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Pacesetter magazine

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Title:
Pacesetter magazine
Added title page title:
Southwestern Division Regional Pacesetter
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United States -- Army. -- Corps of Engineers. -- Southwestern Division ( issuing body )
Place of Publication:
Dallas, TX
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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern Division Public Affairs Office
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Quarterly[2011-]
Bimonthly[ FORMER -2010]
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

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Ceased with: Spring 2015?
General Note:
Issues for 2005 called Issue 1-4. February 2006 called Vol. 2, No. 1

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
on10229 ( NOTIS )
1022947855 ( OCLC )
2018226639 ( LCCN )
on1022947855

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Digital Military Collection

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Pacesetter2 Pacesetter Southwestern Division Regional News ServiceServing the men and women of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern Division Brig. Gen. Kendall P. Cox Commander, Southwestern Division Rhonda James Chief, Public Affairs Southwestern Division Mary Beth Hudson Editor Tulsa District Associate Editors Melanie Ellis Fort Worth District Tammy Moody Little Rock District Martie Cenkci Galveston District O n the cover: O riginal g rap hi c ill u s tration by Andre ` M ayeaux, In f ormation Products C oordinator, Fort Worth D istrict.Pacesetter  C arpe diemŽ S ieze the day!! B ri g Gen.Kendall P. Co x 3 In this issue: 15 S trate g ic plans helps us row to g ether for succes s C ol. D o na ld E J ac k son 12 R ea l E state team sets u n prece d ente d pace 21 With “ scal y ear in si g ht, district g oes f ull s p ee d a h ea d C ol. C hristoper W. Martin 16 C orps, Texas Cit y si g n Pro j ect Partnership A g reement 26 G alveston District ... on the stormy road to great C ol. D avid C. Weston 14 In the Bell y of the Beast S am Masters 30 P acesetter R ea dy A nna Marie C o x 17 Moppin g up after ” ood “ g ht C h er i D ragosP r i tc h ar d 10 9 R ecognizing Excellenc e Col. A nthony C. FunkhouserThe PACESETTER is an unof“ cial publication published under AR 360-1 for members of the Southwestern Division and its retirees. Contents and editorial views expressed are not necessarily the official views of or endorsed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army or the U.S. Government. Articles or photographic submissions are welcome. For more information about the PACESETTER, or to make a submission, call your local Public Affairs Of“ ce. 7 Th ose manag i ng L i tt l e R oc k s water k now i ts we i g ht T ammy M oo d y 38 P acesette r P o in ts 24 Worth Rememberin g : P rotectin g North Texas from F lood and Drou g h t Big B an g Th eor y M ar y B et h H u d son

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August 20083Essayons! Brig. Gen. Kendall P. Cox Commander, Southwestern DivisionCarpe diemŽ Sieze t h e d a y ! D urin g the recent Senior Leader Conference, Chief o f Engineers Lt. Gen. Van Antwerp laid out the details fo r t h e Campa i gn P l an refres h an d ma d e i t c l ear we h a d one p rimar y focus for the future … execute! I n FY08 across t h e Corps, t h e C i v il Wor k s an d M ili tary Programs a re at unprecedented levels, especiall y in the Southwestern D ivision, and it will take all of us in the SWD Family doing extraor di nary t hi ngs to ensure we d e li ver exce ll ence to ou r c ustomers T h e c hi ef l a id out a s i mp l e d escr i pt i on of w h at Great Loo k s Like.Ž It includes : € De li ver i ng super i or performance i n a ll m i ss i ons € Sett i n g t h e stan d ar d s ( for us t h at means exce ll ence ) for our p rofession. € Hav i ng a un i que, pos i t i ve i mpact on our nat i on an d other nations € B u ilt t o la s t We have a unique opportunity to be a part of something much bi gger t h an ourse l ves an d prov id e a serv i ce to t h e Amer i can people that will have a lastin g impact toda y tomorrow and man y years still to come O n the eve of m y “ rst y ear in command, I remain in awe of all t hat the SWD Family does every day. Each of you represents th e Corps of Eng i neers an d t h e Army, an d a ll of you h ave a k e y part in showin g America what ri g ht looks like. We have a c ommitment to say what we will do and then do what we sai d w e wou ld d o.Ž Our new Corps motto … Bu ildi n g Stron g Ž … i s s y mbolic of all that we do as we j oin the Arm y Stron g Ž brandin g t o deliver sustainable facilities and projects by professional Corps e mp l o y ees t h at w ill stan d t h e test of t i me. The SWD Family has the chance today to go from successful to s ig n i“ cant i f we a ll wor k to g et h er, sta y t h e course, an d s h ow our t eammates that The Cor p s Cares! Lets all be the PacesettersŽ a nd git er dun!!! Ž B order Brothers team wins national awar d Katherine Shelton Fort Worth District Contractor T h e Operat i on Bor d er Brot h ers Pro j ect De li very Team h as been awarded the U.S. Arm y Corps of En g ineers P roject Delivery Team Excellence Award for 2008. The awar d w as presente d Aug. 4 at t h e Summer Lea d ers Conference i n Pi tts b ur gh Pa., for t h e PDTs wor k on t h e Pe d estr i an Fence 70 a nd Pedestrian Fence 225 programs in 2007 The PDT is comprised of personnel from the Fort Worth, G alveston, Little Rock, Tulsa, Albuquerque, Los Angeles and S acramento D i str i cts t h e Sout h Pac i“ c an d Sout h western D ivisions and multiple federal a g encies, includin g the U.S. D epartment of Homeland Security, the Secure Border Initiative a n d U.S. Customs an d Bor d er Protect i on. T h e teams wor k includes PF 225, Vehicle Fence 300 and the com p leted PF 7 0 program … all of which will construct fencing along the nat i ons sout h western b or d er from Texas to Ca li forn i a. Overa ll pro g ram mana g ement is the responsibilit y of the En g ineerin g C onstruction and Su pp ort Of“ ce, located in the Fort Worth Di str i ct Of “ ce. E ric Verwers, ECSO director; Ste p hen Brooks, former PF 7 0 program manager; Er i c E ld r id ge, Los Ange l es program m ana g er; and Loren Flossman, Secure Border Initiative Tactical Infrastructure program manager, accepted the award on behalf o f th e team. T h e p l aque w ill b e di sp l aye d i n t h e ECSO

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Pacesetter4Lt. Col. Orenstein is Fort Worths deputy commander Megan Murphey Pacesetter Staff T h e Fort Worth District is p rou d to we l come Lt. C o l Matt h ew S Orenste i n to t h e team. T h e n ew deput y commander assumed his d ut i es Ju l y 14, 2008, after transferr i ng from t h e Hunt i n g ton D i str i ct w h ere h e held the same p osition. Orensteins exemp l ary m ili tary serv i ce s h ows t h a t he is a dedic at ed le a de r who will be a g reat asset to the district. These are ab so l ute l y exc i t i ng an d hi stor i c t i mes fo r t h e Sout h western D i v i s i on an d Fort Wort h D istrict,Ž he said, and I am g rateful fo r t h e opportun i ty to serve w i t h t h e team. Ž O renste i n h as equa lly i mpress i ve c ivilian and militar y resumes. He r ece i ve d hi s un d ergra d uate d egree i n c i v il en gi neer i n g from S y racuse Un i vers i t y a nd his masters de g rees in industrial management eng i neer i ng an d b us i ness ad m i n is trat io n fr o m t he R e n ss a l a er P ol y technic Institute. He is also a license d p rofess i ona l eng i neer i n t h e state o f Vi r gi n i a. H e has also served his countr y in a n array of act i ve d uty ass i gnments i n t h e Un i te d States East As i a an d t h e G ulf Re g ion. He has held instrumental l ea d ers hi p pos i t i ons d ur i ng t i mes of grea t n at i ona l i mportance. Dur i n g Operat i ons D esert Storm and Desert Shield, Orenstein w as t h e com b at eng i neer p l atoon l ea d e r for t h e 24t h Infantr y D i v i s i on. He l ate r saw active dut y in the Gulf Re g ion a s d eputy area eng i neer an d res id en t en gi neer d ur i n g Operat i on Iraq i Free d om, for which he also served two comba t tours. Fo ll ow i ng Hurr i cane Katr i na i n 2005, Orenste i n spent two mont h s i n S aint Bernard Parish where he assiste d i n dis a s t e r r elie f an d wo r ked a s a li a iso n o f “ cer to coor di nate Corps of En gi neers r ecover y efforts. Hi s prev i ous ass i gnments h ave ta k en hi m to d ut y stat i ons as far awa y as Sout h K orea, where he served as the directo r of pu bli c wor k s for Area IV, an d as c l ose as Fort Carson, Colo., where he was the p latoon leader for the 299th Enginee r Batta li on. Orenste i n h as b een awar d e d man y honors for his militar y service i ncluding the Bronze Star Medal, the Arm y Commen d at i on an d Ac hi evemen t Medals and the Humanitarian Service Medal. The Engineer Regiment also awar d e d hi m t h e Bronze Or d er of t h e d e Fleur y Medal. Orenstein is excited to be a p art of the Fort Wort h D i str i ct team an d to b e new to t he re g ion. I have learned that ever y thin g i s bigger in Texas,Ž he joked, adding tha t h e i s amaze d b y t h e c h a ll eng i ng pace an d diversit y of the districts pro g ram.Ž The other members of the Fort W orth team sh ar e his e nt husi a s m an d look f o r w ar d t o the g reat work the y will be doin g with him in the future. Orenstein says that i t i s a l ways a pr i v il ege to wor k w i t h t h e C or p s, a team of p rofessionals devoted to high standards, public service, and Army v a lues. Ž H e a dded t h at t he i mm e n se t alent and commitment of the entire team makes it a joy to come to work each day.Ž L t. C ol. Matthew S O renstei n D eputy District C ommander F ort W ort h Di str i ctDolly called for CAT T h e U.S. Arm y Corps of En gi neers G alveston District Emer g enc y M anagement Of “ ce act i vate d i ts Cr i s i s A ct i on Team on Ju ly 21 i n response to H urricane Doll y movin g into the Gulf o f Me x ico. T h e CAT cons i ste d of Gus Mar i nos, c hief, Emer g enc y Mana g ement Of“ ce; G ary Stange l an d catastrop hi c di saste r r esponse pro g ram mana g er, Emer g enc y M ana g ement Of“ ce; Cind y Burke, pro j ect manager, Pro j ect Managemen t B ranc h ; B y ron W illi ams, pro j ec t m ana g er, Pro j ect Mana g ement Branch; Ali c i a Rea, operat i ons pro j ect manager, Nav ig at i on Branc h ; K i m b er l e y Benav id es, student, Public Affairs Of“ ce; and Alan McConne ll superv i sory account i ng o f “ cer, Resource Mana g ement Of “ ce The C risis Action Teams mission i s to prov id e centra li ze d contro l an d c oor di nat i on of a ll e l ements an d o perations involved with the emer g enc y r esponse. T h e CAT i s act i vate d w h en t h e B yron Willi ams c h ec k s ou t some i nformation durin g Hurricane Doll y CAT op erat i on s rea di ness con di t i on i s at a 3W AT C H. T hi s means t h at h urr i cane con di t i ons are lik e ly t o affect district o p erations or p ersonnel, w hi c h i s id ea ll y 36 to 48 h ours b efore a 3 9-m il e-perh our w i n d l an d fa ll Marinos serves as chief of the CAT, w hi c h requ i re d hi m to atten d meet i ngs an d conference ca ll s d a ily to k eep S ee C A T next page T

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August 20085Troy Collins joins Fort Worth team Megan Murphey Pacesetter Staff Troy Collins Deput y District En g ineer and Chief, Pro g rams and Pro j ect Mana g ement D ivision Fort Worth Distric t T h e Fort W ort h team i s exc i te d to we l come Tro y Co lli ns as t h e new deput y district en g ineer an d c hi ef, Programs an d Pro j ect Managemen t D i v i s i on. Co lli ns was former ly at t h e For t Bliss Pro g ram Of“ ce where he serve d as di rector of Expans i on Programs. He b r i n g s w i t h hi m an i mpress i ve hi stor y of en g ineerin g experience and federal e mp l oyment, an d i s now t h e di str i cts high est ran ki n g c i v ili an. Co lli ns sa y s his focus as deput y district en g inee r w ill revo l ve aroun d t h e t h ree C s: C ommun i cate, Co ll a b orate, Cooperate. He added that he is a “ rm believer in puttin g s afety “ rst, b ecause secon d i s too l ateŽ an d t h at h e h opes to sprea d t hi s motto to his collea g ues. Collins added that his mos t rewar di ng part of wor ki ng for t h e Corps of En gi neers h as b een  li fe l on g fr i en d s I have met alon g the wa y .Ž C o lli ns i s a li cense d profess i ona l e n gi neer w h o rece i ve d hi s b ac h e l or o f s cience in a g ricultural en g ineerin g a t Rutgers Un i vers i ty. As we ll as comp l et i ng b ot h b as i c an d a d vance d AMEDD courses, C ollins also studied at the U.S. Arm y C omman d an d Genera l Staff Co ll ege He h as serve d Corps di str i cts nat i onw id e i ncludin g those in Buffalo, N.Y., an d Seatt l e Was h over t h e course of hi s 23 y ears w i t h t h e Corps. He be g an his federal career as a pro j ec t e ng i neer for t h e Fort Drum Pro j ect Of “ ce i n New Yor k eventua lly wor ki n g up t h e l adder to become the chief of the Pro g ram Management an d Integrat i on D i v i s i on f or t h e Gu l f Re gi on D i v i s i on b efore assumin g the duties of director for the For t B li ss Expans i on Program. In b etween, C o lli ns h e ld a var i et y of fe d era l pos i t i ons i n both g eneral en g ineerin g and pro j ec t management. Pr i or to hi s emp l oymen t w ith the Cor p s, Collins was p resident o f H aupt & Collins, Inc., a Florida design a n d construct i on company. As pres id ent, h e was a bl e to use hi s g enera l contract i n g license and his special skills in both design a n d co n s tr uc t io n Co lli ns a l so s h ows hi s d e di cat i on to engineering through his membership i n a var i ety of prest i g i ous profess i ona l o r g an i zat i ons. T h ese i nc l u d e t h e Amer i can S ociety of Civil Engineers, the Society o f A mer i can M ili tary Eng i neers, t h e Nat i ona l S ociet y of Professional En g ineers and the Texas Society of Professional Engineers. Co lli ns i s a l so a past pres id ent for t h e E l P aso Post of SAME and continues to be a ctive in the organization. t he dis tr ic t i nf o rm ed o n t he s tat us of H urricane Doll y Also attendin g the meetings and conference calls with M ar i nos was Stange l an d w h o serve d as h is deput y Leadin g “ eld operations fo r th e “ r s t tim e w a s B u rk e w h o ove r s a w t h e FEMA m i ss i on ass i gnments w hi c h included re g ional activation, power, d ebris, commodities, housing, roo“ ng, n av i gat i on, an d tec h n i ca l ass i stance fo r hy drolo g ical information. Williams serve d a s the planning lead. As such, he was in ch arge of t h e overa ll m i ss i on p l ann i ng, intelli g ence, upward reportin g liaison o f“ cers Reconnaissance Assessment Team an d t h e S i tuat i on Assessment Team. The Situation Assessment Team was in c harge of establishing and maintaining a c ommun i cat i ons / messa g e l o g mon i tor i n g the districts o p erational status an d w eather situation, establishing an d ma i nta i n i n g contact w i t h state an d l oca l emer g enc y authorities, and assemblin g the Situation Reports using district staff i nput. Rea, w h o h as b een t h e l o gi st i cs l ea d since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, stayed busy all day making reservations for a i r, l o dgi n g an d transportat i on, trac ki n g equipment, locatin g fuel for the navi g ation teams survey boats, and keeping trac k o f t h e personne l t h at were on temporar y d ut y Benavides sent out news releases to the local media around the disaster area a nswere d me di a i nqu i r i es, an d trac k e d the effects of Hurricane Doll y as it passe d through southern Texas. Overseeing the “ nan ce an d a d m i n is trat io n f o r t he “ r s t time was McConnell who mana g ed the M ilitary Interdepartmental Purchase R equests, i nputt i ng of t i me an d atten d ance into the Corps of En g ineers Financial M anagement System, and composing tou r o f d uty l etters an d l o d g i ng expense an d b i-weekl y pa y cap waivers The Crisis Action Team was a grea t success. Its mem b ers came toget h er an d saw the mission throu g h until the end. As o ne member, Alicia Rea said, I enjoye d w or ki ng on t h e CAT b ecause i t a ll owe d me to face new challen g es different from my daily routine. Helping others is very r ewar di ng,Ž s h e a dd e d C ontinued f rom previous page C A T Pacesetters … Arm y Stron g … En g ineer Read y !

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Pacesetter6 Mary Beth Hudson Pacesetter Staff There are two new chiefs in Tulsa District … one a very familiar face and the other very new. Shauna Martinez from Sacramento District now leads Contracting Division, and Earl Groves … whose entire federal career has been in Tulsa District … took over the reins in Operations Division.Shauna MartinezMartinez actually came to Tulsa District the end of June as chief of the Military/HTRW Branch in Contracting Division but was only in that job two and a half days before learning she had been chosen for the chiefs position, a job she had applied for while deployed to Afghanistan. Martinez sees working in SWD as an opportunity to learn more about the Corps and how work is done differently from region to region. She also likes mentoring people and says shes looking forward to working with the folks in Contracting and doing what she can to help them in their careers. Ive had plenty of people help me in mine, and I just think thats my job … to do that for the people who work for me,Ž she said. Plans? Martinez says through the end of the “ scal year the plan is to hold the status quo and just survive.Ž After that, theyll be looking for ways to streamline and standardize processes throughout the region so contracts can be shared more easily. Anything to add?  . Were here to help, and Im excited about working with Tulsa and the region. I like these new regional concepts; they will allow us the ” exibility we need to respond to customers by how the Corps is now organized and into the future.Ž C han g es to sta ff photo i n Tulsa D i str i ctEarl GrovesGroves has gone from mowing parks at Canton Lake to being responsible for the operations and maintenance of all the districts water resources projects. He was selected as chief after serving as the deputy for the past three and a half years. He has spent the majority of his career in Operations but has also served as emergency manager, public affairs of“ cer, and did a six-month stint last year as action of“ cer to Lt. Gen.Van Antwerp. Challenges? Out of 355 employees in Operations Division, 263 will be eligible to retire this year. We have so many of the baby boomers retiring, more work than weve ever had before, and lots less people. The challenge is putting the right person in the right job in a timely manner so they can share the knowledge … sort of like a Star Trek mind meld -so that we are successful. Its coupled with building the bench. . Managements challenge and my challenge is getting them the experience, the training, the knowledge, so that they function as a high performance team.Ž Plans? Tulsa Districts critical maintenance backlog increases about $3 million per year.  The knowledge transfer on how we do maintenance and the funding to do maintenance is on the front burner. We must have that locked up quickly. The other part is getting the money out in the right places -matching the money to where the critical need is.Ž Anything to add?  Its a great honor to serve as chief of Operations for Tulsa and work for such a great group of people.Ž Shauna Martinez Ea r l G r o v es D on  t f or g et W omen  s Equality Day, August 26

