Citation
The Florida cattleman and livestock journal

Material Information

Title:
The Florida cattleman and livestock journal
Abbreviated Title:
Fla. cattlem. livest.
Creator:
Florida State Cattlemen's Association
Florida Cattlemen's Association
Place of Publication:
Kissimmee, Fla
Publisher:
Cody Publications
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Edition:
Volume 33 no.9 June 1969
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 30 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Cattle trade -- Periodicals -- Florida ( lcsh )
Cattle -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Dairying -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Cattle ( fast )
Cattle trade ( fast )
Dairying ( fast )
Florida ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with vol. 8, no. 7 (Apr. 1944).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 8, nos. 7-11 (Apr.-Aug. 1944) are misprinted v. 7, nos. 7 -11. Vol. 9, no. 2 (Nov. 1944) misprinted as v. 8, no. 2.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 11, no. 5 (Feb. 1947) misprinted as v. 11, no. 4, but then from v. 11, no. 6 through v. 12, no. 1 the misprint is 2 issues off until it was corrected with v. 12, no. 3 (Dec. 1947), for instance, v. 12, no. 2 is misprinted as v. 11, no. 12.
Numbering Peculiarities:
In January 1974, two issues were published: v. 38, no. 4, and a "progress edition" numbered v. 38, no. 5. That issue throws off the numbering of the issues for the rest of the volume, so v. 38, no. 12 is August instead of September. They fix it by having both the September and October 1974 issues called v. 39, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 52, no. 10 (July 1988) was misprinted as v. 52, no. 11.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 53, no. 12 to v. 54 no. 8 were misprinted one issue off as v. 53, no. 11 to v. 54, no. 7. This was corrected with v. 54, no. 9 (June 1990).
Issuing Body:
Official publication of: Florida State Cattlemen's Association, <Mar. 1945->; of: Florida Cattlemen's Association, <Oct. 1960->
Funding:
Funded by Project Ceres, a collaboration between the United States Agricultural Information Network (USAIN), the Agriculture Network Information Collaborative (AgNIC) and the Center for Research Libraries (CRL).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Florida Cattlemen's Association
Rights Management:
Copyright, Florida Cattlemen's Association. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
09105128 ( OCLC )
sc 88010916 ( LCCN )
0015-3958 ( ISSN )
ocm09105128
Classification:
637 ( ddc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida cattleman and dairy journal

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ANNOUNCING A CURE FOR THE DISEASE CALLED
"PROFIT SHRINK"
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Nutrena's many years' experience on Florida ranches and dairies means that you can be assured of feeds that are proven right for Florida, feeds which give you maximum efficiency, help you
to close the profit gap.
And, Nutrena's know-how, plus Nutrena's rather exceptional (and free) prescription service, management counsel, and recordkeeping systems can assist you in planning a complete program -a program in which you can have confidence, a program
which will work.
*NUTRENA FEED DIVISION
4014 -40 St., Tampa, Florida 33601 Phone 813/626-5173
A talk with your Nutrena man may show the way to cure "profit-shrink" by reducing costs for better profits. No obligation-just call or write today.




FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION
FLORIDA
CATTLEMEN'S
ASSOCIATION
ART HIGBIE has tendered his resignation as Executive Vice 847-4511, Box 656, Kissimmee
President of the Florida Cattlemen's Association, which took effect May 15. With regret we accepted it so that Art can President
be employed in a similar capacity with the Mississippi Charles Lykes, Tampa
Phone 223-3981
Cattlemen's Association. First Vice President
At this writing it isn't possible to completely assess R.D.Bennett,Greenwood
how much we will miss Art. As we begin to understand firstSecond Vice Presidents
hand the details he has managed to handle with little help Thomas L. Sloan. Fort Pierce
from the association members, it becomes very evident that o.L. Partin, Kiss hme
he is going to be a hard man to replace. On reflection, it Secretary
seems amazing that FCA should be fortunate enough to get J.C. Base, Okeechobee
a man like Art in its first attempt in hiring a full-time Treasurer
executive, especially considering that we didn't really know Pat Wilson, Frostproof
what such a man could do for us or what we actually wanted Past Presidents
him to do. Much credit is due the officers and directors G. H. Prather (Deceased)
whose foresight created the job and whose dedication led to P. E. Williams, Davenport
Dave Turner (Deceased)
a man like Art Higbie. Irlo Bronson Kissimmee
Cushman S. Radebaugh, Orlando
Ben Hill Griffin, Jr., Frostproof
IN THE MEANTIME, (until a new executive is hired), the FCA Jay B. Starkey. St. Petersburg
' B. J. Alderman, Grandin
offices will remain open and functioning thanks to Mrs. J. 0. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee
Sylvia Marshall who was secretary for Art. She will receive Alto Adams, Jr., Fort Pierce
Louis Gilbreath St. Augustine
correspondence and direct it to the proper parties. George Kempier (Deceased)
Ralph Cellon, Sr.. Alachua
W. D. Roberts, Immokalee
LAT TURNER, your former President, is chairmaning LatimerH. Turner, Sarasota
committee to receive applications for the Executive Vice Local Association
Presidency. He would like as wide a choice as possible, so State Directors
if you know of a man whom you think will fit the job, please Jim Price Alachua
ask him to submit three copies of his complete work and Wassie Fish, Baker
U. J. W. Lowrey, Bay
personal history to Lat Turner,P. 0. Box 656, Kissimmee. Rex Smith, Bradord-Union
Gilbert Tucker, Brevard
ALLIED MEMBERSHIPS are coming in daily. We presently have M-Woodward, Broward
E. G. Shelton, Calhoun
17 firms who have paid $100 annual membership dues. Most of Bard Toussant, Charlotte
your suppliers and banks have received letters inviting Walter Williams, Clay
their participation. As you talk to them on other matters, R. A. Roberts, Collier
Conrad Womble, Columbia
please remember to assure them of your interest in their John Du Puis. Bade
pleasePhil Turner, DeSoto helping the association both financially and with their John Obe Osteen, Dixie
E. D. Gregory, Duval
professional counsel. Bill Voss of Cutter Laboratories has C.H. Cowart Fagler
accepted the post of temporary chairman of the allied c. Land, e
meetig of hoseCarl Langfor, Gilchrist
members committee and has called for a meeting of those Billy Peeples, Glades
Dave Gaskin, Gulf
who have joined at the annual convention. J. Pershing Platt, Hardee
Joe Marlin Hilliard, Hendry
John Culbreath, Hernando
ALLIED MEMBERS paid to date are the following,. Bank of Gln rse, ilhlasu
Seminole, Seminole; Capital National Bank of Tampa, Tampa; Manuel Garcia, Jr., Indian River
Cody Publications, Inc., Kissimmee; Cutter Laboratories, J. R. Thompson, Jackson
Berkeley, California; DeLand State Bank, DeLand; Dolomite Joh. Finlason, Jefferson
Nat Hunter. Lee
Products, Ocala; First National Bank of Leesburg, Leesburg; Jon Hunter, Le
Joh Humphreas, Lo
First National Bank in Palm Beach, Palm Beach; Gotham J. P. Sandlin, Levy
Allen Woddiet
Provision Company, Miami Springs; Loeb & Gottfried, Inc., LarrieCher, adison
Hialeah M & M Supply Company of Florida, Inc., Vick Blackmtone. Manatee
Hialah;G. C. Perry, Jr. Marion Thonotosassa; John V. McCarthy and Company, Chicago, P.L. Hinsor, Marti
Ill.; Mid-State Meat Packers, Inc., Bartow; Okeechobee E. D. Grgorh, Nahws
County Bank, Okeechobee; P. D. Q. Company, Lakeland; Super- Forats Sr, Oree
E. L. Yates, Sr., Orange
Mol Division of National Molasses, Tampa; Winn-Dixie Stores, M.M. Overstreet.Osco
K. D. Eatmon, Palm each
Jacksonville. Lance ichbour, Panhandle
H. C. Dogl, Pasco
has been practically finalized. Remember Charles Murphy, Pinellas
ANNUAL CONVENTION hsM. E. Hammond, Polk that this will be the only meeting of the entire membership "Uoyd Osteen, Putnam
Louis Gilbreath, St. Johns
during the year. We have much important business to handle, Robert L. Griffin, St. Lucie L. H. Hawkins, Sarasota
including the election of officers. Since it will be a full R. W. Williams, Seminol
Year before you will have another opportunity to get your C.= Caruthers, Smre
Mattox Ward, Suwannee
views across to the membership, come and bring your family. Elvin Dau hartv, Volusla
Tillie Stri kand, Wakulla
PALM BEACH COUNTY Cattlemen's Association has a good and U.S. Harrisond Washington
enjoyable program on tap for you, you won't want to miss it!
--Charlie Lykes, President
for June, 1969 3




The Florida
JUNE
June 12-White Bros. P.H'fd Disp.. Chester, S.C.
June 19-20-FCA Mid-Year Conf Palm Bch. Shores
June 24-27-ABS Training School ...... Orlando
June 27-28-F.S.G.A. Field Day ...... Belle Glade
June 28-Magic Valley Char. Sale ... Dallas, Tex.
JULY
July 4-FFA Rodeo .. .... ...Ocala Vol. XXXIII, No. 9 JUNE, 1969
July 11-Feeder Calf Sale .......... Belle Glade
July 19-Tanner Char. Sale Beaumont, Alb., Can. ROBERT S. CODY HARRY E. HAMMOND
July 25-S'Gertrudis Feeder Sale ....Belle Glade President and Publisher Editor
AUGUST Associate Editor-James J. Flanagan. Field Representative-Donald E. Berry. Advertising ManagerAug. 1-Manatee Ass'n Feeder Sale .... Tampa Rod Hammond. Advertising Coordinator-Mrs. Jane Stanko. Circulation Manager-Mrs. Margaret
Aug. 2-Circle D Appaloosa Sale ...... Marianna Schield. Write Box 1030. Kissimmee. Florida 32741. Phone (Area 305) 847-2803.
Aug. 8-Stocker-Feeder-Veal Sale ........ Ocala
Aug. 9-L & L Farms Q'Horse Sale. .Dothan, Ala.
Aug. 14-United L/S QH Show .......... Tampa
Aug. 15-Clover Leaf QH Show .......... Odessa
Aug. 15-Mid-Fla. Feeder Calf-Yrlg. Sale Orlando
Aug. 15-S'Gertrudis Feeder Sale ........ Orlando
Aug. 16-Tampa Cutting Ass'n Cutting .. Tampa C
Aug. 17-Sheriff's Posse QH Show ......... Lutz
Aug. 22-Fla. Angus "Off- the-Grass" Sale..G'ville
Aug. 22-Madison Ass'n Feeder Sale ... Madison
Aug. 22-St. Lucie-Oke. St'r Calf Sale Okeechobee
Aug. 23-Highland-Hardee Feeder Sale. Wauchula
Aug. 26-1st Columbia Feeder Calf Sale.Lake City FCA Convention Section ... Regular Departments.
Aug. 28--Jackson Ass'n Feeder Sale ... Marianna
Aug. 29-Jefferson Ass'n Feeder Sale. .Monticello Convention Program ............. 33 FCA Reports .................... 3
Aug. 30-QH Halter Futurity ........ Gainesville Palm Beach Association Tours ... .34 Editor's Desk .................... 6
SEPTEMBER Convention Plans Set ............ 38 Latest Statistics .................. 6
Sept. 4-Leon Ass'n Feeder Sale ........ Quincy County Agriculture Biggest .......40 Now It's History ................ 22
Sept. 5-Fla. Angus Feeder Sale .... Gainesville Co... Sept. 6-Suwannee Valley Feeder Sale..Live Oak CowBelles Program Told ......... 40 Livestock Notebook-T. J. Cunha ..72
Sept. 8-Beckton Red Angus Sale ..Sheridan, Wy. FCA to Vote on By-Laws Change..46 For the CowBelles-Stancil ......80
Sept. 10-Feeder-Stocker-Veal Sale ... Kissimmee Alabama Pledges Theft Help ...... 48 Lab Reports- Cooperrider ....... 84
Sept. 11-N.W. Fla. Ass'n Feeder Sale ...... Jay CowBelle Officer Active.........50 Editorials.....................86
Sept. 12-Marion Ass'n Feeder Sale ... Ocala CowBelle Officer Active .. 50 Editorials ................ 86
Sept. 13-Lazy H Prod. Sale .... Decherd, Tenn. Officers, Committees Listed .......53
Sept. 18-Schearbrook Angus Sale...Dayton, Ohio Shows and Sales ...
Sept. 19-Hereford & Cross Sale ..... Gainesville *
Sept. 23-2d Columbia Feeder Calf Sale.Lake City Palmetto Angus Disperses ........ 23
Sept. 23-Deere Acres Angus Sale... Monroe, Ga. General News... Jubilee Angus Sale Held .59
Sept. 26-Polk Ass'n Feeder Sale ...... Lakeland ..........
Sept. 27-Caiadian Royal Sale .. London, Ontario Higbie Resigns .................. 39
OTHER DATES Court Reverses Bang's Case ....... 38 Pasture Features...
Oct. 1-Arkansas Charolais Sale ..Little Rock, Ark. Short Course Sets Records ... .... 60 It Takes More Than Grass ........ 24
Oct. 3-2d Stocker-Feeder-Veal Sale ...... Ocala Theft Laws Recommended ........ 68 Grow Steers on Pastures-Bertrand.26
Oct. 8-Aberan's "Classic" Sale .. Shadwell, Va.Get pH Right-Gammon and Blue.28 Oct. 9-White Hall Angus Sale Charlottesville, Va.
Oct. 12-White Farms QH Sale ........ Chiefland
Oct. 11-Gildea Charolais Disp ...... Potosi, Mo. Horse, Rodeo News ... Breed Information . .
Oct. 17-Ramsey Angus Prod. Sale..Colquitt, Ga.
Oct. 20-Va. Breeders Sale .. Charlottesville, Va. Tampa, Lutz QH Shows Reported. .74 SGBI Elects Officers ............. 64
Oct. 21-Brandy Rock Prod. Sale. Brandy Sta., Va. Two AQHA Champs Named ...... 78 Brahman Men Tour NE Fla ....... 70
Oct. 29-30-1969 DARE Conference ... Gainesville Bailey Horse in Top Twenty .79 Ayavalla Sale Tops $1 Million .71
Oct. 31-Tested Bull Sale ............ Brooksville Bailey Horse in Top Twenty.....79 Ayavalla Sale Tops $1 Million ...71
Nov. 1-Blue Denim Angus Sale. Scottsville, Va.
Nov. 1-Ky. Nat'l Charolais Sale Louisville, Ky.
Nov. 1-U of F Tested Bull Sale ...... Gainesville
Nov. 3-Burch Angus Sale ...... Mill Creek, Ok.
Nov. 6-Jo-Su-Li Hereford Sale .... Colquitt, Ga.
Nov. 12-Singletary Hereford Sale ...Blakely, Ga.
Nov. 14-Black Watch Bull & Female Sale..Tulsa The Cover for June, 1969
Nov. 14-Millarden Ang. Bull Sale.Woodbury, Ga. Nov. 19-Seminole Hereford Sale.Donalsonville, Ga.
Dec. 5-6-Black Magic Bull Sale. Nashville, Tenn. OUR COVER picture for this month shows a group of purebred Angus cows grazing in Dec. 6-Sunny Acres Bull Sale ........ Polk City the White Dutch clover and Gulf Rye grass pasture at Dexter Farms, Crescent City.
Dec. 8-Black Watch Bull Sale .... Como, Miss.
Dec. 10-Rollins Hereford Sale ......Atlanta, Ga. The Angus operation is owned by Thomas A. and J. Mildred Dexter.
Dec. 10-Rush Bros. Her. Prod. Sale, Kathleen, Ga.
Dec. 13-Fla. Angus Bull Sale ........Kissimmee
Jan. 5-Monarch Angus Sale .......... Wildwood
Jan. 10-Black Angus Bull Sale ............. Citra
Jan. 17-Santa Fe Hereford Sale ........Alachua
Feb. 7-Black Watch Bull Sale. Hawk Springs, Wy.
May 7-9-Beef Short Course .......... Gamesville
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION
Florida Cattlemen's Association, Charles Lykes, President, Tampa Florida Brahman Association, Service Issues of Andrew L. Duda III, President, Cocoa Southeastern Brangus Association, Zeb Parker, President,
Sarasota Florida Angus Association, R. D. Bennett, President, Greenwood Florida Quarter Horse Association, Luther M. White, President, Chiefland Florida Santa Gertrudis Association, Ed Watson, ThIe Florida President, Clewiston Florida Shorthorn Breeders' Association, Jack Hooker, President, Plant City
* Florida Hereford Association, J. Pat Corrigan, President, Vero Beach Florida Meat Packers AssoclaCa l em n tion, Dan Stowe, President, Tampa Eastern Charolais & Charbray Association, Dr. Harlan B. Rogers,
President, Collins, Miss. Florida Beef Council, Cedrick Smith, Chairman, Micanopy Florida Cutting for 1969-70 Horse Association, G. Spencer Harden, Sanford Florida Guernsey Cattle Club, Carroll "Bud" Ward,
President, Winter Park Florida Holstein Cattle Club, Henry B. Ebersole, President, Eustis Florida July ................. Better Bulls Association of Livestock Markets, Terry McDavid, President, Lake City.
August .................. Markets Published monthly by Cody Publications, Inc., at 410 West Verona Street, Kissimmee, Florida 32741
Septmbe Sh..thor Subscription price $2.00. 1 year; $3.00 2 years; $4.00, 3 years; $5.00, 4 years. Second Class Postage paid
September ............ Shorthorns at Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Aldus M. Cody, Chairman of the Board, Robert S. Cody, President, G.
October ............... Herefords Kelly Lyons, Vice President, Dorothy G. Cody, Secretary-Treasurer. Rate Card mailed on request.
November .. Aberdeen-Angus Closing date 10th of preceding month; in circulation 25th of preceding
December .. .. Charolais month. Member Agricultural Publishers Association, Florida Press I&
December .. Charolas Association, American Agricultural Editor's Association, Florida MagaJanuary ........ American Breeds zine Association, Audit Bureau of Circulations, Advertising Representa- f
February ......... Florida Horses tives: East-Stuyvesant Bayard, 20 Vesey St., New York 7; MidwestFrank W. Finn & Associates, 155 N. Wacker Dr., Chicago 6; West- af j March ................. Brahmans Murray Bothwell, 2801 W. Sixth St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90057.
May .................... Forestry '
June ............. Better Pastures
CHANGES of address and undeliverable copies should be sent to Drawer 1030, Kissimmee, Florida 32741.
4 The Florida Cattleman




profit-minded
cattlee fee d
therTEES / PASI Ufl
PHENOTHIAZINE IN UREA-I RA
U~w ~S mineral-VitaminA
BlackstrcupppFJ
Molasses Mix 2-A
orTOICES
SUMMER PASTURE PROFITS
WITHOUTPHENOTHIAZINE Four pounds per day of No. 2-A or No. 5-A supplies the
approximate percentage of the minimum daily nutrient requirements of a 600-pound steer for normal growth (gaining 1.4 pounds per day) shown in black on the graph k Below. Pasture and/or other supplement will provide the portions shown in green. References: (1) National M classes M ix -- /mA NResearch Council Publication 579, (2) "Minerals for Beef
Cattle in Florida," Bulletin No. 683, Everglades Experi. meant Station.
YUST PROOEIN CAPL CN:IUM Co, noral Sce Finfcnl e iteqvat feD
suliwe co ped suppli;ndca ead ld sppled, d stiupp nl -fedstocaleo
by 2A or 5A' -A
Pasture osdrbyls otta te ovninlsplmns
Unit e Son
YOUR MOST ECONOMICAL SUPPLEMENT: It is normally priced significantly below its equivalent feed value when compared with corn; and can be handled, stored, distributed and self-fed to cattle on pasture at considerably less cost than other conventional supplements.
813-983-8121
CLEWISTON
United States Sugar Corporatlon FLORIDA




