s wa wa a te t te r r ru ru no no ff f a nd nd o o ne o f th e high es s t t sn sn ow ow ce ce 1 1 99 99 7 7. 7 7 on on r r ec ec c or or or d d d in in t t he he S S na na ke ke R iv er B B as as in in s s in in n c c c r r at at at at io io ns ns A A ft f er a ct iv at in n g g it it s s Em E er g e nc y Op er er i i n nc e Ce Ce nt nt er er ( ( EO EO C) i n Ma Ma y— y— t t he he r r st st st t t t im im im e e si si dur ing 19 96 96 —t —t he he D istr ic i t t de de pl pl oy oy ed ed ed 1 1 5 5 pe pe op p le o o dt h e co co ur ur se se o o f f th th re r e mo t nt h hs h a a s s s 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ag g ag ag er er er er r er er er er er er er S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S t t te t te t te te t te te te p p p p p n n n g g g g g g Ha Ha H Ha Ha Ha H H Ha Ha a a H a a a ll ll ll ll ll ll l ll l l . . “W “W “W “W “W W “W “W “ “W “W W W W W W e e e e e e e e e e e e e e we we we we we we we w w w w w w w w w w w w er er er e er er er er er r r e r e e e e e su su su su u u u s u u su u u cc cc cc cc c c c c c c es es es s es s es s s s s s sf sf sf sf sf f ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul u ul i i i i i i i n n n n n n wo wo wo w w k k k k rk k rk rk k i i i i i in in i i n n n n n n d d d d d d d d d cl cl cl cl cl cl cl cl l l c cl cl cl cl c cl cl l os os os os os o os os o s s os os os o os o o os o el el el el el el el l el el e el l l el el el e e y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y wi wi w wi wi wi wi i wi wi wi wi wi wi w i w w w w w w th th th h th th th th th th h th th th th h h h t h h o o o o o o o o o o o o o o ur ur ur ur ur ur ur ur ur ur r ur ur c c c c c c c c c c c c c c om om om om m om om m om m om om om m om o m m mu mu mu mu mu mu mu m mu mu mu mu u mu mu u m m ni ni ni ni ni i ni ni n n ni n ni ni ni ni n ni n n n ty ty ty ty t t t ty ty ty ty ty ty ty ty t y y p p p p p p p p p p p ar ar ar ar ar a r ar r ar a a a ar tn tn tn tn tn tn tn t tn tn tn er er er er er r er er er e er er e e s s s s s s s s an an an an an an n an ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye y ye ar ar ar ar ar ar ar r ma ma ma ma ma ma a ma ma ma ma a a a a m ma ma ma a ma m ma na na n na na na a na na na na na n n na n na na n ge ge ge ge ge ge g ge ge ge ge ge ge g g g d d d d d d d d d d d d d to to to to to to o t o o to o o t r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r eg eg eg eg eg eg eg eg g g g g eg g eg eg eg eg g eg e g ul ul ul ul ul l ul ul ul ul ul u u l u u at at a at t at at at at t at e e e e e e e e e e e e a a a a a a a a a a a a ve ve ve ve ve v e ve ve ve e v v v v v v v ry ry ry r ry ry ry ry ry r r y h h h h h h h h h h h h ig g ig ig ig g g g ig ig g g h h h h h h h h h h h h wa w w wa wa wa wa wa wa wa wa w w te te te e te te te te te e t r r r r r r r r r y y y y y y w wi wi wi wi wi wi wi wi wi wi wi i i w wi w w w w i w th th th th th th th th th h th th th th th th th th t v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v er er er er er er er er er e er er er er er er er e er r er r er e e r y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y li li li li li i li li li li i i i i l i li li i tt tt t tt tt tt tt t t t tt tt tt tt le l le le le le l le le le e le e le e e le e e le l o o o o o o o o o o o o od od od od od od od od d d d d od d d od d d d d d d d d d d d d d d am am am am am am am am m m am a am am am am am m a a a ag a ag ag ag ag ag ag g ag ag ag ag g ag g g e. e. e. e. e e. e. e e. e e. e e. e e ” ” ” ” ” ” ” ” ” ” ” ” C C C C C C C ou ou ou ou ou ou o nt nt nt nt nt nt nt nt y y y y y y A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s ch ch ch ch ch h ch ch ch c ch ch ch ch ch ch h ch h c ch ch c ch c c ai ai ai ai ai ai ai a ai ai i ai i ai ai ai ai ai ai rm rm rm rm rm m rm rm m m rm r m m rm rm rm rm rm rm rm m m m an an an a an an a an n an an an an n an n an an n an a n a o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f th th th th th th th th t th t th th th th th th h th h e e e e e e e e e e e e e bo bo bo bo bo bo bo bo bo bo bo bo o b bo ar ar ar ar r ar a ar r ar r r ar ar ar d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d f of of of of of of f of of of o of of o T T T T T T T T T T T et et et et et et on on o on on on on o on on on o C C C C C C C C C h h h h h h h h h e e e e e e e e e e e ar ar ar ar ar ar ar ar ar ar a e ea ea ea ea e e ea ea s s s s s s s Co Co C Co C Co Co Co Co o Co Co Co Co Co Co C C Co o Co C C C Co C Co C o mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm m mm m mm m mm m m mm m m m mm m m is is is is is is is s is s is is s is s s s s is is s s s s si si si si si si si si si si i s s s s s on on on on on on on on on o on n on on o o 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s s s s s s s s s ye ye ye ye ye ye ye e e ye ye ye e y ye e ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye e ye e y y y ar ar a ar ar ar ar ar ar ar ar a a r r a a r a a r a a r r —C —C —C —C —C —C —C —C — —C —C —C —C — —C — — —C —C —C —C — —C —C C C C C C C om om om om om om om om o m o om om om om o o o o o o om om om mi mi mi mi mi mi mi m mi m i i i m m m ss ss ss ss ss ss ss s ss s ss ss ss s s s s io io i io io io io io io io io i io io io i io o io o ne ne ne ne ne ne e n n n n n n n n ne n r r r r r r r r r Be Be Be Be Be Be Be Be Be B Be Be Be nj nj n j n nj nj nj nj n n n nj j nj j w w w w w w w w w w it it it it it it it it i i t t it it i i i h h h h h h h h h h h h h th th th h h th th th th h h e e e e e e e e e El El El El El El El El El El El El l E El El El El l E El El El El E E E E E E E E El l li li li li li li li li i i i li li li i i li li i li i li li i l i s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s ex ex ex ex ex ex ex ex ex x x ex x x ex x ex ex ex ex ex ex ex ex x e e ex ex ex e ex e x e e pl pl pl pl pl pl pl pl pl p pl pl pl p pl p l l l pl p pl pl p l l l p l l l l l p l pl l p p ai ai ai ai ai ai ai ai i ai ai ai a ai a i ai ai ai a a a i ai a a a ai a a a ai ai i a a a a ne n ne ne ne ne n ne ne ne e ne n ne n ne ne ne ne ne n n n ne ne ne ne e e e n n n e n n d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d ho ho ho ho h ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho h ho h ho ho ho ho h h w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w cl cl cl cl cl cl cl cl l l cl cl cl cl cl c c c cl c os os os os os os os os s os s os os os os os os s os os os s s s e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e co co co co co co o o o o co co o co c o co co co or or or or or or o o o or o o o o o o o o or o o o di di di di di di di d d d d i di d i d i d d na na na na a na a na na na na a a na na n ti ti ti ti ti ti ti i on on on on on on on on o n n Co Co Co Co Co C Co Co Co C C Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co C C C C Co C C C r rp r r h h th th th th th th th th th h t th h h h th h e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e oo oo oo oo oo oo oo o oo oo oo o oo o o oo o o oo d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d gh gh gh gh gh h gh h gh gh h gh gh gh gh g g g t. t. t. t. t. t. t. t t t t Co o Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co C Co Co Co C o C C o rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp rp p r p rp r r r r rp r p p p p p s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s e h he he he he he he he he he he he h h he h he he he e e e e h e e he h h he h h h h h lp lp lp lp lp lp lp lp l l p lp l lp p lp p lp lp p lp lp lp lp p p p p p p lp lp lp l lp p ed ed ed ed ed ed ed ed ed ed d ed ed ed ed ed d d e d ed d e d d e d d d d d d d d d d d d d e d i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i n n n n n n n n n n n n n n h th th th th h th h th th th h th th th h th th t th e e e e e r r r r r r r r e e e e e e e e e e e e ab ab ab ab ab ab ab ab b ab b ab ab le le le le le le le le le le le e t t t t he he he h he he he h e he he he he e he he he e e e e r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r cl cl cl cl c cl cl cl l l cl c l l l l l l cl os os o os os os os os s o os os el el el el el l el l el el el el el e e l l y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y we we we w we we we w we e w w w we we w e w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w e er er er er e er e er er e er er er e “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ By By By By By By By By By By By By y y B By By B By B B By By By B y B B B B B By By y By By By By By By y y y y y y y y y y w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w or o or or or or or or or or or or o or or or or or or or r r or or r or or or r or or r or or o or or r r or or r r o o o or o or or r o or or o r o r r r r k k ki ki ki k k k ki i ki ki ki ki k k k k ki ki ki k ki ki ki k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k ng ng ng ng ng ng ng ng ng ng ng ng ng n n ng ng ng ng ng g ng ng g g ng ng g g ng g g ng g g g g g t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t og og og og og og og og g og og o og og