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August 20087 T hose mana gi n g L i ttle Rock  s water know i ts we ig ht Tamm y L. Mood y P acesetter S ta ff F ig htin g ” oods in Little Roc k District earlier this year fell heavily on t h e s h ou ld ers of many di str i c t team members, but Reservoir Control p ersonnel who manage the districts water r esource pro j ects d a il y fe l t t h at we i g ht more directl y than most Our water management decisions are far reac hi ng,Ž c hi ef of Reservo i r Contro l Section Jan Jones said. You have p eo p le w ho make their living on the lakes, so your d ec i s i ons a b out manag i ng t h e wate r in their lake directl y affect them. You h ave p eo p le who live downstream of the p ro j ects, so y ou are d e “ n i te ly affect i n g their lives as well. Public safet y is the ultimate decision maker. We p rotect lives an d property at a ll costs.Ž Jones, seven more en g ineers an d two hydrologic technicians manage 25 w ater resources pro j ects i n Ar k ansas an d s outhern Missouri b y monitorin g an d d irecting the release of water from those p ro j ects, a ll w hil e attempt i n g to b a l ance their efforts for multiple competin g p ur p oses Our ma i n purposes for l a k es an d d ams like Greers Ferr y Table Rock, M illwood and the rest are ” ood damage r e d uct i on, hyd ropower an d water supp ly ,Ž Jones ex p lained. On the Arkansas Rive r our locks and dams provide a navigation c h anne l, b ut we h ave to t hi n k a b ou t farmers cro p s, too.Ž Recreation an d n atural resources management are also co n side r ed. The Reservoir Control team has hel p in the form of water control p lans, each one custom d es ig ne d an d pu bli c ly vette d for that pro j ect alone We use our engineering judgment to execute t h e water contro l p l an, an d every d a y whether its rainin g or not, we make an ana l ys i s of w h at t h e con di t i ons are a t t he t i m e an d e x ecu t e t he w at e r co ntr ol p lan accordin g to those conditions,Ž Jones s a id. For examp l e, Matt Mo i x i s t h e pr i mary hy draulic en g ineer responsible for Blue Mou nta i n an d N i mr od l a kes. H e a lso s erves as a b ac k up hyd rau li c en gi neer an d Little Rock District Hydrology Technician Darrel C ampbell opens the door o f th e g auge h ouse to ma k e repa i rs an d a dj ustments to Bl ue M ounta i n D am  s ta il wate r elevation gauging equipment. U. S Army C orps o f Engineers photo r e g ulator for Clearwater Lake Generally, I analyze all of the hyd ro l o gi c an d hyd rau li c con di t i ons r e g ardin g the pro j ects each da y an d d etermine or revise (according to the w ater contro l p l an ) w h at t h e re l eases s hould be for the next several da y s,Ž M oix said. I convey those releases to pro j ect personne l an d t h ey actua ll y execute them.Ž Amon g factors considered are rainfall stream ” ow s torage c h ange i n t h e l a k e an d more Educatin g the public is done dail y b y everyone in Reservoir Control, an d J ones an d W hi te R i ver System Eng i nee r J ohn Kielczewski have taken a Wate r M anagement 101 presentation on the roa d r ecent l y to p l aces lik e Mounta i n Home and Ro g ers, Ark., and Branson, Mo Ki e l c z ews ki s ai d h e tri es t o educ at e t h e pu bli c an d of “ c i a l s a b out two p rinciples concerning the six White Rive r Bas i n l a k es. F i rst, t h ey are operate d as a s y stem, not i n d epen d ent ly Next, t h e y were built primarily for ” ood damage re d uct i on an d h y d ropower, an d t h e ” oo d re d uct i on m i ss i on h as customers a ll t h e way down to Newport and Georgetown.Ž Jones sa id s h e saw an d h ear d i mme di ate fee db ac k from t h e pu bli c during those meetings Eac h meet i ng we did I use d t h e ana l o gy t h at I cou ld see a ligh t b u lb coming on out in the audience every now an d t h en. T h en we wou ld get some ver y g oo d quest i ons,Ž s h e sa id Once s omebody explains it like John explains t h e system, peop l e m i g h t not rea ll y lik e w h at t h e y h ear, b ut t h e y d o un d erstan d it better. You can tell by the good questions t h ey as k Ž S ee Reservoir Control r next page l

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Pacesetter8 Communication is a bi g part o f Arkansas River En g ineer Steve Brewers j o b too The most important part of m y wor k i s communicatin g with the public. I have many customers up an d d own t h e r i ve r who are farmers, residents, “ shermen, l ocal of“ cials and concerned citizens Ž Brewer sa id He ta lk s w i t h many o f t hem dail y durin g ” oods. Farmers an d residents depend on m y ” ow forecasts an d a le rt s t o ma ke decisio n s a bout plantin g harvestin g or whether to sta y o r l eave their homes,Ž Brewer said He l p i ng peop l e k now w h et h er to l eave th e i r h omes i s j ust one part of mana gi n g a ver y hi g h risk dam like Clearwater Dam i n sou t he rn M issou r i. Hav i n g a high r i s k d am h as a dd e d a whole new level of work for C learwate r regu l ator Nat h an i e l Keen an d Reservo ir C ontro l ,Ž Jones sa id S h e exp l a i ne d t h a t after the dam was classi“ ed ver y hi g h r i s k h er of “ ce d eve l ope d a water contro l act i on p l an t h at d escr ib es a process fo r makin g water mana g ement decisions d ur i ng hi g h water. A tec h n i ca l act i on team eva l uates current and forecast conditions, an d the n ma kes a r eco mm e n d at io n t o a mana g ement act i on team w h et h er to re q uest a deviation to the a pp roved p lan,Ž she s a id. In addition, two new stream gauges w ere i nsta ll e d d ownstream of C l earwate r to help operate the pro j ect. Jones sai d stream gauges are absolutely crucial to t he w at e r co ntr ol m issio n We have to have e q ui p ment tha t a dequately measures and transmits “ el d d ata to us,Ž s h e sa id Our two hyd ro techs, Darrel Campbell and Timoth y Crownover install and maintain tha t equ i pment aroun d our pro j ects. Ž She said she was proud of the wa y the R eservoir Control crew pulled together, w or ki ng l ong, h ar d h ours d ur i ng t h e ” oodin g but she said the crew alwa y s w orks as a team rain or shine. T h e sense of owners hi p of t h ese pro j ects and the pride the y take in doin g t heir work is, I feel, une q ualed,Ž she said. Its not on ly d ur i n g wor k h ours; t h ese g u y s take this stuff home. If were not o n 24-hour duty, weekends, holidays, wh atever, t h ey k now w h at t h ey are responsible for and the y take care of it. Ž Little Rock District Hydraulic Engineer Matt Moix hands C hie f o f Reservoi r C ontrol S ection Jan Jones a report on Blue Mountain and Nimrod lakes, two o f t h e water resource pro j ects h e manages. Ph oto b y D av id Vi r d en Reservoir C ontro l C ontinued from previous pa g e Si te V i s i t to Jor d an S outhwestern Division C ommande r Brig. G en. Kendall P. C ox and Littl e R oc k Di st ri ct Co mm a n de r Co l. E d Jackson, with other Corps, cit y an d con g ressional personnel, listen to Todd Wa g ner, C it y o f S prin g“ elds pr i nc i pa l storm water eng i neer, as h e brie f s them about Jordan C reek in Sprin g “ eld, Mo. The Corps of“ cers saw the p otential ” ood risk reduction pro j ects complexities durin g a sit e visit in June. S prin g“ eld shares its passion f or the project and its vision f o r e nvir o nm e n ta l a n d eco n o mi c development while it participates in a $3 million, 50-50 cost-shared feasibilit y stud y Photo b y Julia S methurst

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August 20089 Col. Anthony C. Funkhouser Commander, Tulsa District R eco g n i z i n g Exce ll ence T h e end of “ scal y ear 2007 is n ear i ng an d I commen d t h e T uls a D is tr ic t t e am f o r an o t her o utstandin g y ear. We have rapidl y r eac h e d t h e fourt h quarter an d are p i c ki ng up momentum as t h e h eat r i ses i n t h e midwest. After nearl y a y ear of severe r a i n, i t appears t h e c l ou d s are c l ear i ng, a n d l a k e l eve l s an d t h e nav ig at i on s y stem a re returnin g to normal. This could not h a ve co m e at a be tt e r t i m e a s we close out t h e “ sca l y ear for our re gi on. A l t h ou gh w e were successful in our metrics, the m o st i m p ortant q uest i on as we re ” ect b ac k t hi s FY i s, D id we execute our pro j ects to our customers satisfaction?Ž I can sa y unequ i voca ll y, Yes! Ž I have tried to thank each and ever y one o f t h e Tu l sa D i str i ct emp l oyees t hi s year fo r y our efforts i n ma ki n g us t h e stan d ar d i n c ustomer service and mission execution. A s I h ave gone aroun d t h e reg i on, I h ave h ear d man y i ncre dibl e stor i es of our team. I want to hi g hli g ht some of our si g ni“ can t a ccom pli s h ments s i nce our l ast i ssue. F irst, I want to publicl y con g ratulate Par k R anger Ro b M ill s for recent l y sav i ng a y oun g b o y from d rown i n g at Oo l o g a h Lake in 10 feet of water. Due to his efforts, t h e young man w ill recover. Mr. Mill s i s anot h er examp l e of t h e se l” ess a nd p rofessional service within each o f ou r T uls a t e am m e m be r s! S ince our last article, con g ress has app rove d a su ppl ementa l to fun d re p a i rs to o ur pro j ects t h at were d ama g e d d ur i n g t h e r ecord ” oodin g of 2007. Repairs will g o most l y towar d ero d e d em b an k ments an d structure repa i rs. We are ver y apprec i at i ve o f this assistance from our con g ressional r epresentat i ves as i t w ill ra i se many p ro j ects b ac k to m i ss i on capa bl e an d ensure the safet y of the pro j ects. In our c i v il wor k s program, we h a d t h e opportun i t y to meet w i t h Con g resswoman Bo y da and the Kansas Water Of“ ce t o di scuss t h e J o h n Re d mon d S tu di es. The f ocus o f discussio n w a s o n t he l o gj am, the recent reallocation and the ma i ntenance requ i rements. S h e was very comp li mentar y of Eu g ene Goff an d hi s t eam for their hospitalit y and professional b r i e “ ngs. We h a d a secon d Kansas meet i n g w i t h Kansas State Representat i ve T om Sloan and Mr. Woodle y assistan t s ecretary of t h e army for c i v il wor k s, t o di scuss t h e wa y a h ea d i n id ent i f yi n g how best to extend the life of ou r reservo i rs. ASA Woo dl ey comm i tte d t o part i c i pat i n g i n a team w i t h USACE representation from Kansas Cit y Tulsa, an d S out h western D i v i s i on. T he Real Estate team has made si g ni“ cant s tr id es i n t h e l ast mont h s w i t h comp l et i ng th e Can dy La k e d ee d transfers. Spec i a l t hanks to Shekinah Baile y and Ida L afayette for t h e i r tenac i ty. T h e Rea l E state Team a l so prov id e d g reat support to T inker Air Force Base with their G eneral Motors P l ant pro j ect. F i na ll y, I want to reco g n i ze Pam Ke lly an d Steve No l en who are reall y makin g pro g ress in the Den i son Lan d Transfer pro j ect. T hi s i s a high v i s ibili t y pro j ect mon i tore d by t h e Secretar y of the Arm y on down. The y h ave b een stea dil y overcom i ng o b stac l es an d move d t h e pro j ect forwar d to t h e s atisfaction of the Denison of“ cials. Th e H yd ropower Safet y Comm i ttee T eam was selected as the reci p ient o f the T e am Ex celle nt A w ar d. A s a r esul t of t hi s TEAM effort an d c l ose wor ki n g relationship with the Safet y Of“ ce, the overa ll ef “ c i ency of t h e organ i zat i on an d s pec i“ ca lly hyd ropower, h as i mprove d s i g ni“ cantl y and emplo y ees have a muc h i mprove d wor ki ng env i ronment. T eam mem b ers were Steve T i mmons H an k Far l ey, George Wors h am, Br i an Ec h o l s, Ra y An d rews, Jo h nn y Bra y M ik e Jerni g en, Ra y Harrison, Dora Karnes, Dale Co l e, Sam Patterson, Just i n Boy l e, Steve Mill s, M ik e R h oa d s, Larr y Law l ess, G l enn S cearce, Shone Couch, Charlie Smith, Tonya Ho l t, Jeff M ill er, James Bav id o, Lance Per d ue, Jam i e Cau dl e, an d B illy F ite. Awesome team! O ur m ili tar y pro g ram h as rea lly execute d w ell this last q uarter and of note, c om pl ete d t h e TRAP re l ocata bl es a t F ort S ill i n recor d t i me. T h e Fort S ill r elocatable buildin g team accomplishe d a m i ss i on i mposs ibl eŽ d es i gn i ng an d c onstruct i n g approx i mate ly 312,000 s q uare feet of s p ace in 25 relocatable b u ildi ngs for t h e TRAP 08-05 tra i n i ng mi ss i on w i t hi n a n i ne-mont h per i o d Challen g es that were overcome prio r t o awar d i nc l u d e d est i mat i ng costs fo r the volu m e o f r eloc ata ble u n i t s i n t he short deliver y timeframe; obtainin g a r ev i se d pro j ect approva l at t hi s hi g h e r c ost from t h e Department of Arm y A ssistant C hief of S taff for Installation M anagement; o b ta i n i ng approva l from th e Sma ll Bus i ness A d m i n i strat i on for a n on-com p etitive p rocurement for a $ 50 milli on contract w i t h a tr ib a l 8 ( a ) “ rm; ensur i n g correct fun di n g was use d fo r t he correct feature of the pro j ect; an d d es i gn i ng, negot i at i ng an d awar di ng a c ontract i n a ver y s h ort t i me li ne. T hi s a ccom p lishment will ensure that Fort Sill will b e a bl e to accom pli s h t h e i r m i ss i on t o tra i n our newest So ldi ers. Team m embers included: Brad Carter, Steve H armon, Co ll een D i ven, San d ra Egan, Terr y R i ce, Dan i e l Fo yil De bbi e G ibb s, M ar y Blackburn, LeViene Hearn, Jane No bl e Laura Re d emann Patr i c k Bear d, D an B i rn b aum R i c k West Wa l t Garner P at Warner, Tomm y Willcox, Brent Clark,See E xce lle nce page 33 e

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Pacesetter10 Mary Beth Hudson Pacesetter Contributor First, you see a ” ash and smoke. Next, the tower starts to tilt. Then, you hear the explosion. Its a strange chain of events and a lesson in the speed of sound experienced by people gathered to watch the old water tower at Fall River Lake be, according to the U.S. Army news release, explosively reduced.Ž A former platoon leader of Col. Funkhousers, Capt. John Miller, leads the 111th Engineer Company (Sapper), 1st Engineer Battalion, stationed at Fort Riley, Kan. Their connection led to a partnership that bene“ ts both the Soldiers and Tulsa District. The engineer company, which returned from Iraq late last year, is always looking for real-life engineering challenges to keep them trained for their military work. The old water tower which needed to be removed from Fall River Project provided just such an opportunity.Big Bang Theory During -Engineer Soldiers prepare  cuts .ŽB efo r e -w i t h bl ast b arr i ers i n p l ace A f ter -Trained and read y f or the cook out, the S oldiers pose be f ore the f elled tower The obsolete tower, erected in 1948, had a 25,000 gallon tank and sat on legs approximately 95 feet from the ground to the top of its cap. It was used for the Fall River Lake Of“ ce and Overlook water supplies. Its “ nal use, however, was to provide training for the young engineer Soldiers. A safe perimeter was established; blast barricades were built by inmate labor (another partnership established by the Fall River Of“ ce); the media was informed; charges were set; people gathered to watch; unmanned cameras were anchored by sand bags; and soon there was “ re in the hole!Ž The tower was taken down by two planned explosions … the “ rst causing it to lean and the second making it fall … right between two trees as predicted. Lots of work went into the event, and Park Ranger Gary Simmons pulled it all together. Coordination was accomplished with Kansas State Parks, the highway department, nearby residents, and the utility company which temporarily removed transformers in the area of the blast. The Soldiers arrived the day before to prepare. On the morning of the demolition, Simmons said, It was a lot of S ee Tower on page r 22

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August 200811 No new d ama g e at Ar k -W hi te Cutof f T ammy L. M oo dy P acesetter S taff W i t h t h e worst of t h e ” oo di ng ove r i n t h e Ar k ansas an d W hi te r i ver b as i ns, Little Rock District Pro j ect Mana g e r G reg Ya d a met 17 di str i ct an d ot h e r ag enc y personne l on an overcast June d a y at the Arkansas-White River Cutof f c onta i nment structures to i nspect fo r d ama g e. Yada and the others were concerne d t h e structures h a d susta i ne d d amage from t h e high water b ut t h e y were p l easant ly sur p rised  We were h appy to see t h ere was no t a n y new d ama g e to t h ese structures,Ž h e said, as the g roup left the area. We we r e co n ce rn ed t h at t he du rat io n o f ” ow o ver t h e structures m igh t h ave cause d more dama g e, considerin g the structures al rea d y h a d ma j or d amage.Ž T h e Me li n d a, Owens La k e an d J i m S mith Lake headcut control structures we r e co n s tr uc t ed t o r educe t he r isk of a cutoff c h anne l form i n g b etween t h e A rkansas and W hite Rivers that woul d di srupt nav i gat i on an d d estroy w ildli fe h a bi tat i n w h at i s k nown as t h e B ig Is l an d a rea of southeast Arkansas. T h ese h a d b een d amage d b efore from high water events an d repa i re d severa l times since their com p letion in 1992. Sh ou ld t h ese structures fa il an d a cutof f ch anne l reac h across from one r i ver to the other, it would p rom p t the need fo r s i gn i“ cant d re d g i ng, create d angerous c ross” ows an d potent i a lly cause l oss o f navi g ation between the Mississippi Rive r an d m o r e t h an 400 m iles of t h e McC l e ll an-Kerr Ar k ansas R i ve r Navi g ation S y stem T h e d eve l opment of more cutoffs w as somet hi n g e l se Ya d a an d hi s teammates looked for while workin g thei r w ay f rom structure to structure.  We a l so use d t hi s tr i p to c h ec k ou t n ew erosion p aths that could develo p wh ere we d ont want t h em Ž h e sa id  One pat h ero d e d more t h an i t h as d ur i n g a n y previous ” ood event. Ž I n 1963 t h e Army Corps of Eng i neers cl ose d a natura l waterwa y ca ll e d t h e A rkansas-White River Cutoff, or Ark-Pro j ect mana g er Gre g Yada walks to w a r d m e m be r s of the ins p ection crew as the y loo k over the g eotubes a t J im S mi t h L a k e t h at were dama g ed b y hi g h water shortl y after the y were buil t in 2004. Photo b y Tamm y L. Mood y Little Rock H y draulic En g inee r N at h a ni e l K ee n c h ec k s t h e pro g ress of an erosion path the White River is makin g in t h e s h o r e lin e as i t t ri es to cut a channel throu g h to th e A rkansas River. Photo b y Tamm y L. Mood y W hite Cutoff, that existed between t h e two r i vers. For t h e past 40 years, h owever, t h e Ar k ansas an d W hi te R i vers h ave been tr y in g to form a new cutoff ch anne l i n t hi s area w h ere t h ey are on l y o ne an d a h a l f m il es apart. A new cutoff would not onl y t h reaten nav i gat i on, b ut i t a l so wou ld di srupt t h e fra gil e ecos y stem of t hi s r emote, p ristine area. Therefore the h ea l t h an d preservat i on of t h e area i s t h e s u bj ect of controvers y stu dy an d d e b ate. Because both rivers are si g ni“ can t pl ayers i n t h e econom i c, nav i gat i ona l an d eco l og i ca l aspects of t h e Ar k ansas De l ta, an y a l terat i on, e i t h er natura l o r manmade, to either of the rivers woul d h ave s i gn i“ cant i mpacts on t h e reg i on. Thi s h as man y a g enc i es l oo ki n g stron gly at the area Thi s year t h e di str i ct i s “ n i s hi ng t h e Draft Env i ronmenta l Impact Statemen t for the ArkansasW hite Rivers C utoff Stu d y, w hi c h was con d ucte d to presen t a l ternat i ves t h at wou ld i n hibi t cutoff d evelopment and recommend a long-term solu t io n