How Much Will YOUR
Cattle Be Worth
This Summer? Reader Correctly Identifies
March Photo Subjects
Even if prices don't increase, they'll
still be worth more if they've been fed Arcadia
GROFAST (hybrid sorghum X sud- Acd
angrass) forage. FIRST your cattle I've been intending for some time
will weigh more. SECOND they'll to write you regarding the picture en have better finish than on plain closed (March, 1969 "History"
pasture. photo), which was run in a recent isYou can plant GROFAST now and sue of THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN.
make silage and have summer's bene- I remember this one well. I have fits this winter! the glossy print of this picture hangIn fact you can ing in my office, and have often said
that you would never get this group
Planlt ...together again. It was taken at a Plant Flood Control meeting at Funie
Steed's camp on Lake Wilson, and I
believe it would have been in about
March of 1950.
MHStanding left to right are: B. Elliott
(HYBRID SORGHUM X SUDANGRASS) of Pahokee, Speaker-Elect (at that
Now! time) of the Florida House; W. J.
Funie Steed, Orlando; and Irlo Bronand graze it-or chop it-or ensile it-- son, Kissimmee. Seated, Spessard OR-do any combination of these things Holland, U.S. Senator; Claude Pep- STEAKS "in appreciation for cattlemen for increased profits. per, U.S. Senator at the time and now using citrus by-products" were on the
meu f herecent meigof Florida
Florida's Finest Sorghum for a U.S. Congressman; Fuller Warren, menu of the meeting
Grain (equal to corn) is: Governor of Florida at the time and Citrus Mutual.
Millard Caldwell, former Governor of
BIRD-GO Florida. concerning the bobcats on her ranch.
Burton Thornal Chances are the decrease in quail (HYDIRID GRAIN SORGHUM) numbers she mentioned was due to
Bird-Go outproduced all other varie- Disappearing Quail Not reasons other than predation by bobties in 1968 with an average yield of Caused by Bobcats cats.
over 4500 pounds of grain, in all trials According to Murray and Frye in
at all locations in Florida. Gainesville "The Bobwhite Quail and it's Man.
As a senior at the University of agement in Florida," out of 281 stomIf your dealer can't supply you, contact: Florida majoring in wildlife ecology, achs or droppings from Florida bobB I N G H A M I was interested in Mrs. Otto Weav- cats, only 2 or .7 percent contained
Seed Company, Inc. er's letter in the May CATTLEMAN traces of quail.
Box 1166 Ph. 904-768-1503
Jacksonville, Florida Latest Statistics
We can also offer: Commercial Slaughter and Average Weight (USDA) ...
Cert. Starr Millet Rice Cattle Calves Swine Sheep
Japanese Millet Game Bird -Mix M Head Wt. M Head Wt. M Head Wt. M Head Wt.
Mar. 1969 (Fla.) 32.0 946 14.3 345 46.0 186 .2 59
Browntop Millet Cover Crops Mar. 1968 (Fla.) 34.0 938 16.0 314 43.5 225
Mar. 1969 (U.S.) 2813.5 1014 451.5 213 7539.0 233 863.8 106
Mar. 1968 (U.S.) 2716.6 1028 481.8 211 7134.4 234 883.9 105
LIV ESTO CK Slaughter Under State Inspection, Head (AITC) ...
Api I.1ES69OC Cattle Calves Swine
HAULINGApril 1969 7195 1068 38,393
April 1968 10,607 1783 37,055
"8 Trucks To Serve You" Livestock Prices Per Hundred (USDA) ...
Local or Long Distance FCattle Cows Strs, Hfrs. Calves Swine C'kens
Fla., Apr. 15, 1969 $24.80 $20.60 $26.40 $32.80 $18.70 $14.00
* Straight Job Loads Fla.. Mar. '15, 1969 22.90 19.80 25.40 31.50 18.80 14.00
U.S., Apr. 15, 1968 23.60 17.80 25.40 28.10 18.50 14.10
* Single or Double Deck U.s., Apr. 15, 1969 26.40 19.20 28.50 32.10 19.60 14.70
Field Crop Prices Per Bushel (USDA) ...
L. T. MANNING Corn Oats Soybeans
Fla., Apr. 15. 1969 $1.30 $.85 $2.55
3352 Blitchton Road Fla., Apr. 15, 1968 1.25 .90 2.60
PHONE 629-1649 OCALA, FLA.
The Florida Cattleman




"We can't afford
not to treat for grubs,"
say these cattlemen who all use 'CO-RAL insecticide.
"Packers know we treat for grubs, so "After using CO-RAL for grub control,
they buy our cattle without question our cattle came through the winter
and usually give us a premium price." gaining-instead of just maintaining."
"We maintain a brood herd of about 800 cows and also "We keep about 1,300 head of brood cows, but also feedhave a feeding operation where we finish-out better than out around 1,600 head a year. We sprayed with CO-RAL 2,000 head a year. CO-RAL Pour-On did a good job for Wettable Powder for the first time last year and got good us, but spraying with the Emulsifiable Concentrate fits results. Our calves and cow herd did a lot better this our operation better. We treat for grubs in the Fall. Then winter on the same amount of feed. In the feedlot, we have we spray with CO-RAL again in the Spring for lice, and to treat for grubs because the packers warned us that continue to use it to control horn flies. As a result of this they were going to start docking for grub damage. We've program, packers tell us that our cattle yield-out better." also had good results with CO-RAL Emulsifiable ConG. B. Howell, Jr., Manager centrate in our fly control program." Normandy Cattle Ranch Herschel Parrish, Manager
Leesburg, Georgia H. E. Wolfe Ranch
Neither can you. St. Augustine, Florida'
With more and more packers docking for grubby cattle.. .with Only CO-RAL offers a treatment that's just right for every size treated animals commanding a premium at the auction barn... and type of operation. cattlemen everywhere agree that treatment for grubs is essential. SPRAY CO-RAL 25% Wettable Powder controls grubs, Records gathered from producers who have used CO-RAL lice, horn flies, screw-worms and ticks.
systemic insecticide during the past 11 years consistently show CO-RAL Emulsifiable Concentrate controls that these animals gain better and return a higher profit in grubs, horn flies, lice, ticks and screw worms.
undamaged meat and hides. 6985 POUR-ON CO-RAL Pour-On controls grubs and reduces
lice. This ready-to-use formulation requires no
further dilution or mixing.
DIP VAT CO-RAL 25% Wettable Powder is the only
systemic insecticide registered for this method
BACKRUBBER CO-RAL Emulsifiable Concentrate may be mixed T| Cwith oil for use in backrubbers to provide excelM, lent control of horn flies and face flies.
-- First with the best in grub control CHE MA GRO
and other quality animal health products. ', KAA CY MRTI 641
*KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 64120




Actually, one of the main staples fort to develop economic data that of the bobcat's diet is the cotton rat, will show the value, of horses and alSigmodon hispidus, one of the worst lied industries to the states and the predators on quail eggs in Florida. country. Up till now, this kind of All the additional information I could facts have been sorely lacking, and we locate on quail predation in Florida feel probably underestimated. Florclosely bears this out. The quail de- ida, fortunately, has been ahead of cline could more likely be attributed most of the country in horse producto poaching or a serious lack of food tion studies as well as studies of the and/or cover. impact and future growth of horses,
Bill Frankenberger thanks to the department of animal science at the University of Florida American Horse Council and the Florida Extension Service.
Seeking Information Polk County Agent Davis
Washington, D.C. Says Thanks for Coverage
As you can tell from the letterhead,
the American Horse Council is slowly Bartow
taking form. We would appreciate I certainly want to thank you for
having comments and suggestions the fine and excellent coverage you from both you and your readers con- gave our 1969 Polk County Youth cerning matters of national impor- Fair in your May issue of THE stance to the horse industry. FLORIDA CATTLEMAN. We certainImmediately, we would solicit your ly appreciate your accurate up-to-date help and assistance in forwarding all reporting of the livestock news for the matter which in any way reflects the state. economic impact of the horse indus- Robert M. Davis
try on the total economy. Polk County Agent
Henry Durham
Executive Director It's nice to be thanked. Especially when it gives us a chance to say that The council is making a strong ef- we try to personally cover every major
New Reader Service Offered
MANY OF our readers tell us they would like more detailed information on products or services described in our "Editor's Desk" column. Starting with this issue, we will provide the "coupon" below which may be completed and returned to THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN if you wish more details on an item.
We will forward your name and address to the proper source asking that they rush the requested material to you. Most items won't have a charge for them, but if there is a charge, we will say so and how much. You may send a check or ask to be billed.
We will keep records on types of information requested and make an effort to use the kind most helpful to you.
r---------------------------------------Want More Information?
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN
DRAWER 1030
KissIMMEE FLORIDA 32741
Please get me information on the material below. (Check more than
one box if you wish.)
] 1. Merck Memo ] 5. Cattle Chute
E] 2. QH Racing Book E] 6. Liquid Supplement Book
E] 3. Feedlot Automation 5 7. New Protein Source
5 4. Grain-O-Vator E] 8. Anchor Lepto Vaccine
N am e ........................................................
A address .......................................................
City ........................ Sta te ................ ZIP ........
---------------------------------- J
The Florida Cattlemin




, Z15 r~r rIME
TO START YOUR FLY and WORM PROGRAM
Here's the simple, proven and profitable way to CONTROL . and ELIMINATE costly flies and worms in your herd. Just feed BEST MAID FLY AND WORM CONTROL SUPPLEMENT, free choice, and your animals will take over from here. The larvicide in BEST MAID FLY AND WORM CONTROL SUPPLEMENT is consumed by each animal-AS IT EATS-and is passed out in.the manure where it KILLS THE FLY AND WORM LARVAEI The BEST MAID Program gives you everything in one package-in one feeding, a complete Pasture Supplement-rich proteins, balanced minerals and vitamins-PLUS the "built in" FLY AND WORM CONTROL. It's the proven-safe, economical and PROFITABLE way to feel cattle the year 'round. Now is the time to investigate this program to enhance your profits this year.
9 SUPPLEMENTS RANGE WITH ESSENTIAL PROTEINS, MINERALS AND VITAMINS
* AID IN PREVENTING FOOT ROT AND SOFT TISSUE LUMPY JAW A IALA GD R rou OF
[ COSTS AVERAGE ONLY ABOUT 2 CENTS PER HEAD DAILY -a M; I 7
* PREVENTS THE BREEDING OF FACE AND HORN FLIES
MIX0. INB 1 CMNM LGAO E
P0 0. BOX 118 MIWON MILLING CO. CAIRO, GEORGIA ''




livestock event in Florida, including the youth fairs of which Polk CounDEW EY ty's is excellent.
P1 Reader Asks About
P0 LLY Stumping Machine
presents
t prese s Winter Haven
At one time I saw an item advertised that removed the top of ground area of stumps by use of a cutter head attached to the PTO shaft of a tractor. Can you advise the manufacturer's name and address?
S. L. Schutt
We just can't seem to find the ad 4 ~if it ever ran in THE CATTLEMAN.
If any of our readers can help us or Mr. Schutt, please drop a line with whatever information you have. Thanks.
Milking Shorthorn Breeder Expanding Herd
Monticello
... The ad is very satisfactory and I would like for it to run for 12 issues or until cancelled, I believe this CHOICE ..... should do us a great deal of good
and as we expand (our herd) the size of our ad can be increased perhaps. BRANGUS CATTLE RANCHPalRLei
Paul R. Lewis
543.4 acres-80% Pensacola Bahia Mr. Lewis is taking advantage of
the discount we offer regular adver150 Head of Blue Ribbon Cattle tisers as well as practicing the consistency that we preach.
Three Lakes Plus Artesian Well
Citrus Men Appreciate
* "* Use of By-Products
LOCATION Ocala
Here is how "we" citrus growers Glades County, 4 1/2 miles South of intersection of State thank "us cattlemen" for using our
by-products citrus pulp and moRoad 29 at Harrisburg, Directly on U. S. 27. lasses.
This (picture) was taken at our
* *annual meeting of Florida Citrus
Mutual. I belong to FCM and the Permanently located ranch foreman's mobile home with Putnam County Cattlemen's AssociaC.B.S. paneled cabana. Loading chutes and additional struc- tion. T. C. Holden
tures necessary to operation. Mr. Holden's photo shows something like 420 'beef filet mignons being Contact:.. prepared over charcoal for the FCM
Ted Anderson meal. We thank him and them!
Randall Polly 4-New "Grain-O-Vator"
Handles 275 Bushels
DEWEY POLLY REALTY
NoxTH AMERIcAN Manufacturing 99 NINTH STREET NORTH Company, Sioux City, Iowa has anNAPLES, FLORIDA nounced the addition of a new
PHONE (813) 642-4356 "Grain-O-Vator 275" to its line of
self-unloading wagons. Price and Terms on Application The new wagon allows feeders to
10 The Florida Cattleman




pOW" as
CLARK SEED COMPANY
ROUTE 3, Box 382
BRADENTON, FLORIDA 33505
We now have this year's harvest of white clover in our warehouses. We suggest purchasing your clover seed now and save, as prices will be higher this fall. If you want to add protein to your pasture grasses, now is a good time to plant some summer legumes.
CURRENT SPRING SEED PRICES
GRASS SEED LEGUMES
Paraguayan #22 ..........ASK S. Humilis .............. ASK
Argentine Bahia ......... ASK Alyce Clover ............ ASX
Pensacola Bahia ......... ASK Hairy Indigo ............ ASK
Aeschynomene in hull ..... ASK Aeschynomene, unhulled ..ASK Combine peas ............ ASK
White Clover ............ ASK
We have a limited supply of S. Humilis on hand on a first come, first served basis.
Call on us anytime our personnel can be of service in helping with your planting needs.
Sales -of Lawn and Pasture Grass Seeds
Seed Harvesting and Processing
RALPH CLARK WENDELL COOPER DON CLARK
PHONE 755-59,23 PHONE 745-9851 PHONE 746-8984
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT ADVANCE NOTICE.




WET
fly~oO
DRY,
h tGRAIN-O-VATOR 275 has been added
to the line of self-unloading-wagons
offered by North American Manufacturing Company of Sioux City, Iowa.
haul and unload a full 275 bushels,
COIDRIN & VAPONA (DDVP) Concentrate... One or the company says, and the box is diboth can be used as stock sprays or back-rubber concentrates! vided into two compartments each of
which can be unloaded separately.
FLY-CORD. . Season-long control with ONE application! 30 to 40 bushels per minute unloadWhen installed on a 450 angle, 75% of the flies leave the cord ing time is claimed.
to die. No Mess! Standard equipment includes roof
doors, rear mounted ladder, heavy
FLYCO BRAND DUST... Rid your premises of fleas. duty oscillating tandem axle with 20inch rims and a fold-up jack. Other
FLYCO BRAND MOLE CRICKET BAIT . A sure kill for features are a front or rear mounted
crickets, cut worms, ants, etc. unloading auger elevator with a fold
out spout, self-locking elevator conCATTLE BACK OILERS... Four gallon capacity-price sub- trol and a heavy channel frame that
ject to size of order. runs the length of the unit for
strength and durability. An overhead
boom type elevator system is avail"Flies Worst Enemy" able at extra cost.
For more information, check NumQuality Products From ber 4 and return the form on page 8.
P.0. Box 15392 7-Dow Chemical Announces
F & W ENTERPRISES, INC. / Tampa, Florida New Protein Source
DEALERS: A NON-PROTEIN nitrogen source for
beef. cattle has been developed by the
AID LABORATORIES, INC. 498 MILLER MACHINERY & SUPPLY FLORIDA PEST CONTROL & Dow Chemical Company of Midland,
N.E. 46th St., Boca Raton, Fla. CO., 1104 Twigg St., Tampa, CHEMICAL, Crystal River, Fla. 33432 Ph. 305/395-2771 (AND) Fla. 33601 (AND) 601 E. Michigan.
708 N.E. 21st Ave., Ocala, Flo. Church St., Jacksonville, Fla. KARSTON & DENSON, Macon, Ph. 904/622-4753 (AND) 7319 32201 Ga. Called Kedlor feed grade biuret, it
Kingsbury Circe, Tampa, Fla. has received clearance from the Food
Ph. 813/626-0736 SOUTHEASTERN LABORATO- MERLIN, INC. Atlanta, Ga.
RIES, INC. 512 College St., MIXON MILLING CO., Cairo, and Drug Administration. Dow says LAKELAND CASH FEED CO., Jacksonvil!e, Fla 32203 Go. it will soon be available to ranchers
INC. Mirror Lake Drive, Lakeland, Fla. 33802, Ph. 813/MU PRIDDY BROTHERS 1231 W. NELSON WHOLESALE CO., as an ingredient in minerals and
26144 18th St., Houston, Texas 77008 Brownwood, Texas. other conventional range supplements.
ALLEN BROS. OF MARION, PAPER CHEMICAL & SUPPLY Compared to urea, the company
GUARDIAN CHEMICAL CO. INC., P.O. Box 24 Marion, CO., Savannah Ga. 694 Jefferson St. Atlanta Go. La. 71260 says it is safer to use and contains
30301 COCHRAN BROS. CO., INC., 37 percent nitrogen, equal to 230 perMAGNOLIA SEED HARDWARE Dublin Ga.
PENNINGTON GRAIN & SEED & IMPLEMENT CO. 8401 Soy- cent protein equivalent. "One pound
CO. P.O. Box 290, Madison, ereign Raw, Dallas, Texas. SPALDING FARM SERVICE, Go. 30650, Ph. 404/342-1234 Griffin, Ga. of Kedlor is equal on a nitrogen basis
(AND) Box 9474, Market
Center Branch, Columbia, S.C. MEYER-BLANKE CO. 2620 Hol- INDEPENDENT B U Y E R S to 5.6 pounds of cottonseed meal at 29201 lywood Ave., Shreveport, La. ASS'N., Prompton, Penn. 41 percent protein.
THE VOSS CO. P.O. Box 94 BIRCHMORE DAIRY SUPPLY, When biruet is fed to ruminants,
WHEELER RANCH SUPPLY Rt. 802 N. Jefferson, Enid, Okla., Athens.lya
8 Box 309-M, Pensacola, Fla. CARBISCO FLOUR & FEED the organic nitrogen is slowly released
32506 WESTERN DAIRY SUPPLY CO. MILLS, INC., Rocky Mount, as ammonia by enzymes in the ruKentwood, La. 70444 N.C.
STANDARD FEED CO. 1282 CAUGHMAN FEED & SEED men, the company explains. Bacteria
Kings Road, Jacksonville, Fla. WOOD-FRUITTICHER CO., CO., Columbia, S.C. then use the ammonia to synthesize
32204 3610-3rd Ave. S., Birmingham, A:a. CENTRAL CAROLINA FARM- protein which is in turn digested in
FLINT RIVER MILLS Box 401, ERS, INC., Durham, N.C. the digestive system of the animal.
Tal:ahossee, Fla. 32302. Ph. BRUNDIDGE MILLING CO., SAIL CHEMICAL CO., 570 In- "An important advantage is that 904/877-1155 Brundidge, Ala. dian St., Savannah, Ga.
12 The Florida Cattleman




4>4
Now... Butt-Bag approved for fly control on
both beef and dairy cattle in Florida!
Revolutionary method proven highly effective against Horn Flies by the Everglades Experiment Station. After testing, fly counts averaged only 12 per cow for treated animals against an average of about 500 flies per cow on ranches outside the test area! Other tests show that the FASCO Butt-Bag also aids in reducing Face Fly populations.
As modern as tomorrow, the Butt-Bag comes ready to use. Just hang it up.. cattle do the rest, saving you important labor costs. It's weather-resistant with a special anti-wet dust containing dependable Co-Ral, that treats up to 50 cattle for 30 days!
___ It makes good sense to take this proven protective
step now. For best results read the label and follow directions.
[FA S CO o
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL SUPPLY COMPANY JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
Co-Ral is a registered Trade Mark