g og o g o o o og o g g g g g g et et et et et et et et et et et et et et t et e e et t et t et et et t e h he he he he he he h e h he h h he he h h h h h e er er er er er er er r er r er er o o o o o o o o o o ws ws ws ws ws ws ws ws ws w w ws ws , , s s s s s m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m on on on o o o on n on o o o on o on on on n o on o on it it it it it it it it it it t it t t t or or or or or or or o or o or r or r o r r r r r r r r r r r r iv iv iv iv iv iv iv iv iv iv iv iv iv v e e e e e e e e e e to to to to to to to to to to to to to to to o o to o t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra a a a a a r a r a a r a ra ra a a a r a ra a a ck c ck ck ck ck ck ck k ck k ck ck ck ck ck ck ck ck ck c c ck ck c c c c k ck w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w ea ea e e ea ea a a ea e e e ea ea ea ea ea a ea a th th th th h th th th th th h t t h th t h h h h er er er er er er er er er er er c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c on on on on o on on on n on on n on on n on o o n on o on on n on o o o n n n o n o on o o n n n n n n di di di di di di di di di di di di d di di d di i d d di d di d d di i d i d d di di di di d d i i di di d d d ti ti i ti ti ti ti ti i t i ti i ti ti ti ti ti ti ti t ti ti i ti ti ti ti i i i ti i i ti ti on on on on on on n on on on on on on o on o o o n o o on on o o o o o o n o o o o on on o o n o o n o s, s, s, s s s s s, s, s, s s s, m m m m m m m Pocatello1 3 2 5 (Above) District Hydraulic Jonathan Petersen coordinates ood ght operations in Bingham County, Idaho in June. (Right page) Scenes from ood ght activity in Idaho and Wyoming. Idaho Falls4 INTERCOM 8July September 2011 9

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* This was a regional ood ght that crossed both Corps district and division boundaries Portland District provided four trailer-mounted “Crisafulli” pumps (also known as “PTOpowered trailer pumps”) to the Walla Walla District for use in Jefferson and Bear Lake counties in Eastern Idaho. Three of those pumps were sent to support ood ght efforts in Jefferson County. The other pump was sent to help Bear Lake County ood ghters, which is within Sacramento District, part of South Paci c Division. The preliminary estimate of ood damages prevented by the Walla Walla District for the 2011 scal year is $646 million The District spent $353,000 during the 2011 ood ght. This gure includes construction, labor and supplies (not including sandbags). *A total of 15 District employees deployed between May and July while the District’s Emergency Operations Center was activated. About 550,000 sandbags were issued by Walla Walla District throughout Southeast Idaho and Jackson Hole, Wyo. (500,000 of those sandbags were supplied by the Corps’ Seattle District, while 50,000 were from Walla Walla District’s stockpiles). 100 rolls of six mil plastic sheeting were issued to three counties. Corps emergency management experts deployed to the Jackson Hole, Wyo., area in May to support Teton County’s ood preparation efforts and monitor levees along the upper Snake River near Jackson. The Corps drafted Dworshak Reservoir near Oro no, Idaho, lower than it’s been since 1999 to create 1,969,300 acre feet of ood-storage capacity on the North Fork of the Clearwater River. All that available space was used for in ows when the reservoir reached full-pool elevation on Jul. 12, 2011. NOTE: It takes about two acre feet to ll an Olympic-sized swimming pool. “The 2011 ood ght was an overwhelming success because of an e ective partnership between local, state, and federal agencies that included training, preparations, communications, and a very proactive approach. We can’t control the weather or the rate of runo but we can mitigate risk by working with others.” Lt. Col. David Caldwell, Walla Walla District Commander o Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo F F Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo o Fo Fo F Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo F o Fo Fo o Fo F F Fo Fo o F o F F F F Fo Fo o o F F o F Fo o F r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r mo mo mo mo mo mo mo mo m m mo m mo mo mo mo o mo mo o mo mo mo m o mo m mo mo m m mo mo m m mo mo o o mo o m m o o o m o o m o o o o mo o m re r re re re re re re re re re re re re re re re r r r re re re re re re re re r re re re e e e e re e e e e r e e i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i nf nf nf nf nf nf nf nf n nf nf nf n nf nf nf nf f nf nf nf nf nf nf nf f nf f f nf nf nf f f f f n f nf f f f f f f nf nf nf n f f nf nf f f nf f nf f nf f nf nf f nf n nf f nf f nf f or or or o or or or o or o o or or or or or or r or or or or o or or or or o o o or o or or or or or o or or or o o r or r or o o r m m ma ma ma ma ma m m ma 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re re re re re e e re re re e e re re r re re e e re re re re re re re re re re e e re r e re e re re e re re re r e e r e r e e r e r e e gi gi gi gi gi gi gi gi gi g gi gi gi gi gi gi gi gi gi gi gi g gi gi gi gi gi gi gi gi gi i i gi gi gi i gi g gi gi g g i i gi i gi i gi i gi gi g gi gi gi gi g g gi i g i i i g g gi i gi i i i i i i on o on on o o o on on on o on n n n on on on on on on n on on on on o on n on on on on on on on o o o on on o o on o on n n o on n on o on n on o o on n on n n o on o on on o n n n a al al al al al al al a a al al al al al l al l a al al a al al al al al a al l al al l l al al l l l al al l al al al al l l l l l l l l l l l l l al al a al a a al a l l a al a a l l l l l a a a 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 01 01 01 0 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 0 0 01 0 01 0 0 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 01 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 01 1 1 01 1 1 1 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n n n n n n n n n th th th th th th th th th th th th th h h h h h h th th th th th th th th h h h th th th th th h h th h th h th th th h h th t h h th h t t th h th h h h h h th th h th th h e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e QR QR QR QR QR QR QR QR QR QR QR QR QR QR QR QR R R QR QR Q QR QR QR QR QR QR QR QR R QR QR QR QR QR QR QR QR QR Q R QR QR QR QR QR QR R R QR QR QR R R Q Q QR R R Q Q Q Q QR QR R QR QR QR R R QR R QR QR QR R R Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c od od od od d od od od o od od od od od od od od od od d d d od od od od d od od od od d od od od d d d d od d d od od d d od od od od od o od o od o od o od o od od d od d d o o d o o o o o o o o e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e to to to to to to to to t to to to to to to to to to to to o o to to to o to o to o to o t to o to to t t o o t o o t t o to o t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t he h he he he h he he he he he he he he he he he he h he he he h h he he he he h h h he h h h h he he h he e e h h h e e e he e e h e he he e he h h e h e he e he e he e he e e r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r ig ig i ig ig ig ig g ig ig ig g g ig ig ig g ig ig ig ig ig g ig ig g ig g g ig ig ig g ig i g g ig g ig g ig ig g ig g ig g g ig g i ig ig g g g g g g g g g ht h ht ht ht ht ht h ht ht ht ht t ht ht t ht ht ht h ht ht ht ht ht ht t ht ht h ht h h h ht h ht h t h h h ht t h h ht t t ht t h h : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 2011 Corps ood ght fact s p The U.S. Army Corps of Engin eers Walla Walla District sent a t welve-member emer g enc y powe r t eam to Fayetteville, N.C., Aug. 25, t o help the Federal Emergency Mana g ement A g enc y (FEMA) respond t o p ower losses to three milli on people following Hurricane Irene’s assault on the Eastern S eaboard W ithin 24 hours of receiving FEMA’s request to send a power team to prov ide emer g enc y power technical assistance t o the disaster zone, the District’s p ow er t eam departed and spent about a week and a h alf supportin g FEMA operations in North C arolina. The District emergency power team c onsists of an action of cer, mission mana g e rs, mission s p ecialists, a mission liaison, l ogistics specialists, a contract specialist and emer g enc y power qualit y assurance specia lis t s. Power team members supported FEM A at emer g enc y mana g ement sta g in g areas and o perations centers throu g hout the state. The all-volunteer team provide backu p electrical power g eneration an y where needed. Members a g ree to be in an on-call, read y -todeploy status by Terri A. Rork e The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla W alla District and the Idaho W ater Resourc e B oard (IDWRB) si g ned two partnerin g a g reem ents in August to conduct geological and o perational studies of the Weiser River nea r W eiser Idaho. The Weiser River Watershed covers a large ar e a in sou th wes t e rn I d ah o w h e r e it s h e a dw aters ori g inate in the southern end of the Seven D evils Mountain Range and the west central m ountains of Idaho before owin g into the Snake River C reating