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Pacesetter12Real Estate team sets unprecedented paceKatherine Shelton Fort Worth District Contractor B uildi ng a fence i s use l ess w h ere t here is no place to put it. Withou t t he land, there can be no fence. So, wh en t h e Eng i neer i ng an d Construct i on Support Of“ ce, located in the U.S. Arm y Corps of Engineers Fort Worth Distric t of “ ce, was tappe d to oversee t h e mass i ve U .S. Department of Home l an d Secur i t y b order fence program in 2007, real estate acqu i s i t i on b ecame a pr i or i ty. A l t h oug h muc h of t h e l an d tar g ete d b etween Texas and California was owned or managed by t h e fe d era l government, t h e Corps was fac i n g approx i mate ly 60 m il es of l an d t h a t w ould have to be obtained from p rivate owners … from t h e State of Texas to l oca l r es id ents. T h e process wou ld not b e easy. T h e highly -c h ar g e d sens i t i ve nature of t h e p rogram was exposed daily in morning h ea dli nes, an d an aggress i ve program d ea dli ne b rou gh t even more o b stac l es to the Cor p s Real Estate team B ecause the E CSO was directed to o versee t h e program, t h e rea l estate effort was led b y Blake Br y ant, a realt y specialist with the ECSO. Joining him i n t h e ECSO was Pau l a Jo h nson-Mu i c a r ealt y specialist from the Southwestern D ivision. Hyla Head, Real Estate chie f i n t h e Fort Wort h D i str i ct, h ea d e d up the lar g est district execution effort, with more than 250 acquisitions. Together, t h ey h ave b een part of a Rea l Estate team that includes four Cor p s districts an d encompasses employees from 22 districts n at io n wide. T he t e am h a s i n cluded n ot o nl y Corps emplo y ees, but contractors an d r etired Cor p s Real Estate veterans as well.  There wasnt another Real Estate a g enc y that could have done what we have Ž sa id Hea d We h ave a natura l b ase o f r esources to tap i nto t h rou gh a ll ou r d i s tri c t s an d r e tir ees.Ž I n addition, the Cor p s has had to wor k c losely with DHS, the U.S. Department o f Just i ce an d myr i a d fe d era l agenc i es  Our success has de p ended on the c oo p eration and ra pp ort weve establishe d Bruce Hardie, le f t, retiree f rom t h e Sout hw este rn Divi s i o n wh o r etu rn ed to serve as a real estate ne g otiator, i nspects property in Hidalgo C ount y with Juan Escanuela, retired border p atro l a g ent and interpreter Ph otos b y R an dy Roberts, Fort Worth District S ee Te am next page t with all the a g encies, especiall y De p artment of Justice,Ž said Johnson Mu i c. We cou ld nt h ave gotten to w h ere we are toda y without the expertise o f our own team and the incredible federal agency partners hi ps. Ž T he Real Estate team was tasked with acqu i r i ng l an d for Pe d estr i an Fence 225 i n March 2007. The g oal of the pro g ram i s to construct 225 miles of primary fence a l ong t h e nat i ons sout h ern b or d er b y December 2008. In October 2007, the j ob expanded to include Vehicle Fence 3 00 … a program t h at w ill p l ace 300 miles of vehicle fence ad j acent to the pedestrian fencing. The land needed fo r b ot h programs i s di v id e d essent i a ll y i nto t hree cate g ories … land that is located in t he Roosevelt Reservation land that is manage d b y fe d era l agenc i es, an d l an d th at i s pr i vate ly owne d by res id ents, munici p alities or state and state-run e nt i t ies. T h e R ooseve lt R ese r v ati o n w a s e sta bli s h e d i n 1907 b y Pres id ent T h eo d ore Roosevelt, said Br y ant. The reservation se t a s i de a 60-f oo t f ede ral z o n e Ž t o be u se d for b or d er protect i on across l an d s no t a l rea dy owne d a l on g t h e nat i ons sout h ern border. The p roclamation affecte d approx i mate l y 600 of t h e 675 m il es o f b or d er stretc hi n g from t h e R i o Gran d e i n E l Paso west to the Paci“ c O cean. Th e secon d cate g or y i s l an d owne d by t h e f ederal government and managed by one of severa l agenc i es, i nc l u di ng t h e U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Burea u of Land Management, the National Par k Serv i ce t h e Bureau of Rec l amat i on an d t he International Boundar y and Wate r C ommission. Normall y we would have had to g e t permits for federally-managed land,Ž sai d J o h nson-Mu i c. But t h e wa i vers b y t h e Secretar y of Homeland Securit y set aside i m p lementation of the p ermits and cleare d th e way for construct i on on t hi s l an d Ž

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August 200813 Th us, t h e c h a ll enge for t h e Rea l Estate t eam la y with the privatel y -owned lan d approximately 60 miles, mostly in Texas, owne d b y c i t i zens, c i t i es an d t h e state. No t onl y did the politics of the pro g ram prove t o be one of the teams biggest challenges … c i t i es suc h as Eag l e Pass, Texas, h ave t aken the border fence construction issue to cou rt … bu t th e s tat e  s ar c hai c an d u norgan i ze d pu bli c l an d recor d system re q uired condemnation of land even in cases where the owners agreed to the pr i ce offere d b y t h e government fo r t heir propert y So, in a matter of months, t he Real Estate team had to identify the owners of areas d es ig nate d for t h e fence, acquire Ri g hts-of-Entr y to the land from t h e ow n e r s t o all ow f o r e n v ir o nm e ntal stu di es an d en gi neer i n g surve y s, o b ta i n a pp raisals, then a pp roach the landowners with a p rice for p art or all of thei r propert y Pro j ect-w id e, approx i mate ly 12 percent of the propert y will be acquire d by purchase and 88 percent requires con d emnat i on for e i t h er t i t l e or pr i ce o r both. An d, t h e d ea dli ne of Decem b er 2008 loomed We h a d to rev i se t h e ma j or i t y of ou r p rocesses,Ž Johnson-Muic said. We had t o develop new expedited procedures jus t f or t hi s pro g ram, i n or d er to meet t h e deadline. Ž Earl y in the Texas pro g ram, the Corps set up a pro j ect of “ ce i n McA ll en to i nterface w i t h b or d er a g ents, sa id Hea d O ver time, the team develo p ed p rocedures th at i nc l u d e d i nnovat i ve programmat i c a pproac h es for l an d va l uat i on fo r p ro p erties below $ 50,000, and e x p e di te d ac q u i s i t i on an d con d emnat i on processes t h at w ill a ll ow execut i on w ithin un p recedented timeframes. A w e b b ase d pro j ect s i te was d eve l ope d o n En gi neer i n g Know l e dg e On li ne to process electronicall y all condemnation a ssem bli es, i nc l u di ng t h e a bili ty to t ransfer d ocuments b etween a g enc i es fo r r eview and obtain an a g enc y si g nature on a Dec l arat i on of Ta ki ng i n a matter of d ays from start to “ n i s h An d, t h e Rea l Estate t eam drafted landowner corres p ondence l etters t h at were staffe d t h roug h t h e Of “ ce o f t h e Secretar y of Home l an d Secur i t y an d t he White House staff, thus standardizin g Ri g h t of Entry requests, Dec l arat i on o f Ta ki n g Not i“ cat i on an d Va l ue Offer letters T h e resu l ts s i x mont h s from t h e pro g rams deadline, speak for themselves  Acqu i s i t i on of 100 owners hi ps wou ld b e a g ood y ears workload,Ž said Head. We h ave d one two an d a h a l f t i mes t h at many i n h a l f a y ear. We expect to b e d one w i t h the ac q uisition p art next month, but it will ta k e us t h e next two years to “ n i s h up on t hi s pro j ect. Ž  T hi s was lik e di saster re li ef Ž a dd e d Jo h nson-Mu i c. We h a d peop l e w h o ta k e p ride in their work commit to the mission, c ome toget h er, an d get t h e j o b d one. Ž C ontinued f rom previous page T e am I n land ne g otiations at t h e h o m e of Jo hn S h u f o r d in R io Grande Cit y a re Geor g e Tri gg s ( left ) a real estate n e g otiator from L ouisville District a nd Pro j ect Mana g er E nrique Villa g omez ( ri g ht) from Ga lv esto n Di st ri ct P hotos b y Rand y R oberts Fort Worth Real Estate community honors Johnson-MuicPaula Johnson-Muic, realty specialist for the Southwestern Division, received the Real Estate Community of Practice Professional of the Year Award at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Senior Leaders Conference Aug. 4 in Pittsburgh, Pa. Johnson-Muic was nominated for her work on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security border fence program. In her nomination, JohnsonMuic was praised for having ƒ continually met or exceeded challenging customer expectations for quality and timely real estate product delivery and information including congressional inquiries and daily data calls in response to the political environment surrounding this program. She is a pleasure to work with and her leadership, passion, dedication, technical expertise and customer focus has been invaluable to the Corps ability to execute this challenging mission. She is an inspirational leader for all.Ž

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Pacesetter14 Photo courtesy of Sam Masters IN THE BELLY OF THE BEAST0630--Ali Al Salem Air Base. Its another Middle Eastern dawn with a not-yet unpleasant breeze lightly waltzing across a vast plain of sand and tarmac. I and about 45 other souls are waiting with eyes “ xed on a grey-green C-130 military cargo plane nearby. It is the instrument that will ferry us over a sea of sand and into the very heart of Iraq. As passengers, we are mixed lot of Soldiers, contractors and government Civilians with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers prominently represented. Small talk is made amongst ourselves about past deployments, mutual acquaintances, family and what else … the weather. An orange tinged yellow sphere has just emerged from the eastern horizon and begins its timeless climb above a part of the world with an ancient, rich and troubled past. Eventually the pieces come together palletized baggage arrives along with the ” ight crew and things begin to happen. The back end of our transport has an inclined plane which serves as our passageway up into the belly of the beast. The interior of this four-prop aircraft has no comparison to commercial passenger planes. Inside is a Rube Goldberg landscape of exposed hydraulic lines, ductwork, wiring, pulleys, cables and various kinds of strange tools anchored to the monsters ribs. Single “ le we trudge down a corridor not much wider than a backpack. We take our seats. No armrests, let alone a reclining seat back here. Instead is a long, low metal framework with seat and back fashioned out of bright red nylon strap webbing. No movie on this voyage either … we are the movie. Once we are seated, a winch hauls our baggage up the same ramp we had just ascended. A crew member scurries over our bags compressed into a single mass. Its as if a giant spider had spun a nylon web around a small mountain of duffel bags. An astute Corps project manager asks a fellow traveler if she is all right. She appears to be showing mild dif“ culty coping with a taxing environment. She replies that she is “ ne. We will help to lighten her burden to ensure she remains so. A sense of obligation has been instilled within us to monitor our co-workers well being. Da teline 26 JUL 08 K u w a i t This is an important part of our pre-deployment training provided by the Trans Atlantic Deployment Center in Winchester, Va. Even before the planes exit is sealed, the beast begins to move. For a prolonged period, the craft whines and groans as speed increases. At some undetermined time, we become airborne. My only clue was the welcomed drop in air temperature as the plane gained altitude. The required ear plugs have been inserted. Even if one could hear conversation above the hypnotic din of the engines, there is no desire to engage in it here. We are all weary from a lengthy sojourn over the past two days. The harmonic vibration of the craft lulls us all into the arms of Morpheus during the hour plus journey to Iraqs capital city, Baghdad. Jolted to attention by the beasts unexpected buck, my eyes scale the interior wall of this Road-Warrior-like transport. About 18 feet up, I see something which makes a Texan proud. Its a full size Lone Star ” ag placed there by a crew member with whom I share the bond of statehood. Our Texas crew member fashions a makeshift seat supported by slings. He then positions himself in front of an elevated portal. From this vantage point, like a deer hunter in a tree stand, he intently watches for any movement below. Sunlight alternately illuminates and then retreats as the plane changes directions and angles. The few round port holes in the beasts cavity are small and placed far too high for viewing. With the distractions of an airplane window banished, I steal the opportunity for re” ection. My thoughts focus on why I am here, the historical and personal events that aligned the planets to bring me and my comrades to this place at this time. As with any new undertaking, the uncertainty can cause apprehension, but with challenges come growth, come experience, comes the opportunity to forge new friendships that would never have been possible otherwise. It is a chance to experience, “ rst hand, a different way of life, another culture and in doing so perhaps “ nds an even deeper appreciation for the American way of life. Through mutual interactions come understanding, acceptance and respect for others. To make this happen is up me. The Corps has laid opportunity at my feet. It is now up to me and my fellow travelers to make of it what we will. Sam Masters Construction Representative Gulf Central Division Iraq ----------Sam Masters is a park ranger at Fort Worth Districts Whitney Lake

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August 200815 Col. Donald E Jackson Commander, Little Rock DistrictStrategic Plan helps us row together for success M y thanks g o out to ever y one for their continued g rea t efforts i n support i ng L i tt l e Roc k D i str i ct. Regar dl ess o f t h e oar y ou h o ld i n t h e SWL s hi p, i f we d ont row to g ether we will “ nd our or g anization spinnin g aimlessl y in mid ch anne l One recent i n i t i at i ve to h e l p ensure we stay on course a n d b u ild a b etter tomorrow i s t h e new di str i ct Strate gi c P l an. D etails are forthcomin g but for now, let me tell y ou wh y an d h ow t h e p l an was d eve l ope d h ow we are us i ng i t, an d h ow we will use i t i n t h e future. Why develop a Strategic Plan? F or L i tt l e Roc k D i str i ct, our Strateg i c P l an ensures we focus on t h e di rect i on man d ate d by high er h ea d quarters an d that we capture all the components required for takin g care o f p eop l e, fo ll ow i ng esta bli s h e d processes, an d execut i ng pro j ects a n d pro g rams. Our b us i ness i s comp l ex. We operate across a b road front, frequentl y with inadequate staf“ n g and inconsisten t fun di ng. We must h ave a game p l an to ensure we ma k e goo d mana g ement d ec i s i ons t h at move t h e or g an i zat i on forwar d. How was the Strategic Plan developed?Tr i s h Ans l ow c hi ef of t h e SW L Pl ann i n g an d Env i ronmenta l Of “ ce o r g anized the effort. Initial plannin g gu id ance was g i ven to sen i or staf f mem b ers i n Octo b er 2007. Se l ec t staff members p artici p ated in the S out h western D i v i s i on Strateg i c Pl ann i n g Conference i n Decem b er 2007. T h e di str i ct staf f b e g an plan formulation in Februar y 2008 to develop g oals an d obj ect i ves t h at supporte d SWD i mperat i ves. Every di str i c t staff of “ ce was represente d to i nc l u d e mem b ers from our “ e ld p ro j ect and resident en g ineer of“ ces. The effort was orchestrate d b y t h e SWL c i v ili an l ea d ers hi p, w hi c h i s essent i a l to any p l an t h at i s  b u il t to l ast.Ž Anot h er meet i n g was h e ld i n Ju ly an d implementation teams have been formed to execute each g oal an d obj ect i ve an d to measure success. Already the plan is in action. The district has taken steps to re“ ne our or g anizational I n di v id ua l Mann i ng Document. T hi s re ” ects t h e nee d to rea li gn th e di str i ct b ase d on current an d future wor kl oa d pro j ect i ons t h a t i nc l u d e re gi ona l an d nat i ona l efforts. In effect we are d e “ n i n g w hat seats are on the bus we will drive to the future. In a ddi t i on to re “ n i ng t h e di str i cts structure, we wor k e d to re “ ne recru i t i n g an d hi r i n g processes. We h ave b e g un efforts t o address leader trainin g usin g existin g Arm y pro g rams an d th e Da l e Carneg i e Corporate Lea d ers hi p program to j umpstart a c r i t i ca l nee d after y ears of ne gl ect How else will we use the Strategic Plan?The Strate g ic Plan will also help us s y nchronize such initiatives a s t h e Fam il y Act i on P l an an d Human Cap i ta l P l an un d e r d eve l opment at re gi ona l an d nat i ona l l eve l s. We will incor p orate several other district initiatives to support var i ous o bj ect i ves. We h ave a l so attempte d to capture th e mu l t i tu d e of annua l requ i rements, rout i ne an d ot h erw i se, such as s y nchronizin g stakeholder, customer and con g ressional e ngagement strateg i es. T h e Strate gi c P l an i s a li v i n g/ wor ki n g d ocument. Execut i on Plans will be reviewed monthl y b y s en i or l ea d ers w i t h t h e ent i re pl an s u bj ect to per i o di c rev i ew as g u id ance f rom hi g her headquarters and mission requ i rements c h ange Strategic Plan addresses employee concerns.I spent much of the past y ea r m eet i ng w i t h di str i ct emp l oyees an d li sten i n g to y our concerns. T h e Strate gi c P l an a dd resses man y o f the issues discussed durin g these candid sessions. I will spen d th e next year i n my trave l s across t h e di str i ct di scuss i ng an d promot i n g t h e Strate gi c P l an to h e l p emp l o y ees un d erstan d i ts intent and p ur p ose. A ga i n one of t h e most essent i a l e l ements of t h e Strateg i c P l an i s t h at i t was d eve l ope d by an d w ill b e a d m i n i stere d by t he civilian leaders of the district. It is our plan, not m y plan. S upport from a ll of us i s cr i t i ca l to ma ki ng i t successfu l He l p us e nsure L i tt l e Roc k D i str i ct i s  b u il t to l ast.Ž Our Strate gi c P l an i s a n important “ rst step in takin g Little Rock District from  g oo d t o great.Ž  If we don  t row to g ether, we will find our organization s p inning aim l ess l y in m idc h a nn e l .Ž

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Pacesetter16Hav i n g a f east w i th FE ST Clay Church Pacesetter Staff A l thou g h the Forwar d E ngineering Suppor t Te am s h a ve bee n ar ou n d f or y ears, there is soon to b e a golden opportunity fo r full -t i m e i n volve m e nt E ver b een approached b y a multi e vel marketing entrepreneu r a n d b een to ld t hi s i s you r o pportunit y to g et in on the g round ” oor?Ž For the 273rd E ng i neer Detac h ment, i t i s r eall y true. B y direction of the Army, th e Corps of Eng i neers i s c reatin g and transformin g c urrent FE S T-A teams to support eac h of t h e b r i ga d e c ombat teams bein g formed. Thi s tran s f o rmati o n in c r e a ses the n u m be r o f volu nt eer FEST teams from n i ne to 77 t hroughout the Army, with th e teams b e i ng staffe d w i t h a ctive-dut y Soldiers and full t ime C ivilian team members T h e m i ss i on of t h e FESTA is to p rovide additional planning capability to co m b atant co mman ds an d A rm y serv i ce componen t c ommands to support a join t t as k force. Essent i a l FESTA t as k s i nc l u d e mu l t i p l e en gi nee r planning and design, real e state acqu i s i t i on an d di sposa l support, contract execut i on, infrastructure assessment, an d t ec h n i ca l eng i neer ass i stance. O ne of the “ rst ei g ht active c om p onent teams is the 273r d E ng i neer Detac h ment ass i gne d t o Fort Worth District. The “ rst team member assigne d i s Sgt. 1st C l ass Josep hi ne Matthews who reported for duty earlier this year. She is a sen i or construct i on superv i so r a nd will serve as the non co mmi ss i o n ed o f“ ce r-in ch arge of t h e d etac h men t pen di n g t h e ass ig nment of t h e co mman de r  I h a d my c h o i ce of any o f the other locations an d w anted to come to Texas so i t i s great to b e h ere i n For t Worth,Ž Matthews said. A n ormal deployable FEST d etac h ment w ill b e ma d e up o f one commissioned of“ cer a s the detachment commander o ne non-comm i ss i one d of “ cer a nd seven civilians. The c ivilians will consist of civil e l ectr i ca l, mec h an i ca l an d structural en g ineers alon g with s p ecialists in environmental, c ontract i n g an d g eo g rap hi c information s y stem. M atthews recently c omp l ete d tra i n i n g at t h e R eadiness Su pp ort Cente r in Mobile Ala. and has b een wor ki n g w i t h l o gi st i cs s p ecialists to im p lement a support agreement with For t H oo d for t h e procurement an d stora g e of FEST equipmen t n eeded for deployment. A ccor di n g to Matt h ews, We a re j ust now draftin g the a greements for our logistical n ee d s an d “ n di n g stora g e locations. It will be some tim e in th e f u t u r e be f o r e we start tr yi n g to “ ll t h e c i v ili an p ositions, but watch for the o pportunity to join. Brig. Gen. Cox recent l y s i gne d a l ette r a nnouncin g new incentives fo r F EST volunteers so we are st ill recru i t i ng mem b ers for ou r volunteer FEST until fundin g is approved for hiring full-time t e am m e m be r s. P le a se c a ll m e a t 817-886-1443 if y ou are interested in volunteering fo r t hi s exc i t i ng d uty.Ž A s new members j oin, the o ld adage of its going to be a groun d ” oor opportun i tyŽ w ill rin g true for the newl y established 273rd Enginee r De ta ch m e nt Corps, Texas City sig n Project Partnership Agreemen t Col. David C. Weston, Galveston district commander, Sharon Tirpak, pro j ect mana g er, and Matthew Do y le, ma y or of Texas Cit y O f “ c i a l s of t h e C i t y of Texas C i t y an d t h e U.S. Arm y Corps of En g ineers Galveston District si g ned a Pro j ec t P artners hi p Agreement i n a ceremony i n Texas C i ty on Ju ly 28 Takin g part were Col. David C. Weston, Galveston Distric t c omman d er, an d Texas C i ty Mayor Matt h ew T. Doy l e. T h e ag reement i s for t h e d eepen i n g of t h e Texas C i t y S hi p C h anne l from 40 to 45 feet, which will improve the navi g ational ef“ cienc y a n d safety of t h e ex i st i ng c h anne l for movement of commerce a n d nat i ona l secur i t y nee d s, accor di n g to Weston The Pro j ect Partnership A g reement helps us achieve o ur m i ss i on of k eep i ng t h e Texas Coasta l waterways open fo r n av ig at i on,Ž sa id Weston, contr ib ut i n g to b ot h t h e econom i c w ellbein g of local communities and the securit y of our nation. T hi s i s an i mportant m il estone i n t h e hi story of t hi s pro j ect. Ž A Pro j ect Partners hi p A g reement i s t h e l e g a lly bi n di n g d ocument between the federal g overnment and a pro j ec t sponsor to out li ne t h e cost s h ar i ng d o ll ar amounts as we ll as t h e r espons ibili t i es of b ot h t h e Corps of En gi neers an d t h e sponso r throu g hout the construction of the pro j ec t T h e Texas C i ty C h anne l w hi c h was “ rst aut h or i ze d b y Con g ress i n 1913, i s a fe d era l d eep d raft nav ig at i on pro j ec t servin g the Port of Texas Cit y in Galveston Count y accordin g to Sh aron T i rpa k Corps of Eng i neers pro j ect manager T hi s pro j ect cons i sts of a ma i n c h anne l connect i n g a turn i n g b asin at the port to the Gulf of Mexico throu g h Bolivar roads, a p art of t h e Houston S hip C h anne l ,Ž s h e sa id T h e ma i n c h anne l i s 40 feet d eep, 400 feet w id e, an d a b out 6.8 m il es l on g T hi s 40foot channel was com p leted in June 1967.Ž In a ddi t i on to d eepen i ng t h e c h anne l t h e pro j ect w ill i nvo l ve i nc id enta l w id en i n g T hi s d eepen i n g an d w id en i n g i s expecte d to g enerate annual bene“ ts of $ 28,058,000 with an annual cost o f $ 3,309,000, producing a bene“ t-cost ratio of 8.5. An a dd e d b ene “ t w ill b e t h e opportun i t y for t h e d re dg e d See Texas City page y 32