A New, Highly !
Effective
Insecticide
a MAL-PHENE
Recommended Where Insect Resistance Has Become a Problem
Stop insect pests and external parasites that
steal profits from your livestock by spraying NEW, hydraulically operated chute is
now available from the My-D Han-D with Dr. Rogers' MAL-PHENE. Contains highly Company of Dodge City, Kansas. It
effective Malathion and Toxaphene. Excellent operates left or right handed, the
company says, and is ideal for dehorning, residual effect helps control horn flies, sheep treating and castrating cattle.
keds, lice and ticks. Use Dr. Rogers' MAL-PHENE Kedlor feed grade biruet, unlike urea,
to spray your cattle, sheep, and goats. releases ammonia slowly in the rumen. This prevents the presence of excess ammonia which can be toxic and create poor nitrogen utilization. Palatability is not a problem because TEXAS_________________COMPANY the ingredient is practically tasteless."
For more information on Kedlor . BX 2 feed grade biuret, check Number 7
and return the form on page 8.
5-New Hydraulically Operated Profit Minded Cattlemen Chute Marketed by My.D Han-D
Feed Their Cattle A NEW, hydraulically operated cattle
chute weighing 1200 pounds is now available from My-D Han-D Company of Dodge City, Kansas. The comGRI-GUpany says it can be portable or stationary, and operates right or leftHigh Protein handed, and is designed for dehorning, castrating and veterinary treatLiquid Feed Supplement ments.
Constructed of two-inch pipeand Rich in Protein, Vitamins, Minerals designed not to choke an animal, the
and therNutrentscompany says it is easy to operate a ohtes( and sells for $995. To get more inE Your most economical Supplement y formation on the chute, check Numa Made and stored locally to save you money her 5 and return the form on page 8.
0 Save $30-40 per ton over other liquid feeds I Meter printed tickets to assure full measure' 6-Pfizer Publishes Liquid
* Eliminate your labor and inconvenience Supplement Reference Book
" We Guarantee our prices through May, '69
WHAT IS claimed to be the first comprehensive reference book on liquid We Fill the Feeders The Cows Feed Themselves supplements for livestock feeding has
been published by the Pfizer Agricultural Division.
Plant Location: Mail to: It provides an in-depth review of
E. Hwy. 92 and 00e FEED Agri-Guard Corp. the new feeding concept that has atFishhatchery Rd. 2822 Dixie Road tracted world-wide interest. The
Across from Lakeland, Fla. author is Robert C. Wornick, director
Cattleman's Mkt. Ph. 813/688-3325 of the agriculture development lab14 The Florida Cattleman




CHARTER MEMBER OF THE FLORIDA BEEFMASTER BREEDERS ASSOCIATION BYRON HERLONG II
General Manager
p
Our herds consist of crossbred and straight-bred cattle including Charbray, Brahman, Charolais, Brangus, Braford and more recently. .. Beefmaster. HERLONG RANCHES. A DIVISION OF A. S. HERLONG & CO. P.O. BOX 418 LEESBURG, FLORIDA PHONE 787-3421, EVENINGS 787-7550




oratory at Pfizer's research center, Terre Haute, Indiana.
The 96 page book is entitled Liquid Supplements for Livestock Feeding.
It covers ration formulations, nonprotein nitrogen sources, product formulation advantages and problems with liquid supplements, vitamin addition, antibiotic addition, equipment and materials of construction and regulatory considerations, along with a number of other topics. Initial issue of the book is in short supply, but to get your order in, check Number 6 and return the form on page 8.
8-Anchor Offers Vaccine For New Lepto Strain
ANCHOR SERUM Company has announced ARS approval to market a new Leptospirosis vaccine aimed at two strains not covered by LeptoPomona bacterins.
Field studies indicate that the two Because you're a farmer, strains-Leptospira Canicola and Icterohemorrbagie are becoming ingrower or rancher, your children creasingly prevalent in cattle, the company said, so the new vaccine is aimed education doesn't have to cost you as much. at them.
It is recommended that the new bacterin, Lepto-Canic, be given to If you obtain an educational loan from your local PRODUCTION CREDIT cattle and swine at the same time ASSOCIATION. PCA lends money for any worthwhile farm credit Lepto-Pomona bacterins are given,
need, including higher education. With a PCA educational loan, you when both new organisms are present,
oa to give complete protection.
obtain the money as you need it at the beginning of the college Anchor warns that Lepto is an inyear or during the year. Interest is figured on the outstanding bal- fectious disease that can cause kidney dance. As the balance decreases, the interest decreases. Saves you trouble, loss of appetite, abortions, money! Because you're a farmer, grower or rancher, see your PCA and breeding problems. It is usually
spread through water runoff, stagnant representative first for your farm family credit needs. ponds and drinking water that has
been contaminated by the urine of infected livestock or wild animals. Arcadia Gaiaesville Madiaon Orlando For more information on LeptoBelle Glade Immokalee Marianna Palatka Canic, check Number 8 and return
Bradenton Jacksonville Miami Pensacola the form on page 8 of this issue.
Clewiston Lakeland Monticello Quincy Dade City Lake Wales Ocala Sebring -Cow-Calf Business Is
Eustis Live Oak Okeechobee Vero Beach Wauchula Moving East Merck Says
STATES LIKE Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana are moving up fast as maexclusive from CUTTER jor producers of feeder calves according to The Merck Livestock Memo, published as a service to feedlot operators, by the animal health products department of Merck Chemical.
Texas is still the largest ranching state, the report said, with almost 5 million beef cows in 150,000 herds, but the other states in the southeast Reasons given in the article include
lack of rainfall in the traditional western states, high cost of land, and So potent, pure and uniform, they are incomparable! high operating costs. In Texas, for
16 The Florida Cattleman




Prepotent- Production Tested
No wonder it pays to use Angus Bulls
Now you can buy good Angus bulls backed by good production records ... yes, bulls that are proven to sire heavier, faster-gaining calves with more red meat.
You see, many progressive Angus breeders are participating in the AHIR (Angus Herd Improvement Records) program, designed to measure the BREED IMPRV N economically important traits in their herds. They can supply you with gain
BRE Rand grade facts, conformation scores, and carcass cutability and quality
_ Angus information.
Herd The AHIR program is the most comprehensive herd improvement program
improvement in the beef industry. It helps assure you of bulls that will improve weaning
and yearling weights, production efficiency and carcass quality. BUILDS BETTER BEEF Of course, Angus bulls, more than any other breed, are prepotent. They
breed the horns off your calves and breed your herd Black. But more imporLook for this symbol tant, they produce heavily muscled calves with deep, full hind quarters and
This symbol of progress can only wide, full loins ... calves with less wasteful bone, belly and brisket.
be used by Angus breeders in the
proven AHIR program. It tells So, for increased efficiency and more profits, next time buy prepotent you that these breeders can Angus bulls with good production records. Look for the AHIR "symbol of show you production records on progress" in Angus breeder ads. It tells you he's using the best records protheir Angus cattle. gram in the country to help him breed higher quality, more efficient cattle.
They're worth more if they're Black merican
" R_&ngus
association
3201 FREDERICK BLVD., ST. JOSEPH MO0 64501




example, the report quotes producers
HIGROMATIC be o o er xldn ao
as saying it costs $90.50 to keep a beef cow for a year, excluding labor E T O and management. Based on the
number of calves per cow, average
CO M ES TO weight and beef prices in recent
years, the hypothetical return per cow has been only $82, or a loss of $8.50 per animal.
For a free copy of The Merck Livestock Memo, check Number 1 and return the form on page 8.
2-Quarter Horse Racing Stakes Book Now Available
A PERMANENT history of major Quarter Horse races from 1949 through 1967 has been published by Renee H. Smelker.
MORE HEAD PER ACRE ... NOT MORE ACRES The volume is divided into four
sections entitled: 1) Sires of stakes Does it matter whether your crop is measured in bushels... or pounds? and feature event winners and placPasture irrigation by HIGROMATIC Self-Propelled means an opportunity to vastly ers; 2) Maternal grandsires and increase beef production on land that requires practically no preparation. dams; 3) History of stakes and feature events; and 4) Index of stakes Terrain, before considered unsuitable for crops, now becomes increasingly valu- and feature horses and their sires. able for beef production. This first volume will be followed
You can add profitable pounds on conservatively four to seven head per acre in by yearly publications starting with the lush pastures made green and nutritious with HIGROMATIC and HIGROMATIC 1968, enabling students of Quarter has the design capabilities to operate in the traditionally rough pasture acreage. Horse racing bloodlines to trace winner-producing families through sevWhether you consider yourself a stockman ... or a farmer, whether beef is your eral generations. second crop, or your only crop ... HIGROMATIC is a profitable investment in The price of the first book is $15. your land. For more detailed information, check
Number 2 on the form on page 8 and return to THE CATTLEMAN.
County Agents Becoming
AE&C Commodity Specialists
B4 F ElBY REC COUNTY AGENTS and their assistants
are gradually moving away from the An Agricultural Product shotgun approach to helping agriculby Enresco turalists, according to Dr. M. 0. Watkins, director of the Florida Extension
YOUR FLORIDA DEALERS: Fletcher Farm Equipment Cb. 9 904-472-2112 Service.
Highway No. 41, Newberry, Florida 32669 Instead of trying to be all things Falcon Irrigation 813-646-5761 Groover Tractor Company 904-973-2245 to all people, county agents are now P.O. Box 1897, Lakeland, Florida 33802 P.0. Box 568, Madison, Rlorida,32340 specializing in one or two commodiFarmServ. c Box er 9 90629-3419 Florida 33802ment Co. 0 flax9568,0Madi32303 ties, Watkins says. "Today, it's posFarm Service Center 904-629-3419 West Florida Equipment Co. 904-482-3033 sible to be a specialist in only one
2940 W. Broadway, Ocala, Florida 32640 West Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida 34246 field such as beef cattle or vegetable crops. In some areas, the sub-division of specialities goes even further.
FOR FAST DEPENDABLE SERVICE That's why we require most of our
agents to have at least a master's deCALER gree and some now hold doctoral
CALL EQM ENT tydaa rmtegnrlsgn
MODERN degrees."
RELIABLE Watkins says that ranchers who
!]EQUIPM ENT stayed away from the generalist agent
now welcome those who can help them
solve highly technical problems. T11 jiStoll "Cross-line agents" are being de528-3575 Florida veloped. These are specialists who
may assist in two or more counties in their field of special training. So far, there are 15 agents who are workPHILLIPS LIVESTOCK HAULING CO. inginmorethanonecounty.
_ 18 The Florida Cattleman




Gaor CAN0
U Scrawny underfed pastureland isn't
m u T., Mfit for man or money-beast. But Florida
a a 0 N has its share. Maybe you do, too.
d Before you write-off that land, try
tnGATOR C.A.N. (Calcium Ammonium Nitrate). It can help cure those acid acres, the nitrogen balance that's out
of whack.
SGATOR C.A.N. is completelyneutral.
rbIt pumps calcium and nitrogen into
la d the earth. Balanced nitrogen, tooU half nitrate, half ammoniacal.
sturelanci Specify GATOR C.A.N. in your mixed
fertilizer. Just ask .. .and your fertilizer manufacturer will mix it! Or use it direct as a top dresser. And forget waste. There's no padding. Every pound is forage food.
GATOR C.A.N.-it's just what Florida needs. It'll beef-up your pastureland but good.
AGRICLTURAL H1CA-I-HL.




The 15 include: Seymour Goldweber, associate Dade County agent, citrus and subtropical fruits; Kent Price, associate Palm Beach County agent, dairying; William E. Collins, assistant Jackson County agent, swine; Lenzy M. Scott, associate Washinga f ton County agent, beef cattle; Charles
M. Walthall, assistant Okaloosa County agent, beef cattle; James E. Bellizio assistant Hendry County agent, citrus; Oscar J. Hebert, Jr., acting ashelps insure a sistant Orange County agent, dairying;
William J. Phillips, assistant Marion County agent, citrus; John L. The est imeto potec aginsttheJackson, Jr., assistant Lake County The best time to protect against the agent, citrus; Edward Allen, associate
costly effects of mastiis is when cows are dry- Duval County agent, ornamentals;
when the dosage of antibiotic can be increased Dua o agent, or., as ;
-when action can be concentrated In a smaller Thomas H. Braddock, Jr., associate
mass of tissue--and when milk production Is Duval County agent, dairying; David
not Interrupted by treatment. DeVoll, assistant Seminole County
And the best way to treat dry cows is with agent, vegetables and ornamentals;
a product specifically formulated for that purpose. Gerald G. Martin, assistant Volusia
T)e one we recommend Is Blody County agent, dairying; John F. Mcstop In and lot us tell you why. Guire, assistant Brevard County
WARNING: Blodry Is for dry cows only. Use no later than 4 weeis prior to calving agent, citrus; and Jim Dilbeck, assistant St. Johns County agent, ornamentals.
Watkins said the extension service also has three regional specialists sRt. 1, Box255I based at the experiment stations.
o FLYO MPDAINY 1, Box 255 They work with cross-line agents and
FL-- O RID Cwith agents limited to one county.
PHONE TAMPA 988-3154
3-New Book Called
"How to Automate Your Feedlot"
I FTHE H. C. DAVIS Sons Manufacture LAKELAND, FLORIDA ing Company of Bonner Springs,
Kansas, has just published a 100 page booklet describing plans and equipment for feedlot automation. The company says the book is designed to assist livestock feeders in determining more efficient methods of preparing and handling feeding raFast, Prompt Delivery tifohebokss.
.......A special feature of the book is a
listing of every installation of Davis DI C 0 equipment in the U.S. and Canada, so that other cattlemen can contact owners and go see equipment in use. (A substantial number of units are YO UR<7 located in Florida.)
--U IThe book includes drawings of recommended placement of units, along RANCH with pictures and complete specificaBIG ENOUGH TO SERVE YOU properly seasoned and treated to meet tions of machinery the company
SMALL ENOUGH TO KNOW YOU your needs. All posts are treated makes. To receive a free copy of the
You can get all standard posts and with creosote or Penta to last for years. book, check Number 3 and return the
poles delivered to your ranch in less For all types of posts, treated lumber, form on page 8 of this issue.
than a week. Posts are selected from and other timber products, phone or straight, sound, Southern Pine Timber, write Stalvey's for complete price lists.
Dealer Inquiries Invited Horse Industry to Get
Economic Survey
THE ECONOMIC value of the horse S TA-VE 'Ybusiness is going to be studied by
ENTERPRIS S. BO0X 8 8 PH. 9 12 / 4 8 7-2 3 6 9 Spindletop Research of Lexington,
HOMERVILLE, GEORGIA 31634Florida Cattleman




Im Im-mm m mm
FO SALE
Have recently purchased herds of LaCrosse Angus Farm and Wade Ranch. These cattle are now located at Drew Ranch on State Road 206, five miles east of Hastings, Florida, and five miles west of Interstate 95. Will sell all or any number desired by the head or by the pound.
Also, approximately 150 good two-year-old cross-bred heifers for sale, out of the C. L. John Herd of Live Oak.
If Interested Contact:
J. D. Odom, Starke, Fla.
Phone: Hastings 692-1030 Starke 964-5476 Mobile Phone JR 4-9263




Kentucky, according to Theodore R. Broida, president.
"There have been a number of
Order The Stockman's Book studies performed dealing with particular breeds, but there have been few attempts to sum up the many f oday! segments of the horse industry operating in the country," he said.
Breeds to be included in the study
are: Quarter Horse, Thoroughbred, Standardbred, Tennesee Walking
I Beef Cattle Science 29 Selecting, Fitting & Horse, American Saddle horse, AppaEnsminger ............. $14.35 Showing Beef Cattle,
2 Crossbreeding Beef Cattle Lattig & Norby .......... 1.95 loosa, and Arabian.
Cunha, Koger, Warnick ... 8.50 30 Approved Practices in Phases of the industry to be sur3 Cowboy Economics Pasture Management,
Oppenheimer ............ 6.95 McVickar & McVickar 6.25 eyed are: economic activities of
4 The Stockman's Handbook 31 Approved Practices in horse breeding; racing and showing
Ensminger .............. 14.75 Feeds, Feeding, Cassard .. 6.25 horses; impact of breeding, racing
5 Using Commercial Fertilizers 33 Selecting, Fitting & and showing, and effects of taxation
McVickar .................6.75 Showing Horses, adsoig n fet ftxto
6 Livestock Judging Handbook Lattig & Norby .......... 1.95
Nordby, Beeson & Fout 7.75 34 Beef Production in the on the horse industry.
7 Farming Programs for Small South, Fowler ............ 12.75 Cooperating with the research will
Acreages, E. M. Juergenson 5.25 35 Careers in AgriBusiness & be the American Horse Council, reB Leadership for Action in Industry, Stone .......... 7.00
Rural Communities Kreitlow, 36 Cowboy Litigation, cently formed, representing most
Aiton and Torrence ........ 7.25 Oppenheimer............8.95 American horse breeds.
9 Farm Tractor Maintenance 37 Mechanics in Agriculture,
Brown and Morrison .... 5.50 Phipps .................. 10.75
10 Factors Affecting Calf Crop 39 Animal Sanitation and Disease Feed Horses Automatically
Cunha, Warnick, Koger .. .12.50 Control, Dykstra .......... 10.00
11 The Farm Management Hand- 40 Pastures fo the South, King 6.50 With Florida Made Unite
book, Hall and Mortenson. 8.00 41 Feed Formulations
12 Horses and Horsemanship Handbook, Perry ........... 6.00
Ensminger ............... 11.75 42 The Meat We Eat, Ziegler.. 9.25 HORSES CAN be fed unattended and
13 When You Preside 43 The Western Horse, Gorman 9.00 automatically for periods up to five
Sutherland .............. 4.95 45 Beef Cattle (5th edition) days according to Technical Indus14 Approved Practices in Beef Snapp .................. 8.50
Cattle Production 47 Animal Breeding (5th edition) tries of Fort Lauderdale which makes
Juergenson .............. 6.25 Winters ................. 6.50 a "Feed-O-Meter."
15 Soil Conservation 51 Cattle Computers
Kohne & Bertrand ........ 6.75 Bonelli .................. 6.00 The unit has a hopper which holds
16 Breeding and Improvement of 52 Approved Practices in 100-125 pounds, and a timing deFarm Animals, Rice ....... 9.95 Swine Production,
17 Swine Science, Ensminger 11.75 Juergenson & Cook ....... 6.25 vice that allows up to eight pre-set
18 Cowboy Arithmetic 53 The Stockman's Handbook, feedings per day.
Oppenhermer ............ 6.95 Ensminger ............... 14.75 Technical Industries has been man19 Contract Farming U.S.A. 54 Veterinary Handbook for
Roy .................... 9.25 Cattlemen. J. W. Bailey. 7.50 ufacturing specialized dairy feeding
20 Sheep and Wool Science 57 Farm Machinery & Equip. equipment for some time, and now
Ensminger ............... 11.75 Smith .................. 8.00
21 Animal Nutrition, Maynard 8.50 58 Managing the Farm Business they are entering the horse feeding
22 Law for the Veterinarian and Beneke ................. 4.50 field.
Livestock Owner, Hannah 60 An Introduction to Ag. Eng.
and Storm ............... 7.50 McColly & Martin ........ 8.25 The company says the Feed-O-Me23 Soil Fertility & Animal 64 Swine Production ter is of extremely rugged construcHealth, Albrecht..........3.98 Carroll & Kreider ......... 9.50 tion, mounts easily on a wall and is
24 How to Make Money Feeding 66 Leather Braiding, Grant ... 3.00 also available in a portable model
Cattle, Simerl and Russell.. 2.50 Tom Lea (2 volumes) ..... 20.00 which can be just plugged into a wall
25 Animal Science, Ensminger 14.75 68 New Lucian Cary on Guns
26 Approved Practices In Dairying Lucian Cary ............. 2.50 socket.
Juergenson & Mortenson .. 6.25 69 Veterinary Drugs in Current The timing device operates on a 24.
27 Approved Practices in Farm Use, Seiden .............. 2.75 hour basis and is designed for the
Management, Hall & 70 Livestock Health Encyclo. horseman who has specific ideas on
Mortenson ............... 6.25 pedia, Seiden, 2nd Edition 9.50
28 Swine Feeding and Nutrition 71 Southern Hog Growing the timing of feedings for his horses.
Cunha .................. 5.75 Scarborough ............. 5.25
USE THIS BLANK TO ORDER BY NUMBER-------Enclosed is (check or money order) for $ Please
send me the books as indicated by the numbers I have encircled:
1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 .
Staying 11 2 13 14 15 16 17 1B 19 201
1 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3
1 31 33 34 35 36 37 39 4
Up-to-Date 2 43 45 47
51 52 53 54 57 58 60
1 64 66 67 68 69 70
Pays Off 71
Send to
In More I Address
AUTOMATIC feeding of horses is pos. Profits! 4% Clip out and mail to I sible with Technical Industries Feed-OISales Tax n I Meter timing and bulk holding unit
B130a, e rs.M THE CATTLEMAN PRESS
BOX 1030, KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA
- -- -- --- -- -- --- -- 20B The Florida Chattleman




