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The Intercom

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The Intercom
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United States -- Army. -- Corps of Engineers. -- Walla Walla District ( issuing body )
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Walla Walla, WA
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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District
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"Serving the military and civiliam members of the Walla Walla District".

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
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on1022849628

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1ARRA Update Special Edition Vol. 37 No. 5 November December 2010 US Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District

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2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act was signed into law by President Barack Obama Feb. 17, 2009. The ARRA was designed as an economic stimulus package to revamp the U.S. economy and create or save millions of jobs. The act is already ful lling its objective. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District was allocated an estimated $40.7 million for scal year 2009 through 2012 to complete a variety of projects. That total includes $24.4 million for operations and maintenance, $7.1 million for construction, $8.6 million for rural Idaho development projects and $436,000 for general investigations, regulatory, cultural resources and inspections of completed work. AR RA update American Recovery and Reinvestment Ac t t American Recovery and Reinvestment Ac t t h A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A i Repairing Infrastructure • Navigation locks • Dams ARRA projects by state Advocating small businesses Restoring ecosystems$5.8 million in recreationRural Idaho’s renovation 4 9 4-9 1 0 1 5 10-15 1 6 1 9 16-19U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photo photo courtesy of Forgren Associates photo courtesy of University of Idaho

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3ARRA Update 3 3 3 ARR R R R R R AR A U A U A U AU A U A U U U pda d pd da da da d d d a te te te te te On the coverFor more information, contact: Public Affairs Of ce U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 201 N. Third Avenue Walla Walla, WA 99362 Phone: (509) 527-7020 E-mail: cenww-pa@usace.army.mil Web site: www.nww.usace.army.milis an unof cial publication authorized by the provi sions of Army Regulation 360-1. It is published bimonthly by the Public Affairs Of ce, Walla Walla District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It has a distribu tion of 1,500 copies. Contents of the INTERCOM are not necessarily the of cial views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Walla Walla District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Commander Lt. Col. David A. Caldwell PA Chief Joe Saxon Editor PA Specialist Terri A. Rorke Stephen Doherty PA Specialist Student Aide Gina Baltrusch Amber Larsen PA Specialist Bruce Henrickson 1ARRA Update Special to the Vol. 37 No. 5 November December 2010 US Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District American Recovery and Reinvestment Act at work rebuilding the Lower Monumental Dam gate. I N T E R C O M NTERCOM photo by Stephen Doherty The United States and the Inland Northwest have encountered and been weathering challenging years. Simultaneously, many needs continued to grow throughout the Walla Walla District as a result of aging infrastructure, and normal wear and tear. The advent of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 brought some well-needed funds to the District and region, more than $40 million. The District had many “shovel ready” projects to go and immediately put many of these funds to good use. Some of this funding went to relatively simple maintenance and recapitalization projects, such as repaving trails and building new restrooms at well-used recreation areas (p. 13). These projects resulted in better-quality facilities in safer conditions. More complex projects, such as ecosystem restoration at Camp Creek in the Zumwalt Prairie (p. 10) and navigation lock gate replacement at Lower Monumental Lock and Dam near Kahlotus, Wash. (p. 4), provided opportunities to put people to work while improving conditions for endangered species and wildlife or the reliability of critical infrastructure. The District worked closely with national-level organizations such as The Nature Conservancy; the States of Idaho, Washington and Oregon; and local entities such as the University of Idaho in Moscow, Idaho (p. 12). We e ectively planned, designed and constructed many projects and continue construction of others. All the money for contracts was obligated within the deadlines to ensure businesses were able to get to work and feel the bene ts. In order to do this, the District put new practices into place and focused heavily on hiring small businesses to do the work. In some cases, we took some risks doing this, and they paid o because of very e ective partnering e orts. As of the publication of this magazine, more than 2,000 jobs were directly sustained or created as a result of District e orts, and many other jobs resulted from material supplies and secondand third-order e ects. Furthermore, those jobs created bene ts to the public for years to come. The Walla Walla District continues to be dedicated to the Inland Northwest. I am extremely proud of the Districts accomplishments and the many successes weve experienced alongside our partners, stakeholders and contractors. Together we have served and will continue to Serve our Community, our Nation and the World! Lt. Col. David Caldwell District makes lasting impacts through ARRALt. Col. Dave Caldwell District Commander

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4 R e p a i r i n g t h e N a t i o n Â’ s Repairing the NationÂ’s I n f r a s t r u c t u r e Infrastructure (Top) Contract workers prepare a crane to lift three gate sections off the barge. (Bottom, left) The three gate sections weigh 700 tons. (Bottom, right) A contractor welds a piece of Lower Monumental Lock and DamÂ’s new gate in Vancouver, Wash. (Right) Lower Monumental Lock and DamÂ’s current navigational lock gate. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photos