additional water storage on the ma j or tributaries of the Snake River in Southwest Idaho, includin g the Weiser River, h as been studied b y private, state and federal p arties for more than 50 y e ars. Speci call y the Corps studied the Weiser River basin com p rehensively from 1987 through 1994. In March 2011, the District completed a g ap anal y sis stud y in partnership with the ID W RB – the W eiserGallowa y Gap Anal y sis, Economic Evaluation and Risk-Based Co st A nalysis Project The partnership-a g reement t eams IWRB with the Cor p s to con duc t t wo n ew t ec hni c al s t ud i es that will address those critical g aps : 1 ) The Snake River Operational Analy s is Pro j ec t will stud y a ran g e of potential r iver-operatin g scenarios that seek to optimize s ystem operations with incremental volumes o f new water stora g e on the Weiser River, i ncludin g ood control, irri g ation, h y dropower production, storage, recreation and ow au g mentation requirements while maximizin g eco n o mi c be n e t s. 2 ) The Weiser River Geologic Investigation and Anal y sis Pro j ect will stud y the s afet y suitabilit y and inte g rit y of the g eolo g ic s tructures at the proposed dam and reservoi r s ite. Stud y activities will include mappin g c ore-samplin g and anal y sis to identif y or rule o ut potential structural weaknesses or seepage potential of a proposed dam and reservoir at t hi s l oc ati o n Th ese t wo t ec hni c al s t ud i es ar e a u th o riz ed b y Section 22 of the Water Resources Developm ent Act of 1974, which allows the Cor p s to provide planning assistance to states and tribes. The Plannin g Assistance States (PAS) Pro g ram permits the Corps to use its technical planning expertise to supplement and sup port state and Indian tribe efforts to undert ake broad, statewide, com p rehensive wat er r esources planning. This program is cost s hared on a 50 percent federal and 50 percent no n-f ede ral b a s i s. “We just completed one of the most succ essful pro j ects ever done between the Corps and the Idaho Water Resource Board ” said J ack Peterson senior advisor to the IDWRB. “ Our extraordinar y partnership with the Corps durin g the past two y ears workin g on the g ap analysis is the reason we want to partner wi th t hem a g ain on these new studies that are vital to f u t u r e o f I d ah o ’ s w at e r r esou r ces. ” “ We’re excited to be working with the state o f Idaho a g ain on the Weiser-Gallowa y studi es,” said Rebecca Kalamasz, District Plannin g Branch chief. “These two technical analysis s tudies are essential to helpin g Idaho make future water-plannin g decisions.” The Corps and IWRB will work together to develop two pro j ect mana g ement plans to more s peci call y develop the scope and schedule of t h e s t ud i es t o be co n duc t ed. District power team helps East Coast recover from Hurricane Irene f rom R E ES P PO NS S E on n 9 phot phot pho phot phot phot p phot pho ph pho ot ot phot ot phot ot pho pho ot ph phot p ph o phot h p p p o by o by o by o by o by o by o by o by o by oby oby o by o by by o by b oby o by by y by o o by o b o by b y o b y y o b b y Amb Amb Amb Amb Amb Amb Amb Am A Am Amb Amb Amb A Am A A mb Am Amb mb Amb A A mb m A Amb A Am b A m m A A A A m A A A rL e er L er L er L er L e er er er L er L er L er L r L rL rL er L er L r L L L erL er L L L L er r L r e r L L r r e ars ars arse ars ar a ars arse rse r arse rs arse arse ars se ars a ars arse arse rs e e e n n n n n n n n n n n n n n District Contract Specialist Jean Desjarlais and Power Plant Electrician James Lyerly take inventory of personnel and equipment at staging area at Ft. Bragg, N.C. Corps signs water resources partnering agreements by Gina Baltrusch U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District Commander Lt. Col. David Caldwell signs a partnering agreement with Cynthia Clark, an engineer from the Idaho Water Resource Board. The two organizations agreed to conduct geological and operations studies of the Weiser River near Weiser, Idaho. p h oto by T err i A R or ke p h oto by K en W an d ers chei he hei ei ei h e e d d d d d d d d py pho pho pho pho ph ph pho ph ho o ho ot t o ot ot ot t t t phot ph ot t t t phot phot ph h ho ho o ot t t t ph ot ot t t phot t ho ot ot t p o o o ot t phot t hot h o ot t t hot ot t t t t t t phot o o o o t t t t t t t p ot t t t o o o t t t t hot t h h o t t t t t hot h h o ot t t t t hot h h h h t t t p p h h h t t t t p p h h h h ot t phot p p p p p p p p o by o o o by oby b o o o b o o o o b b b b b b b by oby oby by by oby o by oby o by o o oby b o o o o b b b y o o by o o b b b b by y oby o ob o o o o o b b o by y y o ob o o o o o o o by o o o by y o o o o o o o o o o by by o o by y o by o o o b by M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M Mik Mik k Mik k ik k k M M M Mi Mik i k k k Mik M M M M M M Mik M Mik Mik M Mi M Mik Mik Mik M M Mik Mik M Mik M Mik k Mik ik k Mik k k k Mik M M Mik k M k Mik M M M k M M ik eD eDe e De e De e De eDe e De e De D e De e De e De De e De e De e De eDe D e De D D De De D D e e De e De e D D e De e De D e D e D D e e D e D e D e De ccio ccio ccio ccio ccio ccio cio cio ccio ccio ccio ccio o cc cc c cc o o o c cc c c c o c c INTERCOM 10July September 2011 11

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INTERCOM 12July September 2011 13 District completes reviews on Hanford Reach Interpretive Center U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District of cials had a chance to update Oregon U.S. Rep. Greg Walden on levee repair work at the Nursery Bridge stilling basin in Milton-Freewater, Ore., in September. The work is part of a $2.85 million bond passed by the MiltonFreewater Water Control District in November 2010 to repair eroding concrete that will make the structure safe by Corps standards, which currently has a rating as “unacceptable”. In 2008, the Corps rated the project as “unacceptable” because of inoperable culverts, riprap damage, unwanted vegetation, and damage to the concrete drop structure. The rating makes the project ineligible to receive federal assistance if it was damaged by a ood or storm. As a result, Federal Emergency Management Agency designated certain portions of Milton-Freewater as being in a ood plain. Walden said the progress being made on the repairs is remarkable given the current economic situation, especially in regards to the local community coming together to approve the bond issue. The repair work is on schedule and expected to be completed before November 2012. The Corps constructed the Walla Walla River Flood Reduction Project near Milton-Freewater, Ore. in the 1950s, and turned over the project to Milton-Freewater on May 19, 1966. The project consists of 5.3 miles of channel improvements and revetted levees. The levees are designed to carry a ow of 18,600 cubic feet per second (cfs) with two feet of freeboard. The concrete drop structure below Nursery Bridge has a design discharge of 12,000 cfs or a 140year event. The 100-year ow is estimated at 10,600 cfs. The sponsor is responsible for operating and maintaining the project while the Corps performs routine inspections to verify proper maintenance, owner preparedness, and component operation under the Rehabilitation and Inspection Program. The Corps will inspect the project when the sponsor completes maintenance de ciencies to determine eligibility to be placed back in the PL 84-99 rehabilitation and inspection program. Meanwhile, the Corps will continue to provide maintenance recommendations and lead an interagency working group to arrive at a levee vegetation solution. Updated progress from sponsor: Repair damaged concrete on drop structure – 50 percent. • Clean, repair, video tape culverts – 80 percent. • Review, correct, approve encroachments – 80 percent. • Repair damaged bank riprap below Nursery Bridge Future • Repair riprap near Couse Creek Bridge – Scheduled for next • year. Remove unwanted vegetation – System Q complete, tried • goats on other systems. Hydraulic analysis of channel capacity – Vicinity of 15 Ave. • Bridge has insuf cient freeboard. Design and construction scheduled for next year. • Restore channel capacity – Design 50 percent. Design and • construction scheduled for next year. by Bruce Henrickso n Illustration by Stephanie Bower (courtesy of Hanford Reach Interpretive Center) The Walla Walla District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed both an environmental compliance and real estate review of the Hanford Reach Interpretive Center proposal. The Corps approved the City of Richland’s request to enter into a sublease agreement with the Richland Public Facilities District, which would allow construction of the Center on Corps-leased land in Columbia Park West in Richland, Wash. The Center is a project of the Richland Public Facilities District proposed to be built on land currently leased by the District to the City of Richland for park and recreation purposes. The Corps review included two important components—National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance plus approval of a proposal for the City of Richland to enter into a sublease agreement with the Richland Public Facilities District. “Like many other proposals we receive, this proposal was evaluated in great detail within a well-established review process,” said Lt. Col. David Caldwell, Walla Walla District commander. “It’s a complex process, and it’s how we serve as good stewards of the environment and federal real estate.” The Corps of Engineers is the lead federal agency for environmental review of the proposal and worked within an established NEPA compliance process. The environmental review process involved local entities, state and Federal agencies and Indian tribes. The District assessed the proposed Center’s environmental compliance with eight federal laws, two federal executive orders, and three Washington state laws and permits. NEPA compliance for the project was comprised of the Corps conducting a public scoping meeting, preparing an Environmental Assessment (EA), submitting it for public review, addressing public comments received in a Finding of No Signi cant Impact (FONSI), and signed approval of the FONSI by Lt. Col. Caldwell. Additionally, the Corps completed a real estate review of a sublease between the City of Richland and the Richland Public Facilities District for use of the federally owned, Corps-administered property. While the Walla Walla District is not a signatory to that sublease, the District’s lease with the City of Richland requires a review of any subordinate real estate agreements proposed for the federally owned land. The project has been coordinated by the District with the City of Richland, Richland Public Facilities District, Washington State Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Washington State Of ce of Archaeology and Historic Preservation, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Nez Perce Tribe, Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Wanapum Band. Each agency, organization or tribe was contacted and provided information on the proposed center. The Corps provided technical consultation with three tribes that requested it. b y Terri A. Rork e U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District Commander Lt. Col. David Caldwell, Deputy District Engineer Alan Feistner, far left, and Civil Engineer Herb Bessey, center, brief Oregon U.S. Rep. Greg Walden about levee repair work in Milton-Freewater, Ore. in September. Architectural illustration of future Hanford Reach Interpretive Center in Richland, Wash. photos by Joe Saxon

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“Let’s discuss this,” Ray Tracy says as he closely examines a gray rock. “Basalt?” asks fellow U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District archaeologist Scott Hall in response. They conclude that the rock is basalt, but not a cultural artifact created by a human. Instead, the archaeologists determine the piece of stone was broken by natural forces, not by human hands. Depending on the type of rock the team nds helps them determine whether they discovered a natural or cultural phenomenon. So for Corps archaeologists, quiet ground speaks loud “The rule of thumb in archaeology is that attractive land today was also attractive land 100 years ago,” Tracy says about the Columbia River, which has always been a popular place for modern and ancient camping, shing and hunting. The archaeologists are digging for remnants of past life as part of a compliance excavation on a proposed construction project. They must determine if the Corps land in Franklin County, Wash. contains any historical, cultural or scienti c resources before construction can begin. After determining the discovered basalt rock indicates no cultural phenomena, it’s back to the methodical digging and meticulous turning of every rock, dust grain and telltale object. The District performs archaeology as part of its cultural resources management mission. The compliance excavations are normally performed by Corps contractors, but today Tracy and Hall are digging as an extra precaution. “As the federal agency that manages this land, we’re dedicated stewards of its cultural, historical and scienti c resources, including archaeological sites,” Hall said. “Essentially, this land is property of the entire nation, so it is our obligation to act as stewards and manage those responsibilities.” Every construction project proposed on Corps land is approached assuming construction will damage artifacts. Therefore, archaeological surveying is a requirement. Each project in the Corps must comply with federal laws, including the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, which requires the Corps to consult with Tribes, the State Historic Preservation Of ce, and other parties. This cautious approach is especially important in years with increased ooding, as in spring 2011, because oods have the potential to expose previously buried archaeological sites. If artifacts are more than 100 years old, they are protected under the Archaeological Resources Protection Act making it a federal crime to remove them or damage protected sites. If the public encounters an artifact, it’s important to immediately notify the federal land manager. Do not disturb or move the object either, Tracy said. The artifact is not only the legal property of the U.S., but the resource has “context”—indicators used by archaeologists to determine its age and cultural signi cance, if any. Through their training, archaeologists are able to study history discovered through the context. What most passersby are oblivious to is very noticeable to them. This information can be easily lost if the object is disturbed or moved. The discovered history is very important to the archaeologists. But as Hall says “it’s not the artifacts themselves that’s so important; it’s the story that lies behind the artifacts.”Walla Walla District Archaeologist Ray Tracy examines a rock during a compliance excavation. Every construction project proposed on Corps land is approached assuming construction will damage artifacts.story and photos by Terri A. Rorke (Right) District Fishery Biologist Jason Achziger dumps dirt in a sift where Archaeologist Ray Tracy looks for evidence of cultural phenomona on a proposed construction project in Franklin County, Wash. “ “ “L “L “L “L “L L L L L L L L L “ L L “ L L e e et t et et t t et t et t et ’s ’ ’ s s s ’ s d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d is is is i is i i i is is i i c c c c c c c s s s s s t hi s ” Ra Tr T T T T T ac ac ac c sa sa s h he h h h he c lo se l l l l e a a a a m mi mi i i i i n n n n n s s t or r y y y an an an n a d d d d d ph ot os o b b y Te T rr r i A. A R R R or or or or o ke ke ke ke ke ke ke k k ly INTERCOM 14July September 2011 15

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INTERCOM 16July September 2011 17 More than 220 Walla Walla District employees have deployed in support of either the Overseas Contingency Operations or the Global War on Terrorism missions since the 9/11 attacks. A year under theRon Ashley re ects on year-long Afghanistan deployment Hazara sun by Terri A. Rorke “This is where the hospital complex is supposed to be built,” he says. It’s a simple photo of a few Afghans standing in a desolate eld, including a white-coat-clad doctor staring o into the distance with his hands clasped behind his back. Seemingly, he’s envisioning how the building will look once it’s nished. “I just got an e-mail that the hospital is now under construction,” Ashley said with a smile. The smile is justi ed because many believe that every completed project the U.S. turns over to Afghanistan means the people are closer to stability. In June, President Obama announced his plan to withdraw 10,000 U.S. troops by the end of the year. The transition of control is expected to be complete by 2014 when Afghans will be responsible for their own security and civil works projects. The Afghans are preparing for this transition. “They are good students. They want to progress, but they still want to keep their culture,” he said. During his latest deployment, Ashley not only spent a year working on construction projects, but also on building a great rapport with the people he lived beside while stationed in Bamyan. “I probably had a thousand conversations over cups of tea,” he says. Because of the relationship the foreign forces built with the locals, the Hazara would look out for their new friends by warning them about traveling to dangerous areas or being cautious around suspicious people. In July, NATO announced that it handed over control to local forces in Bamyan, according to BBC news. This is the rst of seven areas planned for transition of security in Afghanistan. But if you ask Ashley, there’s still time to make a di erence. “I said that was my last deployment, but I’m thinking about giving it another go.”You can sense satisfaction as Ron Ashley excitedly talks about his recent one-year deployment in Afghanistan, a sojourn lled with hard work, long