The 'llleincke
"SPRED-MRSTER"
ACCURATE SPREADING LOW MAINTENANCE CONTINUOUSLY RELIABLE BUILT TO LAST
* Accurate Poundage Control System
* Hydraulically Controlled
* One Man Operation
* 3-ton to 10-ton Models Available
TELEPHONE: TAVARES
MEINCKE SPREADER WORKS, INC. ASTATULA, FLA. (904) 343-2641




GLANIZED F' I 'IL] Ii
Made in Florida 1939: When You Grow Your Own
for "THE MAN who raises his own cattle and feeds his own feed is the hardest
Florida Conditions for adverse circumstances to whip," said an article quoting from the
Shorthorn World. . Calcium must be replaced in the soil over which
CHECK THESE FEATURES cattle graze if their quality is to be maintained, said T. J. Durrance, Jr.,
in an article on nutrition. . As pasture improvement programs got
-Made from 1-1/8" OD tubular under way, "one of the toughest problems . is the lack of experience galvanized (inside and out) steel and and knowledge . .'research did not precede actual development to any woven wire.
-Heavy 3/4" lag screws -they stay! great extent."
-Adjustable hinges-easy to install.
1/4" Diagonal brace rod.
-Light, Strong, Tough. 1944: U.S.S.C. Gets First Purebreds
-Don't warp from heat of summer.
-12'x4'2" 19.95 -10'x'2" $16.95 U. S. SUGAR Corporation at Clewiston moved in the first of four purebred -14'x4'2" 22.95 -12'x'2" 18.45 herds of cattle-Angus, Hereford, Shorthorn and Brahman-to supply -16'x4'2" 24.45 -14'x'2" 20.95 seed stock to Florida cattlemen and to experiment with in molasses feed-10'x4'2" $18.45 -16'x3'2" 22.95 ing trials .... Kingan & Company (forerunner of Midstate Packing Company) opened a new plant at Bartow. ... Value of Florida's cattle (1.136 Order Today million head) was estimated at $51 million.
and $ave! 1949: Electricity on the Farm
- BUY DIRECT MORE THAN 65 percent of Florida farms were receiving electric service....
Florida cattlemen were warned of the danger of overgrazing young or You save middleman's profit- short grass.... Henry 0. Partin & Sons' Heart Bar Ranch was the sub5% discount on 10 or more in ject of an. article in Parade, nationally distributed newspaper supplement.
one order. ... Norris Cattle Company of Ocala shipped 14 Brahmans to California
by air.
CLIP THIS AD
FILL IN QUANTITIES NEEDED 1954: Irrigation Values Cited
and IRRIGATION wAs reported good for 1) early grazing; 2) adequate grazing;
MAIL TO and 3) hay crops. . Florida State Cattlemen's Association began its
first efforts at promoting beef by hiring June Gunn on a part time basis to work with the association and retailers.... Improved pastures mean SILVER LAKE ESTATES plenty of headaches-but they also provide the easiest means to increase
Rt. 2, Box 153 production, said M. M. Overstreet of Kissimmee.
LEESBURG, FLORIDA 32748
Prices FOB Leesburg, Fla.
WORKING CATTLE in the old days was just as tough and hot a job as today. This group being handled back around 1920 was down in the Immokalee area. The picture was sent in by W. D. Roberts, past president, Florida Cattlemen's Association. The Phone (904) 787-4165 Cattleman will pay $2 for old photos and will return the picture undamaged after used.
22 The Florida Cattleman




Palmetto Angus
Herd Is GRAHAM BULLS DO PERFORM
Dispersed Look at our record at Tifton Performance Test:
Top 25% Averaged $338
Top 50% Averaged $306 No. Graham Gain WDA
Bulls Gain Ratio WDA Ratio o
THE ANGUS herd of Palmetto Angus 1965-66 4 2.80 112% 2.57 109% I
Farms, Palmetto, was dispersed on May 1966-67 7 2.60 108 2.51 106
9 at the Manatee Ag Center at Palmetto 1967-68 8 2.63 108 2.59 109
with the 76 lots grossing $19,190 to strike. 1967-68 8 2.63 108 2.59 109
an average of $253 per head.
Joe Jordan of Cookeville, Tennessee
was the largest buyer with purchases of NO CREEP NO NURSE COWS
15 head for $3445. Second high buyer
was Pete Fulton of Palmetto who bought
11 head for $3145.
Top selling animal, a bull, went to
L. H. Hawkins & Son of Sarasota, on GRAHAM ANGUS FARM
the high bid of $560.
The herd was owned by Don Courtney Floyd Wagner, Mgr.
and Jack Travis of Bradenton. The auctioneer was Bob Cooper of Sarasota. Rt. 3, Box 587 Albany, Georgia ph: 432-7728
Buyers at the sale, with number of head
bought, shown in parentheses, if more
than one, and amount spent, follows: Joe Jordan, Cookeville, Tennessee (15) $3445;
Pete Fulton, Palmetto (11) $3145; Roger Mus- Home of
grave, Bradenton (5) $1440; L. H. Hawkins & M. H. Maximilian 1139 Registered Aberdeen-Angus Cattle
Son, Sarasota (4) $1530; W. H. Trawick, Arcadia and Ankonian Black Engraver
(4) $1080; Bill Talley, Ellenton (5) $1095; Reagan
& Son, Bradenton (5) $1010; R&R Ranch, Tampa DERISO ANGUS RANCH MERCURY ANGUS FARMS
(3) $715; Pitts Angus Ranch, Tampa (4) $1185;
W. W. Ragg, Tampa (2) $620; W. H. Lester, St. Mr. and Mrs. Bob F. Deriso, Owners Petersburg (4) $1120; Elmer Stebbins, Valrico Ph: 229-8085 Shelb
(2) $515; M&B Angus Company, Bradenton (3) Frank Smith, Herdsman Ph: 229-2200 yville, Tennessee
$710; G. W. Harmon, Arcadia (2) $360; J. Wood- North Casey Ave. off Gam Highway -2767
ward, Moore Haven $200; Suwannee Revere Farm P. 0. Box 415 Tampa, Florida Phone: 615/684
Bell (3) $495; Russell Reagan, Bradenton, $160;
Keystone Ranch, Palmetto $180; Larry Davidson,
Bradenton, $185. PROGRESSIVE BREEDING WITH
ANGUS OF Our Herd Sires: MM Eileenmere
Kinner Announces 32; Bobo Parallel; Primus HecketPROMINENCE tier 99.
Change In Operation T R I P L E "Z"
BILL KiNNR, formerly of St. LAZY X RANCHAngus nch
Cloud, and presently manager of Gos- Joe and Sara Zamblto, owners
plouMeadow Asently aars Sais- T. B. Bradshaw, owner Woodstock, Go. Rt. 5. Box 136 Ph: 884-93
pel Meadows Angus Farms, Salis- James "Red" Thompson, Mgr. Ph: 926-6191 Located on Linebaugh Ave.
bury, Connecticut, has announced a 1 Tampa 5 M. off Dale Mabrv Fla.
major expansion in the Angus operation which is owned by Sydney and "Proving Ground for John Deers
Jo Carter. Farm Equipment ... and the Best
The change involves the purchase BOYETTS ANGUS i Angus Cattle"
of an additional 400 acre farm 11/2 DEEREACRES
miles away at Sheffield, Massachu- BROOKSVILLE, FLA. C. M. HAASL DOYLE MITCELL
setts. The new farm will be known as SAT or SUN 796-2289 Owner (404) 267-U70 Mlager
the Four Square Division of Gospel MONROE, GEORGIA
Meadows Angus Farms.
Adding force to the expansion is
the purchase of 36 head of cows and Phil Sanders MIJO FARM
calves from 15 herds in nine states
recently. The purchase raised the P. 0. Drawer A, Laurel, Min. 39440 Performance Tested Reg. Angus
total of breeding age females at Gos- Phone 601/428-0648 Herd Sire: Mijo Blackcap Terry
"The Ton of Beef Bull"
pel Meadows to 71. Ankonian Jes- PRIVATE TREATY AND AUCTION Sire of the Grand Champion Carcas at the
ter is the senior herd sire. SALES 1968 Florida State Fair, Tama
"It's not how big you make them, U. S. 19 N. of Monticello, Fla.
Kinner said the new farm will be it's how you make them big." 904/997-2998
used as a base to fit cattle.
TOTAL VALUE of all land and buildings HUGHES ANGUS RANCH
in Florida farms is about $5.1 billion.
This is an average of $139,372 per farm Ellenton, Florida 33561
-Thes ighanaetg of ny 9,2 s e r ast oQuality Breeding Stock, Scotch and Domestic Bloodlines Herd Classified 86.5.
-the highest of any state east of the Fully Certified for Your Protection.
Rocky Mountains. Quality Doesn't Cost, It Pays!
Over 50 years experience breeding quality cattle
for June, 1969 23 Curtis Hughes, Owner Phone 722-3168 or 722-3139




rwflf
It .Takes More Than ifly Now!
.' + +"You jusT can't do it on hay alone ...... \any more if you want to produce more ~beef per acre," is the observation made by Bob F. Crane, Jr., managing part' ner of Rock Hollow Farm near Ocala,
~This view was what prompted a look at the advantages of forage crop planting on selected acreage- at the ranch along with an irrigation system
N -hat would do the job effectively, efficiently and within reasonable cost figures. Crane says that after conwas decided to go with the overhead
_ self-propelled, circular irrigator.
Background in the decision to irrigate ties in with the idea of producing more beef per acre. Crane right now is irrigating a pasture area of 133
- __acres where winter oats and rye were
,/+;raised this past season with marked success. Plantings have recently been made of Millex 22 and SX 16 Sudax and a selected variety of corn will also figure in the crop program.+ Heavy application of fertilizer is noted in these plantings with 1000 pounds per acre of 5-10-20 laid on. Silage will be made and stored in a bunker silo from these crops at an, overall estimated cost of $9.50 per ton, Crane says.
The Rock Hollow operation features a purebred Angus herd and a
24 The Florida Cattleman




purebred Polled Hereford herd as well
ere~oDEXTER FARMS
as a crossbred commercial herd on which registered purebred Angus, 3 miles north of Crescent City, Florida
Polled Hereford and Charolais bulls Registered Angus Cattle
are used.
The method observed in irrigating Featuring JINGO 36, son of the $600,000 Bull JINGO
winter oats and rye is heavier ferti- 2, and ANKONY PRESIDENT QUEEN MOTHER, son of lization, heavier seeding and green
chopping. It's delivered in that form ANKONY PRESIDENT, the $1,000,000 Bull. direct to the cattle in Oswalt forage
wagons with no grazing involved.
Added cuttings have been realized F O R S A L E
under the irrigation program, and it
was noted that some acreage with YOUNG BULLS and
Elbon rye was being cut the third WORKING BULLS
time for the season. Crane points out
the cattle clean up the green chop Some Good 4-H Club Bargains
and there's little or no waste involved.
Some Facts... DEXTER FARMS
THE IRRIGATION system installed by JAMES PRINGLE THOMAS A. DEXTER
Crane is the hyGROmatic, a center- MANAGER OWNER
pivot type which can put out one On The Farm 168 Oak'Grove St. Summer Address
inch of water in 66 hours or 1/2 inch Ormond Beach, Fla. 58 Turner Road
Ph. 904/698-2212 Ph. 904/677-4583 Pearl River, N.Y.
in 32 hours. As the pivot system Ph. 914/735-2623
swings its main line around a circular Visitors Always Welcome
area, it could be compared to the
second hand on a clockface. The Eva's Bandolier Lad Registered Angus Cattle
sprinkler heads on the main line near This great sire and progenitor of the BARthe center of the circle are moved over DOLIERMERES is the foundation breeding of c--ro cw hr ea eand our top herd
the field relatively slowly; those out sires also descend from this same propotent on the end of the main line are moved bloodline. at a faster rate. They must apply FAIRMEADOWS RANCH
water at a faster rate than those to- HUGH & FRONITA SCHNEIDER Mr. & Mrs. Low Crofton, Owners
Route I Phone: 48&-2642
ward the center. Running on rubber HAMPTON, GEORGIA Box 114 Gaiesille, Florida
tired wheels, the system at Rock Hol- Ph. Atlanta 355-5364
low covers 133 acres in one circular
sweep. BALDWIN ANGUS RANCH Grovelane Farms
Operating costs run to just over $1 Our Herd Sire: Bardoliermere 60PP3
per hour, Crane estimates, including "Nugget"-the only two-time Florida Home of
diesel fuel. He operates the unit at Premier Bull winner. MEADOW LANE BELLMAN
night to save on evaporation, usually ~We are breeding him to daughters of Dor Macs Bardoliermere 65 Owned jointly with Meadow Lane Farm starting at 6:00 p.m. and running for ,A Ton of Angus Type."
Ranch 5 Miles North of Ocala off 1-75. EARRY FRIEDLANDER, Owner 12 hours. Crane says a good water Ph: 629-4574. Leroy & Jane Baldwin, owners. P. 0. Box 272, Lake Wale. Florida
pattern figures out to one inch every
10 days in the winter and one inch
every seven days in the summer. Quality Registered Angus Registered, Top Quality Angus
When.it's very dry and there's been SUN MAR C RANCH
little or no rainfall for an appreciable Zephyrhills, Fla. Bennett's Angus Ranch
time, the system is in operation every Phone Tampa 949-4294
night. featuring P. 0. Box 8, Phone 594-5202
A unique feature of the system is GREENWOOD, FLORIDA
the liquid nitrogen hookup with the Meadow Lane Mascot
sprinklers. It's the Inject-O-Meter
Injector and in addition to liquid nitrogen, any other liquid fertilizer can PERFORMANCE TESTED ANGUS 1 5 0 R E G I ST E R E D A N G U S
be used and fed through the irrigation
nozzles to the soil, along with the wa- MILLARDEN FARMS Deep River Ranch
ter. The complete system is powered E. H. and Robert Lenholt
by an Allis-Chalmers 2900 engine. 404/553-5375 Phone Daytona Beach CL 2-8478
A 10 inch well is used going 264 James E. Cushman Bob Blalock DELAND, FLORIDA I
deep with the water coming up 38 Owner Msnging Partner RANCH 6 MILES WEST ON HIGHWAY 44
feet. Sprinkler head outflow is adjusted and the pump operates on 85
continuous horsepower.
A Few Reasons..
CRANE PoITrs out the main reason
(Continued on page 30)
for June, 1969 25
BREEDERS OF REGISTERED ANGUS CATTLE (904) 748-1856




Raising Crops for Forage Can Prove
To Be Profitable for Cattlemen
by J. E. BERTRAND Mostly in the fall, a large supply ment Station to evaluate five different
and L. S. DUNAVIN, JR. (over 800,000 in 1968) of light-weight cool-searon feeding programs for
W. Fla. Experiment Station calves (around 300 pounds) are avail- growing fall-weaned, light-weight
THERE ARE certain cool-season able in Florida. By utilizing cool- stocker beef calves. The treatments
pasture grasses which can be grown season forage feedng programs (pas- were as follows:
for grazing such as small grains ture or harvested forage), many of the 1) Sorghum silage plus concentrate
(wheat,, rye, and oats), fescue, and better quality stocker beef calves can supplement (protein, mineral, vitaRye grass, but each has certain dis- be grown to desired feedlot weights of min) in drylot.
advantages often magnified by weath- 600 to 800 pounds instead of being 2) Sorghum silage plus concentrate
er conditions. The growing of these shipped out of state or slaughtered. supplement (prote-n, mineral, vitapasture grasses for grazing is quite The growing of stocker beef calves min) plus high-moisture corn in dryvulnerable to economic situations in can fit in as an off-season enterprise lot.
that temporary grazing crops face in rotation with early-maturing soy- 3) Tall fescue (Kentucky 31) and
competition with harvesting of prior beans. wheat (Hadden) grazed in rotation
crops for establishment, while perma- (supplemented with a 12 percent
nent grasses tie up valuable land Five Programs Tried crude protein high-energy supplement
which might otherwise be used during IN THE fall of 1967, a study was fed at the level of 1 percent of bodythe Summer for a cash crop. initiated at the West Florida Experi- weight). Stocking rate: eight calves
Five Feeding Programs Evaluated
EVALUATION OF Five Different Cool-Season Feeding Regimes for Growing Stocker Beef Calves in Northwest Florida (1967-68)
Treatments
I (a) II (b) III (c) IV (d) V (e)
No. of animals 16(f) 15 (f) (g) 16(f) 16(f) 16(f)
Length of trial, days 173 173 173 173 173
Av. initial wt., lb. 330.6 329.3 328.4 339.4 323.4
Av. final wt., lb. 597.2 635.7 609.7 530.3 561.9
Av. daily gain, lb. 266.6 306.4 281.3 190.9 238.5
Feed/cwt. gain (h) 1.54 1.77 1.63 1.10 1.38
Sorghum silage
Concentrate supplement 2362.0 1778.7
High-moisture corn 108.8 102.5
Pasture supplement 168.0
Feed/animal/day, lb. (h) 276.6
Sorghum silage 36.38 31.49
Concentrate supplement 1.68 1.81
High-moisture corn 2.98
Pasture supplement 4.49
Feed cost/cwt. gain
Sorghum silage(i) $ 11.81 $ 8.89
Concentrate supplement(j) $ 5.36 $ 5.05
High-moisture corn (k) $ 3.70
Pasture supplement (1) $ 7.14
Pasture(m) $ 11.85 $ 17.45 $ 14.43
Total $ 17.17 $ 17.64 $ 18.99 $ 17.45 $ 14.43
Av. cost/head of feeder $ 88.01 $ 87.66 $ 87.42 $ 90.35 $ 86.09
Av. feed cost/head of feeder $ 45.78 $ 54.05 $ 53.42 $ 33.31 $ 34.42
Total cost/head of feeder(o) $ 133.79 $ 141.71 $ 140.84 $ 123.66 $ 120.51
Gross value/head(p) $ 152.20 $ 162.10 $ 155.47 $ 135.23 $ 143.28
Profit per head +$ 18.50 +$ 20.39 +$ 14.63 +$ 11.57 +$ 22.77
(a) Treatment I sorghum silage +1 concentrate supplement (pro- (g) One animal broke a leg during the course of the experiment; the
tein, mineral, vitamin) in dry lot. data for that animal were disregarded.
(b) Treatment II sorghum silage + concentrate supplement (pro- (h) Does not include pasture.
tein, mineral, vitamin) + high-moisture corn in drylot. () Sorghum silage $10.00/ton.
(c) Treatment III tall fescue and wheat grazed in rotation (j) oncentrate supplement (protein, mineral, vitamin) = $98.53/ton.
pasture supplemental ration was fed at the level of 1% of (k) High-moisture corn = $44.00/ton.
bodyweight. (1) Pasture supplemental ration = $51.57/ton.
(d) Treatment IV tall fescue and wheat grazed in rotation (m) Pasture cost $61.25/acre for tall fescue, $45.38/acre for
unsupplemented. wheat and $48.88/acre for rye.
(e) Treatment V tall fescue and rye grazed in rotation (n) Feeder cost = $26.62/cwt. (includes initial cost of animals,
unsupplemented. hauling, and ve.erinary cost).
(f) Two pens of eight animals (seven seers and one heifer) each (o) Does not include labor.
per treatment group. (p) Based on an animal value of $25.50/cwt. at the end of the trial.
26 The Florida Cattleman