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5ARRA Update Corps replaces Lower Monumental gate during extended navigation lock outage The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers closes the Columbia and Snake Rivers navigation system each year for maintenance activities, but this year is different. The normal two-to-three week outage was extended to 13 to 14 weeks from December 2010 through March 2011 so the Corps could replace three navigational lock gates in a $44.9 million extended outage. The following downstream lock gates will be replaced: Walla Walla District’s Lower Monumental Lock and Dam ($13.6 million), Portland District’s John Day Lock and Dam ($15.6 million) and The Dalles Lock and Dam ($15.7 million). Completing these recovery act projects will help the Corps maintain the viability of the Columbia-Snake navigation system for decades to come. The gates range in size from 350 to 1,000 tons and require 13 to 14 weeks to install and test. Other locks in the system will undergo outages ranging from routine two-week maintenance outages to more extensive eight-week repair outages. No waterborne transportation on the Columbia/Snake navigation system, a vital part of the Paci c Northwest’s commercial transportation network will be possible during this outage. The Columbia and Snake rivers system serves as the number one U.S. wheat and barley export gateway; number one West Coast paper and forest products gateway; number one West Coast mineral bulk exporteer; and number one West Coast auto imports gateway. According to Brit Ausman in November’s Wheat Life magazine, “This inland system supports 10 million tons of cargo and is connected to the deep draft channel and ocean shipping which supports over 40 million tons of cargo.” Lt.Col. David Caldwell, Walla Walla District commander said, “The Corps understands the impact this outage has on its navigation stakeholders and plans to complete the needed work in a timely manner. We also coordinated the outage schedule with shippers and their customers well in advance, so they could develop and communicate alternative transportation plans.” Ausman agreed that communications between the Corps, Paci c Northwest Waterways Association and river users has been excellent throughout this process saying “it seems to me that the Corps has been very responsive to the industry.” Corps of cials said this communication is key to public preparation for the outage, adding that the Portland and Walla Walla districts prepared an unprecedented maintenance schedule with two years of planning, design, construction, preparation and communication. Corps of cials also stressed that if they don’t replace these gates, the facilities eventually will become unsafe to use. “The alternative to this planned, coordinated outage is an unplanned emergency outage that might shut down the navigation locks for a year or more,” Caldwell said. The outage also allowed regional companies to take part in boosting local economies through Lower Monumental’s prime contractor, Dix Corporation, of Spokane, Wash., and Thompson Metal Fabrication, of Vancouver, Wash., and Lampson International of Kennewick, W ash. D D Gear boxes to be replaced at Lower Monumental Lock and Dam.

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6 Carving and reshaping 1.4 million pounds of steel into a navigational lift gate isn’t done every day. But when Walla Walla District engineers saw a chance to address infrastructure needs, they jumped at the opportunity. Fabrication of the $13.6 million Lower Monumental Navigation Lock downstream gate is now nished, and it’s already shipped to its new home. The more than 700-ton structure stands 84 feet high, 88 feet wide, and 15 feet thick. It was fabricated in three separate sections by Thompson Metal Fabrication (TMF), the subcontractor in charge of fabrication under the prime contractor, Dix Corp., of Spokane, Wash. The fabricated gate was completed in November and barged up river in December from V L b l t R f p t e h “ c l District welco m (Top, left) A tow barges the three newly fabricated Lower Monumental Dam navigation lock gate sections to their new home at the dam near Kahlotus, Wash., in December. (Center, left) A welder shapes the “rib” section of a gate section in Vancouver, Wash., in July. (Bottom, left) Thompson Metal Fabrication (TMF) shop in Vancouver, Wash. (Main) A TMF contract worker welds at a piece of the new LoMo gate.

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7ARRA Update f y Vancouver, Wash., to the Lower Monumental Lock and Dam near Kahlotus, Wash. That mobilization preceded the lower Snake River and lower Columbia River system extended navigation lock outage, which began Dec. 10. According to District Project Engineer Andy Rajala, TMF executed a very robust design plan for the gate fabrication. This project has been a priority of both TMF’s technical and administrative staff. “Working with TMF on this fabrication effort has provided insight on why they have had numerous successful projects,” said Rajala. “Their organizational structure and approach to completing jobs is one of the best I have seen for large steel fabrication.” The gate replacement for Lower Monumental Dam is part of an approved major rehabilitation project. During lift gate inspections in the 1990s, structural fatigue and fracture problems were revealed. Since 2005, the District has contracted annual welding repairs to continue reliable lock operations. The scope of the repairs grew at a substantial rate over the years, making the gate replacement inevitable and raising the priority to an urgent need. The lift gate replacement was funded through ARRA funds in Aug. 2009 and has moved steadily forward since that time. “The reality is that if we don’t take these few months to make these repairs, the facilities will eventually become unsafe to use,” said District Project Manager Steve Hartman about the Lower Monumental gate status. “A gate replacement is a major undertaking and requires more time to install than allotted during the annual two-week routine outages. The choice was either pursue funding and plan ahead for a multi-month outage, or potentially experience an unplanned outage that might shut the lock down for a year or more.” The extended outage’s impact is still the main concern. It is planned to end March 18, 2011. Industry and District leaders, as well as project contractors, continue to stress continued communication with partners, stakeholders and the public. o mes new LoMo navlock gate story and photos by Stephen Doherty

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8 In 2005, the Corps initiated the Dam Safety Action Classi cation (DSAC) System as part of its overall dam safety program to optimize public safety. The DSAC system is a method of screening Corps dams to identify dam safety issues and de ciencies and establish a relative ranking of their potential risk to the public. The Corps used this rating system to establish a nationwide prioritization to focus funding rst on dams and navigation locks that pose the greatest risks to the public. The Walla Walla District screened all its dams, assessed each for the threat they pose to public safety and assigned DSAC ratings based on two key factors. (1) An assessment of the probability (high, medium, low) of dam failure (based on con rmed or uncon rmed dam safety issues). (2) The consequences if failure were to occur. Engineers identi ed interim xes at all District facilities needed to mitigate risk to public safety and are now implementing those short-term xes, which will lead to long-term resolutions. District enacting dam safety and risk reduction measures photo by Stephen Doherty