days and many environmental and cultural challenges. His journey in central Afghanistan among the Hazara people, claimed descendants from 13th century Mongol ruler Genghis Khan, was lled with contrast and opportunities as he saw an interesting mix of people who, for example, still use primitive threshers in their farm elds, but have modern cell phones. Ashley dove into this mix by working closely with Afghans as a construction representative. His work a orded him many occasions to teach. He describes how Afghans commonly approached him calling out “Mr. Engineer, tell me how this works!” Ashley was part of a team of four Walla Walla District employees who served as construction representatives on numerous civil works projects. Collectively, they worked on about 250 projects—all making lasting di erences in this underdeveloped country. The team provided independent government cost estimates, performed quality assurance inspections, and o ered assistance to Afghans on proof of land ownership and on basic infrastructure and facility-building projects like wells, roads and bridges. While facing extreme weather and rough terrain, Ashley traveled to both the most populated and most remote corners of Afghanistan, where he says people can count on one hand how many times they’ve seen Americans. He’s lived in Afghanistan for at least part of every year since 2006 on three separate Corps deployments, while working on nearly 160 projects combined. During his most recent deployment, he worked on about 70 projects alone. He also taught Afghans basic trades in a training program rst established by Corps employees, Power Plant Operator Bill Stratton and Mechanical Engineer Carl Knaak, at the New Zealand Base in Bamyan. Both Knaak and Stratton returned to Afghanistan over the years to continue the combined construction e ort as well. During that time, the team has had the opportunity to not only see projects built from start to nish, but to also see how people’s lives have changed. Ashley scrolls through before and after photos of projects he’s worked on.photos courtesy of Ron Ashley Scenes from Ron Ashley’s recent deployment in Afghanistan phot phot t phot phot phot phot os sc c s os c os s sc o s s c sc os s o os c c o o o os c t t t or ourt ourt t ourt ou ourt es s esy e esy esy es e esy y fR fR fR f fR ofR ofR ofR of ofR ofR ofR ofR ofR ofR R R of R A A A onA onA on nA A nA onA onA onA nA A onA onA on A hl hl hl hl hl s sh shle shle s h sh s sh shle shle shle sh s shle y y y y y y y

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phot os os s c c os c os c ou ourt esy sy of J J o o ohn ohn Gorn ick ick S t e p p i n g o u t t o Stepping out to help out Second article in a two-part series on how the Cost Engineering Branch supports the Corps and beyond. by Terri A. Rorke In June, Walla Walla District Civil Engineer Kurt Friederich had a chance to travel to Brazil--the largest country in Latin America. But he wasn’t there to sightsee. At the request of Brazil’s port authority, Friederich and fellow colleague, Portland District Cost Engineer John Gornick, taught port authority cost engineers in a week-long Dredging Prospect Course in Brasilia. This is one of the Cost Engineering Center of Expertise’s main missions, “Support for Others,” which includes serving organizations outside of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The Brazilians wanted to learn Corps practices because they are trying to nd a way to standardize their port authority program, according to Friederich. One of the differences Friederich learned about the two countries was that Brazil allows boats from all over the world to enter its ports, while the U.S. only permits U.S. agged vessels to enter. This is one reason why the Brazilians wanted to learn about the District’s software program, the Cost Engineering Dredge Estimating Program (CEDEP)--to help the port authority streamline its operation. With the help of translators, the Corps engineers taught what Friederich described as a “fun and challenging class.” Friederich said the class also bene ted the Corps because the trip allowed all the participants to exchange professional knowledge. He said the training was well-received and the Brazilians are already discussing the possibility of another class in the future. Although it’s uncommon for the District to travel abroad to conduct training, countries such as Russia, Germany and Brazil have already called on Walla Walla District for its cost engineering expertise. S upport for others T ra i n i n g D D D D D i i i i r r r r r e e e e e e c c c c c c c c t t t t o o o o o o o o r r r r r r r r y y y y y y o o o o o f f f f f f e e e x x p p p p p p p e e e r r r t t t t i i i s s s s e e e y y y y y y y y y y p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p The Walla Walla District’s Cost Engineering Branch carries a lot of responsibility as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers National Directory of Expertise (Cost DX) for all U.S. civil works projects and the “Support for Others” program. The DX also provides cost estimatin g services on all projects from the planning phases through construction, maintenance, and facilities’ rehabilitation. This second part in a two-part series offers a closer look at how District engineers are making a difference around the Corps and beyond. E n g ineer streamlines cost risk too l g g g g g g E The DX is actively involved in learning new techniques, methods and practices used in the federal and private sector applications. DX engineers pass on their knowledge to the cost community and other Project Delivery Team (PDT) members. The Corps of Engineers Dredge Estimating Program (CEDEP) is used Corps-wide. Trained DX personnel use the software to develop and communicate potential costs and schedules of dredging projects and identify potential risk areas that the Corps PDT can focus on to allow for fair project estimates. DX experts provide Proponent-Sponsored Engineer Corps Training (PROSPECT) to teach dredge estimating in and outside of the Corps (see “Support for Others” on left page). The DX also provides instruction for several other PROSPECT classes including Cost and Schedule Risk Analysis and Civil Works Cost Estimating. Along with Friederich, other DX engineers have developed course details and served as instructors. As an example, District Civil Engineer Jim Neubauer developed a certi cation course for cost estimators who provide Agency Technical Reviews (ATR) for projects needing authorization at the Congressional level. The ATR process is an effort to improve and ensure the quality and creditability of Corps decisions. He trained more than 100 cost engineering professionals to date. The cost engineers also provide ad hoc training, both formal and hands-on, upon request. Several districts have sent junior level cost personnel to Walla Walla District for mentoring. The visiting engineers work on their own district project work while receiving over-the-shoulder mentoring from DX personnel. “This has been a win–win opportunity because it allows individuals to receive customized real time training from senior level folks, while the DX facilitates enhanced future communication and partnership with other districts,” Cost Engineering Chief Kim Callan said. Lo cal level Tiig The Cost DX supports the Corps headquarters in Washington, D.C. by creating and updating all cost engineering regulations and guidance. The DX also serves as a consultant to support the headquarters on high-risk projects. With highly trained individuals in various areas such as cost, scheduling risk, earned value management, contracting, construction modi cations, regulations and FAR requirements, the cost estimating DX either already has the experience or can nd a subject-matter expert to provide support where needed. The Cost DX also provides budgetary estimating support to local projects, to include programming estimates and Independent Government Estimate preparation (required for award of all construction contracts and most supply/service contracts). “There are speci c regulations which dictate what and how an IGE is prepared. Mainly, an estimate is only considered an IGE if it has proper signatures from, at the very least, include the chief of cost engineering,” explained Callan. p p ( Above, left ) In June, District Civil En g ineer Kurt F r i e d er i c h r i gh t, con d uc t s a d re d gi ng course F i d i h i h t d t d d i f or Brazilian port authorit y cost en g ineers with P ortland District Cost En g ineer John Gornick in B ras ili a, B raz il. After working for the U.S. Army C orps of Engineers Walla Walla C D istrict a little more than a y ear, D C ost Engineer Jim Jetton helped C c reate a cost-estimating tool that cost c e n g ineers will use countr y -wide e I n July, Jetton was awarded the D istrict Corps Day New Employee D o f the Year Award for developin g o a streamlined risk analysis process a f or projects costing less than $40 f m illi o n m C orps regulations stipulate that a ll project cost estimates