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August 200817Little Rock mopping up after flood fight Cheri Dragos-PritchardPacesetter S taf f (Note: This is the “ nal installment in the Little Rock Distric t ” ood story. Part 1 focused on levees and district actions to help aff ecte d communities. Part 2 d escribe d what occurre d a f te r m ost d istrict lakes “ lle d an d the ” oo d “ ght shifte d Now the ” oods appear to be over, though there is still some risk because lakes an d rivers remain unseasonabl y f ull. ) W i t h w h at i s h opefu ll y t h e worst of t h e ” oo di ng b e hi n d them, Little Rock District ” ood “ g hters have been a t it since March and are now cleaning up and repairing t h e arena, w i t h an e y e on stepp i n g b ac k i nto t h e r i n g s h ou ld t h e n eed arise A nd while work crews are doing what they can, it is uncerta i n w h en enou gh fun d s w ill b e ava il a bl e to repa i r a ll t h e d ama g e and restore all facilities to service F or now, the districts focus is cleaning up parks that are surfac i n g from t h e ” oo d waters, ass i st i n g ot h ers w i t h repa i rs to their dama g ed levees and dred g in g silted navi g ation channels. The district is trying to get back to business as usual, even t h ou gh t h e W hi te R i ver l a k es rema i n high er t h an norma l an d t h e A rkansas River is ” owin g faster than usual. Cleanup crews have been dealing with trash, timber an d d e b r i s pro bl ems, as we ll as d ama g e d fac ili t i es. Before t h e wate r b e g an to noticeabl y recede, more than 60 percent of the districts p ark facilities were ” ooded.  We h ave b een wor ki n g on par k c l eanup for more t h an a month,Ž Park Ran g er Joseph Harper of Greers Ferr y Lake said.  W e still have several areas that need work. W eve been w or ki n g on t hi n g s suc h as remov i n g d e b r i s, rep l ac i n g s ig ns, lantern han g ers and g ravel screenin g replacin g or repairin g p icnic tables and electrical pedestals and adding gravel to r oa d wa y s.Ž M an y park ran g ers had help with the cleanup, some from unex p ected p laces  Beaver La k e Pro j ect staff wor k e d i n con j unct i on w i t h six inmates from Benton Count y Jail and volunteer par k a ttendants,Ž Beaver Lake Chief Ranger Michael Richards said.  T h ey cut, h au l e d off an d p il e d tons of d r i ftwoo d T h ey a l so c leaned all kinds of trash from the shoreline and cam p sites w ithin the p arks.Ž S ome h e l p h a d to b e contracte d out.  The team effort between our permanent emplo y ees, summe r h ires and volunteers has been outstanding,Ž Harper said. In some areas t h oug h weve h a d to i ssue contracts for t hi ngs suc h a s electrical repairs and lar g e debris removal. Ultimatel y were making progress toward getting the parks back to normal. Ž T h e ma j or i t y of t h e sw i m b eac h es an d b oat ramps are st ill unusable at this point and are pro j ected to sta y that wa y on some o f the lakes until the end of August or even months later. S ee Flood C leanu p on next pa g e C ivil En g ineer TechnicianRussell Cooper (in oran g e),P a rk R an g er Ja r ed Tr a mm e ll (with lo g ), a n d N atu r a l R esou r ces Sp ecialists M ichael Hurle y ( back to camera ) a n d Ri ck H i g htower clean up debris after the ” oodin g recedes at H ickor y Creek Park on Beaver Lake. Photo courtes y of Beaver Pro j ect Of“ ce. C leanup e ff orts district wid e L ocal volunteers clean up ” ood debris at Viola Camp g round a t Table Rock Lake. Photo courtes y of Table Rock Pro j ect O f“ ce

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Pacesetter18 At most of the lakes swim beach restrooms were ” ooded c aus i ng some concern i n surroun di ng commun i t i es a b out t h e safet y of the water. The district has tested the water in all of the lakes, and it is safe for swimming Ta ki n g a proact i ve approac h to g ett i n g i nformat i on out, some o f the pro j ect of“ ces met with local, state and federal of“ cials, p ublic groups and the media  Weve k ept t h em i nforme d a b out ” oo di n g concerns an d w arnin g s. These meetin g s also explained the ” ood reduction system, its process and why we do what we do,Ž Table Roc k P ar k Ranger Larry Hur l ey sa id. D istrict team members are also still workin g levees. Durin g the ” ood, personnel spent long hours assisting communities a n d l evee b oar d s a l on g t h e B l ac k an d W hi te R i vers w i t h l evee p roblems. The y provided pumps, sandba g s and other ” oo d “ ghting materials. Mostly they offered expertise levee owners c ou ld tap to k eep t h e i r l evees from fa ili ng. Now efforts h ave shifted to after-action ins p ections and re p airs.  We have conducted many inspections on the levees originally a ffecte d by t h e ” oo di n g ,Ž Levee Inspector E l mo We bb sa id  We have also received re q uests for assistance with re p airs. Then there are some of the levees weve ins p ected that have r ece i ve d mone y from Natura l Resources Conservat i on Serv i ce a nd have alread y been repaired. Ž Little Rock is also trying to repair damage Mother Nature did a l ong t h e 308 m il es of Ar k ansas R i ver nav i gat i on c h anne l entrusted to the district to maintain.  There was a lot of silting in the channels,Ž Chief o f Nav ig at i on Branc h G l enn Prof “ tt sa id We cou ld nt d re dg e o r c lam while the ” ows were so hi g h, but now that the ” ows are starting to drop, the dredge was noti“ ed to mobilize July 15. Ž D eputy of Operat i ons An d rea Lew i s sa id d amage to L i tt l e R ock District facilities is estimated at about $ 50 million. This includes parks, bank stabilization, navigation channels and othe r ” oo d -re l ate d d amage. A n emer g enc y supplemental bill was si g ned b y the president, though only about $ 16 million was slated for Little Rock. Lewis a ttr ib ute d t hi s to t h e t i me l ag i n w h at i s reporte d to Congress an d the recurrin g ” ood events.  Weve sent an additional re q uest for consideration unde r a second emer g enc y supplemental bill for $22 million,Ž Lewis said. It is our understandin g because of the ” oodin g in the midwest, Congress may pass another bill.Ž D ur i n g t hi s event, L i tt l e Roc k s peop l e supporte d t h e ir c ommunities and other districts with ” ood “ g htin g in man y d ifferent capacities. They continue to do so today as the wate r r ece d es an d t h e d ama g e assessments come i n Flood Cleanu p C o ntinued from previous pa g eNatural Resources S pecialist Rick Hightower cleans up tree limbs and other debris f rom Hickory C reek Park on Little Rock Districts Beaver Lake. Photo courtesy o f Beaver Project Of“ ce. The erosion at this cam p site in a Blue Mountain Lake p ark surfaced as ” ood waters receded. This t y pe of dama g e will have to be re p aired when funds become available. Photo courtes y of Blue Mountain Pro j ect Of“ ce.

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August 200819Little Rocks FEST-A returns f rom deplo y ment Tamm y L. Mood y P acesetter S ta ff L i ttle Rocks Forward En g ineer Support Team-Advance r eturne d recent l y from wor ki ng i n t h e Dom i n i can Repu bli c wh ere team mem b ers supporte d j o i nt serv i ce m ili tar y exerc i se B e y on d the Horizon s S ponsore d b y t h e U.S. Sout h ern Comman d t h e annua l B e y ond the Horizon s m issio n i n cludes hu man i tar i an an d civic a ssistance pro j ects to foster g oodwill and improve relationships b etween t h e U.S. an d Car ibb ean nat i ons as p art of t h e c omman d s Partners hi p for t h e Amer i cas pro g ram. Chief of Emer g enc y Mana g ement Charlie Tobin said Little R oc k respon d e d to t h e G l o b a l War on Terror b y j o i n i ng a h an d fu l of Corps di str i cts to create a FEST-A i n l ate 2001 to support the militar y and the nation with en g ineerin g capabilities d ur i ng cont i ngenc i es an d emergenc i es.  We h ave tra i ne d an d ma i nta i ne d a force rea dy to ass i s t since October 2001,Ž he said. Since then our team has d ep l oye d overseas to four l ocat i ons ( Iraq, T h a il an d Japan, an d t h e Dom i n i can Repu bli c ) a l on g w i t h support i n g exerc i ses an d trainin g with the active Arm y in several locations.Ž To bi n went on to ex pl a i n h ow t h e di str i ct rece i ves m i ss i ons f o r t he t e am  Southwestern Division is ali g ned with Central Comman d for support. Typ i ca ll y t h e act i ve component ma k es a reques t to t h e Arm y for forces, an d i t “ l ters d own t h rou gh t h e a lig ne d d ivision,Ž he said. This is not alwa y s the case since until r ecent l y t h ere h ave on l y b een e i g h t FEST-As an d n i ne Base D eve l opment Teams t h rou gh out t h e Corps. So we h ave a l so su pp orted Paci“ c Command and Southern Command in d ep l oyments. Ž L i tt l e Roc k E l ectr i ca l En gi neer Tuan Dan g P i ne B l uff R esource Mana g er Steven Shaw and Ozark Powerhouse Construct i on Re p resentat i ve Joe Jac k son wor k e d w i t h Sout h ern Comman d an d Dom i n i can Repu bli c So ldi ers from June 30 throu g h Jul y 11 as the y inspected infrastructure that neede d r e h a bili tat i on aroun d t h e country  We were t h ere to assess t h e wor k t h e s i tes nee d e d ,Ž Dang said. We went to San Francisco ( de Macoris ) “ rst, where we w or k e d our way t h roug h a h osp i ta l c li n i c, a sc h oo l a commun i ty c enter an d a sports comp l ex. We l oo k e d at p l um bi ng an d d raina g e issues and electrical problems and wrote up a scope o f w or k cost est i mate an d b u ildi ng mater i a l li st for eac h s i te  T h en we went to Santo Dom i ngo an d did t h ree more s i tes there durin g the rest of our time in the Dominican Republic. Ž Sh aw a dd e d t h at after Dang, Jac k son an d h e did t h e i r i n i t i a l a ssessments of t h e s i tes t h e y were ass ig ne d t h e y t h en came up w ith two to three p lans and p resented them to the host nation  We werent s h oot i ng i n t h e d ar k as Sout h Com h a d a l rea d y ta lk e d to t h e h ost nat i on to “ n d out w h at t h e i r g oa l s were fo r these sites, so we knew g enerall y what to look for and where to go w i t h our p l ans,Ž h e sa id It was goo d to b e t h e eyes on t h e groun d t h oug h as we cou ld see w h at t h e i r capa bili t i es are an d Little Rock Electrical En g ineer Tuan Dan g takes photos as he and Ozark Powerhouse Construction Re p resentative J oe Jackson inspect the roof of a buildin g in the Dominican R epublic durin g their recent FEST-A deplo y ment to suppor t j oint militar y exercise Be y ond the Horizons. Photo courtes y o f t h e FE S T-A. wh at ki n d of mater i a l s are t h ere, as i ts not goo d to g i ve t h em a fanc y e l ectr i ca l s y stem i f t h e y cant ma i nta i n i t. We were t h ere to desi g n somethin g that is g ood for them with the materials av a il a ble t he r e.Ž H e furt h er exp l a i ne d t h at some of t h e wor k cou ld b e d one by local contractors, some b y U.S. Arm y en g ineer units and some d one b y Nat i ona l Guar d an d Reserve un i ts.  T h e b est t hi n g a b out t hi s d ep l o y ment i s t h e opportun i t y to see other places, do other thin g s and develop almost immediate c orrect i ons for p ro bl ems for ot h er p eo pl e,Ž h e sa id As a p ro j ect mana g er, y ou ki n d of h ave a v i s i on for h ow y ou wan t thin g s to turn out, and y ou have the power to g et it done. Here i ts a ll acce l erate d an d i t i s very rewar di ng to k now t h ose un i ts will b e com i n g i n to d o w h at weve l a id out. Ž Jackson echoed Shaws sentiments in what he thou g ht the b est t hi ng a b out t hi s d ep l oyment was. Ive b een te lli ng t hi s g u y at t h e power h ouse a b out w h at we d o,Ž Jac k son sa id Ive told him that its a g reat chance to travel, meet people and do some rewar di ng wor k for ot h er peop l e. Ž ( E d itors note: For more in f ormation about becomin g part o f the Corps Fiel d Force Engineering program, you can contac t y our Emer g enc y Mana g ement o f“ ce. S l ots are avai l a bl e on both FEST-A an d the sta y -behin d Base Developmenta l T eam that provides engineering support through reachback. James Fields, the Southwestern Division militar y contin g enc y p lanner who contribute d in f ormation to this article can also be contacted at (469) 487-7021 for more information. )

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Pacesetter20Based on an article by C hris Ede n s of th e O ologah Lake Leade r Tu l sa D i str i ct Par k Ranger Ro b Mill s fee l s t h at a wet un i form ce ll p hone, and wallet are a small p rice to p ay for sav i ng a li fe. Whil e on w h at h a d b een a rout i ne p atrol at Oolo g ah Lake in Oklahoma, r angers Ro b M ill s an d Jason Person p ar k e d i n a l ot over l oo ki n g Hawt h orn B luff Beach. About 60 y ards awa y in 1 0 feet of water, 14-year-o ld Anton i o R amos was sw i mm i n g w i t h hi s s i ster. M ills spotted Ramos showin g cl ass i c symptoms of someone s tru ggli n g to sta y a ” oat. M ills said, He was in the same s pot, com i ng up an d gu l p i ng for a i r an d go i ng b ac k d own, t h en b ac k up g asp i n g a g a i n. Ž  We could tell b y the look on his face it was serious,Ž Person s a id. I t w a s t he n M ills an d P e r so n r e a li z ed n o o n e close t o t he s wimmer was aware of the situation. Both Mills and Person b egan runn i ng to t h e water as Ramos tr i e d to gra b on to hi s s i ster. See i n g hi m a l most pu ll h er un d er, M ill s d ove i nto t h e water. He w as about six inches under water when I g ot to him,Ž Mills said, b ut I saw hi m an d gra bb e d hi m.Ž P ersons sa id I rea lly b e li eve h e wou ld h ave d rowne d r ight there if Rob hadnt g rabbed him.Ž Lead ran g er Paul Shockle y s a id t h ey ca ll e d a few d ays after t h e acc id ent an d t h e b oys p arents sa id h e was d o i n g “ ne. T h e y h a d ta k en hi m to t h e h ospital immediatel y after the incident for a checkup. A ccor di ng to S h oc kl ey, everyone s h ou ld l earn to sw i m.  Even a d u l ts can “ n d t h emse l ves i n t hi s s i tuat i on Ž h e sa id V isitors to Hawthorn Bluff can pick up loaner life jackets at V V t h e gate. T h e l oaner program i s ava il a bl e at a num b er of Corps l a k es t h an k s to l oca l Safe K id s Coa li t i on sponsors hi p. T h ere i s n o char g e to check a life j acket out, j ust a reminder to return it so t h at t he n e xt visi t o r will h a ve o n e t o bo rr ow. Q uick reaction saves lif e Si te mana g er becomes a her o Megan Murphey Pacesetter Staff T hi s i nc id ent was anot h er examp l e of w h y we nee d to h ave g ood situational awareness and to alwa y s be responsive an d rea d y,Ž sa id Sc hi man k He a dd e d t h at h e b e li eves t h e Corps d oes a great j o b of d eve l op i ng respons ibl e an d capa bl e emp l oyees w h o a re prepared for emer g enc y situations. Im con“ dent that two o t h er p eo pl e i n a s i m il ar s i tuat i on wou ld h ave res p on d e d i n t h e same way to get t h e same outcome,Ž sa id Sc hi man k. M a rcus Schimank is the Site Mana g er for Gran g er Lake, b ut on July 16, he became a hero when he saved a y oun g b o y s li fe. T h e c hild 23-mont h -o ld D i e g o Coerre-Bonites, was at the lake when he went into respirator y a rrest. Schimank performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the to ddl er an d got hi m to rega i n consc i ousness an d b reat h e on hi s o wn. He also helped care for Die g o until the paramedics arrive d to take him to the S eton Medical C enter for further evaluation. S c hi man k sa id i t was a bout 12:45 p .m. when the in c i de nt occu rr ed. H e an d P ar k Ran g er Bran d on Ran dig w ere installin g a park si g n w hen they saw a panicke d man runn i n g towar d t h em w ith a lim p toddler in his a rms. He couldnt s p eak En gli s h b ut i t was o b v i ous that the child he was holdin g w asnt doing well,Ž sai d S c hi man k He a dd e d t h a t h e could tell b y the childs c olor and non-res p onsiveness t h at h e was not b reat hi n g Par k Ran g er Ran dig use d hi s ra di o to c all the Emer g enc y Medical Service while Schimank be g an to p erform CPR. He laid the child down and gave him two rescue b reat h s. After t h e secon d b reat h went i n w i t h a g oo d c h est r i se, h e started breathin g on his own and had a stron g pulse, so ches t c ompressions werent necessary,Ž Schimank recounted. The b oy qu i c kl y b ecame a l ert enoug h to ca ll out for hi s mot h er, an d S chimank took him to an air-conditioned car to cool off until p aramedics arrived about 20 minutes later. They took the childs v i ta l s ig ns, w hi c h appeare d to b e norma l T h e b o y was t h en ta k en to the local medical center in Round Rock for recover y. S chimank said that the following day, he called a member o f Di egos fam il y to c h ec k on hi s progress. He was p l ease d to h ea r that the bo y was doin g well and had alread y been sent home from the hos p ital. The EMTs and medical staff at Seton deduced tha t Di ego most lik e l y went i nto resp i ratory arrest from a com bi nat i on o f the heat, deh y dration, and a fever stemmin g from a pre existing throat infection. Schimank added that one nurse tol d hi m t h at c hild ren often go i nto resp i ratory di stress b efore car di ac a rrest. If Die g o had g one into cardiac arrest, serious dama g e o r d eath may have resulted. Luckily, Schimank and Ranger Randig w ere present at t h e scene to ren d er ass i stance G ran g er Lake is located about 40 miles northeast o f A ustin and is one of a cluster of lakes under the jurisdiction o f t h e Fort Wort h D i str i cts Cap i ta l Re gi ona l Of “ ce. As s i te mana g er, Schimank is responsible for emplo y ee supervision a nd partnership relations. He also deals with issues concerning env i ronmenta l stewar d s hi p, ” oo d -r i s k management, an d wate r suppl y Schimank be g an his career as a park ran g er at the nearb y B elton and Stillhouse Hollow Lakes before transferring to b ecome s i te manager at Granger M arcus S chimank R o b Mills