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9ARRA Update Dworshak Dam is one of the highest straight-axis concrete dams in the Western Hemisphere. Reaching a height of 717 feet and crest length of 3,287 feet, the dam serves the Oro no, Idaho community as a ood control dam on the Clearwater River’s North Fork. Construction began in 1966; ood damage reduction operations started in June 1972, and power generation came online in 1973. Dworshak is classi ed as a Dam Safety Action Classi cation level II “Urgent (Unsafe or Potentially Unsafe)” because of related seepage and leakage water passing through the dam’s foundation and/or joint drains. The Walla Walla District completed an Interim Risk Reduction Measures Plan in 2008 that includes immediate, short-term and ongoing initiatives to reduce public risk. These measures, some of which were funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, are designed to evaluate and reduce the probability and consequence of dam failure. What the Corps is Doing Now The Corps of Engineers is moving forward at Dworshak Dam with interim risk reduction measures and longer-term studies to reduce the probability of potential dam failure until long-term remediation is complete. Studies will identify and measure what is happening inside the dam and its foundation. Measurements and studies will help determine if structural or foundation problems exist, or if the known movements of the dam’s 51 concrete segments (monoliths) are normal reactions to rapid changes in pool levels, daily and seasonal temperature changes, and long-term curing and concrete shrinking inside the massive structure. ARRA Instrumentation Study The Corps contracted to integrate systems and install new monitoring instrumentation at the dam. They are designing and placing engineering instruments to measure dam movements and provide real-time data that will help engineers re ne the nite element analysis and provide other engineering data. The instrumentation will also improve the Corps early response to emergency events. The contract was awarded in June 2010 and will be completed by September 2011. This contract is a $2 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act-funded activity. ARRA High Head Dam Leaks and Waterstops Study In early summer season, the reservoir behind Dworshak is about 630-feet deep. Since 2009, the District has been studying and prototyping new waterstop technologies for tall or “high-head” dams. This study may create groundbreaking engineering research data for future high-head waterstop repairs at Dworshak and around the world. The waterstops study is already being closely looked at for techniques by dam engineers around the world, such as countries like China, home to the world’s largest dam, the Three Gorges Dam. This $1.5 million technology demonstration is funded with ARRA funds. The waterstop cylinders were laboratory tested in Seattle, manufactured in Redmond Ore., and installed in the dam in September and October 2010. The urethane eight-inch diameter cylinders absorbed water and swelled to ll two of the drill holes that extend from the top to the bottom of the dam. The contractor will evaluate the materials through spring of 2011 and provide the government a full engineering report by September 2011. District using ARRA funds for xes at Dworshak DamU.S. Army Corps of Engineers photos

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10 Nature Conservancy, Co r Corps serves Nation through e Home on the Zumwalt Prairie is restored thanks to an aquatic ecosystem restoration project conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District and its costshare partner, The Nature Conservancy. The $1.3 million project allowed the cost-share partners to remove small earthen dams in the headwaters of Camp Creek on the 33,000-acre Zumwalt Prairie Preserve to restore that portion of the creek to a more natural, owing state. As the Corps’ cost-share partner, The Nature Conservancy provided 35 percent of the cost of the project that reestablished native riparian vegetation. “The Nature Conservancy has been a wonderful sponsor,” said Plan Formulation Section Chief Rebecca Kalamasz. “They were extremely proactive and drove the project to completion. Successes with sponsors like the Conservancy help build a strong foundation for future work.” The Corps participates in ecosystem restoration projects, like Camp Creek, because it is one of the Corps’ primary missions. “It makes sense because we are the agency that has a full spectrum of engineers and scientists that study and truly understand how and why watersheds respond to work we do for our various missions like reduction of ood risk, navigation and other actions like hydropower and water supply,” Kalamasz said. “Adding ecosystem restoration leverages our expertise and gives us the authority to build multiple purpose projects that meet the needs and values of the local communities while addressing issues of national importance,” she added. Funds for this project were appropriated through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. The project is authorized under Section 206, Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration, of the Water Resources Development Act of 1996, which authorizes t r t h Z h r h by Terri A. Rorke

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11ARRA Update o rps restore Camp Creek h ecosystem restoration projects s the Corps to undertake aquatic ecosystem restoration projects in the public interest. “It’s a win-win situation,” said Corps Project Manager Richard Turner. “Recovery Act dollars put people to work on a great project to enhance sh passage and create a much healthier, more natural ecosystem.” The project area is within the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve in Eastern Oregon owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Conservancyowned property is part of the 220-square-mile Zumwalt Prairie, known as the largest and highest-quality Palouse bunchgrass prairie remaining in North America. It provides habitat for concentrations of nesting birds of prey and other wildlife. Snake River steelhead trout, one Endangered Species Act-listed plant, several rare plants and numerous terrestrial species of concern also reside in the larger prairie.“Since we rst walked on two legs, people have found grasslands a hospitable place to live and work,” said Nature Conservancy Preserve Manager Jeff Fields. “One consequence of this is that grasslands are the most altered and least protected ecosystems on the planet. The Zumwalt Prairie is a fragment of intact grasslands, representative of the Palouse prairie type that historically covered millions of acres in the Inland Paci c Northwest,” he said.The removed ponds contributed to erosion, adversely impacted water quality and were passage barriers to aquatic species. Now important water sources will be safeguarded for ecologically compatible grazing on the Conservancy’s preserve. Joseph, Ore.-based small business, L D Perry, Inc., was awarded a $219,188 contract to conduct the restoration project. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photos Scenes from Camp Creek restoration efforts on the 33,000-acre Zumwalt Prairie Preserve in Oregon. photos courtesy of University of Idaho