in the a r econnaissance, feasibilit y and r p reconstruction engineering and p d esigning phases have risk-based d c ontin g enc y applied to them c Pro j ects estimated at costing more t han $40 million go through a “formal t c ost and schedule risk anal y sis.” Howc e ver, there was not a de nitive p rocess e f or smaller projects until now f Th e f o rmal cos t an d sc h edu l e ri s k a nalysis is very involved because it a u ses statistical analysis and requires u q ualitative and q uantitative methods q f or evaluating risks and generating f c ontingencies, according to Jetton. c “ Pro j ects under the $ 40 million t hreshold were including contingent c i es that we r e n’t b a sed o n ri s k An d c p er our re g ulations, the y need to be,” p J etton sai d. J “ Jim Neubauer, Cost Estimating B ranch a g enc y technical review coorB d inator saw the need for the p rocess d to be s tr e amlin ed an d s tan d ar d iz ed so t t hat cost en g ineers across the countr y t c an develo p more accurate risk-based c c ontingencies for smaller projects.” c The new “abbreviated risk anal ys is” process offers cost engineers a s impler process for evaluating risks on projects costing less than $40 million, w hile saving time and creating more a ccu rat e es timat es. Th e n ew t oo l i s already being recommended by Corps h eadquarters to districts across the c ountr y The process not only helps cost engineers develop accurate cost estim ates, but also helps pro j ect delive ry t eams create more accurate budgets and identify risks that need to be add ressed as the pro j ect develops, Jetton s ai d. “We don’t want a lack of appropriate plannin g to keep the j ob from progressing,” Jetton said. “We want to give everyone a reali stic portra y al of how much the pro j ect w ill likely cost to construct.” J etton said the new streamlined p rocess will also hel p reinforce Cor p s r egulations requiring that risk-based c ontingencies are applied to governme nt es timat es. J im J etton phot o by Terri A. Rork e INTERCOM 18July September 2011 19

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INTERCOM 20July September 2011 21 INT INT ERC ERC RC RC OM OM OM OM 20 20 0 Path ahead:(Above) McNary Lock and Dam. (Main) Five-year tunnel inspection at Lucky Peak Dam and Lake, Boise, Idaho. When the hydropower dam facilities were rst built, we had new equipment and a lot of the same people who built the dams stayed on as maintenance and operations staff. But today, most of that crew’s expertise disappeared when people retired, and there were few records kept of how the work was accomplished. In order to survive in today’s business climate, we need to change the way we operate. Without uniform standards and speci c goals, the work is accomplished in different methods and procedures at each facility. This results in an inability to compare each facility’s practices. It’s dif cult to determine who is doing it ’right’ and understand what to improve and how to do so. It’s been shown that continuing to use old methods while trying to maintain aging infrastructure is ineffective. Successful industries change methods to improve both maintenance and operations. Now, as a “business” in the District, we must reevaluate our practices or we risk failing at our primary missions. Instead of doing maintenance strictly on the basis of time, we need to consider additional factors like: How many used hours does one generator have compared to the units in the plant? Does a unit with 600 hours of run time need as much maintenance as one that has 3,000 hours of run time? With enough of the right type of information and accurate risk assessments, we may determine we only need to do annual maintenance on the unit with less run time every two years. The maintenance team is working on updating equipment hierarchies, reviewing how our warehouses operate and setting up job plans. Meanwhile, planning and scheduling will become the main driver of both maintenance and operations in making sure we have all the parts and pieces necessary to complete a job before we start it and also completing the work at a time that will cause the fewest problems. By implementing these new practices, the District is creating a foundation for rst-class maintenance and operation. The result of these changes will ultimately result in a highly trained workforce.Jim SimonsenLittle Goose Lock and Dam Maintenance Chief From the field The dutiful mechanic marks off a checklist. He’s checking this list off for what seems to be the hundredth time. It’s routine, preventive maintenance. It’s behind the scenes and seemingly repetitive but many do not realize that simply checking off this list may be the District’s key to carrying out its maintenance mission. And District Operations Chief Rick Werner wants to share this key. Because, according to Werner, maintenance is everyone’s business. BUSINESS CULTURE “It’s not just the foreman’s business,” Werner said. “It’s also the ranger, the control room operator and the sh biologist who have to effectively communicate their priorities in order for maintenance staff to know how and when to approach their mission” Werner and Maintenance Engineering Chief Kimberley Oldham started developing the revamped maintenance system while previously working for Seattle and Portland districts. Now at Walla Walla District, Werner and Oldham are “trying to build a business mindset around our maintenance mission. And we’re in the business of selling reliability.” Werner aims to help everyone understand that if he can get the right people doing the right work at the right time, the District can offer the maximum bene t to the region. “As a business, we need to provide our product at minimal cost,” Werner said. “If you don’t do the right work at the right time, the asset is not going to be there when you need it and will probably cost you more money, energy and time in the long run. It’s about sustaining the investment. That’s why we do maintenance.” VISION “We aim to be proactive stewards of entrusted resources,” Werner said. “These parks, dams and waterways aren’t mine. They’re the taxpayers. We are here to operate and maintain these projects.” Werner said it is important to approach maintenance with a business-mindset because there are more resources than people to get the job done. “I can shut everything down to do maintenance but if I do, it affects energy production and sh passage and that affects the region. It makes more sense to perform a repair when you’re already doing scheduled routine maintenance,” Werner said. A CORPS CORE Werner and Oldham gradually have been building up a maintenance team that serves as the core group implementing the vision of getting the District synergized. The team is made up of maintenance chiefs, engineers, schedulers and planners and technicians. “The business of maintenance is not on everyone’s radars, unlike some other business lines that focus on how we can work on project management process better or how we can design something better,” Werner said. Ice Harbor Lock and Dam Maintenance Chief Scott Thoren said his role is to implement “reliability excellence.” “In some ways, we are getting back to basics and relearning old maintenance processes that used to be standard within the District, such as having the crews prepare a maintenance report after completing non-routine or special evolutions,” Thoren said. “In other ways, we are choosing the best practices from industry leaders to help maximize optimize our maintenance and warehousing practices and synchronize the equipment reliability efforts within our operations and maintenance sections. We are the guardians of these gems in and near the river; they deserve our best efforts.” Core team leads Corps maintenance vision by by y by by by T T er er r ri r A Ro Ro Ro Ro rk rk rk rk e e e e photo b y Rob Lus tig photo by Brandon Fra zier ph oto by K e i t h H yde Se e MA IN N TE TE NA NA NA N NC C NC C C C NC E E E on on n n on 2 2 2 2 2 2 photo by Frank W acho b b p hoto b y David Lewis