Board Sales Held For Sale or Lease Fine Improved Stock Farm
BOARD SALES for large lots of cat- WITH HERD OF TOP QUALITY CATTLE
tle are getting interest in South
Florida according to Pete Clem- Approximately 1500 to 2000 acres of fine brown loam well improved posture stock
ons, manager of the Okeechobee farm with 350 to 400 good quality Angus cows bred to Charolais bulls. The range
and Belle Glade livestock markets. is well improved with sod and this year some 600 acres of soybeans are being planted on
200 steers sold April 21 at the same. The ranch will care for 400 head of brood cows easily and plant 300 to 500 acres
Glades Market for $25.90. Ray of beans or grain on the side. This ranch has ample management and labor, push .button
Leach, marketing reporter said automatic feeding silo to care for cattle in winter. Can finance same with reasonable
they were Standard crossbreds interest rates if bought. If leased, lease will be in keeping with ranch improvements and
weighing 775 pounds. They were type oi range. This property has 11/2 miles frontage on good blacktop road.
Clewiston to U.S. Sugar Corpora- Also option to purchase approximately 2500 acres of adjoining lands with 65 per cent
tion at Clewiston (which plans to improved pasture and balance in timberland or area suitable for clearing.
finish them), with a five percent Also 800 acre ranch with improvements second to none in the South and lands as
cut and three percent shrink, productive and fertile as any in the southland, with sizeable top quality purebred Charolais
Okeechobee saw a board sale of herd of cattle bred largely to French bulls for lease only, term of years. This ranch
two lots consigned by Williamson has nice show or preparation barn, ample separating pens, and a $35,000 concrete feed
Ranch at Okeechobee May 6. 147 lot with automatic operating silos. 100 acres Coastal Bermuda, 200 acres of soybeans and
head were bought by Nathan ltwt uoai prtn io.10arsCatlBrua 0 ce fsyen n
holmes of Fort Pierce for $29. silage planted this year. Reason for selling or leasing is because of age and desire to retire.
They weighed 480 pounds and he This ranch located 1/4 mile off U.S. highway with good road leading to same. All lands
was allowed a five percent cut. 75 individually owned.
head were bought by U.S. Sugar If interested, contact P.O. Box 1320, Greenwood, Mississippi or telephone day 453-4312,
for $28.10. Weights on the last or night 453-3493, or 237-6158, area code 601.
group weren't available at presst.ime.
For yeae we have promoted the type of Angus A
cattle wich are becoming popular today When
on 2.5 acres of tall fescue and 2.5 in need of Angus with length, muscling and
grow-ability, we invite you to visit our herd. ,featuring the breeding of Whitneyacres of wheat. mere 512 and Meadowmere 1632.
4) Tall fescue (Kentucky 31) and Barnett Angus Farm
wheat (Hadden) grazed in rotation Gulfstream Farm
(unsupplemented). Stocking rate: Phone: 678-2264 8401 S.W. 30th St., Phone LU 3-3759
same as in treatment 3 above. Washington, Georgia FT. LAUDFIDLE, FWIDA 33314
5) Tall fescue (Kentucky 31) and
rye (Explorer) grazed in rotation
(unsupplemented). Stocking rate: GEORGIA ANGUS ASS'N REGISTERED ANGUS
same as in treatment 3 above. Cattle listed at all times
Tall fescue pastures received an- (Both reg. and commercial) Circle R Ranch
nually 500 pound/acre of a complete Arky E. Rogers, Owner
fertilizer (0-14-14) and three applica- JIM VOGT, Fieldman 752-2103 RFD 3, Box 118
tions of 200 pound/acre of ammonium P. 0. Box 593 Phone AC 912 LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
nitrate. Perry, Georgia 31069 987-3319 Located 7 miles south on U.S. 41
It can be noted in the chart that ....
calves fed sorghum silage, a concen- Edwin Elite Perth Champion A TON BULLtrate supplement, and high-moisture Centurion Barrn A SON OF THE Immortal BROOKS HILL FARM
corn (approximately 3 pound/head/ 100; K. B. Eclipse 2nd Reserve Champion
day) in drylot had the largest gain. Dixie Hatl. Quality Angus
Service Age Bulls for sale sired by the above. John H. Tyler, owner
Ph. 226-1675
Cheapest Gains? FRANK L. RAMSEY FARM Verlyn Denney, Mgr.-Partner
Jim Griffin, Mgr., Ph. AC 912/246-6412 Ph. 735.-3350
TM produed gain nspplmeted COLQUITT, GEORGIA Thomasville, Ga.
was produced by unsupplemented ______________ ____________calves grazing tall fescue and rye in
rotation. The most expensive gain SE TP -U Y
$18.99/cwt.) was produced by sup- SIZE- TYPE- QUALITY
plemented calves grazing tall fescue ABERDEEN-ANGUS
and wheat in rotation.
If the feedlot industry in Florida is THOMPSON BROS. FARM
J. R. and Bruce Thompson, Owners
to ever grow to sufficient size to take Rt. 1, Box 323 Marianna Y0V?7 U
care of the state's demand for fed PH: 482-8522 Florida -" l 1 1
ROUTE 1, BOX 267-A, OCALA, FLORIDA 32670
beef, a large supply"of high-grade, TELEPHONE (904) 237-2815
heavy-weight feeder cattle will have ROBERT F. CRANE Jr., MANAGER
to be available for feeding. Feeding I Sw n F Inc. WA. i, /,. ,f ,-,h.
programs, similar to those mentioned Performance Tested Regstered AnJgus
in this paper, for growing and con- I Perf. Tested Reg. Polled Herefords
ditioning light-weight calves to de- W...600H,. .
P.~~eml~ 0. oBor 11,4 LieOkFoia 26
sired feedlot weights will need to be 1 I, II,1i] o,,ct,
thoroughly tested and evaluated. Mr. &: Mrs. Ernes A. S1e &.., .
Pm ac w TteMd l ca"I
for June, 1969 27 OtsMrdg Feuder iCsal




Soil pH of 5.8 Minimum
For Clover-Grass Pastures
by N. GAMMON Jr. & W. C. BLUE tion in clover growth. Nitrogen is
University of Florida fixed by the bacteria (Rhizobium) livALTHOUGH IT has been known for ing attached to the clover roots. Poor
many years that lime was necessary clover growth results when less nitroto produce a satisfactory soil pH for gen is fixed and the subsequent grass good clover growth in Florida, it has growth is also poorer. been difficult to specify the minimum Basic laboratory studies with white pH necessary for optimum growth. clover inoculating bacteria (RhizoAn experiment initiated in the Fall bium) have shown that it grows best PASTURES WITH clover in abundance of 1956 has now provided the data and fixes most nitrogen in a pH can be seen in Palm Beach County. This
that establish a soil pH of 5.8 as the range of 5.8 to 7.0. At lower pH scene is from one of K. D. Eatmon's pasminimum necessary for optimum values growth rates and nitrogen fix- tures near Loxahatchee.
white clover (Trifolium repens) ation gradually decline, becoming alPensacola Bahia grass (Paspalum no- most completely ineffective below 5.0. tatum) pasture production. A significant reduction in white losses approximated 500 pounds per
In this experiment, lime at rates of clover-grass herbage production and acre at a soil pH of 7.0. 1, 21/2, 4, and 5/2 tons per acre was quality can be expected whenever the thoroughly mixed to a six-inch depth soil pH in the surface 0 to six inch Excess Lime Wasteful in a flatwoods soil Leon fine sand; layer drops below 5.8. Additional THIS INCREASED calcium loss at
then the entire area was seeded to lime should be applied whenever the higher soil pH levels makes it wastewhite clover and Pensacola Bahia soil reaches a pH of 5.8 or lower. ful and more costly to maintain the
grass. The area was fertilized an- On the soil studied, which was soil reaction much above the pH 5.8
nually in November with 0-10-20 fer- fairly representative of most of the to 6.0 level necessary for optimum tilizer at the rate of 400 pounds per flatwoods soils in Florida, the average clover-grass production. To maintain acre. The 0-10-20 was formulated annual calcium loss from the surface a soil pH of 5.8 or higher for an from potassium chloride and ordinary six inches of soil was equivalent to established white clover-grass pasture superphosphate, since use of the lat- about 200 pounds per acre of agri- will require 1/2 to one ton of agriculter insures an adequate supply of cultural limestone. This rate of cal- tural limestone every five years. Such sulfur. cium loss was measured at a soil pH a program constitutes a very minor
The only other fertilization was a of 5.8 to 6.0. Of particular interest part of the cost of good pasture mainmicronutrient frit containing copper, was the fact that calcium losses from tenance but in a clover-grass pasture zinc, manganese, iron, molybdenum, the surface six inches increased with it is a major factor in obtaining maxiand boron applied to the entire area higher pH levels so that annual lime mum quality and quantity of herbage. in the Fall of 1957 at the rate of 35
pounds per acre. Herbage samples
were taken five or six times a year.
pH 7.0 5Y2 tons lime/acre
How Much Lime? pH 6.7 4 tons lime/acre
0pH 6.2 2Y2 tons lime/acre
FROM THE beginning it was evident b 11,000 s .
that one ton of lime was not sufficient P p. i, 5.0
for good clover growth, but all other __lime rates produced herbage at rates 10,000 ,t56pIt.4
that were not significantly different 0 P 5ofH.
from one another. However, in 1962
the herbage yields on the 21/2 ton per U 9,000 acre plots began to decline. Then in O
1966 the plots that originally received 0 pH 5.0
four tons of lime per acre also showed 8,000
a significant yield decrease. .
Although there were variations in 7,000
yield from year to year associated flu,
with rainfall and other Weather chang- -p 4.7 es the significant differences based on
:D 6,000
average yields can be diagrammed as Z
shown in the graph. Note prticul- Z
larly that there seemed to be no im- 0 '59 6 6 6 64 6 6 67
provement in yield as long as the soil 159 '60 '61 '62 '63 '64 '65 '66 '6!
pH was in the range 5.8 to 7.0 but YEARS
that soil pH values below 5.8 resulted
that deceaso i Hvalue b o 8uted DIAGRAm OF effects of lime rates and soil pH changes on annual oven-dry in a decrease in forage production. herbage production from white clover-Bahia grass pasture.
The major factor in the reduced
total forage production was the reduc28 The Florida Cattleman




Now-Made in FLORIDA
TO MEET THE FEEDING NEEDS IN FLORIDA AND THE SOUTHEAST
1~ 41
4,,
To better serve you, we have just completed our new Tampa facility
0 SUPER-MOL FLY CONTROL BLOCKS-Controls SUPER-LASS-Dried Cane (blackstrap) Molasses
flies and stomach worms and prevents foot rot. on a nutritious carrier . free-flowing . for Economical to feed-5elf-fed-Saves labor. mixing in Beef or Dairy rations. All the benefits
Also supplies Molasses, Major Minerals, Trace of Molasses without the problems associated with
Also supples Molasses, Major Minerals, Trace Minerals and Vitamins A and D. wet molasses.
(Not to be fed to lactacting dairy cows) SUPER-PRO BLOCKS-Protein Supplements for self-feeding or in confinement ... Supplies bal* SUPER-MIN BLOCKS (and sacked Mineral Sup- once of Proteins, Minerals and Vitamins to supplements) for self-feeding on pasture or in con- plement pasture or grains. finement. Provides Major Minerals, Trace Minerals and Vitamins A and D. Economical and con- SUPER HORSE BLOCKS-Self-fed as a supplevenient. ment to grain and roughage. Provides a balance
of Proteins, Minerals and complete Vitamin fortification.
See your local distributor, or 5
Write or Call Collect...
W MOLASSES
Super-Mol Division P
Telephone 813 677-9181
Route 3, Box 498 Tampa, Florida 33619




per year on the irrigated land, Crane
L pointed out. He said, "I see no way
44th Semi Annual 1RI*_ we can do this on a hay system or on
a grass system."
The carrying rate of pastures under
7 the previous system was three acres to
the cattle unit. Under the new sysS IL V E Rtem, the carrying capacity has been changed to two cow units per acre
and Crane confidently feels that he
will be able to eventually carry a unit
per acre.
S P U R I p vIn Florida, under conditions where
water tables don't permit use of seep- ~ ~ age irrigation, this represents a significantly favorable ratio of cattle to
RO DE 0COWS AND CALVES at Rock Hollow land.
Farm clean up the green chop that's delvrdfresh cut to pasture and leave Looking Ahead ...
July4, 6 erylitte o thegrond.CRANE BELIEVES the sprinkler irri2:30 Friay I rig te C opsgation method is the most efficient,
2:30 Friay Irig te C opsand that it will do the job of providing feed for the cattle in a shorter
8:0 S turay(Continued from Page 25) time than previously, and with added
8:00 Satudayfor turning to irrigated winter forage tonnage.
and silage is to keep things level after Going from being strictly a pro2:30 Sunday his Coastal Bermuda and Coast cross ducer of beef to a combination ranchsummer pastures are gone. These er-farmer has nettled Crane a bit as
at the grasses grow well on the farm's Lake- he doesn't consider himself a farmer
land fine sand soil from June to Sep- in the sense of the word. But he sees SILVER SPURS ARENA tember and at times on into Novem- the value in the step he's taken and
her when there is sufficient moisture. is willing to assume the role to attain MID-WAY BETWEEN He observed that "the new Coast the goal of more beef production.
cross looks like it has the palatability Crane speculates that the operation KISSIMMEE & ST. CLOUD and productivity of Pangola grass, or might eventually become a "semi-dryON .S.441close to it, with greater frost resist- lot" one, with six months of mechaniON US.,441ance than Pangola." His success with cal feeding and six months of grazing
growing the grasses goes back to good in a year's time. 4-an Hghayfertilization, coupled with careful A number of different crop varie4-Lae Hihwaycontrol of grazing so that the grasses ties have been experimented with at
are neither overgrazed nor under- the farm including Florida Black
50 Acres of Free Parking grazed. Rye; Florida 500 oats; Florida 501
In the winter, after frost gets to oats; Elbon rye; Pennington Winter the pasture grasses, there remains Graze y;M'i' iaGae
9 FEATURING what Crane calls "standing hay or rye anermeMNalr' "8-11 rerh
SILVER SPURS frosted grass." A molasses and urea ls he l en yrd) n
SILVER SPURS supplement is fed to the cattle then Glas tRee galbinsybis. n
"QUADRILLE ON HORSEBACK" and it seems to give them a taste for Gulf Rye goras srcivdti
SADDLE BRONC RIDING the "frosted grass." season from the rye, it appears that it
BAREBACK RIDING The breeding program at Rock Hol- will be used heavily along with oats
CALF ROPING low is established so that the COWS and Rye grass together to make up
STEERWRESLINGstart calving in December. Feeding the major portion of forage production
STE RETIGof rye or Rye grass, oats and hay is ec pig
BULL RIDING started with the arrival of the new eacosping.t h uueCaesy
CLOVERLEAF BARREL RACE calf crop. Loo ing adton th futuein Crae says
This is part of the background from hrthat inadiio toy feedinguth cowsan which Crane reached his decision to ha s erth farm may feedot businds
12,00000 go with an irrigation program. mayh alster int these.o usns
REVED He explained, "We couldn't see ir- wit the ster cit is. kprm
SEATS rigating a lot of acres, but to get the A any fratcoditon's clok wrom~UNDER ROOF maximum production per on this iigfrRc olwsctiwt
small acreage, we felt we must have crops being raised for feed 12 months $3.0 $.0 $100irrigation." Costs run to not less of the year under a modem system of
$3.0 $200 $.00than $30 per acre, and with irrigation, overhead irrigation.
For Rodeo Reservations Contact: to $45 per acre, Crane figures. This As Crane puts it, "The land will
Pat lle's Isurnceincludes the heavier fertilization and never be idle."
124 Broadway hairseig
Phone 305 847-5118 or 847-5119 The ultimate goal is the production PLANT iNss in Florida for profit.
Kissimmee of at least 35 tons of forage per acre Ask your County Forester.'
___________________ 30 The Florida Cattleman




c 0 .4 L
.... .. . ....
4,1 rl J A I I
VALIVI SIIOItES:6.:,.:.*JUN
REAMm',
e -&Cti'in-, l
'JAL, ne 1969




Th rn Equipment
For y's Cattleman Beef
Beef Master
BOX 728-DR DODGE CITY, KANSAS
ELIMINATE HIGH COST OF RANCH LABOR WITH
W-W Calf Cradle
W~'S4 l44e t
CATTLE HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
Loading Chute
Designed For Abuse-No Injury To Cattle
C MPLETE LINE OF W-W
* e es Portable Corralsj
C Cr I Stock Oilers
* oading h es Farm and Ranch Scales
* Feed Bunks Pick-up Stake Racks
* Branding Iron Heaters Pick-up Stake Rack
.NCII
c_ Jack Cullison
Phone 629-5050 or 629-4759 4900 N.W. Blitchton Rd.
OCALA, FLORIDA
(U.S. HIGHWAY 27 JUST WEST OF 1-75)




Annual Convention Program
Florida Cattlemen's Association A Warm Welcome,
Palm Beach Shores, Florida Cattlemen
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18
8:30 p.m.-Animal Industry Technical Committee Meet ............. TBA to Palm Beach County
THURSDAY, JUNE 19
8:00 a.m.-'til-Registration .................... Colonnades Beach Hotel
9:00 a.m.-Florida Cattlemen's Ass'n Committee Meetings* ....Colonnades We wish you every best
12:00 noon-FCA Exec. Com.-Breed Ass'n Pres. and Sec'ys Lunch.Fla. Room wish for a successful con(Courtesy Hector Feed Mills) vention and hope you enjoy
2:00 p.m.-Florida Cattlemen's Ass'n Directors' Meeting.. Palm Beach Room your visit in the area. 2:00 p.m.-Florida CowBelles Business Session .............. French Room
4:00 p.m.-Address: Honorable Claude Kirk, Governor .. Crystal Ball Room 5:00 p.m.-Cattlemen's Sweetheart Swimsuit Revue ............. Poolside
6:00 p.m.-Get Acquainted Hospitality Hour ............ Colonnades Lawn
(Courtesy Fla. Angus Ass'n and PBCCA)
FRIDAY, JUNE 20 BANK OF
7:00 a.m.-Breakfast for the Cattlemen .................. Marine Terrace
(Courtesy Cutter Laboratories)
7:30 a.m.-Florida CowBelles Breakfast .................... French Room
(Courtesy Jo-Su-Li Farms, Colquitt, Georgia)
8:00 a.m.-'til-Registration ...................... Colonnades Beach Hotel "THE OLDEST BANK IN
9:00 a.m.-General Business Session ........................ Ocean Room
Call to Order: President Charles Lykes PALM BEACH COUNTY
Invocation: John R. Sanderson, N'wood United Methodist Church
Welcome: Dan Gaynor, Chairman, Board of Commissioners
Response: First Vice President R. D. Bennett Pahokee, Florida
Program Presiding Officer: R. D. Bennett, 1st Vice President
9:30 a.m.-Committee Reports: (5 minutes maximum) MEMBER: F.D.I.C.
Brand and Theft: John DuPuis Research: R. D. Bennett
Beef Grading: Dallas Dort Beef Council: Cedrick Smith, Jr,
Marketing: Gene Felton Legislative: Latimer Turner
Disease: J. 0. Pearce, Jr. Others
10:00 a.m.-Report by Executive Committee: President Charles Lykes 10:15 a.m.-Preliminary Resolutions Report: Billy Peeples 10:30 a.m.-Presentation of Sweetheart Contestants: JoAnn Smith 11:00 a.m.-Address and Film, John C. Duncan, Jr. 11:30 a.m.-Address: Ray Wilkinson
i2:00noon-Cattlemen's Lunch (Dutch) .................. Marine Terrace
12:30 p.m.-CowBelles Luncheon and Fashion Show ..... Palm Beach Room
(Courtesy Florida Ass'n of Livestock Markets) 09
1:30 p.m.-General Business Session ........................ Ocean Room
Presiding Officer: T. L. Sloan, 2nd Vice President
1:30 p.m.-"Livestock Thefts Program," N. H. Gregory, Ala. Dept. of Ag. 1:45 p.m.-"U. of F. Veterinary College" Dr. G. T. Edds 2:00 p.m.-Address: Honorable Doyle Conner We hope you have one of
2:45 p.m.-Resolutions Committee Final Presentation and Vote the best conventions yet!
Election of Officers
6:30-7:00 p.m.-Hospitality Party ..... ...... Colonnades Lawn
(Courtesy Dolomite Products Division of Dixie Lime and Stone Co.)
7:00 'p.m.-Banquet ................................ Crysstal Ball Room
Invocation: Robert Johnson, Lay Leader, Calvary Meth. Church Distributor of
Master of Ceremonies: Ralph Cellon, Jr. Pure Oil Products
Sweetheart Winner Introduction: Commissioner Doyle Conner
Drawing for Loin of Beef, Courtesy Florida Beef Council
9:30 p.m.-Dance .................................. Crystal Ball Room
(Band Courtesy Caravelle Land and Cattle Company) J.E. WILSON & SN, I .
During the Convention, Enjoy a Coffee Break
(Courtesy Singletary Hereford Farms, Blakely, Georgia) BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA
Enjoy an Orange Juice Break
(Courtesy Ben Hill Griffin, Inc.)
FOR THE TEENAGERS
Movies, Music, "Do the Milk Thing," Games, Fun Box #836
(Courtesy U. S. Sugar Corp., Syfrett Feeds and McArthur Jersey Farm) Ph: 996-2585
* Meeting Sites Will Be Posted In Colonnades Lobby
for June, 1969 33