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12 Recreating natural habitat in an urban setting requires delicate balancing in paradise. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Walla Walla District achieved this balance when it partnered with the University of Idaho (UI) to complete the Paradise Creek restoration project in November. The $3.6 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project was authorized under Section 206 of the 1996 Water Resources Development Act, Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration. The Corps’ cost-share sponsor, the University of Idaho, supplied 35 percent of the cost. The project is a success story for the City of Moscow, Idaho, the Corps and a local contractor working together to create 13 acres of habitat, said Corps Project Manager Margie McGill. “The university is by far one of the best sponsors I have had the privilege to work with,” said Project Manager Margie McGill. “They not only partnered with us and the contractor on this project, but found ways to enhance the project outputs and resolve issues as soon as they were identi ed.” While serving as the District’s rst design-build-restoration project, Paradise Creek was authorized in April 2009 and nished on schedule and within budget in November. A design-build project is when a contractor is responsible for both the design and construction of the project. The Corps awarded the designbuild-restoration contract to McMillen, LLC, a small business, that oversaw the project from start to nish. McGill said McMillen exceeded design and construction expectations while meeting all the project goals. “This contract was the perfect vehicle because it allowed us to tap into the expertise of McMillen, as well as meet the obligation and expenditure requirements of ARRA,” McGill said. University of Idaho President M. Duane Ellis said the completed project will serve as an example for future collaborative projects. “It was a fantastic project with tremendous bene ts ranging from ood control, water quality, erosion control, recreation and restoring an aquatic ecosystem. It’s a model of how the Corps can work with the university and business entities in the local community,” Ellis said. The project included major changes to Paradise Creek, which runs through the University of Idaho campus: Paradise Creek was realigned to its original location adding 1.2 miles of habitat Flood mitigation characteristics were improved. Lost riparian habitat was reestablished along the creek within the campus. 1,100 feet of the creek that ran under a street was daylighted. Water quality and aesthetics were improved. The completed project was dedicated during a Nov. 12 ceremony attended by District Commander Lt. Col. David Caldwell and UI President Ellis. Mort McMillen, owner of McMillen, LLC, which received the design build contract, goes over the Paradise Creek project with District Commander Lt. Col. David Caldwell in November. “This was much more than a normal cost-sharing agreement for a project; it has been a model partnership,” Caldwell said in the Nov. 12 ceremony.by Terri A. Rorke P a r a d i s e C r e e k Paradise Creek Scenes from the newly restored creek that was covered for nearly 40 years. Nearly 19,000 seedlings were planted along the creek ’s bank. Recre a Rec u rban set t urban s ancing in ancing TheU heU ( T v A a p n v photo by Stephen Doherty photo courtesy of University of Idaho photo courtesy of University of Idaho photo courtesy of University of Idaho

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13ARRA Update P a r a d i s e C r e e k Recreational projects get face lift thanks to ARRA Walla Walla District recreation facilities are getting a “shovel ready” facelift thanks to American Recovery and Reinvestment Act dollars. For many years, the Corps had a long list of unfunded, nonroutine projects that needed to be worked on. When ARRA was implemented in 2009, the Corps was able to put those dollars toward many of its recreation-related projects. The District is executing $5.8 million worth of recreationrelated projects. The projects include paving parks and roadways, infrastructure upgrades, replacing existing restrooms, adding picnic shelters and more. The bulk of the ARRA funding for the District’s recreation projects were $2.2 million worth of paving contracts at four sites and a $1.3 million potable water system upgrade at Ice Harbor Lock and Dam’s Charbonneau Park. According to Corps Natural Resources Supervisor Lonnie Mettler, the ARRA funds allowed the District to achieve water quality compliance with Washington State at Charbonneau Park. There may not have been a chance to fund recreation-related projects if it weren’t for ARRA. “If we didn’t have this funding, we may have had to close down parts of our facilities because they could have become a health or safety issue,” Mettler said. With recreation projects renovation, the District not only provided local community members employment, but their work offers lasting bene ts to the public he said. Mettler added, “What remains is the product of their work and the public will bene t for years to come.”(Top) Little Goose Lock and Dam now has a new vault toilet as part of a park amenities upgrade ARRA contract to its Starbuck, Wash. recreational area. Other amenities included picnic tables, re pits and trash can holders. (Main) Lucky Peak Dam now has a new storage building and shelter for a volunteer host’s RV near Boise, Idaho.photo by Keith Hyde U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photoby Terri A. Rorke

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14 City of Ammon What we are doing: funding a proposed wastewater collection system. Cost: The Corps is providing $2.75 million to construct the rst phase of sewer line that will connect Ammon with the new Eastern Idaho Regional Wastewater AuthorityÂ’s Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant in Shelley, Idaho. Start date: Fall 2009 Estimated completion date: Spring 2011 Estimated jobs created or retained : 153 City of Lava Hot Springs What we are doing: funding the cityÂ’s proposed wastewater treatment facility design. Cost: The Corps is providing $1.05 million to design a system of transmission lines, lagoons and land applications intended to serve the citizens of Lava Hot Springs, the surrounding area and visitors who use the city as a popular destination point. Start date: Fall 2009 Estimated completion date: Summer 2011 Estimated jobs created or retained : 58 The Corps and six rural Idaho cities signed partnering agreements to help fund the citiesÂ’ wastewater projects. The funds were appropriated through the ARRA under Section 595, the Rural Idaho Environmental Infrastructure Program. About $8 million will be spent on this effort. R u r a l Rural I d a h o Â’ s IdahoÂ’s r e n o v a t i o n renovation by Terri A. Rorke T h e f un d s were appropr i ate d d t hrough the ARRA under Sec t ion 595 the Rural Idaho En v ir o nm e ntal Infra s tr uc t u r e e Program. About $8 millio n n will be spent on this effor t t photo courtesy of Forsgren Associates photo courtesy o