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August 200821August 2008 Col. David C. Weston Commander, Galveston District G alveston District ... on the stormy r oa d to g rea t T h eres an o ld sa il ors say i ng a b ou t h urr i cane season: June„too s oon; Jul y „stand b y ; Au g ust„ come i t must; Septem b er„remem b er.Ž Th ou gh t h e meteoro l o gi ca l forecasts var y the Galveston District certainl y has l earne d t h e trut h i n t h at a d age t hi s year, w i t h Hurr i cane Do lly i n Ju ly an d Trop i ca l Storm Edouard in Au g ust, both impactin g our di str i ct. T h e G a l veston area i tse lf h as ever y reason to b e war y of h urr i cane s eason: of the 10 deadliest hurricanes i n U.S. hi story, num b ers one an d ten occurre d at Ga l veston. B u t wi t h t he e nt i r e T e xa s co a s t li n e an d a se g ment of Lou i s i ana out li n i n g ou r district boundaries, the odds o f a hu rr ic an e affect i n g some par t of the G alveston D i str i ct are very high So w h en Hurricane Doll y ma de l an d fa ll a t Sout h Pa d re Is l an d and im p acted the Brownsville area, t h e Ga l veston D i str i ct respon d e d ( a l on g w i t h Pr i mar y Response Teams an d l iaison of“ cers from our teammates in Fort Wort h, Tu l sa L i tt l e Roc k, New Yor k, N as h v ill e an d Norfo lk di str i cts ) An d w h en Trop i ca l Storm E d ouar d wen t t h rou gh t h e Beaumont / H igh Is l an d/ Rollover Pass area, well, thats us too. Potent i a l ” oo di ng from TS E d ouar d i n Houston, one of t h e l ar g est metropo li tan areas in the countr y ? Were involve d i n t h at too. An d, we h ave to some h ow O ur district work force is involved across the f ull spectrum o f operations and has responded a dmirabl y to these storms. Ž k eep execut i ng our norma l m i ss i on requ i rements at t h e same t i me As y ou can see, these storms an d our response to t h em crosses ove r s evera l g eo g rap hi c an d m i ss i on areas. People immediatel y think o f E mergency Management an d F l oo d R i s k Mana g ement, of course. But ot h e r mission areas are j ust as much in pla y : nav i gat i on„survey i ng t h e waterways t o ensure t h e y can b e re-opene d fo r navi g ation; re g ulator y to ensure that p roper perm i ts are i ssue d for repa i r o f d ama g es; s h ore li ne protect i on„w h a t dama g e has the storm done that we ma y nee d to un d o d own t h e roa d ? Will more b each nourishment projects be needed? S upport for ot h ers„support to t h e Fe d era l Emergency Management Agency? I mpacts on t h e b or d er fence? Even m ili tar y construct i on„were t h ere d amages to Ellington Field? S o you can see that a hurricane or tropical storm affects us far b eyon d w h at may b e reported in the news. Our distric t w ork force is involved across the full spectrum of operat i ons an d h as respon d e d a d m i ra bl y to t h ese storms. W i t h teams g o i n g to t h e areas to c h ec k for d ama g e, s urve y crews checkin g out the waterwa y s, th e Cr i s i s Act i on Team d ep l oye d an d e mp l o y ees h e l p i n g i n a mu l t i tu d e of wa y s t o kee p p eo p le safe and sound„it has b een i nsp i r i ng to see. I thank all district emplo y ees who have contr ib ute d so muc h d ur i ng t h e l ast two s torms„an d w ill cont i nue t h e i r b rave e ndeavors throu g hout hurricane season It i s t h e act i on of eac h i n di v id ua l team member that leads to our success. W e must cont i nue to d o everyt hi ng necessary, b ot h as i n di v id ua l s an d as an or g an i zat i on, t o ensure that we are p re p ared to meet the c h a ll enges t h at may come our way an d th at we d o our part to ta k e care of ou r res p onsibilities to our district and to ou r nat io n From g ood to g reat„the chief has se t th e mar k ers to s h ow us t h e way. Eac h an d ever y t i me we execute our m i ss i on i n the face of these storms, we are on tha t roa d to greatŽ„ b y d e li ver i ng super i o r performance i n a ll m i ss i ons; sett i n g t h e s tandards for our profession; havin g a u n i que, pos i t i ve i mpact on our Nat i on; an d b u ildi n g to l ast. Next on t h e ra d ar ( un l ess t h eyve a l rea d y g race d us w i t h t h e i r presence ) : Fa y an d G ustav! D o y ou have an interestin g stor y or picture? Share it with y our fellow Corps team members. Simpl y submit y ou r story idea, written article, or photo with caption to your local Public Affairs Of“ ce by the “ rst day of each month. G ot an idea f or the Pacesetter ?

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Pacesetter22 C o ntinued from pa g e 1 0 Towerwork … lots and lots of manhours … but it was all worth it to spend last night camped with those young Soldiers and hear their stories and look at their pictures. I think getting to know them on a personal level was the de“ nitive highpoint for the entire staff.Ž Following the towers fall, nearly 100 Soldiers and family members were guests at a cookout provided by the Fall River Project Of“ ce. Everyone worked real hard,Ž according to Susan Couch, manager of Fall River, Big Hill, and Toronto projects. She noted that all the extra work and preparation for both the blast and the barbeque was accomplished during a ” ood watch. Fall River was teetering on the edge of requiring 24-hour surveillance. Fortunately, sunny skies greeted the Soldiers and onlookers that day, and the weather stayed clear through the meal and family time. The day that started with a bang ended with the feeling of a job well done … and appreciated. Jason Person, natural resource specialist, Oologah Lake Of“ ce is Tulsa Districts Customer Care Employee for the second quarter of 2008. When there was an unexpected, last-minute turnover of some gate attendant contractors, Person worked diligently to secure the services of replacement contractors. He managed to get new ones on board in time for the opening of the recreation season. He spent many hours of his own time to ensure the needs of the visiting public were met. Additionally, changes he instituted in phone service billings are expected to yield almost $1,650 per year for the lake of“ ce. P erson w i ns awar d J ason P erson wor ki ng di sas t er response i n A ust i n, T exas, f ollowing Hurricane Rita T homasson receives f irst-ever Golden Mic Awar d Melanie Ellis Pacesetter Contributor Dan Thomasson, lake manager, Stillhouse Hollow and Belton Lakes, was recognized at the Fort Worth Districts Engineer Day ceremony as the “ rst-ever Golden Mic Award winner. The award originated in the Public Affairs Of“ ce after the 2007 ” ood event and is designed to recognize the Fort Worth District team member who has made the most noteworthy contributions in the area of media relations. Stillhouse Hollow and Belton Lakes were inundated with ” oodwaters for most of the 2007 summer, and Thomasson was put on the hot seat more than once. He took multiple opportunities to tell the public about the Corps missions. I tried to keep the message simple and uncomplicated,Ž he said. Luckily, that works well with short, televised interviews.Ž During the 2007 ” ood event, of“ ces were ” ooded with calls and faced with rumors about infrastructure failure. Landowners were upset about release rates, and there were many other issues as well. Thomasson quickly found himself on a “ rst-name basis with many members of the local media. I tried to be prompt in responding to their inquiries because I realized they were usually up against a short deadline. I also made a point to not appear to be avoiding their questions,Ž he said. Thomasson has taken training through the Public Affairs Of“ ce and found it helpful. I have had the media training, actually a couple of times now,Ž he said. I do use the things I learned there, particularly the part about trying to develop your key talking points before the interview. I also try and anticipate the tough questions and develop a nonDan Thommason controversial response. One thing I would add to the training is to know when to stop talking.Ž Thomassons recognition as the Golden Mic Award winner was a surprise to him. Engineer Day award winners are usually noti“ ed prior to the ceremony, but the PAO wanted to keep it a surprise. With the help of Thommasons co-workers, he was in the district of“ ce and did not know of the award until shortly before the ceremony. Thomasson continues to provide immediate response to any and all media inquiries. He does so in a manner that re” ects the criteria of the Golden Mic Award. He demonstrates tact, diplomacy and professionalism while telling the Corps story.

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August 200823 D i st ri ct University t t t o t t provide sites for patients o L i tt le R ock D is tr ict and the University t o f Arkansas for Medical Sciences entere d a n agreement July 29 to provide at leas t s i x new camps i tes i n Maume ll e Par k to accommodate patients under g oin g extended medical treatment in the Little Rock ar e a The Challen g e-Cost Share A g reemen t o utlines how the Cor p s and UAMS will s h are i n construct i ng an d operat i ng t h e n ew campsites. Maumelle Park has h istorically been an economical source o f l o d g i ng for out-of-town pat i ents w ho come to Little Rock for medical t r e a t m e n t.  T h roug h out t h e past year, more t h an 8 1 p eo pl e were d ocumente d i n Maume ll e P ark as seeking long-term stays related to me di ca l treatment Ž sa id M il es Jo h nson the actin g pro j ect operations mana g er o f the Corps Russellville Project Of“ ce.  T h e fun di ng prov id e d b y UAMS w ill meet a de“ nite need. Ž U AMS is providing $ 90,000 for the Little Rock C hie f o f O perations Lee Bass and UAM S C hancellor I. Dodd Wilson, M .D., sign the C hallenge C ostS haring Agreement between the C orps and the U niversity o f Arkansas f or Medical S ciences to provide extended-stay campsites at Maumelle Park f or long-term-care patients. (Photo by J.P. Jones, UAM S .) p artnership to be led b y its hospital, U AMS Me di ca l Center, i ts W i nt h ro p P Roc k efe ll er Cancer Inst i tute an d t h e U AMS M y eloma Institute for Research a n d T h erapy  We see pat i ents from aroun d t h e w orld, man y of whom must sta y in L i tt le R ock f o r weeks o r m o nt hs while un d er g o i n g treatment,Ž sa id Pete r Emanuel, M.D., director of the Cance r I nst i tute at U AM S.  Hav i n g t h ese camps i tes ava il a bl e for extended p eriods of time will p rovide p at i ents an d t h e i r l ove d ones w i t h a n affor d a bl e opt i on for l o dgi n g i n a b eautiful settin g and at the same time help e a se “ nan ci a l bu r de n s.Ž  UAMS i s ver y p l ease d to partne r w ith the U.S. Arm y Corps of En g ineers to ma k e t h ese cam p s i tes ava il a bl e fo r p at i ents,Ž sa id UAMS C h ance ll or I. Do dd W ilson, M.D. We are ver y appreciative o f t h e su pp ort an d com p ass i on t h e Cor p s h as s h own i n h e l p i n g ma k e t hi s poss ibl e. Ž Little Rock signs cost-sharing agreemen t Current regulations limit the time i n di v id ua l s may stay i n fe d era l par k s. U AMS fundin g will enable patients to enjoy extended, uninterrupted stays in the p ar k contr ib ut i n g to t h e i r recover y i n a restive settin g. T he Corps obtained seed money to be use d for construct i on management, sept i c n eeds and dail y utilities and maintenance. U AMS funds will p rovide for the rema i n i n g camps i te b u ildi n g nee d s. T h e extended sta y campsites will be reserve d s peci“ cally for medical care patients as recommen d e d t h roug h Pat i ent A d vocates Services of Little Rock Hos p itals. M a u m e ll e Park i s o n th e b ank o f th e Ar k an s a s R ive r wes t o f L i tt le R ock. T he p arks uni q ue environment p rovides an excellent setting for camping, boating, “ s hi ng or gett i ng away from i t a ll T h e p ark offers ei g ht g roup picnic shelters an d 129 campsites with electricity and wate r h oo k ups. Ot h er amen i t i es i nc l u d e a b oa t l aunch ramp, pla yg round, hot showers, p ublic tele p hones and a dum p station. M aume ll e P ar k on t h e A r k ansas Ri ver

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Pacesetter24 i nc l u d e d 23 m il es of l evee i mprovemen t plus a deeper channel This ” ood damage reduction activity see m ed odd at t he t i m e si n ce T e xa s w a s experiencin g a tremendous drou g ht. From 1 950-1956, the state endured the longes t d ry spe ll i n 300 years, w hi c h h e l pe d people for g et the historicall y wettest “ ve years immediately preceding the drought. S cant ra i nfa ll fa il e d to “ ll t h e reservo i rs a nd b y 1956 farmers and ranchers were f o r ced fr o m th e ir lan d an d 46 T e xa s cou nt ies r eceived f ede ra l f ood a id. The dr y conditions emphasize d t h e be n e “ t s o f r ese r vo ir s an d w at e r i mpoun d ment. On t h e Tr i n i ty R i ver, wi t hi n t h e four reservo i rs, more t h an 6 72,000 acre-feet of water was im p ounde d t o supp l y water to t h e Da ll as-Fort Wort h a rea durin g the earl y and mid 1950s I n true Texas fashion, hu g e rains fell in 1 957. T h e ons l aug h t, for some areas t h e w orst of the centur y tested the new ” ood d ama g e reduction measures in the Dallas F ort Wort h area. T h e reservo i rs an d ” oo d wa y s k ept t h e towns safe as t h e wate r ” owed smoothl y throu g h the area. W i t h a di sc h arge of 1.5 t i mes t h e 1908 ” ood, district en g ineers stated that withou t t he ” ood dama g e reduction structures, the w ater wou ld h ave reac h e d t h e A d o l p h us H otel in downtown Dallas. The event was n icknamed the ” ood that didnt ha pp enŽ b ecause an estimated $84 000 000 in ” ood d ama g e was prevented, and more than 600 bus in esses an d in dus trial es ta b li s hm e nt s w ere protecte d T h rou gh out t h e 1950s, t h e For t Worth District pro j ects protected the ci t i zens i n d roug h t an d ” oo d G i ven t he unpredictabilit y and intensit y of the Texas weather, this was a si g ni“ can t a ccomp li s h ment. (For more information an d d iscussion o f a ll t h e f aci l ities in t h e Jo h nson Space Center see Rivers Rockets and Readiness: A rmy Engineers in the Sunbelt; a History o f t h e Fort Wort h District, Army Corps o f En g ineers 1950-1975 b y D. Cla y ton Brown. ) Protecting North Texas from Flood and Drought homes, stood in front of the bulldozers wor ki ng on t h e l evees. T h ey wante d t h e l evee relocated awa y from the old g rowth t rees, and, at one p oint, several linke d h an d s aroun d a tree trun k to stop wor k Other residents protested that the y had ha d t o run from four ” oodsŽ and wanted the wo r k t o co nt i n ue. Fort Worth District ne g otiated this con” ict by leaving some of the trees u ncut ; h owever Lt. Co l W. G. Tra i ner remarked that this was not normall y done because its not good hydraulics. Ž Th e Da ll as F l oo d way face d a di fferent n t h e 1950s, t h e U.S. Arm y Corps o f En g ineers, Fort Worth District, built a ser i es of ” oo d d amage re d uct i on structures a n d reservo i rs i n response to t h e extreme w eather conditions alon g the Texas plain. T h e Tr i n i ty R i ver h a d l ong b een a p ro bl em to b ot h Da ll as an d Fort Wort h w ith the disastrous Fort W orth ” ood of 1 949 h asten i ng t h e comm i tment of fun d s from Con g ress for t h ese structures The y proved their worth durin g thei r “ rst d eca d e of o p erat i on Construct i on of four reservo i rs ( Benbrook, Lewisville, Gra p evine an d Lavon ) on t h e Upper Tr i n i ty b egan un d er Ga l vestons watc h A l t h ou gh t h e y supported the navi g ation desires of local sponsors, t h e pro j ects ma i n purpose w as ” oo d d ama g e re d uct i on. Des ig ne d to reduce the dama g e from ” oodwaters from torrent i a l ra i ns, a ll t h e pro j ects were c omp l ete d by 1955 R eservoirs were not the onl y g uns i n t h e arsena l aga i nst rag i ng ” oo d s. B u ildi n g l evees a l on g t h e stream b an k s a nd deepenin g the channel produce d ” oo d ways a l ong t h e Tr i n i ty i n b ot h Da ll as a n d Fort Wort h t h at a l so prove d effect i ve ” ood-“ g htin g weapons. I n Fort Wort h, t h e di str i ct face d t h e ch a ll en g e of repa i r i n g l evees d ama g e d in 1949. Not onl y did workers need to r emove b rus h trees an d gar b age from t h e ri ver, t h e y a l so h a d to d ea l w i t h a croo k e d w aterwa y Usin g dra g lines to di g a smoot h curv i ng c h anne l w i t h a w id e, smoot h ” oor, wor k ers remove d mu l t i p l e kinks, bends and bottlenecks from the ri ver, ma ki ng i t a m il e s h orter w h en t h e wo r k e n ded. T he n ew levees we r e m uch w ider than those the y replaced, but the y w ere no hi g h er an d i n some i nstances, a ctua lly l ower, as t h e d eeper c h anne l p rotected the landowners from over” ow. Not everyone was p l ease d w i t h t h e p ro j ect, h owever. In Septem b er 1954 a g roup of women, concerned abou t t h e remova l of l arge trees s h a di ng t h e ir Jud y Bullwinkl e P acesetter S ta ff c h a ll enge. T h e o ld 1928 l evees h a d deteriorated, and the cit y needed a new, com p rehensive levee and channelization s ystem. Aut h or i ze d i n 1945, t h e pro j ec t received no fundin g A cost-conscious Bud g et Of“ ce and a “ scall y conservative C ongress fun d e d ot h er pro j ects. It too k e i g ht y ears and a trip to visit Presiden t Harr y Truman to “ nd con g ressional s upport. Comp l ete d i n 1959, t h e ” oo d wayWomen concerned about the removal o f l arge trees s h a di ng t h e i r h omes stan d in f ront o f the bulldozers workin g on t h e l evees i n F ort W ort h Di str i ct. Historical photo courtesy o f Fort Worth W orth Remembering ..