WELCOME
FLORIDA
CATTLEMEN
from
I Lu.I. Am CROSSBRED CATTLE at Double D Ranch, Nine Mile Bend, are shown grazing in
O e echobee the Rye grass pastures provided under the ranch program.
and Palm Beach County Has Strong
Glades And Active Cattlemen's Group
IN THE almost 30 years of its exist- and K. D. Eatmon's Loxahatchee ence, the Palm Beach Cattlemen's As- ranch. The tour concluded at the Live tocksociation has an exceptional record of Delray Beach ranch of Eatmon.
accomplishments in helping solve A welcome to Double D Ranch was some of the many problems facing given by A. Richard Diebold, owner, M arkets cattlemen in addition to being a close- who introduced Dave Young, the
knit group in programming various manager and Dudley Diebold, assistevents, ant manager. The group saw the
The association was originally pastures where Florida Certified Rust formed as the Palm Beach County Resistant Rye grass was planted and Pete Clemons, Manager Livestock Producer's Association. The where the crossbred cattle graze on a
name was changed to the present one rotational basis. in 1945. First president was Roscoe The pastures are set up in 70 acre L. Braddock of Belle Glade who plots and figures out to a cow and a
served for five years. calf per acre or 140 head. The plots
We extend our sincere best In addition to Braddock, the orig- are fertilized in the spring and fall
wishes for a most successful inal group of men who were instru- with 200 pounds of 0-8-24 per acre.
convention to all our cattle- mental in forming the association in- Other grasses in use at the ranch are
men friends, If we can be of cluded H. L. Speer, Fritz Stein, Sr. Argentine Bahia and Coastal Berany ssitane t yo atany (deceased); Howard Haney; John L. muda. The cattle operation is the anye pastne lto yus atk n y Evans (deceased); and M. U. Mounts cow-calf type and Angus, Hereford,
tim, peas lt u knw.who was county agent for almost 40 Charolais and Santa Gertrudis bulls
years. are used in the crossbreeding proSome of the early work was boost- gram observed. ing the necessity for drenching cattle At McArthur's dairy the members Okeechobee Livestock Market and the use of minor elements, both were told how the operation functions
Auctions Every Tuesday in fertilizer and the mineral box. by Al Stokes, manager. A total of
Phone 763-3127 Other activities included helping with 1000 cows are milked twice a day at
Pete Clemons the tick eradication program and the* the dairy with 100 head in the stanOKEECHOBEE, FLA. disaster feed program during 1958. chion barn at a time, 50 on each side.
The association has been active in Each 100 cows have their own pasture putting on barbecues in conjunction and replacement heifers are raised on with field days held at the Everglades the farm. Complete A.I. is observed Glaes ivetoc MaketExperiment Station and other events, in the breeding program. Stokes said
GAdeios Livetoc Market A recent program put on by the that 414 Jersey calves were raised last
Auctoner Monday2 group was a ranch tour type field day year and only four were lost. They're
Pone 996-3028 held on April 16. The tour started started on special feed the day followPetel Bleonsh at Double D Ranch at Nine Mile ing birth and are raised in 3x5 pens
HaLd oGLAEhFA Bend,' followed by a visit to the Mc- until six weeks old. A total of 1,'038,BE IE LAD, FA.Arthur Jersey Dairy at Loxahatchee 000 gallons of milk was produced at
_________________________ 34 The Florida Cattlems',




Welcome
CATTLE I
ASSOCI to your
196 9 CONVENTION
Your hosts, the members of the Palm Beach County Cattlemen's Association, will be looking forward to seeing you in Palm Beach Shores.
Our sincere appreciation to the following for their assistance in sponsoring various events of this convention, for your pleasure and benefit:
Gleason Stambaugh & Son, Florida Music Com- Florida Association of Livestock Markets, Kissimpany, West Palm Beach mee
Singletary Farms, Blakely, Georgia Florida Angus Association, Kissimmee
Okeechobee Livestock Market, Okeechobee Hector Supply Company, Deerfield Beach and
Glades Livestock Market, Belle Glade Okeechobee
J. C. Western Supply, Farmers Market, West McLelland Boot & Saddle Shop, Lake Worth
Palm Beach Palm Beach County Commissioners
Caravelle Land & Cattle Company, Loxahatchee Jo-Su-Li Farms, Colquitt, Georgia A. Duda & Sons, Belle Glade Cutter Laboratories
U.S. Sugar Corporation, Clewiston Palm Beach County Convention Committee
Syfrett Feeds, Lake Park Naco Fertilizer Company, Deerfield Beach




Welcome FCA
from all of us at Sykes Angus Ranch
PUREBRED CATTLE numbers are on the increase in Palm Beach County. There are a number of large herds including the Santa Gertrudis cattle of K. D. Eatmon, some of which are shown above.
the dairy last year, Stokes told the group.
At Eatmon's Loxahatchee ranch, the group was given a pasture tour and saw the Santa Gertrudis cattle and the Quarter Horses. Eatmon and Here is our main herd sire, Black Watch President 239, son his manager, Harold McLeod, exof President, the 1964 International Grand Champion. He plained the breeding program in effect
has been used extensively in our breeding program and his with the cattle and the procedures observed in the feeding and grazing. A first calves look just great. While you're down here in our special look at the Quarter Horses searea, why don't you come by for a visit and we'll show you. lected for Eatmon's annual sale next
year was also given the visitors. The group then went to the Delray Beach ranch where owner Eatmon proIf you're leaving the convention, take 1-95 South to Okeechobee vided a steak dinner before resuming Road and then West to the Ranch. the tour portion of the program. The
group next saw the Santa Gertrudis bulls on gain test and the results were Performance Tested Cattle exxplained by Eatmon, manager
Herd is TB and Bang's Accredited xpand b Etmmnge
Charles Wolf and Jim Pace, extension
animal husbandman, University of Florida. The top-gaining bull averaged 5.07 pounds per day for the 140 day period for 710 pounds total gain. Ph. 683-5134, 683-1464 The 26 bulls involved consumed 88,Rt. 1, Box 358-0 400 pounds of feed.
WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA The ranch tour event was concluded
with, looks at several of the pasture Located at Sunshine State Parkway Exit No. 9 areas carrying the Eatmon purebred
in West Palm Beach Santa Gertrudis cow herds.
The Palm Beach County Association has had strong leadership over the years and a healthy membership. GROVE & PASTURE ___Heading the group this year is G. W.
SPREADERS ... -"Bud" Putnam of Sawyer Ranch. Vice
(Also available "president is John D. Chamblee and
(Alson ailable-IRayburn K. Price is secretary. Harin 5 & 6 ton old McLeod is treasurer and Eatmon
models) is state director. Alternate state director is Putnam.
Local association directors are Putnam, Scott L. French; Bill Hair; McLeod; Chamblee; Jimmy Repper and Stokes. Immediate past presi'W4F/A 7.'W FA PCONIBEAR EQUIPMENT dent is French, who served for two
terms. State director Eatmon also CO., INC. served as president for two terms preP. 0. Box 376 Phone 858-4414 ceding French.
LAKELAND, FLORIDA
7 Miles North on U. S. 98 36 The Florida Cattleman




FOR PROFIT,
SUPPLEMENT
YOUR PASTURES
YEAR-ROUND
. 0 especially in spring
You can get everything you need to keep your cattle in top condition through the winter months ahead from Hector Feed Mills.
Hector has PASTURE BALANCERS in 26 and 30 percent protein mixes. Use Pasture Balancers to compensate for low quality grass. They keep your protein up so your cattle don't lose weight. They help your cows raise healthy calves and rebreed quickly.
We offer a complete range of MINERALS for Florida's climate, and for different soil conditions. Only with the proper mineral balance can you be sure your cattle are getting the full amount of nutrition from roughage and other feeds.
Or use VITA-PRO BLOCKS which assure you that your cattle don't fail to get essential vitamins and protein. Keep them available to all animals during the short grass months. They're made to stand ,
Florida's moist climate.
A..'
A DIVISION OF HECTOR SUPPLY CO.
DEERFIELD BEACH AND OKEECHOBEE, FLA.
TELEPHONES: Boca Raton 399-3003, Okeechobee RO 3-3175 Tom Burdsall, Lake Worth 585-2179 a Elton Lowe, Lake Placid HO 5-5361 Paul Kelly, Fort Pierce HO 1-4895 Oswald Forsee, Okeechobee RO 3-3175 Rod Peeples, Deerfield Beach 399-3003, or Boca Raton 395-0114




Go W1mo au iir till
'44
Address Annual .Conention
FLORIDA CATTLMEN will see a re- The entire session has been shrunk vention starts on Thursday.
vamped program and schedule of to two full days with the exception of All meetings will. b e held at the events at the annual-convention of the the Animal Industry Technical Comn- Colonnades Beach Hotel, a huge
association, June 19-20 at Palm Beach mittee meeting which is set for 8:30 sprawling structure, well designed for Shores. p.m. Wednesday night before the con- the numerous conventions it has hosted. Reservations for rooms should be
made direct to the Colonnades, Box
12633, Palm Beach Shores 33403.
Bang's Ruling Reversed Advance registration for the convention is being offered for the first time
THE FLORIDA Supreme Court has ruled the Florida brucellosis law constitu- in an effort to eliminate standing in tional, reversing a Martin County Circuit decision rendered last September. line for credentials on arrival. This Attorney for the original cattlemen defendants, Charles Damsel of West will also help the hosting Palm Beach Palm Beach, says that a motion for a rehearing will be filed. County Cattlemen's Association lay
The decision in Martin County had been under appeal since early De- plans for "extra-curricular" activities
cember by the Florida Department of Agriculture. The Supreme Court available for adults and teenagers.
granted the cattlemen involved-Reuben Carlton, Fort Pierce; H. C. William- Among the special attractions catson, Indiantown; and G. W. "Bill" Hair of Belle Glade-15 days in which to tlemen can preregister for are deep seek a rehearing. If the requested hearing is turned down by the court, the sea fishing trips, Lion Country Safari, ruling will then become final. golf, as well as the usual convention
Damsel said that the Supreme Court overruled the finding of facts by the
circuit court, basing its decision in part on a book called Beef Cattle by Snapp meals and activities, including baby and Neumann, fifth edition. Damsel said the book contains a "theory of eradi- sitting service. cation five years old" and raises the spectre of undulant fever in humans drinking contaminated milk, which "is impossible since pasteurization." Thursday...
Damsel continued, "The court recognized no distinction between reactors REGISTRATON STARTS in the Colonand diseased cattle, which was the basis of our defense in court-that a reactor AT 8:00 n thursday,
should be proved diseased before slaughter." hades lobby at 8:00 a.m., Thursday,
June 19. Committee meetings are set
for the balance of the morning, with
38 The Florida Cattleman




Art Highie Resigns
ART HIGBIE resigned as executive vice president of the Florida Cattlemen's Association effective May 15. He has accepted a similar post with the Mississippi Cattlemen's Association.
FCA President Charles Lykes of Tampa said the resignation was accepted regretfully by the association, and that he and the entire association wishes success for Higbie.
Higbie was the first full time executive hired by the association. He be- / gan with FCA May 15, 1960, assuming the work of the late June Gunn and the late R. Elmo Griffin, both of Kissimmee. Gunn was the corporate secretary of the association and continued until his death in May, 1965. Griffin had been employed by the association part time as assistant secretary from For Charolais
1947 until his death in May, 1960. and larger beef breeds
Lat Turner, Sarasota, FCA's immediate past president, has been appointed chairman of a committee to receive applications from men interested in the vacated position. He has asked that interested applicants submit three copies of personal and work history to him at FCA headquarters, Box 656, Kissimmee. Turner said, "We are going to take our time and search the field. Art leaves with the office functioning in good shape."
Now, the TECO cattle squeeze
is available in a longer model to
room numbers to be posted. in the Marine Terrace dining room. handle the larger beef breeds
At noon, FCA's executive commit- The afternoon session will recon- quickly, and with safety to
tee will lunch with presidents and sec- vene at 1:30 p.m., with a talk by N. operator and animal. Automatic,
retaries of the various breed associa- H. Gregory, chief of stockyards and adjustable, portable and effitions in Florida, courtesy of Hector brands division of the Alabama De- cient. Same famous TECO construction as standard model for
Feed Mills at Deerfield Beach. partment of Agriculture, speaking on the smaller breeds.
FCA directors will meet at 2:00 livestock theft problems. Dr. G. T.
p.m. in the Palm Beach Room, and Edds, director of the veterinary sci- Write for catalog sheet and prices.
will adjourn to the Crystal Ball Room ence department at the University of Florida Distributor
at about 3:30 p.m., to hear an address Florida will discuss research on dis- NORRIS CATTLE CO.
by Governor Claude Kirk. Following eases and the proposed veterinary col- Box 1088 .. .. Ph. 622-7151
Kirk's speech, will be a hospitality lege at the university. Ocala, Florida 32670
hour sponsored by the Florida Angus Doyle Conner, Florida CommissionAssociation and the Palm Beach er of Agriculture will speak at 2:00 *** County Cattlemen's Association. p.m. Final report of the resolutions Anu
committee is set for 2:45. Election Registered ,
Friday... of officers brought on by the change
of the date of the annual convention c Performance and semen FRIDAY IS a full day beginning at will be next, followed by the formal 0 *
7:00 a.m., with a breakfast for all apol of the tate d or tested Bulls and
catlme sonord y uterla-approval of the state directors precattlemen sponsored by Cutter Lib- sented by the local associations. -K select Heifers
oratories. The registration desk will At 6:30 p.m., Dolomite Products of For Sale Now
open at 8:00 a.m. Ocala will sponsor its traditional hosGeneral business session of the pitality party, after which the banquet c *
membership is called for 9:00 a.m..m. with the irreReports of standing committees will pressible Ralph C on, Jr., Alachua, STARDUST RANCH
start at 9:30 a.m., followed by a report acting as master*of ceremonies. Fea- Henry and Jeannette Chiy
by President Charles Lykes of Tampa atn a of ceenesea- Phone (Ga nnevie) 94/37t-165
from the executive committee. The ture of the evening will be the presen- Phone (insIl 3
resolutions committee chairman, Billy station of the crown to the winning MICANOPY, FLORIDA
Peeples of Moore Haven, will make a contestant for the Cattlemen's Sweet- a preliminary report of questionable or heart, by Commissioner Conner. controversial resolutions, so the mem- The banquet will be followed by a bership may have an opportunity to dance with the orchestra provided by be heard before presentation for final Caravelle Land and Cattle Company, action. Inc., of West Palm Beach.
At 10:30 a.m., Mrs. Cedrick (Jo- Saturday... Ann) Smith of Micanopy will intro- S duce the Cattlemen's Sweetheart con- THE CONVENTION will officially contestants. John C. Duncan, director of elude with the banquet, but shopping Southern Railway System, Washing- and area visits of ranches and enterton, D.C. will show a film and com- tainment are arnple to fill the weekend ment on the help Southern offers. for those who have the time.
Ray Wilkinson, a radio farm news- Throughout the convention, orange
caster from Raleigh,, North Carolina, juice will be provided by Ben Hill ..
will speak next, after which the meet- Griffin, Inc., Frostproof; coffee by .
ing will adjourn to a Dutch luncheon Singletary Farms, Blakely, Georgia. M:] :I4 o
for June, 1969 3a o :




Welcome FCA
To South Florida
MANUFACTURERS OF
Hughes Beefmaker
Hughes 7 Percent
Hughes 14 Percent
PALM BEACH COUNTY has large areas devoted to the raising of ground tomatoes,
Hughes 21 Percent such as shown here.
PASTURE BALANCERS Palm Beach County's Ag. Picture
Hughes Protein Supplement Looks Bright for Coming Years
PALM BEACH County has a land double-cropping was by beans. The
area of 1,265,920 acres with less than estimated payroll in the Coastal area 80,000 acres in urban development, comes to $26,500,000. H U G H ES The total acreage devoted to agricul- The Glades area is noted for its
ture figures out to 1,169,104. Pas- sugar cane and winter salad vegetaFeed & Grain Company. ture and range land totals 161,658 bles. In 1966-67 there were some 20
Boynton Beach Okeechobee acres. different varieties of vegetables rePh: 732-9712 Ph:'RO 3-4110 Two main areas make up the coun- ported on 78,830 acres. Estimated
ty's agricultural picture with the worth of the 23,761 carlots involved P. 0. Box 10 Coastal area and the Glades area. is $48,646,852. Raising of sugar cane
BOYNTON BEACH, FLORIDA Vegetables are the main crops in the has been on the increase in the Glades
Coastal area with 41,680 planted acres with 632,976 tons of sugar produced on approximately 29,523 acres of on 173,114 acres in 1967-68. Seven land. There are 23 dairies with ap- sugar mills are in Palm Beach County. 'proximately 15,000 cows producing The county produces approximately Greetings, Cattlemen annually 120,000,000 pounds of milk. 85 percent of all Florida's sugar and
Cut flowers and sod operations oc- has an estimated payroll of some cupy around 2400 acres and 18,000 $30,000,000. Over 150 farmers are
EVERGLADES acres of new citrus has been planted producing cane for these mills. Price
in the past four years. says the gross worth of cane and moFarm Equipment, Inc. Kent Price, assistant county agent, lasses in 1967-68 was estimated at
points out that due to double-crop- $99,003,914. ping over part of the land, 41,680 The Glades area in 1960 had a large
John Deere Equipment acres were harvested. Most of the number of beef cattle. These dropped
Firestone & Dunlop Tires
Caldwell Manta-Ray Mowers
Ph: 9, P.0. M i CowBelles' Meetings Set
BELLE G FLA. 33430 FLORIDA CowBELLES Association members will have their usual full schedule
of meetings and entertainment along with FCA members at the annual convention, June 19-20, at the Colonnades Hotel, Palm Beach Shores.
The program and schedule of events is as follows: THURSDAY, JUNE 19
WELCOME 8: 00 a.m.' 'til-Registration .................................Hotel Lobby
, tFCA 2:00 p.m.-General Business Meeting (all ladies invited) ........ French Room
Drop in while you're in the 5:00 p.m.-Sweetheart Contestants Swim Suit Revue ................Poolside
~FRIDAY, JUNE 20 : 7:30 a.m.-Florida CowBelles Breakfast ..................... French Room
A complete line of boots, saddles, apparel and (Courtesy Jo-Su-Li Farms, Colquitt, Georgia)
accessories for all. Also, STETSON hats. 10:00 a.m.-8weetheart Contestants Coke Party* ......... Colonnades Hotel
12:30 p.m.-Luncheon and Fashion Show ................ Palm Beach Room
J. C. WESTERN (Courtesy Florida Ass'n of Livestock Markets)
SUPPLY, INC. *Site will be posted in lobby of Colonnades Hotel
FARMERS MARKET SUPER DISCOUNT
1200 S. Congress Ave. W. Palm Beach, Fla.
40 The Florida Cattleman