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15ARRA Update What was once a challenge for small communities to fund necessary wastewater projects is now a reality for rural cities like Lava Hot Springs, Idaho. With a population of a mere 520, the city was provided grant money through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District to fund a major wastewater upgrade through collaborative efforts between the Corps’ $1.05 million in grant money and other partners’ funding. Lava Hot Springs blooms into about 3,000 people during its tourist season Memorial Day through Labor Day. Without Corps grant money to fund the engineering design of its wastewater improvement project, the city would not have been able to accommodate population growth, nor comply with a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit that requires the city to maintain phosphorus and nitrogen ef uent limits. “The Corps’ grant money has been a tremendous help to the community of Lava Hot Springs. There is no way that the City of Lava Hot Springs wastewater users could have been able to afford the mandated multimillion dollar project without the Corps’ and other funding agencies assistance,” said Lava Hot Springs City Clerk Canda Dimick. Projects like Lava Hot Spring’s wastewater improvement are possible through Section 595 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Section 595 projects are located at sites throughout the State of Idaho. The primary objective of this program is to assist rural communities with design and construction of water-related environmental infrastructure and resource protection and development projects. The Corps is working with various sponsors to assist six rural Idaho communities with projects such as wastewater treatment, water supply, environmental restoration, surface water resource protection and development and related facilities for each project. The city expects for the project design to be completed by July 2011. (Above) Lava Hot Springs groundwork. (Main photo) Eastern interceptor line for wastewater treatment plant near Ammon, Idaho. City of Buhl What we are doing: funding the city’s proposed wastewater system collection system design and construction. Cost: The Corps is providing $1.5 million for the project. Start date: Fall 2009 Estimated completion date: Fall 2011 Estimated jobs created or retained : 83 City of Greenleaf What we are doing: helping to fund the design and construction of the city’s proposed wastewater collection system project. Cost: The Corps is providing $1 million to construct a new collection system, treatment plant and ef uent discharge system for the city’s entire service area. Start date: Fall 2009 Estimated completion date: Fall 2011 Estimated jobs created or retained : 56 City of Bliss What we are doing: helping fund the design and construction of the city’s proposed wastewater system development project. Cost: The Corps is providing $2.1 million to construct a new wastewater collection and treatment system to eliminate septic system use and unlined lagoons within the community. Start date: October 2010 Estimated completion date: Summer 2011 Estimated jobs created or retained : 117 City of New Meadows What we are doing: funding a preliminary engineering report and environmental information document for the city’s proposed drinking water improvements. Cost: The Corps is providing $180,000 for the documents. Start date: February 2010 Estimated completion date: February 2011 Estimated jobs created or retained : 10 u rtesy of City of Lava Hot Springs

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16 Washington*Washington jobs created or retained= 1,090Funding for Washington = $20 millionProject : Charbonneau Park potable water system upgrade Where : Ice Harbor Lock and Dam, Burbank, Wash. What we are doing : Charbonneau Park water system nal design upgrades. Funding was also used for construction contracts to build a reverse osmosis water treatment system to ensure water quality meets US Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standards. Start date : June 2009 Completion date : June 2010 Estimated jobs created or retained : 73 Project : Charbonneau and Fishhook campgrounds electrical systems upgrades Where : Ice Harbor Lock and Dam, Burbank, Wash. What we are doing : Funding upgrade of existing electrical systems for campground/RV sites to meet current National Electric Code requirements. Start date : September 2009 Estimated Completion date : December 2011 Estimated jobs created or retained : 60 Project : Repairing/paving park areas Where : Ice Harbor Lock and Dam, Burbank, Wash. What we are doing : Fund the contracted rehabilitation/repair and improvement of existing roads and parking areas for access to recreation and public use areas through new chip seal, pothole repair and paving where needed as determined by inspection. Start date : September 2009 Completion date : August 2010 Estimated jobs created or retained : 24 Project : Picnic tables Where : Hood Park, Ice Harbor Lock and Dam, Burbank, Wash. What we are doing : Funded manufacturing of 63 picnic tables that will enhance recreation facilities for visitors. Start date : August 2009 Completion date : January 2010 Estimated jobs created or retained : 1 Project : Swallows Nest Park restroom upgrades Where : Lower Granite Lock and Dam, Pomeroy, Wash. What we are doing : Upgraded restroom buildings. The deteriorated restrooms did not meet Americans With Disabilities Act code requirements. Start date : July 2009 Completion date : November 2009 Estimated jobs created or retained : 11 Project : Visitor center heating ventilation air conditioning replacement Where : Lower Granite Lock and Dam, Pomeroy, Wash. What we are doing : Funded survey and repair/replacement of all or portions of existing HVAC system to ensure system performs in accordance with building and design requirements. Start date : September 2009 Completion date : February 2009 Estimated jobs created or retained : 32 Project : Repairing/paving park areas Where : Lower Granite Lock and Dam, Pomeroy, Wash. What we are doing : Fund the rehabilitation/ repair and improvement of existing roads to recreation and public use areas through new chip seal, pothole repair and paving where needed as determined by inspection. Start date : September 2009 Completion date : August 2010 Estimated jobs created or retained : 60 Project : Group picnic shelters at miscellaneous locations Where : Lower Granite Lock and Dam recreational areas, Pomeroy, Wash. What we are doing : Through contracting with private sector, procure and install group picnic shelters at various locations. Start date : September 2009 Completion date : October 2009 Estimated jobs created or retained : 4 Project : Electrical utility serviceWhere : Lower Granite Lock and Dam, Pomeroy, Wash. What we are doing : Electrical utility service Start date : February 2010 Completion date : June 2010 Estimated jobs created or retained : 8 Project : Group picnic shelters at miscellaneous locations Where : Lower Granite Lock and Dam, Pomeroy, Wash. What we are doing : Through contracting with private sector, procure and install group picnic shelters at various locations. Start date : September 2009 Completion date : October 2009 Estimated jobs created or retained : 4 Project : Northshore storage building Where : Lower Granite Lock and Dam, Pomeroy, Wash. What we are doing : Funded procurement and installation of prefabricated open bay storage building for hydropower and other materials and equipment to protect from the environment and prolong their life. Start date : September 2009 Completion date : July 2010 Estimated jobs created or retained : 45 Project : Park host shelters Where : Lower Granite Lock and Dam, Pomeroy, Wash. What we are doing : Funded building of park host shelters in recreational areas Start date : December 2009 Completion date : January 2010 Estimated jobs created or retained : 1 Project : Repairing/paving roads Where : Little Goose Lock and Dam, Starbuck, Wash. What we are doing : Funded rehabilitation/ repair and improvement of existing roads to recreation and public use areas through new chip seal, pothole repair and paving where needed as determined by inspection. Start date : September 2009 Completion date : August 2010 Estimated jobs created or retained : 24 P W W W S C EOOF Figures on pages 16-18 are current as of September 2010 ARRA reporting period deadline