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Cub day in the park About 100 Cub Scouts participated in a day camp at Rooks Park near Walla Walla, Wash. in June. Some of the camp’s activities included cooking, beading, leatherwork, obstacle courses, BB-gun shooting and archery. As part of a community service project, the Cub Scouts also weeded a planter bed at the park entrance and planted plants donated by local businesses.INTERCOM 22July September 2011 23 Summer at last, and my husband and I are back in our favorite area, Dworshak Dam and Reservoir in Ahsahka, Idaho. Planning for an R.V. retirement gave us a terri c lifestyle as U.S. Army Corps of Engineers volunteers. As our second season at Dworshak opens, we are once again amazed at the project, thrilled by the natural beauty, and welcomed as part of the visitor center staff. The summer season welcomes visitors eager to hear about the history of the river and reservoir and learn the bene ts of our dam. Students and curious travelers can experience the conception, construction and completion of the dam and reservoir through lms, exhibits and, best of all, the dam tour. I love the expressions of wonder at the “hows” and welcome all questions. Frequently there are questions I don’t have the answer to, like “how were the creeks named?” But nding the why and how and relaying the information really creates a sense of pride because we are not only able to respond to our visitors’ concerns, but we also learn something new. Often I can nd the answers from the project manager if a question is dam-related, but other times I mine the brains of the natural resources team managers and rangers. Learning while sharing our experiences is a joy, but the true pleasure is the nature of it all. River to reservoir, water to power and wildlife viewing are all a part of a marvelous cycle. As spring faded to summer we had the awesome experience of seeing the reservoir go from the lowest level in decades to collecting the record run-off from a tremendous snow pack and seemingly endless spring rains. I told visitors about the severe historical ooding, while they told me about the money they earned as young people lling sand bags by the river at the fairgrounds. Their memories are a wonderful source of information. Every day we have endless opportunities to learn while working with the team of rangers and resource management personnel. So we truly thank you for the wonderful USACE volunteer program. You are the best. “A Dam Volunteer and Proud Of It” story and photos by Penny Bray Penny Bray ‘Mac’ makes it to the top Lucky Peak Dam and Lake Maintenance Worker Monte A. Crawford, known as “Mac,” was recognized with a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-wide level award for his performance successfully leading a $100,000 intake tower wire rope replacement project. The job was only performed twice before in the dam’s history. Mac earned the 2011 scal year’s National Castle Award at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters level. Mac’s 27 years of Corps service includes his position at Lucky Peak, where he’s worked 10 years. Mac was previously recognized in December 2010 with a “special act award” for his “outstanding leadership, dedication and support in the overall coordination and success of the rope replacement project and for returning the emergency gates to service without incident,” according to Lucky Peak Operations Manager Joyce Dunning. “We’ve changed our operations to meet extenuating requirements as we learn more about needs for sh and the environment,” Oldham said. Much of the District’s efforts revolve around operating six hydropower facilities, and none of it can be done without maintaining the equipment. So if maintenance may seem like a behind the scenes kind of mission, remember the key to mission success lies in the hands of everyone in the District ... because it’s your business, too. MAINTE NA NA NC E, con ti ti nu ed f ro m 21 Scott Thoren Ch ie f of M ai nt en an ce I ce H ar b or K i pl an Notti ng ha m Ma in te na nc e Te ch ni ci an I ce H ar b o r G i ng er Lerou e Ma in te na nc e Te ch ni ci an L ittle Goos e A few Core maintenance faces CHALLENGES AHEAD The maintenance team faces both expected and unexpected challenges ahead. Expectedly, “reactive” maintenance is the most costly mode of operations. The most ef cient form of maintenance is planned and scheduled maintenance with a target of less than 10 percent reactive work as an industry best practice. “It may take you four or ve years to plan, design and build a structure, but then you have to operate and maintain it for another 50,” Werner said. The District must also prepare for many unexpected consequences of operating aging infrastructure in a progressing society. “One of the biggest challenges with this business is that it’s not prescriptive,” Oldham said. “We don’t have manuals that tell us how to turn a dial. And we don’t know when external factors may affect our operations.” Some of the units are operating differently than what they were originally designed to do. The District had to adapt the units for evolving demands and changes, pushing structures outside of their design criteria. p p pho pho phot phot phot ho hot p hot phot p h t p p ph pho ph pho ot t p p p p p p phot h p p p p p p p ph p p ph pho p p p p ph p ph p p p p h p p p p p p p p p p o o o o o o o o o by o b b b by by by by y o b b b b o by o o by b by by y o by o by b b b by y by o o b o b by y y o by o o by by y y y o o b by y y y y y o y o o b o b b y o o by by by o by o o o o K K K K K K K Kei Kei Kei Ke K Kei Kei K K K K K K K Kei K K K K Ke Kei K K i K K K K K K K K K e Ke K Ke Ke t t t t th h h h h h h h h H H H H H t t th th h h h h h h H t t t th h h h h h h H t t t h th h h th h h h h h H H t t th h h h h h h h H H t h h h h h h h t h h h h h h h h t t h h h h h h t t t t t t t t t h h h h t t t h h h H H t h h H H t t h h t t h h h h t t t h h h t t t t t h h t y y yd yd yd yde yde yde de de e de e yd y y y phot pho phot pho ph pho pho h ph ot hot t ot ot ph pho h pho pho phot ph pho ot ot ot ph ph ph o phot ot p hot ot ot ot ot ot o t p o ot o t t p o t ph phot p p ho hot ot o p p h ot o p p p o p os os b os s os os s b os b os b os b os b osb os os os s os b s b os os os b s s os o os b s s os b os b s os s s os b s s s b s os b s s b s sb y y Je yJ y J y Je y Je y Je J y Je y Je Je Je yJe yJe Je y J y Je J y Je Je yJe y Je J J J y y J J J y Je Je y y Je remy remy remy remy remy remy remy my my my my remy em y y my y emy remy remy remy em re e e em em m m m m m y N N N Ngu Ngu gu Ngu gu Ng gu N N u N N N N N N N N N u u u u N N Ng g gu N Ngu g g g ye y y ye en en en en n en ye ye en en y ye y ye y n y y e y en y y y y ye

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Another hit at C o r p s D a y Corps Day Every summer, the Walla Walla District takes a day to relax, soak up the sun and recognize employee achievements. (Main) Katie Sinclair hits a volleyball in a competitive Corps Day match at Rooks Park in June. (Left, above) Corps family kids glide down the ever-popular water slide. (Left, below) District Paralegal Specialist Amber Trukositz winces as District Fishery Biologist Tim Wik’s child, Josiah, 10, prepares to pop a water balloon. Annual Corps Day winners Em Em Em Em E pl pl pl pl pl oy oy oy oy oy y y y y y y y y y y y y y ee ee ee ee ee ee ee e ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee e ee e ee e e s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s of of of of of of o of of of of f f of o t t t t t t t t t t t t t t he he he h he he he he he h he he he e Q Q Q Q Q Q Q ua ua ua ua ua ua ua a rt rt r t e e er er er er er er e er er r r JOH JOH JO JO JO JO O O N C HAT FIELD, Power P l ant E l ect t ric ian a D D wor wor sha sha k D kD am am L EROY PHILLIPS, Envir onm o ent nt al al Res Res our our ce ce Sup Sup erv erv isor, Boise Re g ulator y Of ce Outs tand in g Achiev em m en en t t Aw Aw ar d A LL ISON YOUNG, Mai a nte nte nan nan ce ce Man Man age age men m t Tec h nician, D wors h a k Dam W W WIL WIL WIL WIL WIL W L LIA LIA LIA LIA IA LIA M G M G M G G MG MG MG ERS ERS ERS ERS ER R ERS BAC BAC BAC BAC BAC C H H H H H HER HER ER HE HER H BB B B B B B B B B B BB B ESS ESS ESS ESS ESS ESS EY EY EY EY EY Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y McNary Lock and Dam Mechanical Engineer Supervisor Art Maldonado presents McNary Electronic Systems Control Craftsman William Gersbach with an employee of the quarter award at the June Corps Day town hall meeting. (Right) District Supervisory Civil Engineer Yvonne Gibbons presents Civil Engineer Herb Bessey with an employee of the quarter award. Di Di Di D D D D D D D D D Di D D D D D D D D st st st st st st t st st t st t t t st t t t t s in in in in in in n n i n n n n n n n n n n gu gu gu u u u gu g g g i is he e h d d d d d d d R R R R R R R R et et et et e e e t ir ir ir ir r ed ed ed ed e ed e e e e E E E E mp mp mp mp m mp mp mp mp p p mp mp p m m m p mp p mp m mp m m mp p p p p p p p p lo lo lo lo lo lo lo lo lo lo l lo l l lo o l l o lo lo lo lo lo lo lo o o lo lo lo lo lo o o o o ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye ye e ye ye ye ye y y y y e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e DAV DAV DAV DAV DAV DAV DAV DAV D DAV A DAV A D DAV DAV D ID D D D D D D D D D D D D D A. A A. A. A. A. OP OP OP PB P B OP ROE E K Former District Construction Chief David Opbroek speaks to personnel at June’s town hall. Opbroek is the District’s Distinguished Retired Employee of the year. He retired in 2009 after 34 years of service. En En n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n gi gi gi gi g g g g g g g g g g g g n n e n er i i i in g Ex Ex Ex Ex x x ce ce ce e e e c e e e l l ll l ll ll ll l en en en en en ce ce ce ce e e A A A A A w w w wa wa wa wa wa wa w wa wa a a a a a a a a a a rd rd r rd r d d d d rd r r rd rd r r r KEV EV EV EV I I IN I N N N N N I I N RE RE EN RE R E E E SHA A A A SHA W, , Mec Mec ec ec ha ha han a an an an an an han n h a n n n n n ica ica ica ica