#ge a good Colneti 0n, Cattleme e.. .
... and while you're looking over the fertile Palm
Beach County area, remember that we supply what
nature doesn't! Why not give us a call for satisfying service?
W. R. G R AC E. &co.
AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS FORT PIERCE TAMPA
THE FLY IS A
PROFIT ROBBER
STOP HIM WITH THE ALL NEW
J' z ANTI-FLY BLOCK
Start Today! Put your cattle on JAZZ Anti-Fly Block, containing all the necessary mineral ... vitamin ... protein supplement and medication content needed to do the job. Easy and convenient to feed ... prevents the breeding of horn flies in the droppings of treated cattle. Aids in the prevention of stomach worms, hook worms and nodular worms. Also, aids in preventing foot rot and lumpy jaw.
ISN'T IT TIME TO GET RID OF THE PROFIT ROBBERS!
"? 20% 37% Protein
S Horse Block Supplement Block
Start now! Balance your pastures with Packed with high energy feed, balJAZZ 20% Horse Block. Easy and anced with high quality proteins from convenient to feed . supplies the natural resources, supplemented with needed protein, mineral and vitamin minerals and vitamins. Free choice supplement for horses of all ages! feeding. Convenient and labor-saving. Feed free choice to horses in training, ... Buy some soon! on pasture, or stall-fed.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION . CONTACT YOUR LOCAL FEED DEALER OR COSBY-HODGES MILLING COMPANY 501 HAMES STREET, ORLANDO, FLA. 32802 PHONE 305/241-3353




WEDGWORTH'S INC,
WI PALM BEACH COUNTY'S coastal area
.............................. .........alone accounts for 23,450 acres of beans
planted in 1967-68.
SINCE 1932sonme because of the sugar cane exSINCE1932pansion, but 1968 numbers are back Ph. 996-2076 up to the previous levels.
The Glades development in agriculture has been influenced by the work
of the Everglades Experiment Station
at Belle Glade. Intensive cattle and
vegetable research has been done at
Catte M iera s Fe tiliersthe station.
Catte M ieras FetiliersWith cattle production corning back
up the estimate for the future appears
Cane iviiass s P sticdesbright with at least 35,000 head
Cane M ola ses estiides moved on new ranch operations during the past three years. Other
ranches with drops in numbers in
__________________________________________________ 1961 have also been increasing during
the same period.
[ 1996-7635 There's no doubt that farming-I I including the raising of beef cattleI I is big business in Palm Beach CounSOUTH BAY EQUIPMENT COMPANY ty. Income in 1967-68 from agriculture totaled $223,526,510, of which
U.S. 27 at N.W. 1st St. South Bay, Florida over $6 million came from the beef
cattle industry segment. Dairy pro___________________________________________________ duction brought over $8 million.
Agri-business accounts for a substantial part of the income with $36,200,STAL AKER000 coming from fertilizer, seed, feed STALN KE Rand insecticide sources and another
ARM RAN H SUPLYINC. $9 million plus coming from landFARM & R NCH SUPPY, NC. scaping and landscape service. The
TAMPA, FLORIDA estimated labor payroll in 1967-68 for
PHONE COLLECT 248-6238 P. 0. Box 172 agriculture came to $78,500,00.
Price says another 200,000 acres are
Corne seeus at 33rd and East Broadway, Tampa. available for agricultural development
Largest Inventory of Fencing for Farm & Ranch in Florida in the county and says that much of
FARMFENING RNA ENTL LA N FNCE the land is quite suitable to the exFARMFENING RNA ENTL LA N FNCE panding beef industry. And he looks
BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED ROOFING for the beef industry to grow even
GAUCHO BARBED WIRE Republic Steel Blue Ridge more in the next 10 years or so. He
POULTRY NETTING Channel Drain 29 gauge. predicts a bright future for overall
FARM GATES -.Galvanized Also 2%/ inch corrugated roof- agriculture in Palm Beach County.
steel, wood panel, wire filled, ing. FLORIDA HAD an estimated 60,000 cattle
aluminum. WELDED WIRE and calves on feed as of January 1,
FENCE POSTS Steel, pres- HARDWARE CLOTH 1969, down three percent from a year
sure treated, creosoted. NAILS Bright or galvanized, ago.
STAPLES SAiN i'mSi seedlings are well suited
F R EE D E L IV ER Y for transplanting on deep sand sites.
42 The Florida Cattleman




Welcome to Palm Beach County!
FCA Mid-Year Conference
JUNE 19-20
Palm Beach County Everglades soil still holds the record for pounds of
beef production per acre per year.
We're proud to join with the Palm Beach County' Cattlemen's Association in welcoming the cattlemen of Florida to growing Palm
Beach County for another convention, It's a
pleasure to have you here!
E. DAN GAYNOR, CHAIRMAN GEORGE V. WARREN, Vice Chairman ROBERT F. CULPEPPER
ROBERT C. JOHNSON E. W. "BUD" WEAVER




IT'S NOT HOW BIG YOU GROW THEMIt's How Quick You Grow'em Big
Welcome.. cattlemen to Palm Make your calves bigger quicker, with Santa
Beach County. We're going all the way to help Gertrudis bulls. Whether you're selling vealers, you enjoy the convention. Hope you have a feeder calves, grass fed steers, or bulls for corngood meeting and a good time. While you're mercial cattlemen to use you'll get more here, take time to stop by our ranches to look pounds and more dollars with Santa Gertrudis.
over our Santa Gertrudis cattle and our Quar- Let us show you some profit building ter Horses. You may see some surprises if you bulls and heifers. You have everything to
aren't familiar with good Santa Gertrudis and gain from a visit to our ranches.
Quarter Horses.
K DE




Introduce Your Best Mares to
BEN de BAR
273,557-1961 Sorrel
BEN de BAR is by Gay Bar King who is by Three Bars. See our Santa Gertrudis at the Delray Ranch He has been at stud in Texas since maturity, but with south of Delray Road on Military Trail. Quarter just a little training he is already responding better Horses and other Santa Gertrudis are at the than we could have hoped. He's bred to show and Loxahatchee Ranch of McArthur's Dairy off perform and he'll do it. So will his colts. Look him Hwy. 441 and 98. Phone Pompano Beach 942over and try him on your top mares. Private Treaty. 6728. 413 N.E. 12th Avenue, Pompano Beach.




BE OUR GUEST!
Welcome to Ouw /kip'ta/itj #ku
It PAYS to use Brand
......... .:.........:..........q
....IME iS DOLOMITE e HI-CAL
L i TARAGONITE 9 FAIRFIELD SLAG
CONVENTION committee chairman
Scott L. French, at right, and Rayburn K. Price, assistant county agent, Palm T IV Beach County, did yeoman work in arranging the 1969 FCA convention activities.
L996-6701 FCA fBy-Laws
ROYAL FERTILIZER AND CHEMICAL CO. Changed
MEMBERS OF the Florida Cattlemen's U.S. 27 at N.W. 1st St. Sou-th Bay, Florida Association will vote on a proposed
by-laws change at the annual convention in Palm Beach Shores, June 19-20. The amendment, if adopted, will SUPPORT THE call for the annual meeting to be held
in June of each year rather than Ocr tober as has been the rule.
Full text of the proposed amend. ii ment is as follows:
"See. 2. The annual meeting of the Corporation shall be held in the month of June each year, and site for the next annual meeting shall be selected at this time, unless by action of the Board of Directors the date Advertise! for the annual meeting may be
changed and the membership is given written notice of such change at least thirty days prior to the time of such For Your Liquid Fertilizer Program meeting. At this annual meeting the
membership shall elect by a majority M EINCKE vote such officers as are provided for
"LIQUI-SPRED" truck mounted or tractor drawn nitrogen applicator or complete in the charter of this Corporation mix fertilizer applicator, and shall transact such other business
3 Models: 1000-1250-1600 gallon capacities .. all fiberglass as may be properly brought before
tanks, stainless steel agitators ... MP Flomax transfer pumps the meeting. At this annual meeting,
h K r athe members shall confirm by a mawith Kohler all iron engine . 32 Ft. wide manual gravity jority vote the members who are to
boom system with dribble or flooding nozzles. serve on the Board of Directors."
President Charles Lykes of Tampa has issued a plea to all members to make a special effort to attend the convention and suggests that the site and program will be of special interest to families.
SINCE 1928, Florida's reforestation program has included the planting of two billion pine seedlings.
M EIN CK E Tel. Tavares 904/343-2641 TREES FOR tomorrow must be planted
SPREADER WORKS ASTATULA, FLA. 32705 today.
46 The Florida Cattleman




! Get Details From
0Danny Yant
Box IOA, Hibernia Rt. Green Cove Springs, Fla. 32043 ~Ph. (904) 284-3982 Walter Oelfke
Palm Springs, Florida 33460 Ph. (305) 965-9384 John Kugel
Route 3, Box 232-8 Lake Worth, Florida 33460




qPeet94 and Welcome
Florida Cattlemen
to your annual Convention
here in Palm Beach County
COMMISSIONER of Agriculture Doyle Connor, left, and his counterpart in Alabama, Commissioner Richard Beard met recently in Montgomery, Alabama, The staff of Big B Ranch wish to take and pledged its cooperation in
Florida's cattle theft enforcement prothis opportunity to extend our best gra"
wishes to you all., We know that Alabama Pledges
you will enjoy your visit to the area Support In
and sincerely hope that you will T
have a most successful meeting for Theft Program
1969 here in Palm Beach County. ALABAMA HAS pledged its cooperation and support to Florida in assisting in the creation of a strengthened cattle theft enforcement program. Alabama's Department of Agriculture and Industries, through its Commissioner Richard Beard and his staff, will be working closely with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Broward Coker, recently appointed by Commissioner Doyle Conner as the Department's chief livestock theft investigator. A meeting was held recently in RANCH Montgomery, Alabama, with Conner,
Coker, Dr. Clarence L. Campbell, diAlvaro Sanchez, Jr., General Manager rector of the FDA division of animal
industry; Robert Chastain, FDA atP.O. Box 99 torney; Joe Hilliard, member of the
FCA brands and theft committee, and BELLE -GLA ,, FLORIDA 33430 Art Higbie, executive vice president
Located 15 miles south of South Bay on Hwy. 27 of the Florida Cattlemen's Association. The meeting was hosted by the Alabama Cattlemen's Association. Conner and his staff explained Florida's existing program and for planned operations for cutting cattle
theft losses to Florida cattlemen, estimated at $3.5 million yearly. CATTLEMEN W. H. Gregory, of the Alabama de(1) It can be used for all size animals, apartment's livestock and brands diviwith both sides squeezing, and the sides sion, explained the Alabama cattle
easily movable to provide more or less theft laws and how they are adminspace; istered.
(2) All side bars drop down but are The Alabama officials gave the
secured so they can't get lost;
(3) Floor is cleated to prevent slipping, Florida representatives several suggesand there's a blind at the front and so TRIANG LE tions on protective measures that
cattle won't attempt to jump out; should be observed. Also that all
(4) There are several special features: a IRON W ORKS cattlemen shouldbecome acquainted
drenching pully, leg catching hook, and a rocking tail gate with off-center spring Phones: EV 5-0540, EV 5-0040 with local law enforcement officials. which holds it both open and shut, but Owner: L. E. Selph, Jr.
requires no latches. BOX 525, SEBRING, FLORIDA 48 The Florida Cattleman




HOW IN FLORIDA .. .
,cheap6bok 6ntu4
We are pleased to take this opportunity and
announce the expansion of Schearbrook Angus
into Florida, an area we consider to be of vital
importance to the ever-growing cattle industry.
Schearbrook of Florida at Lake Worth will be
managed by Andy Jones. Your visit and inspection will be welcomed.
With this announcement goes our best
wishes to the Florida Cattlemen's Association
for a most successful and fruitful 1969 convention.
Including Florida, Schearbrook Angus now operates at five Class); BARDOLIERMERE WWF 51, 1962 Tulsa National Grand locations in the U.S. We feature the breeding of JONAH Champion, 1962 Eastern National Grand Champion, 1962 5,000,000, 1965 International Junior Champion, 1966 Denver Dallas Grand Champion, 1963 National Western class winner. Grand Champion, 1966 Dixie National Grand Champion, 1966 A quality selection of full 12 month old and younger, bull International Reserve Grand Champion; H H EILEENMERE 44, calves by Jonah and the Fabulous Fifty-First are presently avail1967 American Royal Grand Champion, 1968 Fort Worth able at all of our Schearbrook Angus locations. Make your
Reserve Grand Champion, (He has Never Been Defeated in selection nowl
Our Tenth ANGUSversary Sale will be held
Thursday, September 18th at the Headquarters
in Ohio.
CHARLES HARA
General Manager
RR 1, Box 415
SCHEARBROOK OF Clayton, Ohio
Office 513/837-4128
Home 513/837-6533
FLORIDA _/ d
Andy Jones, Mgr. GENE SCHEAR
Managing Partner B
Rt. 3, Box 1052 Home 513/837-8085 1
LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA
305/965-1473 GENERAL OFFICES
RR 1, Box 415, Clayton, Ohio
Located 1/4 mile South of Lantana on Phone: 513/837-4128
Highway 441. Certified ad Accredited Herds




Sharlene Perry
Welcome ctt~le) Active Mother
and CowBelle
to South Florida by MRS. ALAN J. BECKER
SHARLENE PERRY, third vice president, Florida CowBelles Association, and Palm Beach County a busy, active life centered primarily around family, ranch and church. But you'll also find her going to junior college, substitute teaching, bowling, 'politicking' and what have you.
The family, husband G. C., Jr., sons Greg, 11, and Mark, nine, and Sharlene's brother, Ted, make their home on the Flying G Ranch two
ACRICULTURAL CHEMICALS miles north of
Belleview in their
n e w I y enlarged
a n d remodeled
home, and where
the kids are enGcouraged to invite
1000 No. Farmers Market Road, Ph: 924-7107 their friends out
to romp in the
open spaces. They
- "'P.EE, FLORIDA MRs. PERRY all think the cow
pasture is a wonderful ball field. Greg and Mark are in Little League, Sharlene keeps score and announces, and "G. C." assists in South Florida Headquarters for ... the cooking department. During the
summer, they all enjoy swimming and Ford Tractors & Implements skiing and try to spend some time at
0 Oliver Tractors & Implements their Salt Springs cabin where they
also like to net mullet and go crabbing. 0 Servis Rotary Mowers Music is also a big part of Share Land Rovers lene's life. The family enjoys having
young people in their home for "singWelcome, Cattlemen to Palm Beach County ins" and hearing their folk music.
Brother Ted is minister of musicyouth director at the Wyomina BapHENDRY TRACTOR COMPANY tist Church in Ocala and Sharlene is
Ph. 305/996-6771 Drawer H music-youth director at the Belleview
BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA First Baptist Church where "G.C."
teaches Sunday School and Greg and Mark are also active. A native Floridian, Sharlene was For Tborn in Webster and attended high
rThe Very Best In Service school there. She was a majorette and
was in the band. She was also active
* QUICK in sports and won several medals, priTHOROUGH marily in basketball. Since, she has
also won several trophies for league
* ON TIME bowling, but now open bowls for fun.
She has made her home in Belleview
* REASONABLE since her marriage in 1953.
Aside from her duties with the state CowBelles, Sharlene is also second GLADES FEED & FARM SUPPLIES, INC. vic president and beef promotion
POULTRY, LIVESTOCK & FARM SUPPLIES chairman of the Marion County Cow901 W. Canal St. North Phone 996-3024 Belles.
BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA
_________________________________________________ 50 The Florida Cattleman




FLORI DA
FEEDER-STOCKER
AUCTION SALES
Florda 19 9eeerStoc er
Cattle and Calf Sales '
Feeder Calf Sale
Fri., July 11
Glades Livest6ck Market, Belle Glade
Fla. S' Gertrudis Feeder Calf Sale
Fri., July 25
Glades Livestock Market, Belle Glade Sat., Sept., 6
Manatee Ass'n Feeder Stocker Sale Suwannee Co. Livestock Mkt., Live Oak
Fri., Aug. 1 Feeder-Stocker-Veal Sale
Cattlemen's Livestock Market, Tampa Wed., Sept. 10
1st Stocker-Feeder-Veal Sale Kissimmee Livestock Market
Fri., Aug. 8 NW Fla. Ass'n Feeder Calf Sale
Mills Livestock Market, Ocala Florida Feeders Perform Jay Thurs., Sept. 11
Mid-Fla. Feeder Calf-Yearling Sale Well in the Corn Belt Livestock Auction Mkt., Jay
(Including Santa Gertrudis Crosses) Marion Ass'n Feeder Calf Sale
Fri., Aug. 15 Many thousands of Florida An- Fri., Sept. 12
Mid-Fla. Livestock Market, Orlando gus and Hereford crosses have Mills Livestock Market, Ocala
Madison Ass'n Feeder Sale now been fed out in other states
Fri., Aug. 22 with good results. One group Hereford & Cross Feeder Calf Sale
Madison Livestock Market, Madison fed complete mixed-in roughage Fri., Sept. 19
rations averaged 2.4 pounds av- Gainesville Livestock Market
St. Lucie-Okeechobee Steer Calf Sale erage daily gain. Another fed 2d Columbia Feeder Calf Sale
and Board Sale on corn silage, supplement, and Tues., Sept. 23
Fri., Aug. 22 grain gained 2.15 pounds. Columbia Livestock Mkt., Lake City
Okeechobee Livestock Mkt. We stand ready to help you Polk Ass'n Feeder Calf Sale
Highlands-Hardee Feeder Calf Sale buy Florida Feeders with quali- Fri., Sept. 26
Sat., Aug. 23 ty and do-ability to perform for Cattlemen's Livestock Mkt., Lakeland
Hardee Livestock Market, Wauchula you.
Some sales are mixed. Buyers 2d Stocker-Feeder-Veal Sale
1st Columbia Feeder Calf Sale should contact the livestock Fri., Oct. 3
Tues., Aug. 26 market for specific information Mills Livestock Market, Ocala
Columbia Livestock Mkt., Lake City on quality and number selling.
Jackson Ass'n Feeder Calf Sale BROCHURE,
Thurs., Aug. 28 WRITE
West Fla. Livestock Mkt., Marianna
Jefferson Ass'n Feeder Sale FLORIDA
Fri., Aug. 29
Monticello Livestock Market DEPARTMENT
Leon Ass'n Feeder Calf Sale OF AGRICULTURE
Thurs., Sept. 4
Gadsden Co. Livestock Mkt., Quincy MARKETING Div.
Florida Angus Feeder Calf Sale MAYO BLDG..
Fri., Sept. 5
Gainesville Livestock Market TALLAHASSEEs
Suwannee Valley Feeder Sale FLORIDA
FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION, FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF LIVESTOCK MARKETS,@
WITH COOPERATION OF THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE