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17ARRA Update Project : Repair derrick cranes Where : McNary Lock and Dam, Umatilla, Ore. What we are doing : Funded repair of two derrick cranes, including structure and operating controls. Start date : October 2009 Completion date : August 2010 Estimated jobs created or retained : 49 Project : Picnic shelters Where : McNary Lock and Dam, Umatilla, Ore. What we are doing : Purchased large and mini picnic shelters for McNary Lock and Dam recreational areas. Start date : September 2009 Completion date : November 2009 Estimated jobs created or retained : 3 Project : Drinking fountains Where : McNary Lock and Dam, Umatilla, Ore. What we are doing : Purchased four concrete drinking fountains for McNary Lock and Dam recreational areas. Start date : August 2009 Completion date : September 2009 Estimated jobs created or retained : 1 Project : Toilets Where : McNary Lock and Dam, Umatilla, Ore. What we are doing : Funded prefabrication of toilets in McNary Lock and Dam recreational areas. Start date : August 2009 Completion date : November 2009 Estimated jobs created or retained : 3 Project: Ball eld fence Where : McNary Lock and Dam, Umatilla, Ore. What we are doing : funded building of ball eld fence Start date : September 2009 Completion date : October 2009 Estimated jobs created or retained : 1 Project : Spillway gate Where : McNary Lock and Dam, Umatilla, Ore. What we are doing : Spill gate rehabilitation Start date : September 2010 Completion date : May 2011 Estimated jobs created or retained : 14 Project : Hazardous material shipping Where : McNary Lock and Dam in Umatilla, Ore. What we are doing : Hazardous material shipping and disposal of 51 tons of contaminated sand blast grit. Hazardous and universal waste disposal regulations require a “Large Quantity Generator” (LQG) to ship hazardous waste offsite within a speci ed time of generation. The shipment and disposal will bring McNary Lock and Dam into compliance with these regulations. Start date : August 2010 Completion date : August 2010 Estimated jobs created or retained : 1 Project : Levee safety inspection workshop Where : La Grande, Ore. What we are doing : Anderson Perry and Associates Inc., of La Grande, Ore., was awarded a contract to attend a levee inspection workshop that provided training to conduct periodic levee inspections in accordance with USACE National Levee Safety Inspection Program standards. Start date : August 2009 Completion date : October 2009 Estimated jobs created or retained: 1 Project : Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act collection repatriation Where : District boundaries What we are doing : Fund NAGPRA collection repatriation Start date : January 2010 Estimated completion date : September 2011 Estimated jobs created or retained : 18 Project : Levee inspections Where : District boundaries What we are doing : Levee inspections in the Walla Walla District Start date : November 2010 Completion date : July 2010 Estimated jobs created or retained : 12Oregon*Oregon jobs created/retained = 103Funding for Oregon = $2 million*Washington gures includes the Lower Monumental Lock and Dam project (p.5) *Oregon gures include the Camp Creek restoration project (p. 10).