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August 200825FUDS is not a d u d Andy Schwartz (L) from Huntsville an d D wa y ne F or d F ort W ort h Di str i ct, hold a map o f the f ormer World War II Camp Maxe y impact areas about ten m iles north o f Paris, Texas, while G rady Dobbs f rom the Tulsa District describes a r eas o f co n ce rn wh e r e t h e co n t r acto r s will b e wor ki n g. Contract personnel use a towed array at the former World War II Camp Howze near Gainesville, Texas, to help locate munitions and ex p losives of concern.It is not that you want them in your yard or on your street but the potential is there. As urban sprawl, drilling operations and even wind-generating farms being brought online have Clay Church Pacesetter Contributor discovered they are there. The theyŽ in this case are munitions and other hazards left over from former military operations. Except for California, there are more Formerly Used Defense Sites or FUDS in Texas than in any other state. FUDS are properties that were formerly owned, leased, possessed by, or otherwise under the jurisdiction of the Department of Defense or military prior to 1986. There are almost 10,000 FUDS in the United States with about 900 locations in which the Fort Worth District is currently involved. The goal of the FUDS program is to reduce the risk to human health and the environment through implementation of effective, legally compliant, and costeffective response actions. For the Fort Worth team, the work seems to never end. Debra Castens, Fort Worth District FUDS program manager, explains, We bring in geologists, cultural experts, explosive safety professionals, public affairs and many other disciplines of experts to work any particular FUDS site. Each site seems to bring its own unique situation to the table. We have encountered bombs and missiles in peoples yards and other hazards over the years. We are now in the process of site investigations at 80 locations which are keeping us pretty busy.Ž The process “ rst starts with identi“ cation of a site along with any history that can be obtained. The history is accomplished through an archival search of records, public meetings and interviews. Once a site is identi“ ed then removal, clearance and disposal operations can be conducted. If any remediation is needed, it has to be accomplished before the site can be certi“ ed for reuse. Seems like a simple task, but funding and other issues impact the process. An increasing issue is when development occurs prior to the FUDS process taking place. A site in Arlington, Texas, known as Five Points, illustrates this. The former out-laying bombing range was used during World War II by the Dallas Naval Air Station. Although only training munitions were used, the area now is a housing development with almost 800 homes. Spring rains in 2001 and 2002 started pushing the miniature practice bombs close to the surface and home owners were increasingly discovering the bombs. With this increased attention and concern for public safety, the site was moved up in priority. Funding was appropriated and removal operations were conducted in 2006. Even with hundreds of sites being worked, the Fort Worth FUDS staff continues to assess and mediate sites formerly used by the military.

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Pacesetter26 S ee Full Speed on next page d Col. Christopher W. Martin Commander, Fort Worth District A s we p re p are to tackle the las t two mont h s of t h e “ sca l year, I want us to look back at wha t a n amazing year weve had and le t t h at momentum carry us t h roug h to t h e b e g innin g of another y ear of success an d c hallenges A s t h e year d raws to a c l ose, t h e National Securit y Personnel S y stem is on everyones mind. To date, all Fort Worth Di str i ct team mem b ers, except wa g e g rade emplo y ees and those represente d b y bargaining units, have transitioned to NSPS. T h e moc k pa y poo l s pane li n g fo r n on-su p ervisors was com p leted and, at the moment, the mid-year assessments are in t h e process of b e i n g comp l ete d K ee p in mind, the NSPS annual a ppraisal cycle for the period is Sept. 30, a n d i t i s fast approac hi n g Team mem b ers should be preparin g for submissions n ow by getting ahead of the pack an d c omp ili n g t h e i r li sts of accomp li s h ments. S peakin g of accomplishments, ou r military construction projects continue to move forwar d an d meet g oa l s an d milestones. As the Fort Bliss Pro g ram O f“ ce and the Land Develo p men t En gi neer cont i nue t h e i r stea d fas t r elationshi p with another contract, the p rogram of“ ce along with the rest o f Team B li ss d e li vere d four b arrac k s two c ompan y operations facilities, two tactical e q ui p ment maintenance facilities and two d ep l oyment storage b u ildi ngs to So ldi ers from 1st Bri g ade, 1st Armored Division, June 20, and on July 15 to the Brigade S upport Batta li on at East Fort B li ss a h ea d o f schedule A t Fort Polk, we are receiving p roposals for a $150 to $175 million p ro j ect to stud y and resolve mold g rowth i ssues an d co n s tr uc t 15 b arra c k s an d f our c entra l energy p l ant fac ili t i es to prov id e h ealth y apartment st y le dormitories free o f mold following the best practices a va il a bl e i n t h e i n d ustry an d to reconstruc t the remodeled, redesi g ned barracks to the A rmys 1+1 barracks requirements In a ddi t i on, t h e construct i on p h ase of the bi gg est and most complex i n di v id ua l pro j ect of t h e San Anton i o Base Rea lig nment an d C l osure Pro g ram has formall y be g un with the award of a $ 556 million contract for additions an d renovat i ons to Broo k e Arm y Me di ca l C enter on Fort Sam Houston. Throu g hout th e construct i on an d renovat i on wor k, a ll me di ca l serv i ces are expecte d to b e fu lly maintained. This effort will brin g more th an 760,000 square feet of new space to th e BAMC comp l ex. A multi-stor y addition will house a L eve l 1 trauma center, operat i ng rooms, c li n i ca l an d a d m i n i strat i ve space, an d an extension of BAMCs internationall y acc l a i me d b urn center. A 5,000 space p ar ki n g g ara g e w ill a l so b e b u il t, as we ll as a central ener gy plant. Approximatel y 2 88,000 square feet of t h e ex i st i ng BAMC f ac ili t i es w ill b e renovate d. With our militar y pro g rams headin g t o max i mum pro d uct i on, our b or d er fence p ro j ects are cont i nu i n g to g a i n momentum. W ith less than six months left until the comp l et i on d ea dli ne, b ot h t h e Pe d estr i an Fence 225 an d Ve hi c l e Fence 300 p ro g rams are continuin g to move forwar d w i t h rea l estate acqu i s i t i ons, Request fo r Proposa l d eve l opment, tas k or d er awar d s and fence construction. To date, 338 m iles o f f e n ce h a ve bee n co n s tr uc t ed f or b ot h pro g rams. In t h e PF 225 pro g ram, 2 9 task orders have been awarded and 16 RFPs are current l y out for bid In t h e VF 3 00 pro g ram, two tas k or d ers h ave b een a war d e d an d 10 RFPs are current ly out fo r b id. I n t h e c i v il wor k s an d operat i ons arena, w e are dilig ent ly tr yi n g to ensure t h e m inimal amount of carr y over from one year to anot h er b y execut i ng our sc h e d u l e d w or k p l an. An d we cont i nue to awar d c ontracts to repair ” ood dama g es. The district received $ 15.6 million i n supp l ementa l fun di n g to b e di v id e d a mon g ei g ht lakes for repairs to recreation fac ili t i es, s lid e repa i r, an d out l et wor k s a n d c h anne l repa i r after t h e ” oo d s of 2007 when man y of the lakes sustaine d d amages. Belton Lake received $5 million a nd Stillhouse Lake received $4 million since the y sustained some of the heavies t d amage to recreat i on fac ili t i es O n Au g 7, Operat i ons Pro j ec t M ana g er Gre g Pope and Lake Mana g e r D an T h omasson from t h e Cap i ta l Reg i on O f “ ce met w i t h Con g ressman Jo h n Carte r a nd staff at Dana Peak Park on S tillhouse Hollow La ke f o r a m edi a r ele a se c oncern i n g t h e ” oo d d ama g e to t h e par k a nd recreation facilities. Actin g Chief o f O perat i ons C h ar li e Burger a l so atten d e d. O n t h e nat i ona l l eve l Fort Wort h D istrict is workin g on the Recreation S trategy P l an w hi c h i nvo l ves strateg i z i ng for t h e pre di cte d d ownwar d c h an g es i n fundin g for the recreation pro g ram. All l a k es w ill b e con d uct i ng a se l f assessmen t t o d eterm i n i e ef “ c i enc y l eve l s for t h e ir p arks which will include basic O&M cost, v i s i tat i on revenue an d ot h er cr i ter i a. A s we move forwar d from l ast y ears ” ood events, lets kee p in mind tha t al t h oug h we h ave not b een affecte d too m uc h by Hurr i cane Do lly an d Trop i ca l S tormEduard, hurricane season is fa r from over. Lets ensure t h at we are rea d y b ot h at h ome an d i n our pos i t i ons to b e a ble to take care of our families and fellow ci t i zens i f we are ca ll e d upon to con d uc t o r support cont i n g enc y operat i ons A s we steam ahead to the end of the  . the construction phase of the b iggest and most com p lex individual p roject o f the San Antonio Base Re alignment and C losure Program has f ormally be g un . Ž

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August 200827 N o or g anization is immune to t ragedy, and when our own C orps emp l oyees are i nvo l ve d t he emotional toll can be hi g h. Ima g ine leaving the of“ ce for a long 4 t h of J u l y h o lid ay wee k en d an d re l ax i ng at home when a call comes in that a f atal accident has taken the life of you r f r i en d an d co ll ea g ue. Its lik e a tra gi c scene out of a movie, not somethin g in r e al lif e. On Ju ly 4t h tra g e dy hi t h ar d a t t he Galveston District. Ben Boren, an Operations Division navigation pro g ram mana g er, was kill e d i n a m otorc y cle accident. A quick y e t com p assionate call went out from the c hi ef of t h e Operat i ons D i v i s i on to t he Galveston Critical Incident Stress Management team coordinator to a c t iv at e a ssis tan ce. Earl y the followin g Monda y m orning, local volunteer peer suppor t was ma d e ava il a bl e to a ll Ga l veston District emplo y ees. So what is CISM and how did it wor k i n Ga l veston?T h e Corps CISM pro g ram is a nationwide, voluntar y comprehensive system of services, i nc l u di ng e d ucat i on an d outreac h desi g ned to achieve several ob j ectives such as preventing and alleviating the symptoms of traumat i c stress di sor d er. C ISM exists for Corps emplo y ees who e n cou n ter signi“ cant stressful events th at generate unusua ll y strong emot i ons T he SWD CISM team, mana g e d u nder C hris S mith of Little Roc k D i str i ct, coor di nate d b ot h profess i ona l m ental health provider services ( g rie f counseling) under the districts E mp l oyee Ass i stance Program an d p eer su pp ort assistance. The team o ff e r ed o ne-on-one or group debrie“ ng sess i ons to manage emp l oyees i n i t i a l g rief, lessen the impact, and facilitate recovery. A ma j or component of t h e program P ro g ra m h e l ps us h e l p our own dur i n g t i me of tragedyKristine N. Brown Park Ranger, Galveston District and CISM Team Member is that all information shared during o ne-on-one sess i ons an d d e b r i e “ ngs i s k e p t con“ dential; no notes are taken so e mployees may feel comfortable relating th e i r exper i ences. What happens in a debrie“ n g session? C ISM p eer su pp orters and health care profess i ona l s h e l p Corps emp l oyees deal with their emotional res p onses to t raumatic incidents such as the death o f a n emp l oyee. A we ll -tra i ne d team c onducts a session that lasts no lon g e r t han one hour. Attendees might include d octors, nurses, soc i a l wor k ers, c h ap l a i ns, a nd an y others in vo l ved in th e eve nt A lo t of t issues g et passed a r ou n d at th ese sess i onsŽ says C hris Smith. This is not a “ nger po i nt i n g process but rather a forum w here people talk about what they thin k a n d f eel. Its a s i mp l e wa y to start to wor k t hrou g h feelin g s, to look for wa y s to deal w ith th e m an d th e n co m e t o c l osu r e. W h at t h e Ga l veston l ea d ers hi p did was t o take a proactive step to help emplo y ees deal with their grief. They opted to prov id e ear ly i ntervent i on, an d i t ma d e a bi g difference. Emplo y ees were thankful a nd commented that management cared.Ž C ISM i s a natura l extens i on of t h e Corps m ission to help others. Galveston clearl y p rovides evidence that leaders want to t a k e care of t h e i r peop l e, an d CISM i s a t ool to hel p them do that The Corps CISM program was o f “ c i a ll y i nst i tute d on May 15, 2006. Toda y it consists of 56 trained voluntee r p eer su pp or t ers r eady to respond at any ti me i f ca ll e d It i s i mportant for Corps e mplo y ees to know about this con“ dential program and to know that help is av a il a ble. A s we all know, stuff ha pp ens -so m e tim es t e rri b l e s t u ff It i s no rmal t o h ave a stress react i on an d it h e l ps to ta lk a bout it. CISM can help y ou g et over it If you are ever in need of a CISM spec i a li st, ca ll one of t h e Corps Nat i ona l O p erations Center civilian contacts, Mar k Ro d er i c k at 618-724-2493 or Larry Bogue at 469-487-7062. In a major disaster like Hurricane Katr i na or R i ta, t h e CISM spec i a li sts are assi g ned to the Emer g enc y Mana g emen t as “ rst res p onders. Ž Y ou c an “ n d m o r e i nf o rmat io n a bout C ISM at h ttp://corpslakes.usace.arm y m il/employees/cism/cism.ht m l c ontinued from previous pa g e F ull S p ee d “ scal y ear, for man y of us, it marks the b eg i nn i ng of a new sc h oo l year as we ll R emem b er as d r i vers we nee d to use extra c aution in and around schools. Obe y the sc h oo l zone s p ee d li m i ts, use extra caut i on a t sc h oo l crosswa lk s an d o b e y cross i n g g uards. Watch for school buses loadin g a n d un l oa di ng stu d ents. Stop w h en you see t h e re d ligh ts ” as hi n g Keep an e y e o ut for children dartin g out between cars a n d i nto i ntersect i ons an d d ont use ce ll p h ones w hil e i n sc h oo l zones. A lso, remind y our children to loo k b ot h ways b efore cross i ng t h e street, o b ey all traf “ c s ig na l s an d cross i n g g uar d s an d t o walk with friends. If the y ride a bike t o sc h oo l ensure t h ey l earn an d o b ey bik e safet y ru l es, t h e i r bik es are i n prope r w orkin g condition and to alwa y s wear a hel m e t Lets cont i nue to k eep our d ep l o y e d m embers and their families in our thou g hts a n d b r i ng t hi s year to a c l ose toget h er, an d t a k e t i me to en j o y our accomp li s h ments w ith our team members as well as ou r fam ilies.

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Pacesetter28 Megan Murphey Pacesetter Contributor The work of the Regulatory Community of Practice C orpswide was recentl y applauded b y Assistant Secretar y o f the Arm y f or C ivil Works John Paul Woodle y Jr., and Director o f C ivil Works S teven S tockton. In this p hoto, much of Tulsa Districts Re g ulator y Of“ ce is pictured shortl y a f ter receivin g their reco g nition. From le f t, C ol. Anthony Funkhouser, David Manning, S hane C harlson, Dale Davidson, Br y an Ta y lor, Helen Williams, Marcus Ware, Ed Parisotto, Michael Ware, Timoth y Harts “ eld, a nd Jamie Hyslop. A l a i n Bern i er an d Bo b Morr i s were recent l y h onore d fo r their dedication to the en g ineerin g profession when the y joined The Society of American Military Engineers A A ca d emy of Fe ll ows. T h e assoc i at i on reserves t h e t i t l e o f  FellowŽ for hi g hl y esteemed members of the or g anization who h ave been chosen due to their outstandin g service to SAME a n d to t h e i r profess i on as a w h o l e. Bot h men were i n d ucte d to their new ranks at the societ y s 2008 Investiture Ceremon y in Minneapolis, Minn. The event was held on Ma y 20 in the G reat Ha ll of T h e Depot, a hi stor i c h ote l an d b anquet fac ili ty i n d owntown M i nneapo li s. Bern i er an d Morr i s too k t h e Fe ll ows p led g e to support the or g anizations mission and to be models a n d mentors for ot h er eng i neers. T h e Aca d emy of Fe ll ows i s c ompose d of over 600 outstan di n g SAME mem b ers, 27 of w hi c h w ere inducted at this y ears ceremon y. S AME i s a profess i ona l organ i zat i on t h at was esta bli s h e d fo ll ow i n g Wor ld War I to prov id e arc hi tects, en gi neers an d b uilders with the opportunit y to develop business contacts and to un i te t h ese groups i n or d er to i mprove i n di v id ua l an d co ll ect i ve c apa bili t i es for nat i ona l secur i t y S AME is broken down into a worldwide network of re g ional di v i s i ons, ca ll e d posts,Ž in order to facilitate c loser communit y r e l at i ons hi ps across h e l ar g e or g an i zat i on. M orris is a member o f h e Fort Wort h Post an d B ernier is a member o f h e p ost in Dallas. In o r d er to b ecome a Fe ll ow a n SAME mem b e r m ust be nominated b y c o ll eagues from hi s o r h er p ost w h o p re p are a n a pp lication p acket. No m i n ees m us t h a ve bee n S AME members for a m inimum of ten y ears an d h ave exemp l ary serv i ce to t h e o r g anization and to their “ elds. A national committee then selec t s t he m e m be r s who will be invited to j oin the Academ y M orris j oined SAME in 1979 and has held man y importan t p os i t i ons for t h e Fort Wort h Post, i nc l u di ng pres id ent an d p resident-elect. He currentl y serves as chairperson of the Pas t P residents and Fellows Council. Morris dedicated 25 y ears to Alain Bernier Bob M o rri s act i ve d ut y as a topo g raphic an d com b at eng i nee r for t h e m ili tar y He is the Base Rea li gnment an d C l osure pro g ram mana g er for For t W ort h D i str i ct whe r e he wo r ks on j oint service agreements f o r San Anton i o area construction programs A l a i n B e rn ier h as served the Da ll a s P os t of SAME as an of “ ce r and as treasurer since j oinin g in 1995. He has also helped the p ost w i t h “ nanc i a l matters an d w i t h t h e Sc h o l ars hip Foun d at i on. Bern i er current ly wor k s for Fac ili t i es Branc h as t h e nat i ona l p ro g rammin g mana g er for the Department of Homelan d Secur i tys Eng i neer i ng Construct i on Support Of “ ce. H i s contr ib ut i ons to t h e “ e ld of en gi neer i n g i nc l u d e severa l pu bli s h e d articles and p rofessional develo p ment p resentations In reac hi ng t hi s new h e i g h t of profess i ona li sm i n t h e ir en gi neer i n g careers, Bern i er an d Morr i s w ill b e expecte d to uphold the SAME values of inte g rit y patriotism and public se r vice.