i ic ic ic ic c l E lE lE E l E ngi ngi ngi n ngi nee nee nee nee e r, r, r, Dis Dis tri r i i ri r i i i i r i r r i i i ct t t ct ct ct ct ct ct ct ct c c c H H H ea ea H dqu u u u ar ar ar ar art a ar ar a ar a a a ers ers ers s Ne Ne Ne Ne Ne Ne e Ne Ne e Ne Ne Ne Ne Ne Ne e e e Ne Ne Ne Ne Ne w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w E E E Em m E E E E E pl l l l l l pl l l l l o o o o oy oy oy o oy o o o ee ee ee ee ee e e e e e o o o o o o f th h h h h h h h e e e e e e e e e e Ye Ye e e e e e ar ar a ar ar ar ar ar r r r r a a r JAM AM AM JAM AM M M M M A A ES ES ES ES ES ES ES E S JET J ET ET ET T ET ET T JET E ET T T JE T J T T T T T T J T T T T TO TON TON TON TON TON TON TON TON TON T TON TO T T , , C C C C C C C C C C ivi i ivi vi ivi vi v l E E E E E E E E E l l l l E l E E E E E ng ng n ngi ng ng ng ng n n ng ng nee nee ee e e e e e e r, r, r, r, r, r r r r r, Dis D D D tri ri i ct ct ct c c c He He He ea e e He dqu qu a ar ar art rt art art art art a art art ers ers ers ers e ers e ers ers ers e ers SHE SHE HE SHE SHE SH HE E E LLY LLY LLY LLY L LLY L LY WE WE WE WE ST ST, Ma a nag n ag g g g g g g g ag g eme me me m nt t nt nt t Ser Ser er Ser vic vic vic c es es es es Spe Spe Spe Spe p p cia cia cia cia c lis lis is lis lis lis l lis s s t, t, t, t, t t t t t D D Dw Dwo wo Dwo wo wo Dwo w w w w w rsh rsh rsh s rs rs r ak ak ak ak D D Dam Da D D D D D D D D D D D D D Su Su Su Su S p pp pp pp pp pp p p p p pp p or or or or r r r t t Em m p p l l pl p p pl p p p oy oy oy oy oy oy y oy y oy y o oy ee ee ee e ee e e e o o o o o o o f f f f f f f th th th th e e e e Ye Ye Ye Ye Ye Ye Ye Ye Y Y Y ar ar ar r ar CAS CAS CA AS EY EY EY EY FOR FOR FOR R FOR F FOR FOR F FO F F F EST E A dm m mi mi i i i mi mi mi m i ni ni nis ni ni n n n n n tra ra ra r tiv tiv tiv iv t i tiv i e S e S e upp upp up pp ort ort o o Ass Ass Ass Ass As As As A s ist st st t t s ant ant n ant n n n L L L L L L L uck u y P ea a a ak ak a a a a ak a a ak a Da D D D D D D m m m m m m Corps Crowned Corporate Challenge Champs (Top) Jordon Fink, Kent Bernard, Jon Petersen and Jon Renholds showcase the winning trophy. (Above) Bernard and Fink display the defense that shut down their opponents. (Right) Renholds’ jumpers, drives and defense-propelled the District to two wins against the Red Monkey Lounge team, including a 20-13 nals victory. (Right, below) Corps friends, family members and supporters observe the action. Story by Joe Saxon USA Today and Rand McNall y recentl y anointed W alla W alla as America’s Friendliest Small Town H owever, one weekend a y ea r i n August, the welcoming streets of Walla Walla turn into a blazin g battle eld wher e m ore than 300 teams compete i n a thr ee o n-thr ee b a s k e t b all t ourne y in which tenacious defense, deadly long range shooting and composure, or l ack thereof, se p arate winners fr o m l ose r s. The U.S. Army Cor ps o f En g ineers Walla Walla D i s tri c t’ s f ou r-man t e am o f H yrdraulic Engineer Jo n R enholds, H y draulic En g inee r J on Petersen, Contracting Train ee K e nt B e rnar d an d Electrical En g ineer Jordon F ink came up roses at the Peach Classic, sweeping thei r opp onents 4-0 en route to the t itl e. Keys to victory, according t o Bernard a former Eastern Oregon offensive lineman, i ncluded “practicing two to t hree da y s a week for thre e weeks prior to the tournament, k eeping our composure, mental t ou g hness and scoutin g ou r o pponents to determine thei r strengths and weaknesses.” That a pp roach bore fruit, particularly during the seco nd g ame of the tournament when t he y faced a tou g h Washin g ton State Penitentiary team. “The Penitentiary was the t ou g hest team we faced,” B ernard said. “Athletically we outmatched them, but they presented a tou g h ph y sical m atchu p. A tough physical matchup t he y overcame when Petersen’s l ate game heroics and j umpe r l ocked down the jailers 21-17. After g rindin g their wa y to t he titl e, Petersen summariz ed t heir Peach Basket Classic experiences sa y in g “It was a fun team-building event and a g ood opportunity to represent t he Cor p s.” C orps Crowned Corporate ChallengeChamps Stor y b y Joe SaxonPeach Basket Classic p hotos b y Terri A. Rork e p hoto by Joe Saxon p hoto by Joe Sax on py p hoto b y Joe Sax on p hoto b y Kev an S chne ne idm dm dm mi m dmi idmi i i ller er ller ller ler ller p hoto by Joe Saxon py p hoto b y Joe Saxon INTERCOM 24July September 2011 25

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Walla Walla he District participated in its biggest community relations event of the year-the Walla Walla Fair ontier Da y s. About 95,000 fair g oers had an o p p ortunit y to sto p b y the District’s booth featurin g rmational displays, a Lower Monumental Lock and m model, an educational streamtabl e a theater for attendees to ch District mission videos while y rest their feet his year, about 50 volunteers interacted h about 1,600 people who visited the Corps booth. moor, the Corps’ o cial Water Safety Serpent mascot als o racted with area elementary students as part of “Education ” Seamoorserves as a steward of remindin g the p ubli c ut water safety. very year, the Corps makes an e ort to educate the munity on its various missions he county fair. story and photos by Terri A. Rorke District shares mission at the Walla Walla Count y Fair T h & Fr o info r Da m and wat c the y T h with Seam inter Day. abou Ev comm at th ri A. Ror ke ) The “Ring of Fire” amusement ride offers one of many attractions at the fair. (From left to right) District (Main) nical Su pp ort Chief Dw ay ne Weston tours the fair g rounds with his wife, An ge la and children, Kee ga n and Techn ey; Scene from this year’s Corps booth; Students from Blue Ridge Elementary School in Walla Walla, Wash., Sydne ly raise their hands when Seamoor, the Corps of cial Water Safety Serpent mascot asks a question. About eagerl hildren interacted with Seamoor at this year’s fair; District Purchasing Agent Lana Murry talks to Jeremy 440 ch r, 13, with his parents of College Place, about wetlands and ooding over a streamtable at the fair. Fetter, INTERCOM 26July September 2011 27

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I ’ m w i t h t h e I’m with the C O R P S CORPS R o y C l a r k Roy Clark Name: Roy ClarkPosition: Worker-In-Charge at Little Goose Lock and Dam, Starbuck, Wash.Describe your job. I’ve been with the Corps for eight years now. As worker-in-charge, I ensure that all work assigned by the crew foreman is completed in a timely and efficient manner. I also handle mechanical issues as they arise. I assist the foreman with managing a team of mechanics, riggers and utility hands to accomplish all daily missions—both scheduled and unscheduled. I keep all the project management sheets up-to-date and help plan all of the annual outages. What is the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your current position? The biggest challenge so far was making the transition from working as a mechanic to working as a foreman on the same crew. It was challenging to one day be a mechanic on the floor and the next day having extra responsibilities of managing the same crew effectively. As a mechanic, I only had one job assigned to me at a time. As a working foreman, I need to know what is going on with all the jobs assigned out to the mechanical crew and stay up-to-date on all jobs being worked in the plant with other crews and contractors to help me better plan work schedules. This can be very challenging at times.Describe a few accomplishments you’ve experienced with your job. The one I am most proud of the crew for is the T-1 bushing repair job. We worked side by side with the Bonneville Power Administration and came together as a team with people we never worked with before. I must say that the crew at Little Goose was flawless at removing and replacing the T-1 transformer bushing. When T-1 came back online, I was extremely proud of the mechanical crew for successfully working as a team to accomplish the mission. What is the most rewarding part about your job? The most rewarding thing for me is to see a group of individuals get together with their own ideas for problem-solving, but in the end they come together as a team with one solution and execute the fix as a team.Please highlight a notable milestone or memory in your position. I worked as a foreman for 90 days in a developmental position before I was selected as the working foreman. On the first day of the job, we had to take the navigation lock out of service. I was running around like a chicken with its head cut off and I look back now and it just cracks me up. My foreman came out and pulled me aside and made me look at how the crew was getting all worked up because of how I was acting. I just wanted to do a good job, but I was trying to get everything done all at once and it actually takes a couple of days to un-water the navigation lock. I learned a lot that day. My foreman and I still crack up when we think about it. p h oto by L i sa H uston