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18 Idaho*Idaho jobs created or retained= 919 Funding for Idaho = $18.7 millionProject : Repairing and paving recreational areas Where : Dent Acres Campground, Dworshak Dam and Reservoir, Ahsahka, Idaho What we are doing : Funded rehabilitation/repair and improvement of existing roads and parking areas for access to recreation and public use areas through new chip seal, pothole repair and paving where needed as determined by inspection. Start date : September 2009 Completion date : August 2010 Estimated jobs created or retained : 32 Project : MackÂ’s Creek storage building Where : Lucky Peak Lake, Boise, Idaho What we are doing : Funded procurement and construction of a prefabricated storage building for recreation material and equipment on site to protect items from the elements. Start date : September 2009 Completion date : November 2009 Estimated jobs created or retained : 2 Project : Dworshak hatchery upgrade Where : Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, Dworshak Dam and Reservoir, Ahsahka, Idaho What we are doing : Funding architectural rm to investigate ef uent system water quality to determine what system modi cations and improvements are necessary to bring water quality up to proper standards. Start date : July 2009 Estimated completion date : May 2011 Estimated jobs created or retained : 91 Project : Dam safety Interim Risk Reduction Measures plan Where : Lucky Peak Lake, Boise, Idaho What we are doing : Funded architectural engineering rm to prepare an interim risk reduction plan as part of dam safety review. Plan will address concerns, risks and potential mitigation measures. Start date : July 2009 Completion date : October 2010 Estimated jobs created or retained : 4 Project : Bull Trout literature review Where : University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho What we are doing : The Corps awarded the University of Idaho, of Moscow, Idaho, a contract to conduct a Bull Trout literature review. This review will help researchers better understand what is impacting Bull Trout that are currently listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Start date : September 2010 Estimated Completion date : May 2012 Estimated jobs created or retained : 17 Project : Flood plain study Where : Warm Springs Creek, Challis, Idaho What we are doing : Funded creation of a supplement to an existing ood plain study. The Federal Emergency Management Agency will use the new maps to determine ood insurance rates. Start date : August 2009 Completion date : October 2009 Estimated jobs created or retained : 1 Project : Boise River ood mapping Where : Lucky Peak Dam and Lake, Boise, Idaho What we are doing : Funded Boise River ood mapping. This helps update the ood maps for the area below Lucky Peak Dam and Lake. Start date : July 2009Completion date : December 2009 Estimated jobs created or retained : 6*The Idaho gures also include projects at Dworshak Dam (pg.8), the University of Idaho in Moscow, Idaho (pg.12) and projects in rural Ida ho (pg.14). BeforeDent Acres Campground paving contract, Dworshak Dam, Oro no, Idaho paving U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photo U U U U US US US US U U US U U U U S US S US S S US S S S S S U U US US US US U U U U U S S S S US US S US US US U U US U U U U U US U U U U S S S US S US US US US S U U U U U US S S S S US S US S US U U U U US S S S US S S US U U U U US S S S S S US S S S U US U US U U U US S S S US U U U U U S S US S US S U U U US U U S S US S S U U U S S S S S S S S A Arm Arm Arm Arm A A A A Arm rm r A Arm Arm Arm m Arm Arm Arm Arm Arm Arm Arm rm Arm A Ar A Ar A A Ar rm Arm Arm Arm Arm Arm Ar A A Arm Arm rm rm Arm m m Arm Arm Arm Ar A Arm Ar Arm A A A A Arm A Ar A A m m m A m A yCo yCo y yCo y yCo yCo yCo yC Co Co C C yCo Co yCo yCo yCo yC C yCo yCo yCo yCo Co Co C yCo C Co yCo Co yCo yCo yCo yCo Co Co C C yCo Co Co C Co y y C yC yC C Co o o C C C o yCo y C o rps rps rp rp r rps rps ps ps ps ps ps ps ps rp r r rps rp ps ps ps ps rps ps rps rps ps ps ps s ps rp r rp p ps p ps s s r r r s r rps r rp s s o f f f of of ofE ofE ofE ofE E ofE fE ofE E ofE ofE ofE fE ofE f ofE f of f of of of f f f of ofE of f ofE fE fE fE E ofE ofE f E E E E fE E ofE ofE of of E E E E E E ofE E ofE E ofE fE E E E E E E E E E E E f f E E E E ngin ngin ngin ngin ngin ngin ng gin ngin ngin gin gin n ngin ngin ngin ngin ngin ng gi gin n gin ngin ngin ngi ngin n g g ngin n n n ngin gin n ngin n n n n n n n g n n n g n n n n g e e eers eers eer eers eers eers eers eers e eer eer eers eers eers eers e eers e ee eers ers e r ers e e eers eers e er e e e e rs s s e e ee e e pho ph pho pho pho pho pho pho pho ph pho pho pho h h pho pho pho pho pho pho pho ho ho pho pho pho pho h h o h o o o h o to to to to to t to to to to to to o to o o o o After U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photo Greenbelt boat ramp paving contract, Clarkston, Wash. Natural Resources Of ce