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August 200829Interior secretar y ta k es p ri d e in Mur p hy f or taking pride in Americ a Melanie Ellis Pacesetter Staff D o rie Murph y voluntee r c oordinator, Trinity R eg i ona l Pro j ect, was r eco g nized as a 2008 Take P ri de in Am e ri c a Nati o nal A war d rec i p i ent at a ceremony Jul y 18 in Washin g ton, D .C. One of 15 reci p ients, M urp h y was recogn i ze d fo r h er p ublic lands a pp reciation a nd stewardshi p efforts while w or ki n g as a par k ran g er a t B ardwell Lake. Take Pride in A m e ri c a i s a nati o nal se r v i ce i n i t i at i ve t h at promotes t h e app reciation and stewardshi p o f p ublic lands and is active in all 50 s tat es. Secretar y of the Interio r D irk Kem p thorne p resente d opp ortunities in and aroun d B ar dwe ll Lak e that we r e spec i“ ca ll y targete d towar d the pro j ects missions an d goals. Volunteers, working un d er h er l ea d ers hi p an d supervision, cleared a backlo g o f maintenance, im p lemente d p reventat i ve ma i ntenance fo r p ark facilities and e q ui p ment, a nd upgraded facilities aroun d t he l a ke. Murph y came to work fo r the Cor p s from the Texas P ar k s an d W ildli fe Departmen t a nd is now workin g for the Trinity Regional Of“ ce as the volu nt ee r coo r di nat o r The Fort Worth District uses vo l u nt ee r s at m os t lak es t o h e l p ma i nta i n par k fac ili t i es a nd educate the p ublic on w ater safety and the missions o f t h e Corps. reci p ients with their awards at t h e ceremony. He state d i n a news re l ease t h at, T hi s i s a remarkable g roup o f volu nt ee r s. T hese m e n an d women h ave l eft l ast i n g l e g acies of service to ou r public lands and trul y show the i mpact t h at a comm i tte d group o f vo l unteers can ma k e on t h e e nvironment and lands aroun d the m Ž Murp hy d eve l ope d a nd or g anized voluntee r Gerich reaches career milestone F o rt W orth Districts Eng i neer i ng an d C onstruction Division is p roud to welcome Zach Gerich as i ts newest profess i ona l en g ineer. Gerich has been with the Cor p s since the summer o f 2003. He obtained his p rofessional registration on June 10 an d i s now forma lly able to refer to himself as an  engineer.Ž Becoming license d i s an i mportant step i n t h e career of an y en g ineer an d s h ows ded i c ati o n t o th e “ e l d.  Hav i ng your profess i ona l t i t l e g ives y ou more responsibilit y w hen designing,Ž Gerich said. Megan Murphey Pacesetter Contributor Zach Gerich P rofessional En g inee r He went on to ex p lain tha t p rofess i ona l reg i strat i on i s a l on g an d di f “ cu l t process. In order for an engineer to b ecome a PE h e or s h e mus t p ass a ser i es of tests. T h e “ rs t i s taken as an undergraduate an d ca ll e d t h e Eng i neer i n T rainin g Once the individual has p assed the EIT an d o b ta i ne d a b ac h e l ors d egree, the candidate must spen d f our years working unde r t h e superv i s i on of a li cense d en g ineer. After this time p eriod has p assed, the p erson i s e li g ibl e to app l y for t h e PE exam. A board reviews the a pp lication and decides i f t h e can did ate i s e li g ibl e to ta k e t h e test b ase d on wor k history and design portfolio. T h e profess i ona l reg i strat i on e xam i s compose d of c i v il e ngineering and structural d es i gn sect i ons. T hi s d ayl on g test i s one of t h e mos t im p ortant events in the life o f a n up-an d -com i ng eng i neer. Obtainin g m y PE is a m ajor milestone in my career,Ž sa id Ger i c h It was a h uge relief to know that I passed the t est!Ž Gerich currently works wi t h Jo h n VanLeeuwen an d hi s t eam in the Structural Desi g n S ection. He is pursing his m asters d egree i n structura l e n g ineerin g at the Universit y o f Texas at Arlington

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Pacesetter30 Pacesetter Ready F amil y Readiness -R e p ort on R ecommen d ations Anna Marie Cox Special to the Pacesetter I n a recent ema il to a ll emp l oyees from L t. Gen. Van Antwerp concern i n g t h e A rm y Famil y Action Plan, he wrote : AFAP is a f orum to raise unresolve d issues o f concern an d make recommendations to improve the tota l A rm y Fami ly qua l it y o f l i f e. An y one can submit an issue to AFAP. Whether y ou are a Soldier, Civilian, or Family member, you m a y provide y our thou g hts about where improvements shoul d be ma d e in Arm y progr a ms  The process really d oes work in fact, in the past 24 years, 633 issues identi“ e d in the AFAP p rocess have d riven 101 l egislative changes, 147Department o f Defense Army policy and regulatory chan g es an d 165 improve d pro g rams an d serv i ces  We are revitalizin g our participation. W e want to buil d a robust AFAP capacity wit h in USACE over t h e coming mont h s, an d will keep y ou in f orme d o f pro g ress  As a “ rst step to increased USACE participation, we plan to submit issues o f concern for an upcoming Army-wi d e AFA P conference to be held early next year. We are intereste d in hearin g f rom y ou with issues that y ou believe would be valuable f or the Army to consi d er. Remember, the f ocus should be on making things wor k better f or ever y one, Soldiers, Civilians, o r F amilies. Ž H e also included a website link that coul d b e used for submitting issues. There w as on l y a s h ort span of t i me … about … 2 weeks … but over 300 issues were submitted!!! Those were narrowed down i n i t i a ll y to 75 an d t h en furt h er narrowe d d own b y USACE HQ to 13 which were presented to the Executive Steering Comm i ttee ( compr i se d of t h e di v i s i on c omman d ers spouses, Sen i or Execut i ve S ee Family Planning page 38 g

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August 200831 b u ildi ngs w i t h part i a l co ll apse, an d great d amage to poor l y b u ilt structures. T o keep as safe as possible durin g an earthquake: ( 1 ) T h e greatest d anger i s fa lli ng o bj ects. Stay ca l m. If you are inside sta y inside, do not run outside. (Hazards outside could be vehicles out of control, fallin g electrical lines and buildin g trim o r d ecorat i ve b r i c k/ stone wor k fa lli ng. ) (2) Stand or crouch in a stron g supported doorwa y or g et unde r a sturd y table o r desk an d hold o n t o it. If it moves, y ou move with it. You c an a lso b ra ce y ourse l f i n an i ns id e c orner of the house o r o f “ ce. ( 3 ) Sta y awa y from w indows or g lass th at cou ld s h atter c a bi nets t h at cou ld op en and release th e i r contents o r obj ects t h at cou ld f all on y ou such as p i ctures h ang i ng on w a ll s, “ li n g ca bi nets a n d boo k c a ses. ( 4 ) If i n a hi g h -r i se b u ildi n g sta y i n t he buildin g on the same ” oor an d d o not use t h e e l evators. Do not b e surpr i se d i f t h e e l ectr i c i t y g oes o ut, or if the sprinkler s y stems g o on, and remember the shakin g var i es from b u ildi ng to b u ildi ng an d from ” oor to ” oor. L ower ” oors will shake rapidl y much like smaller buildin g s, w hile on the u pp er ” oors, movement will be slower, but the b u ildi ng w ill move fart h er from s id e to s id e. You m i g h t fee l dizz y and be unable to walk. (5) If drivin g pull over to the side of the road and stop. Avoi d o verpasses an d power li nes an d stay i ns id e your ve hi c l e unt il t h e s h a ki n g stops (6) If outdoors, move to a clear area awa y from trees, si g ns, b u ildi ngs, or d owne d e l ectr i ca l w i res an d po l es (7) Wait until the earthquake and possible buildin g and ob j ec t m ovement is over before y ou leave y our cover T h ese t i ps are to get you t hi n ki ng a b out w h at to d o d ur i ng t hese t y pes of emer g encies. If y ou are unsure of y our of“ ces procedures, ask y our safet y of“ cer or y our emer g enc y m anagement team mem b er for a refres h er or a safety d r ill Occupant Emergency Plan has answers T amm y L. Mood y Pacesetter Staf f W hat would y ou do if disaster struck while y ou were at work? Little Rock District has an Occupant Emergency Plan tha t p rov id es i nformat i on an d proce d ures for emergenc i es suc h as “ re, severe weather and earthquakes. The plan is g eared towar d p ersonnel in the Federal Building, although many steps can be use d i n any wor k sett i ng t h roug h out t h e di str i ct I f y ou d i scover a “ re : I mmediately pull a “ re alarm and notify your building manage r o r coor di nator an d g i ve t h e exact l ocat i on of t h e “ re. When y ou hear the “ re alarm : ( 1) Obey the instructions of your of“ ce safety monitor o r superv i sor ( 2) Leave of“ ce doors closed but unlocked (Exce p t critical areas that must be ke p t locked) ( 3 ) If your b u ildi ng h as sta i rs, d escen d t h em i n an or d er l y manner. ( 4) Avoid crowding and undue haste ( 5 ) Stay i n format i on unt il you ex i t t h e b u ildi ng ( 6) Go immediatel y to y our desi g nated assembl y point. Once there, report to your supervisor to ensure accountability. ( 7 ) Keep t h e i mme di ate area aroun d t h e b u ildi ng c l ear fo r emer g enc y vehicles. If y ou have securit y g uards for y ou r b uilding they will control re-entry. S evere Weather and Tornado Alert : ( 1 ) A warn i n g a l arm w ill soun d W h en t hi s warn i n g i s gi ven, tak e imm ed iat e cove r ( 2 ) Peop l e i n exter i or rooms s h ou ld i mme di ate l y move to interior rooms or to middle hallwa y s, closin g doors securel y b ehind them to protect from ” ying glass and debris ( 3 ) Peop l e on t h e “ rst ” oor s h ou ld i mme di ate l y move to t h e b asement t h rou gh t h e sta i rwa y s. Peop l e i n high -r i ses s h ou ld g o to the elevator lobbies to get away from windows ( 4 ) Wa i t unt il t h e a ll c l ear s i gna l i s g i ven E art h qua k es: The New Madrid Fault Zone lies along a zigzag seismic zone from Ca i ro I ll sout h west to New Ma d r id, Mo. t h en sout h eas t to R idg e ly Tenn., an d from Carut h ersv ill e, Mo., sout h west to M arked Tree, Ark. A strong possibility exists for a future majo r to great eart h qua k e. O n a hy pot h et i ca l Merca lli Intens i t y Sca l e Map i nc l u d e d in the Occupant Emergency Plan, Little Rock could feel an i ntens i ty VI, w hi c h i s d e “ ne d as fe l t b y a ll w i t h many fr i g h tene d a s we ll as some h eav y furn i ture move d w i t h a few i nstances o f falling plaster and slight structural damage. P op l ar B l uff, Mo., on t h e ot h er h an d cou ld exper i ence an V III, w hi c h i s d e “ ne d as h av i n g s ligh t d ama g e to spec i a lly d esigned structures, considerable damage in ordinary substantialWhen emer g encies strike

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Pacesetter32 E ach y ear, the Fort Worth District recognizes an a d m i n i strat i ve profess i ona l who has demonstrate d e xemplary service to the Corps an d to t h e profess i on as a whole. This y ears recipien t i s Kelly Beck, an Operations D ivisio n t e am m e m be r who has been a shinin g example t o t h e Corps of Eng i neers fo r more than 24 y ears. T he award is given each s pr i ng w h en t h e di str i c t celebrates Administrative Professionals Day. Every year, the dis tr ic t mar ks t he occ a sio n b y hostin g a luncheon fo r Megan Murphey Pacesetter Staff Fort Worth names Administrative Employee of the Yearth e l oc al a d mini s trati ve support team mem b ers an d their collea g ues. This y ears e vent was held May 2 5 a t t he H il t o n i n dow nt ow n F ort W orth. G uests dined on c hicken and looked on as C ol. M art i n presente d Bec k w i t h a g lass plaque depictin g the C ommanders C oin for her achieve m e nt s. It was a g reat honor to be n ominated Ž she said and an e ven g reater h onor to actua lly b e selected. Ž W hen asked how to bes t d escr ib e h er profess i on, Bec k summed it up b y sa y in g tha t a dministrative p rofessionals a re t h e gl ue t h at h o ld s t h e ir divisions and of“ ces to g ether. They are assistants to thei r superv i sors i n a ll aspects o f o f“ ce functions includin g timekeeping, budget, an d hu man r esou r ces. B eck is app reciative of her award an d thankful that there are so many o utstan di n g a d m i n i strat i ve p rofessionals in the Cor p s. It is always a pleasure t o wo r k wi t h t he o t her a dministrative su pp or t personnel throughout the di str i ct Ž sa id Bec k K e ll y B ec k Continued from pa g e 16 T exas Cit y mater i a l from d eepen i n g the channel, as well as ma i nt e nan ce mat e r i a l fr o m t h e c h anne l to b e use d b ene“ ciall y About 1,000 acres o f emergent mars h w ill b e c reate d as part of t h e pro j ect, a ccordin g to Weston. In May, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board hosted Water Appreciation Day at the state capitol. The event presented a unique opportunity for groups to demonstrate the importance of Oklahomas water resources and provide information on their water management, conservation, and educational programs for state legislators and other government of“ cials. Don Dixon of Operations Division and Maria WegnerJohnson of Planning Division manned an information booth and display where water safety, Corps projects, and telling the Corps story were the focus. Safety items were distributed to many students and visitors. Col. Funkhouser looks on as Tenkiller Lead Ranger Don D ixon visits with one of the y oun g visitors to the Oklahoma S tate C apitol f or Water Appreciation Da y. Apprec i at i n g wate r T he ma y or o f Yukon, O kla., Ward Larson, visited T ulsa District July 29 to sign the Project C ooperation A g reement which formall y si g ni“ es commitment b y the C orps and the C it y to participate in cost sharin g o n the construction project which will upgrade Yukons d omestic water suppl y s y stem. Us i n g d re dg e d mater i a l bene“ ciall y adds anothe r p os i t i ve e l ement to t hi s cr i t i ca l pro j ect,Ž Weston sa id expandin g the advanta g es to t h e l oca l commun i ty. It i s a w i nn i n g s i tuat i on from ever y as p ect.Ž

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August 200833 Little Rock, Wal-Mart team for water safet y L ittle Rock Distric t h as partnered with the Wal-Mar t S u p ercenter in Dardanelle, Ark., to im p lement a life j ac k et l oaner program t h at w ill h e l p i mprove v i s i to r safet y at two swim beaches at Nimrod Lake in time fo r the busy Labor Day weekend. Wal-Mart donated $100 worth of life jackets, an d the Corps purchased $200 worth of life j ackets. The life jackets range in size from infant to adult X-large, a n d t h ey are out “ tt i ng t h e li fe j ac k et l oaner stat i ons a t the swim beaches at Carden Point and Count y Line p arks. T h ey can b e use d free of c h arge b y go i ng to t h e loaner station and pickin g out a properl y -“ ttin g life jacket for use while at the beach and returning it to the stat i on b efore l eav i ng for t h e d ay  The g oal of these stations is drownin g p revention,Ž Nimrod Lake Park Ranger Lisa Owens sa id We h ope b y ma ki ng t h ese li fe j ac k ets rea dil y a vailable, p eo p le will use them to kee p themselves an d their children safe. If one drowning can be prevente d b y ma ki ng t h ese li fe j ac k ets ava il a bl e, t h ey h ave d one their j ob. Ž Willie Davie, a park ran g er at Nimrod Lake, displa y s the life j acke t loaner station at the C arden Point S wim Beach. (U. S Army C orps o f En g ineers Photo ) R honda Fields, Paul Webb, Helen Landry, J i m Sn yd er, Bran d on Westcott, Da l e A ll en, Chuck Morse, Will Corle y and Helen S mith. LT G W ilson and B G C ox visite d t h e s i te an d were i mpresse d w i t h h ow we ll the ADA School has pro g ressed. Bob O wens did a great job brie“ ng the many v i s i tors an d s h ow i n g h ow t h e y h ave b een a ble to keep the pro j ect ahead of schedule. Thanks for everyones tremendous efforts! We have a few moves to announce. Earl G roves is our new chief of O p erations Di v i s i on an d S h auna Mart i nez was r ecentl y selected to lead our Contractin g D ivision. Mona Willig was selecte d a s our new d eputy for Eng i neer i ng an d Construction Division, and Mike Abate h as taken a six-month develo p mental p os i t i on as t h e d eputy for operat i ons. With the movements of Mona and Mike, C ontinued f rom page 9 E xce ll encewe want to con g ratu l ate our two newes t actin g chiefs of our civil and militar y p rograms Jo h n Marne ll an d Steve Harmon, respect i ve ly I a l so want to reco g nize our two latest DA interns from E &C M i c h ae l McG ill an d Jo h n Pr i nce. W e l come to t h e Tu l sa Team. W e a l so h ave severa l emp l oyees w h o were n o m i nat ed o r r eceived v ar ious ho n o r s an d achievements. Eddie Mattioda p assed the PMP test an d of “ c i a ll y rece i ve d Leve l 2 Cert i“ cat i on. Dan Brue gg en j o h ann was Tulsa Districts nominee for the US A C E Lt. G en. J o h n W Morr i s Ci v ili an of t h e Year Awar d L i sa Lawson was selected as our Native American p ro j ect manager. De bbi e Overstree t r eceived t he 2008 Af “ li at es A w ar d f o r outstandin g contribution and dedication t o t h e a d vancement of t h e l ega l ass i stan t profess i on t h rou gh vo l unteer serv i ce to NALA af“ liated associations. S he also c om pl ete d t h e Lea d ers hip En h ancemen t a n d Preparat i on pro g ram, a 12-mont h c ourse of education and trainin g to prepare para l ega l l ea d ers of t h e future F inall y Tulsa District continues to lea d th e way i n support to GWOT. To a ll ou r d ep l o y e d emp l o y ees an d t h e i r fam ili es, w e look forward to y our safe return home. I f you get a c h ance, rea d t h e art i c l es i n this issue o f t he Pacesetter on the Family r R eadiness PDT that recentl y met. Thanks for a ll you d o You can alwa y s count on Tulsa T e am wo r k!

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Pacesetter34 C amp Cavett, kids favorite -ran g ers to o Camp Cavett, located on Lake Texoma, caters to special needs youngsters. Its a camp where these children “ t inŽ because the others around them understand what adversity really is. Many are survivors of cancer or major operations. Grady Dobbs Park Ranger It is heart warming to be able to put a smile on faces of these campers. Rangers Tommy Holder, Isaac Martin, and Grady Dobbs took “ ve youngsters “ shing on July 11. Two days later, rangers Dwaine Mcbee, Sarah Noel, and Lindsey Tatum took four more. Texoma Rangers have assisted with Camp Cavett for several years. Everyone involved this year said they would like the Days Catch -the people who “ shed with Ran g ers Mcbee, Noel, and T atum sto p on t h e b an k to s h ow t h e i r r esults. G ear h ea d Ž a “ s hi n g g u id e w h o d ona t e d hi s ti me f or th e da y helps a camper remove a “ sh P hotos by Grady Dobbs I n Jul y C ol. Funkhouser, U. S Representative Nanc y Boyda (K S -2), and Kansas Water Of“ ce Directo r Trac y Streeter met to discuss John Redmond Rese rv oi r m ai n te n a n ce issues a n d the Jacobs C reek logjam. The group then toured the area by helicopter to g et a better understandin g of the on g oin g problem. S hown f rom le f t, Trac y S treeter, Rep. Boyda, C ol. Funkhouser, and John Roberts.

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August 200835 Sue Morris of Tulsa Districts Executive Of“ ce has been quietly gaining a reputation as an authority on the Comanche Code Talkers. She is a direct descendent of several Comanche Code Talkers. Thirteen code talkers went overseas in World War II; Morris is related to “ ve or six of them. Earlier this year, Morris was the featured speaker at the Defense Contract Management Agencys National American Indian Heritage Month program in Boston, Mass., where she spoke on the Comanche Code Talkers. And, this summer while at the Society of American Indian Government Workers Conference, she was “ lmed by the Veterans Administration to get her re” ections on the same topic. Morris has often graced the districts of“ cial ceremonies with her heartfelt rendering of the Lords Prayer in Comanche sign language. She is a full-blood member of the Comanche Nation of Oklahoma and is Tulsa Districts American Indian Special Emphasis Program Manager. She is a member of the Comanche Nation Fair Board and serves as secretary of the Cameron University American Indian Alumni Association. S ue MorrisCode talkers legacy lives on The purpose of the Hydropower committee is to initiate and maintain a safety and health program that provides systematic policies, procedures, and practices to recognize and protect employees from occupational and health hazards. The program includes four major elements: management commitment and employee involvement, worksite analysis, hazard prevention and control, and safety and health training. In coordination with the Tulsa District Safety Of“ ce, this team uses the Operations Division SAFE Program Inspection to conduct annual inspections of each Tulsa District hydroelectric powerplant. In the “ rst year alone, 80 de“ ciencies were found and corrected utilizing the SAFE Inspection Program. The team is comprised of representatives from nine different of“ ces. All facets of disciplines have made this team very effective. It is the goal of each member to promote safety awareness during normal day-today operations at each facility by working closely with the Tulsa District Safety Of“ ce to ensure that all safety requirements are met. As a result of this team effort, the overall ef“ ciency of the organization and speci“ cally hydropower has improved signi“ cantly. Employees have bene“ ted and have a safer working environment. C ommittee addresses safet y Hydropower Safety Committee MembersBroken Bow Powerhouse : Steve Timmons, Hank Farley, George Worsham Denison Powerhouse : Brian Echols, Ray Andrews Eufaula Powerhouse : Johnny Bray, Mike Jernigen Fort Gibson Powerhouse : Ray Harrison, Dora Karnes, Dale Cole Keystone Powerhouse: Sam Patterson, Justin Boyle Robert S. Kerr Powerhouse : Steve Mills, Mike Rhoads, Larry Lawless Tenkiller Powerhouse : Glenn Scearce, Shone Couch, Charlie Smith Tulsa District Of“ ce : Tonya Holt, Jeff Miller, James Bavido, Lance PerdueWebbers Falls Powerhouse : Jamie Caudle, Billy FiteCheryl Partee, budget of“ cer, Southwestern Division headquarters, recently graduated from Syracuse University with a dual masters and a Department of Defense Financial Management professional certi“ cation. Her graduation culminates her 14-month participation in the Defense Comptrollership Program. Cheryls success in the DCP certainly makes her a star in by book,Ž said Wesley Miller, the Corps director, Resource Management. Fourteen months is quite a commitment of time and effort, both on the part of the attendees and those who sacri“ ced to make the attendance possible.Ž Partee has served as SWDs budget of“ cer since April 2006.Partee graduates, moves from good to greatŽ