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19ARRA Update e g d As seen in this publication, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) has impacted many areas in the Paci c Northwest. The infrastructure and ecological results are easy to see. What may not be so easy to see is the effect that ARRA has had on the businesses in the area. Because “business” is mostly a process, sometimes it can be dif cult to conceptualize. Numbers and data can help. The ARRA has no speci c requirement for its funds to ow to and through the Small Business Of ce. This leaves individual agencies open to manage their own goals. The overall Department of Defense goal for Small Business contracting in Fiscal Year 2009 was 22.24 percent. The Walla Walla District funneled 62 percent of ARRA funding to Small Business. That’s an incredible achievement at almost three times the DoD goal! But it doesn’t end there, as the District worked on getting the projects done, they also worked on the processes as well. In Fiscal Year 2010, when the DoD Small Business Goal was 22.28 percent, this effort enabled the District to obligate 91 percent of ARRA Funds to Small Business – an astounding four times the DoD Small Business goal. Why is this important? Because Small Business creates jobs. It’s really that simple. The District realizes this, and actively works at assisting our community in creating these jobs. This understanding was, and is, evident in the District’s stewardship of ARRA funds – funds with the express purpose is to improve the economy. Our team of operators, engineers, program managers, contracting professionals and command works hard to implement the aspiration that Congress put into the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR). It states that “It is the policy of the government to provide maximum practicable opportunities in its acquisitions to small business...” This is an incredible acknowledgement of the role that Small Business plays in our economy, our society and our everyday lives. The District achieved this incredible level of 91 percent of ARRA funds going to small businesses by doing two things. First, they fostered the understanding that when it comes to spending the taxpayers’ money, Small Business needs to be at the forefront of everybody’s thinking; and second, they searched out and found those small businesses that have the capability and availability to do the work the District needs done. Successfully implementing these two steps not only helped with using the ARRA funds, but also in our overall contracting results. Over 65 percent of last year’s $103 million contracting budget went to small businesses. This was a repeat of the prior year’s achievement, when 66 percent of $65 million went to small businesses. What this means to us as taxpayers and members of our communities, is that during the last two years in the District, more than $108 million went to small businesses with of ces around the corner and employees who live next door. Scott Beckstrand, Deputy for Small Business Walla Walla District If you have any questions about the District’s Small Business Programs, or if you have any other questions about doing business with USACE, please contact Scott at scott.v.beckstrand@usace.army.mil. e District worked on ge ttin g the n the processes as well. In Fiscal B usiness Goal was 22.28 percen t, t, t, t, t, t, t, t, t, , o bli ga te 91 pe rcent of ARR A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A F F F Fu Fu Fu Fu Fu Fu F F F F F F F F F F Fu F nd nd nd nd d d nd d d d d d d s s s s s s s s s s s s g four times the DoD S ma ma ma ma ma ma a ma ma ma a ma ma ma ma a a m m l l l l ll ll ll ll l l l ll l l l l B B B B B B B B B B B B B u u u u u us us us us us in ess s e Small Busines s c c c c cr cr c cr c c c cr c c r c c c ea ea ea ea a a a a te te te te te te te te te s jobs. It It It It It t t t It t t t t t t ’s ’s ’s ’s ’s ’s ’s ’s ’ s a lizes this, and ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac c a a a a a a ti ti ti ti ve ve v ve e ve ve ve ve ve e v ly wor ks ks ks ks ks ks ks s ks s s s a a a a t t t as as g these jo bs. 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S c ot t Be Be Be Be Be Be Be Be Be Be B B ck ck ck ck ck ck k ck k k ck ck ck st st st st r r ra ra nd nd nd nd d d d d d d d , , De De pu pu ty ty f f or or S S ma ma ll ll ll B B B B B B B B B B B us us us us us us us us us us in in in in in in in in i in in i n es e e e s W W Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa W Wa W W l ll ll ll a a a W Wa Wa ll ll ll a a Di Di Di i s s s s s st s s s s s s r r r r ri ri ri ri r r r r ct ct ct If If If If If f I f f y y y y y y y y y y ou ou ou ou h h av av e e e e an an a an n n an an an an a y y y y y y y y qu qu qu qu qu qu q qu qu qu qu qu qu qu es ti ti ti ti t t t t t t on on on o s s ab ab ou ou t t th th e e Di Di st st ri ri ct ct ’s ’s S S ma ma ll ll B B us us in in es es es s s s Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr P P P o gr gr gr gr am am am am s, s, s s s s s s, s s s o o o r r r if if y y y y ou ou ou ou u u u u u u u u u h h h h h h h h h h h h av av av av e e e an an an an n n n y y y y y y y y y y y y ot o ot he he r r qu qu es es ti ti on on s s ab ab ou ou t t do do in in g g bu bu si si ne ne ss ss w w w w it it it it h h h h h h h US US US US US US US US US US US U U US S S AC AC A A E, E, p p le le as as e e co co nt nt nt t t t t t n t t t t t t t t a a a ac ac a ac a a a a t t Sc Sc ot ot t t at at s s co co tt tt .v .v .b .b ec ec ks ks tr tr an an d@ d@ us us ac ac e. e. ar ar my my .m .m il il l . A d v o c a t i n g f o r s m a l l b u s i n e s s Advocating for small businessThe Walla Walla District is a champion for small business entrepeneurs ARRA Fast FactsDisclosure/Disclaimer regarding accuracy of data supplied: The Walla Walla District is still in the construction phase of many projects and therefore cannot ensure the accuracy of the gures in this publication at this time. All information should be veri ed prior to use by other parties. Estimations calculated for jobs created or retained through ARRA-funded projects were based on a minimum wage pay scale at an annual $18,000 salary rate. ARRA labor wages ranged from $9 to $75 an hour with professions, such as laborers, engineers, construction workers, heavy equipment operators and scientists. Some of the contracts included bot h labor and supplies, while others were solely labor or solely supplies. If comparing job estimations to Recovery.gov, please not e that those gures are based on quarterly calculations and not annual calculations.• Total ARRA funds allocated in District projects $40.7 million• Amount of ARRA contracts awarded to small businesses in FY09 62 percent • Amount of ARRA contracts awarded to small businesses in FY10 91 percent• Largest Project – $13.6 million (Lower Monumental navigation lock gate replacement)• Funds spent in Washington $20 million • Funds spent in Idaho $18 million • Funds spent in Oregon $2 million

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20 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District Public Affairs Of ce 201 North 3rd Avenue Walla Walla, WA 99362 (509) 527-7020www.nww.usace.army.mil AR RA R update American Recovery and Reinvestment Act AmericanRecoveryandReinvestmentAct Fo r m o re inf o rmati on Facebook.com/WallaWallaUSACE Youtube.com/Walla WallaUSACE Twitter.com/WallaWallaUSACE “What remains is the product of their work, and the public will benefit for years to come.” Lonnie Mettler on how ARRA dollars help the Corps create lasting impacts with its projects.photo by Theresa Stephens