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Pacesetter36 Pacesetter Ready F amil y Readiness Grou p Installment TwoCol. Anthony Funkhouser Special to the Pacesetter W elcome back to the S out h western D i v i s i on Fam il y R ea di ness Forum. Man y members of our team continue to deplo y i n su pp ort of t h e G l o b a l War on Terror a n d ot h er CONUS requ i rements. Ou r thou g hts and pra y ers continue to g o ou t t o t he m an d t hei r fam ilies a s we a w a it t hei r s af e r e t u rn I h a ve bee n f o rt u nat e to receive a number of emails from o ur d ep l oye d emp l oyees recent l y an d t h e y report t h e y cont i nue to apprec i ate the develo p mental o pp ortunities thei r m i ss i on prov id es an d t h e peop l e t h ey are support i n g We h ave p l enty to report i n t hi s i ssue as t h e Fam ily Rea di ness Group an d t h e Arm y F amil y Action Plan Pro j ect Developmen t Teams recent l y met at t hi s years Sen i o r Lea d er Conference i n P i tts b ur g Pa. T h e P DTs j umped ri g ht into their g roups an d c ont i nue d to ma k e progress i n support i ng o ur C i v ili an emp l o y ees an d t h e i r fam ili es. Lt. Gen. VanAntwer p addressed the group an d re i nforce d w h y t hi s su bj ec t i s so i mportant to our l ea d ers hi p. He h i g hli g hted that it is a matter of necessit y a n d opportun i ty. Necess i ty b ecause we h ave over 800 emp l o y ees d ep l o y e d each with their own challen g es an d needs f o r t he m an d t hei r fam ilies. It is o pportun i t y b ecause our USACE pro g ram is the lar g est in our histor y and we ma y n ot h ave t h e i n ” uence or t h e b u d get to a ccomp li s h w h at we nee d to i mprove ou r o r g anization. The Corps is takin g the i n i t i at ive t o le a d t he e ff o rt t o a dd r ess ou r C i v ili an c h a ll en g es w i t hi n USACE b u t more importantl y to the Arm y leadership. Lt. Gen. VanAntwerp a l so hi g hli g h te d t h e fact t h at Arm y Stron g commerc i a l s are a bout S oldiers and their families but we d ont see our Army C i v ili ans represente d Hi s o bj ect i ve i s for t h e Arm y to prov id e a ttention to our Arm y Civilians and thei r fam ili es as t h ey equa ll y support ou r A rm y an d our GWOT m i ss i on. It i s ou r j ob in the PDTs to address our emplo y ee and family needs until they are resolve d an d b ecome i nst i tut i ona li ze d We s h are t he same conditions and challen g es o f any Soldier in our deployed areas so we are l oo ki ng at t h e b est way to b e goo d s tewards for our emplo y ees and thei r f amili es. USACE provided each of the PDTs with g oals prior to the conference and each of t h e PDTs i n turn prov id e d resu l ts t h a t will be made available in the after action re p ort. I would like to p rovide a q uic k s ynops i s of w h at eac h of t h e PDTs b r i efe d b ac k to t h e di v i s i on comman d ers. Th e Pred ep l oyment PDT d eve l ope d a d raft d ep l o y ment h an db oo k for emp l o y ees and families that will address many f requent l y as k e d quest i ons w i t h t h e mos t current po li c i es an d proce d ures. Once a pp roved and p osted to the Cor p s website, i t will be t he b a sis f o r divisio n s an d di str i cts to a dd t h e i r annexes as nee d e d T hey also plan to make the USACE websi t e t he co n solid at ed si t e wi t h a ll li n k s an d i nformat i on poste d t h ere to re d uce mu l t i p l e we b s i tes w i t h out d ate d i nformation. Th e Dep l oyment / Post Dep l oyment PDT l ooked at the need for sensitivit y trainin g f or homestation employees. They also l oo k e d at stan d ar di z i ng a return l eave an d reco g nition polic y The y expanded thei r view to non-Cor p s hires (Schedule A) and h ow we can expe di te t h e hi r i ng process f or those that are interested in convertin g t o the Corps after their deployments. F i na ll y, t h ey prov id e d a status on t h e hi r i n g of t h e fam ily support coor di nators at the division. They anticipate bringing on b oar d ten personne l to “ ll t h e e i g h t d ivisions, HQ USACE and TAC b y thi s fa ll T h ey w ill i n i t i a ll y b e contrac t positions for a couple of y ears until the y a re added to our TDA. US A C E will also look t o dis tr ibu t e a 1-800 n u m ber for emplo y ees and families to access fo r r esource related q uestions. The Casualt y Assistance PDT complete d t hree sections of the deplo y men t h an db oo k : Casua l ty Report i ng, Noti“ cation Process, and the Medical Treatment Plan. These were si g ni“ can t i n stan d ar di z i ng an d ensur i ng everyone u n d erstan d s t h e processes an d t h e i r ro l e t o best support our emplo y ees and thei r fam ili es. T h ey h ave a l so comm i tte d to h av i n g a d e di cate d li a i son of “ cer at Wa l te r R eed Arm y Medical Center and to create a fam il y support representat i ve pos i t i on t o ass i st emp l o y ee fam ili es for i n j ure d/ w ounded emplo y ees who transit throu g h th e me di ca l system. The Arm y Famil y Action Plan PDT w or k e d w i t h t h e Execut i ve Steer i ng Comm i ttee to rev i ew a ll t h e su b m i ss i ons sent in b y Corps emplo y ees an d r ecommen d e d t h e Army an d hi g h er l eve l i ssues for su b m i ss i on an d reso l ut i on. We h ad a short window of time this y ea r for AFAP i ssue su b m i ss i on b ut w i t h ever y ones i nvo l vement, we st ill h a d o ver 300 issues submitted. The g roup w as a bl e to id ent i fy 75 t h at were DA level or above issues. The USACE-, d ivision-, and district-level issues will be dis tr ibu t ed an d de a l t wi t h at t he app ro p riate level of command. Of the 75 ma j or issues, the g roup was able to pare t h em d own to 13 ma j or areas. After r eviewin g the 13, we identi“ ed some tha t w ere alread y bein g addressed, some tha t n ee d e d a ddi t i ona l stu d y an d 5 t h at we c ou ld su b m i t on b e h a l f of a ll emp l o y ees t o the national AFAP steerin g committee. T h e USACE AFAP team w ill d eve l op information p a p ers and submit the “ ve issues. The “ rst issue was that D O D C i v ili ans an d t h e i r fam il y mem b ers areSee F amil y Foru m next page

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August 200837 no t aff o r ded th e s am e r esou r ces a v aila b l e to t h e m ili tar y an d t h e i r fam ili es. Fo r instance, emplo y ee spouses cannot g ain access t o a v aila b l e r esou r ces suc h a s A rmyOneSource We b s i te or fac ili t i es on militar y installations that ma y be nea r them. The second is getting tax exemp t status for emp l oyees d ep l oye d to GWOT similar to contractors. The third is g ettin g A rm ed F o r ces N e t wo rk t e l ev i s i o n c l osed c apt i one d i n t h eater. Man y m ili tar y a nd civilian emplo y ees have hearin g loss and closed captioning would be b ene “ c i a l T h e fourt h i s d eve l op i n g a polic y to decon” ict assi g nments fo r c ross-component military families where o ne mem b er ma y b e act i ve componen t w hile the s p ouse is a reservist or national guard. The last issue is the death gratuity for d ep l oye d emp l oyees. Current po li cy for next of kin is 100 p ercent in the death gratuity but when the bene“ ciary is a n on-fam ily mem b er t h e d eat h g ratu i t y i s L e arn t o swi m Watch y our children closel y Always swim with a buddy Sw i m on ly i n d es ig nate d sw i m areas Dont overestimate y our swimmin g abilities Alcohol does not mix with swimming or boating Dont re l y on water toys suc h as tu b es an d a i r mattresses to k eep y ou a” oat Never jump or dive into water when you do not know whethe r a n o b struct i on m i g h t b e un d er t h e surface. F or more information about water safet y visit the Little Roc k Di str i ct Water Safety we b page a t w ww.swl.usace.army.mil/ w atersa f ety /i ndex.htm l At this web site, you will “ nd many safety suggest i ons. O f interest to children, Bobber the Water Safet y Do g is a national character for the Corps similar to Smokey Bear for the F orest Serv i ce. At www.bobbe r .i n fo you can “ nd entertaining cartoons featur i ng Bo bb er t h e Water Safety Dog for your c hild ren to watc h W hil e y ou are at t h e s i te, y our c hild ren can d own l oa d co l or i n g sheets and play a game that simulates locking a boat through one o f t he locks o n t he Ar k an s a s R ive r B e safe and wear y our life j acket when y ou are in or aroun d t he water. S afet y tips to remembe r a maximum of 50 p ercent. These issues w ill b e su b m i tte d to t h e De p artment o f th e Arm y t hi s w i nter an d we w ill repor t p ro g ress in this P acesette r forum. r Th an k s a g a i n to a ll w h o su b m i tte d i ssues t his y ear. Special thanks to our emplo y ees th at are current l y d ep l oye d our t h oug h ts are w i t h y ou an d y our fam ili es F amil y Foru m C ontinued from previous pa g e

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Pacesetter38 P acesette r Poi n ts See Points next pageCongratulationsLittle Rocks Winn Hargis began working in June as the new project operations manager at Greers Ferry Lake. Natural Resources Management Team Leader Dale Leggett was the Little Rock District and Southwestern Division nominee for the American Recreation Coalition Legends Award. The ARC presents its Legends Awards to seven federal managers in recognition of their outstanding work to improve outdoor recreation experiences and opportunities for the American people. John Marnell operations project manger for Tulsa Districts northern area, has been elected to serve as an at-large director on the board of directors for the National Society for Park Resources. Shirley Boldon-Bruce of Little Rock District was appointed by Governor Mike Beebe to serve as a member of the State Board of Architects. Daniel Ring, son of Stephen Ring of Little Rocks Air Force Base Resident Of“ ce, graduated with honors from Cabot High School May 16. Bob Stubb s, logistics liaison of“ cer, joined SWD in July. Stubbs works for the Corps Logistics Agency, Millington, Tenn., with a duty station in Dallas. He previously served in Tulsa District. Esta Allen was selected as a program analyst, Military Integration Division, Programs Directorate, SWD headquarters in July. Allen previously served SWD in the Business Resources Division, Regional Business Directorate. S ervice s p ouses, and the Cor p s comman d sergeant majors spouse, among others) for di scuss i on an d rewor di ng. From this g roup, the followin g issues an d r ecommendations were sent to De p artmen t o f t h e Army for i nc l us i on i n t h e next Army A FAP Convention. I SS UE: C i v ili an Dep l oyment Process S co p e : During all phases of deployment, D OD c i v ili ans an d t h e i r fam il y mem b ers a re not afforded the same resources a vailable to the military and their families. T h ese b ene “ c i a l resources, d eve l ope d a nd implemented b y the militar y are no t a vailable to civilian family members. La ck o f a ccess t o t hese r esou r ces hi n de r s informed decision makin g re g ardin g d eployment and family preparedness. R eco mm e n datio n : o Educate and ensure that famil y members may access (and/or be made a ware of ) t h e M ili tary One Source, Army Communit y Service, and other services. o Provide temporary ID to families d ur i n g d ep l o y ment of sponsor t h a t a uthorizes access to resources I SS UE: Dua l M ili tar y F amilies S cope : T he r e is n o formal s y stem to ensure c onsideration of dual military a ss i gnments w h en cross i ng c om p onent lines between A ctive Component/Army R eserve / Act i ve Guar d an d R eserve. Cross talk between com p onents d oes not occur during the assignmen t p rocess. T hi s i mpacts retent i on an d fam il y stabilit y R eco mm e n datio n : o Requ i re t h at So ldi ers note on t h e ir Enlisted Record Brief/Of“ cer Recor d B rief that they are married to a Soldier in a not h er component. o Develop a j oint database of Dual M ilitary Spouses across all components to b e cons id ere d i n t h e ass i gnment an d d eplo y ment process. I SS UE: Deat h Gratu i ty for C i v ili ans K illed in a Militar y Contin g enc y Op eratio n S cope : Dep l oye d DOD c i v ili ans w h o have no immediate famil y members may d es i gnate a non-re l ate d b ene “ c i ary; h owever, on ly up to 50 percent of t h e g ratuit y can be paid to said bene“ ciar y In accor d ance w i t h t i t l e 5 USC S ect i on 8102a (d)( E )( 4 ) t h e b a l ance of t h e g ratu i t y remains with the De p artment of Labor. Un l ess t h ere i s an amen d ment to t h e l aw no more t h an 50 percent of t h e amoun t p a y able as a death g ratuit y will ever be p aya bl e on b e h a l f of t h e d ecease d Reco mm e n datio n : Am e n d a bove sec t io n t o allow 100 percent of the death g ratuit y t o go to t h e d es i gnate d person ( s ) if th ere are no i mme di ate surv i v i n g fam ily members. ISS UE: Arm ed F o r ces N e t wo r k T elevision … Lack of Closed Ca p tion Programs S co p e : Not all pro g rams on Armed Forces Networ k are c l ose d capt i one d Hear i ng l oss d ue to com b at an d ot h er i n j ur i es i n militar y and civilian emplo y ees creates an i ncreas i ng nee d for c l ose d capt i one d p ro g ramm i n g on AFN. Hear i n g i mpa i re d viewers are unable to take full advanta g e of AFN programm i ng. Reco mm e n datio n : Pr ovide closed captionin g for AFN television broadcasts. ISS UE: Taxes Dur i n g Deplo y men t S cope : Dep l o y e d c i v ili ans pa y t axes on all earned income, w hil e S o ldi ers an d contractors rece i ve tax re li ef on a port i on of their income. This results in di spar i ty b etween contractors an d DOD c i v ili ans w h o serve to g et h e r as memb ers of the same team. This has a “ nanc i a l i m p act an d i s a di s i ncent i ve t o c i v ili an d ep l o y ments an d retent i on o f civilians. Reco mm e n datio n : Prov id e D O D c i v ili ans th e same tax exempt i ons as contractors. So you may b e as ki ng yourse l f, W h a t h appene d to t h e ot h er 295 i ssues?Ž Heres t he answer: if an issue can be solve d at t h e di str i ct, di v i s i on or h ea dq uarters l eve l w i t hi n t h e Corps, i t i s forwar d e d to t he a pp ro p riate command for action. I f th ere i s a l rea d y l eg i s l at i on ma ki ng i ts wa y t h rou gh t h e s y stem, t h en t h at i ssue i s set aside. Also, an AFAP issue cannot b e sent to DA tw i ce w i t hi n a t h ree-yea r p er i o d On ly t h ose i ssues t h at cannot b e F amil y Plannin g C o ntinued f rom page 30 a nswered within the Cor p s and those tha t m eet t h e AFAP re q u i rements of sco p e a n d r eco mm e n d at io n ar e sub m i tt ed t o D epartment of the Arm y Next y ear, y ou w ill b e gi ven anot h e r c hance to submit issues in the AFAP process. T h ere w ill b e a l arger w i n d ow o f opportun i t y an d j u dgi n g from t h e r esponse this y ear, should prove to be a success.

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August 200839 P o in ts C ontinued f rom previous page Danny Price, son of Jerri Keith of Little Rocks Central Arkansas Area Of“ ce, made the deans list at Arkansas State University at Jonesboro. Manuel Fano senior regional construction engineer, Regional Business Directorate, is departing SWD headquarters for a new position as chief, Construction Branch, Galveston District. Fano assumes his new duties Aug. 18. Lindsey Specht, daughter of Elizabeth Whitmore of Little Rocks Programs and Project Management Of“ ce, made cheerleader at Oak Grove High School. Hayden Balgavy, son of John Balgavy of Little Rocks Design Branch and wife Jane, was elected to attend Boys Nation during the recent Arkansas session of the American Legions Boys State. He will spend a week in Washington D.C. attending a citizenship and government program designed to instill in each participant a deep loyalty to America while providing practical insight into the operation of the federal government. Participants are high school students who have completed their junior year. Each delegate represents his state as a senator in the structure of a mock senate. Felicia Fishers daughter, Candace Brown, graduated from Oklahoma State University this past spring. She just accepted an offer to be a kindergarten teacher (her dream job) at Pawnee Elementary School. Fisher works in Tulsa Districts Resource Management Of“ ce. Ted Kerr Operations and Maintenance account manager, recently joined the Civil Works Integration Division, Programs Directorate, SWD headquarters. Kerr comes to the division from a previous assignment as a project engineer in Rock Island District. Congratulations to Bruce Barrett chief, Safety and Occupational Health, SWD, and member, Dallas-Fort Worth Field Federal Safety and Health Council, for the Notable Recognition Award the council received from the U.S. Department of Labor for its activities in 2007 to support the Occupational Safety and Health Administrations federal agency program. Charlotte Waldron assumed a new position as program analyst, Civil Works Integration Division, Programs Directorate, SWD headquarters, in July. She previously served as the divisions administrative and training of“ cer. Sara Beard, daughter to James Beard of Little Rocks Clearwater Lake Project Of“ ce, graduated from the College of the Ozarks in Branson and received an award for academic excellence. Teresa King deputy FUDS program manager, Military Integration Division, Programs Directorate, joined SWD headquarters in July. King comes to the division from New Orleans District, where she served as a physical scientist. Prior to that, she worked as an environmental scientist and project manager for the Alaska District for more than “ ve years. The American Red Cross recently presented John Marnell of Tulsa District his eight-gallon donor pin. Congratulations and thank you!RetirementsLarry Hill retired June 3 from Galveston District. Gerald Voelkel retired July 2 from Galveston District. Jack Johnson of Little Rocks Natural Resource Management team retired July 31 after more than 38 years of service to the district and the Corps. Baldev Mann retired July 31 from Galveston District.BirthsPatricia Lutz  son and his wife, Bryan and Trisha, are parents of twins born June 3. Babies: Noah (8lbs 2oz) and Sarah (7lbs 4 oz) Carpenter. Lutz is Tulsa District security of“ cer. Brenda Kinions daughter gave birth to a beautiful baby girl June 18 at about 1:15 p.m. Vivian Nola D. arrived at a birthweight of 6 lb, 14 oz, one week ahead of schedule, surprising the proud parents, Erik and Melanie. Kinion works in Tulsa Districts Regulatory Division. Allysa Faith Farley arrived Friday, July 25, at 11:30 a.m. (just in time for lunch), weighing 7 pounds, 11 ounces. Her parents are Crystal and Hank Farley of Broken Bow, Okla., and she has a big sister, Emily. Her daddy is the senior electrician at the Broken Bow Powerhouse. Congratulations to Debbie and Brett Cowan Their “ rst child, Braden Ray, was born at approximately 4:00 p.m. July 28. Stats: 8 lbs 2 oz., 19-inches long. Cowan is a civil engineer in Tulsa Districts Civil Design Section.CondolencesKent Dunlaps mother, Robbie J. Dunlap, passed away in early June. Dunlap is manager at Keystone Project Of“ ce in Tulsa District. Kenneth Gaines brother of Rod Gaines of Little Rocks Design Branch, passed away June 18. Marilyn Neeley, mother of Little Rocks Raven Neeley of the Pine Bluff Project Of“ ce, passed away June 19. Agnes Scott, mother to Tim Scott of Little Rocks Regulatory Of“ ce, passed away June 22. Tulsa District retiree Ernie Howze passed away June 18. Billy Warren Jones, father to George Jones of Little Rocks Lake Dardanelle Powerhouse, passed away June 25. Robert BenŽ Boren an Operations Project Manager, Galveston District, passed away July 4. He began his Corps career in August 2000 as a regulatory specialist in the Regulatory Branch. Izishill IkeŽ Boldon Sr., father to Shirley Boldon-Bruce of Little Rocks Programs and Project Management Of“ ce, passed away July 6. Pauline Whitlow, mother-in-law to Elaine Whitlow of Little Rocks Hydraulics and Technical Services Branch, passed July 15. Shirley Ann Bray, mother-in-law to Lola Holt of Little Rocks Contracting Division, passed July 22. Tulsa District retiree Ruby Been 96, died July 24 in Joplin, Mo. Kathy E. Moore a program analyst in Programs Management Branch, passed away on July 28. She was the wife of Randy Moore, a project assistant in the Project Management Branch, and had 31 years of federal service. She had been a Galveston District employee since 1996.