Some Impressive Figures...0
On Special Feeder Sales in Florida:
Each season since 1962, special feeder calf sales have been held with growing success. A total of
173 sales have been held at the livestock auction markets across the State with a total of 137,179
head being sold for $13,603,600.00 in those years. This year 20 sales have been scheduled and it is
expected that 20,000 head will be sold.
Your Markets Association is proud to participate in these sales and happy to cooperate with
the Florida* Cattleme n's-Association and the Florida Department of Agriculture in establishing these
events. And we welcome the opportunty of being of service to the industry again this year.
CONTACT ANY OF THESE MARKETS, ALL MEMBERS OF THE STATE ASSOCIATION
Arcadia State Livestock Market Columbia Livestock Market Mid-Florida Livestock Market
Auctions Every Wednesday Auctions Every Thursday Auctions Every Monday
Pat Kelly, Mgr., Ph. 929-3151, 928-6901 H. Tom Willis, Mgr., Ph. 752-1874 Gilbert Tucker, Mgr. 0 Phone 425-0432
ARCADIA, .33821 LAKE CITY, 32055 ORLANDO, 32806
Glades Livestock 'Market Cattlemen's Livestock Markets Okeechobee Livestock Market
Auctions Every Monday Monday e Sales e Tuesday Auctions Every Tuesday
Pete Clemons, Mgr. 9 Ph. 996-3028 Harry McCollum, Mgr. Pete Clemons, Mgr. a Phone 763-3127
BELLE GLADE, 33430 Tampa 626-5164 e Lakeland 682-0117 OKEECHOBEE, 33472
TAMPA, 33609 and LAKELAND, 32340
Chipley Livestock Company Suwannee Valley Livestock Market Paxton Livestock Cooperative
Auctions Every Tuesday Acin vr ensa utosEeyMna
E. D. (Buddy) Neel, Mgr. J ucJones vr C.eMoo e sa Auh.36-102onEery M-5853
Ph. 638.0267, 638-4498 LIV OAKs 320 oreePh60 -70 PAXon FLA.5
CHIPLEY, 32428 LV A,300PXOFA
Gainesville Livestock Market Madison Stockyards Gadsden County Livestock Market
Cattle Auctions Every Mon-Wed. Auctions Every Tuesday ,Auctions Every Wednesday
Hog Auctions Every Tuesday George Townsend, 973.2310, 929-4605 Wayne Henry, Mgr. Phone 627-8627
J. W. "Buddy" Clark, Mgr. a Ph: 372-3442 MADISON, 33801 QUINCY, 32351
GAINESVILLE, 32601
Tindel Livestock Market West Florida Livestock Market Interstate Livestock Auction Market, Inc.
Aucion EeryMonayAuctions Every Tuesday Sale every Tuesday 10:00 a.m.
Acydes Cruthied Mgr.a Floyd Harris, Mgr. Phone 482-2229 Phones 689-2424, 689-5995
Jam e CretchfiBudy WlMs MARIANNA, 32446 G. H. Robison, President
Phone 263-3224 GRACEVILLE, 32440 Monticello Livestock Market SFNR 38
Jay Livestock Auction Auctions Every MondayHadeLvsokMrtIc
Auctions Every Tuesday W. C.Hawkins, Mgr. Phone 997-17 11 Haute in veokry e Th nsda
Horae M~ury, Mr. ONTCELL, 3344Jack Duncan, Mgr. e Phone 773-9747
Phones 675-8585, 675-6274 WAUCHULA, 33873
JAY, 32565 Mills Livestock Market
Hog Auction Every Wednesday
Kissimmee Livestock Market Cattle Auction Every Thursday Sumter County Farmers Market
Auctions Every Wednesday Clarence Mills, Manager Auctions Every Tuesday,
Kenneth Caldwell, Mgr. 9 847-3521 Phone 622-4454,' 629-3662 Lamar Hall 9 Ph. 793-2021
KISSIMMEE, 32741 OCALA, 32670 WEBSTER, 33597
For Further Information about Florida Livestock Auction Markets, Contact
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF LIVESTOCK MARKETS
v y Affiliated with the Certified Livestock Market Association
- Livestock Exchange Building, Kissimmee, Florida 32741




nFC A L d0man 00 NW 32nd Ave., Mi ; J. R. Norve.l Industry Members: Lois bert, Fla. Bankers
Are.iste aZ y d khyem eeeA
ae e D. ene Vice-Chairman, Fort Pierce; W Mike" Van Ass'n, StA. Augustine; Gilbert Tucker, Fla. Ase'n
S e d ersNess, Inverness; Maurice Carlton, Wauchula; of Livestock Markets, Cocoa; Robert Hall, Fla.
Marty Whidden, Bradley Junction; Gene Felton Dairy Farmers Fed. Venus; Dan C. Stone, Fla. C oinniitteesm J' ' LaBelle; Billy Peeples, Moore Haven; R. C. DresPasOl.Seechobe t Wilon, Ftear; Joh Ch ackers Ass'n, Tampa; Lacy G. Thomas,
iaeeuer Sebing; Gilbert B arkoskie lrn, GFelsere; Rayin Fla. Farm Bureau, Groveland; Glenn Woodard,
Raulerson, Okeechobee; B. J. Alderman, Grandin; Fla. Retail Fed., Jacksonville; Dr. A. Z. Palmer Ar l eM. e M. Overstreet, Kissimmee; Elvin Daugharty, and Dr. R. L. Reddish Fla. Ag Extension Service,
DeLand; Cushman Radebaugh, Jr., Fort Pierce; J. Gainesville; Ray Thompson, Fla. Feeder Industry. A re L isted Clayton Welch, Cross City; Latimer H. Turner, Riverview; Jim Flanagan, SFla. Press,ar Ksm
Sarasota; George L. Carlisle, Green Cove Springs; Fred E. Orr, Fla. Restaurant Ass'n, Miami; Mrs FCA OFFICERS: President-Charles P. Lykes, W. G. Kilbee, Geneva; W. D. Roberts, Immokalee, Donald LeFils, Fla. CowBelles Ass'n Osteen.
Deer ark (eceasd); Rlph CllonSr., lachu. Andew L.Duda II, Pes., la.nBahmanAss'nPolke;.Dalas DrteSrasot;'HarissFusell Tampa; First Vice President-R. D. Bennett, Cletus Andrews, Bonifay; Donald S. McLean, Bab- FLA. INT. AGRIC. TRADE COUNCIL-M. E.
Greenwood; Second Vice President-Thomas L. son Park; Ed Yarbrough, Tallahassee; Albert Hammond, Delegate, t. 2, Box 880, Winter HaSloan, Fort Pierce; 0. L. Partin, Kissimmee; Austin, Immokalee; James H. Hendrie, Hialeah; yen; Arthur L. Higbie, Alt. Del., Kissimmee.
Secretary-J. C. Bass, Okechobee; Treasurer- Gene Turner, Arcadia; Phil Turner, Arcadia; J. C. HISTORICAL Cushman Radebaugh, Sr.,
Pat Wilson, Frostproof; Executive Vice President- Bass, Okeechobee; Pat Wilson, Frostproof; John Chairman, P.O. Box 1928, Orlando; W. D. RobArthur L. Higbie Kissimmee. Turner, Arcadia; J. W. "Buddy" Clark, Gaines- erts. Vice Chairman, Immokalee; J. B. Starkey,
Executive Committee-All officers; Lat Turner, ville; Jim K. Tillman, Sarasota; Thomas M. Fort- Sr., St. Petersburg; Irlo Bronson, Kissimmee; Sarasot; Ralph Cellon, Alachua; Gilbert Tucker, son', Fellsmere; Carl Langford, Tallahassee; John H. 0. Partin Kissimee J. 0. Pearce Jr., rCocoa; Cedrick Smith, Jr., Micuanopy. McCartyier Dade City; Andy Tucker, Rockledge; Okeechobee; Frank Lster Platt, Melbourne; Jrohn
Past Presidents-G h. H. Prathero, Kissimmee H.H. Parrish, Jr., St. Augustine; Harold Emery, Saul A. Snyder, St. Augustine;
(deceased) P. E. Williams, Davenport; Dave Tur- Bunnell; Butler Walker, Monticello; Tommy Bron- Bob Griffin, Fort Pierce; Lloyd Rhoden, Tallaner, Bradley Junction (deceased); Irlo Bronson, son, Moore Haven; J. D. Garrett, Jr. Malone; hassee; W. W. Glenn, Marianna; R. M. WilKissimmee; C. S. Radebaugh, Orlando; Ben Hill Don Hectz, Venice; Charles Jenkins, Lakeland; liams, Bayard; Mabry Carlton, Sr., Wauchula.
Griffin, Jr., Frostproof; J. B. Starkey, St. Peters- Joe Hilliard, Clewiston; Robert Hendry, Orlando; I RTS h ell r amn T
burg; B. J. Alderman, Grandin; Alto Adams, Jr., James Tucker, Miami; Broward Coker, Tallahassee. IMPORTSalesph Cellon, Sr Chairman Rt.Fort Pierce; J. 0. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobre; BREED ADVISORY GROUP-R. D. Bennett, 3. Box 83, Gainesvlle; W D. Bart on, Vice hairLouis Gilbreath, St. Augustine; George Kempfer, Pres., Fla. Angus Ass'n P. 0. Box 8, Greenwood, ran, LaBelle; Joe Priest, Ocala; J. D. Odom, Deer Park (deceased); Ralph Cellon, Sr., Alachua; Andrew L. Duda III, Pres., Fla. Braman Ass'n, LStarke ; Dallas Dort, Sarasota; Harris Fusell,
F. WrdAvo Pak; E.WhiehustW~iton; Wiliam, Wlmigton De.;at ilsn Frst, John Finlyso GReeville;ms H.lmC.gDoga, ephyErW. D. Roberts, Immokalee; Lat Turner, Sarasota. Rt. 1, Box 1370, Cocoa; Zeb Parker, Pres., South- Gilbert; Parker;b Charles Lykes, Tamo; R. i P.
Honorary Directors-J. F. Sumner, Wimauma; eastern Brangus Ass'n, Rt. 2, Box 91Lth S. St, Sarasota; DTrta; ra
J. A. Landrum, Brookville (deceased); A. C. Dr. Harlan B. Rogers, Pres., Eastern Charolais uortch, Sr., Sebring; Tommy Mack, Citra; Fred
E.. M aell,a ; B .vil M erritt O Apa DeC Kismme breth t uutine ort Griffin, Fort acPiere
Wright, Arcadia; W. W. Carlton, Fort Pierce; & Charbray Ass'n, Collins, Miss.; J. Pat Corrigan, C. Babcock, Punta Gorda; Jay Shuler, ApalachiC. A. Fulford, Okeechobee; R. Roberts, m Pres, Fla. Hereford Ass'n, Drawer CR, Station 1, Clewiston. rel, eac r O
mokalee; S. A. Snyder, St. Augustine; W. F. Vero Beach; Ed Watson, Pres, Fla. Santa Ger- o.
Tilton, San Mateo; J. R. Henry, Tampa; Ned trudis Ass'n, P. 0. Box 71, Arcadia; Jack Hooker, LEGISLATIVE-Lat Turner, Chairman, Rt. 2
Folks, Dunnelalon; G. E. Bronson, Kissimmee Pres., Fla. Shorthorn Ass'n, 605 W. Cherry St., Box 333, Sarasota; Irlo Bronson (3 yrs.), Kissim(deceased); T. W. Brown, Webster; C. L. Cor- Plant City. mee; Gerald Cayson (1 yr.) Blountstown; Louis
gan, Wewahitchka (deceased); J. Q. Thompson, BUDGET AND FINANCE-Pat Wilson, Co- Gilbreath (4 yrs.), St. Augustine; Henry Mangels
Brandon (deceased); E. V. Whidden, Bradley; chairman, Box 65, Frostproof; Thomas L. Sloan, (2 yrs.), Miami; (FCA President, First Vice PresiJ. D. Williams, Ocala; W. M. O'Dell, Oxford (de- Co-chairman, 1033 Orange Ave., Fort Pierce dent and immediate Past President are also
ceased); Henry 0. Partin, Kissimmee; George C. 0. L. "Slim" Partin, Kissimmee; Robert members). Perry, Oxford; Walter F. Bronson, Orlando; Nath- Morris, Gainesville Earl Gilbert, Parker; H. C. LIVESTOCK DISEASE AND TECHNICAL-an Holmes, Fort Pierce; B. E. Alderman, Sr., Fort Douglas, Jr., Zephyrhills; J. B. Starkey, Sr, J. 0. Pearce, Jr, Chairman, P. 0. Box 251, Okee Pierce (deceased); James Durrance, Basinger; W. Odessa; Louis Gilbreath, St. Augustine; Norman chobee; Clyde Crutchfield, Vice Chairman, GraceE. Pearce, Wauchula J. J. Bronson, Kissimmee H erron, Naples; J. C. Bass, Okeechobee; Bob F. ville; L. H. "Buck" Hawkins, Sarasota; C. W.
(deceased); John B. Daugharty, DeLand; P.P. Deriso, Tampa; Carlyle Platt, Melbourne; Al Al Bellotto, Lakeland; Harris Fussell, Polk City;
Fore, Oxford (deceased); W. M. Larkin, Dade Bellotto, Lakeland; Ralph Sumner, Brandon; "Mann" Bailey, Ocala; Ray Raulerson, OkeechoCity; Cedrick M. Smith, Sr., Wacahoota (de- Charles Lykes, Tampa; Bunnell; Luther S. Remsberg, Fort Lauderdale;
ceased); H. E. Wolfe, St. Augustine; R. B. BUILDING AND MAINTENANCE 0. L. bee; Gilbert Smith, Fellsmere Raymon Tucker,
Beck, Sanford; Charles S. Lee, Oviedo; "Slim" Partin, Chairman, Rt. 1, Box 84, Kissim- Bunnell; Charles Harman, Moore Haven; Gene FulL A. Krusen, Zephyrhills (deceased); G. E. Bark- mee; Carlyle Platt, Vice Chairman, Melbourne; Irlo ford, Avon Park; Dr. Robert Love, Monticello; oskie, Felsmere; J. A. Barthle, San Antonio; D. Bronson, Kissimmee; Arthur L. Higbie, Kissim- B.J. Alderman, Grandin; Ralph Sumner, Brandon; E. Cannon, San Antonio; A. B. Folks, Martel; W. mee; Billy Peeples, Moore Haven; R. B. Leo Kight, Hastings; Lyman Gage, St. Augustine; F. Ward, Avon Park; V. E. Whitehurst, Williston; Williams, Wilmington, Del.; Pat Wilson, Frost- John Finlayson, Greenville; H. C. Douglas, ZephyrJ. 0. Pearce, Sr., Okeechobee; L. R. Becker, Fort proof; Horace Fulford, Ocala. hills; Rueben Carlton, Fort Pierce; V. R. Simma ,
Pierce; W. M. Bridges, Clermont; C. H. Downs, COMMITEE OF 100-Charles Lykes, Delegate, Lithia; S. W. Stout, Sarasota; Robert Hall,
Sarasota (deceased); N. B. Jackson, Sebring; R. P. 0. Box 2879, Tampa; Arthur L. Higbie, Alt. Venus; Gerald Cason, Blountstown; Louis GilE. Maxwell, Umatilla; A. B. Merritt, Okahumpka; Del., Kissimmee. breath, St. Augustine; Robert Griffin, Fort Pierce;
John Norman, Okeechobee; Henry D. Perry, Hol- CONSERVATION OF NATIONAL RE Joseph O'Farrell, Ocala; J. 0. Pearce, Sr., Okeelywood; Luther S. Remsberg, Fort Lauderdale; SOURCES-Albert Barthle, Chairman, Box 128, chobee.
Herman Turner, Sarasota; Dr. Tom Chaires, Bra- San Antonio; W. C. "Bill" Wing, Wildwood; MARKETING Gene Felton, Chairman, Box
denton (deceased); John N. McClure, Bradenton. Cedrick Smith, Jr., Micanopy; Henry Mangels, 327, La Belle; Gilbert Tucker, Vice Chairman,
Ralph L. Griggs, Oxford (deceased); D. R. Crum, Miami; Jim Flanagan, Kissimmee; William E. Ocala; Alto Adams, Jr., Fort Pierce; Joe Priest, Plant City; J. R. Hammett, Dade City; R. L. Bippa, Jr., Greenville; Swanson Lockhart, St. Ocala; 0. W. Dixon, Tampa; W. C. Wing, WildStark; Frd Monsdeoa, More Hven alph pna, Gorda; Laenie RicbugCstview;at W ad uyCnoTma er erHl
Gainer, Cottondale; R. W. Kidder, Belle Glade; Augustine; B. T. Longino, Sarasota; S. W. Stout, wood; Cedrick Smith, Jr., Micanopy; J. D. Odom, Dr. W. G. Kirk, On; R. H. Ochiltree, Wildwood; Sarasota; Marvin Kahn, Sebring; Al Bellotto, Starke; Earl Bryan, Alachua; John Hawkins, MonH. D. Ryals, Fort Ogden; George Sewell, Cotton- Lakeland; Earl Norton, Lake Wales. ticello; Leo Kight, Hastings; Miles Scofield, Nadale; M. A. Smith, Avon Park. CONVENTION-Bob Deriso, Chairman, Box ples; G. C. Norman, Tallahassee; Francis Merri415, Tampa; Ralph Cellon, Sr. Vice Chairman, ield, Florala, Ala.; Pat Wilson, Froatproof; T. M.
Gainesville; J. B. Starkey Jr., Odessa; Francis Hewerton, Madison; R. W. Maxwell, Umatilla; Chairmen and Members Merrifield, Florala, Ala.; Pat Wilson, Frostproof; Thomas M. Fortson, Fellsmere; Homer Harvey,
Sprns J.eW. J. Boynton, Tallahassee; John Alexander, Crawfordville; Tom Willis Lake City; Henry
, State Committees Frostproof; Chuck Downs, Sarasota; Bill Pad- Chitty, Micanopy; Bert Harris, Jr., Sebring;
rick, Fort Pierce; Thomas L. Sloan, Fort Pierce; Carl L'Orange, Veoin Beach; Martin Nicely, Lake AMERICAN NATIONAL CATTLEMEN'S Cedrick Smith, Jr. Micanopy; Vernan Ross, Bris- City; John Stiles, Tallahassee; Gifford Rhodes,
ASSOCIATION-Charles Lykes, Tampa, men- tol; J. B. Thornhill, Winter Haven; Gilbert Smith, Tallahassee; R. E. Padgett Lake Wales; J. E.
ber of board of directors; Lat Turner, Sarasota, Fellsmere; Tommy Bronson, Moore Haven; Rob- Pace, Gainesville; W. K. McPherson Gainesville;
member of board of directors; Cushman Rade- ert H. Milton, Marianna; Mrs. C. W. Smith, T. J. Cunha, Gainesville; Joe Mullin Orlando; A.
baugh, Fort Pierce, past president. Micanopy; Mrs. T. L. Sloan, Fort Pierce; Carey Z. Palmer, Gainesville; Ken Tefertiller, GainesAMERICAN NATIONAL CATTLEMEN'S Carlton, Sebring. ville; C. H. Downs, Sarasota; W. T. Stitt, ClewisASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIPS-Lat Turner, FEEDER Angelo Massaro, Chairman, 510 ton; Richard S. Kelly, Stuart; G. C. Perry, Jr.,
Chairman. Rt. 2, Box 333, Sarasota; Mrs. T. L. Bryan Circle, Brandon; Clyde Crutchfield, Vice Bellview; C. W. "Mann" Bailey, Oxford; Russ Sloan, Vice Chairman, Fort Pierce; Cushman Chairman, Graceville;. S. L. Crochet, Vice Chair- Kiser, Immokalee.
Radebaugh, Sr., Fort Pierce; Alto Adams, Jr. man, U. S. Sugar Corp., Clewiston; W. M. Inman, MEMBERSHIP R. D. Bennett, Co-ChairFort Pierce B. T. Longino, Jr., Sarasota; Carey Quincy; Ray Thompson, Wiinauma; Ralph Sexton, man, Greenwood; J. Leroy Fortner, Co-Chairman Carlton, Jr.. Sebring; Seth Alderman, Wimauma. Vero Beach; Lynwood Seay, Marianna; Henry (allied members), P.O. Box 795, Sarasota; Marvin
ANIMAL RESEARCH-R. D. Bennett, Chair- Ward, Jr., Live Oak; Willis Evans, Marianna; Kahn, Sebring; Carlyle Platt, Melbourne; Clyde
man, Greenwood; L. H. Hawkins, Vice Chairman James Alford, Tallahassee; Ralph Cellon Jr. R. Colson, Bell; W. M. Keen, Lake Wales; Ed
Sarasota; Ben Hill Griffin Jr., Frostproof; Alachua; W. C. Hawkins, Monticello; E. J. doowan, Yarborough, Geneva; Allied Membership ComDonald McLean, Babson Park; Dr. Charles Mur- Mayo; J. B. Starkey, Jr., Odessa; Elbert Shelton, mittee Members: Carl Glidden, Naples; Norman
p hy J. 0. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee; Dr. Altha; Robert N. Morris, Gainesville; Jack Hay- Herron, Naples; Russell Kiser, Immokalee; Lat
.enon Wman, Wauchula; Carl L'Orange, Vero Beach; J. Turner, Sarasota; Joe Amor, Plant City; Ray
Dr. Robert L. Caldwell, Haines City; J. D. Odom, Clayton Welch, Cross City; Bayard Toussaint, Thompson, Gibsonton; Charlie Jenkins, LakeStarke; Fred Montsdeoca, Moore Haven; Ralph Punta Gorda; Lance Richburg, Crestview; W. M. land; Rudy Connor, Tampa; Henry Perry, HolSexton, Vero Beach; R. E. Padgett, Lake Wales; Keen, Lake Wales; Robert Over, Lake Placid; lvwood: Martin Woodward, Fort Lauderdale;
G. C. Perry, Belleview; C. D. Jernigan, Milton; Elliott Whitehurst, Williston. Henry Mangels, Miami; K. D. Eatmon, PownRaymon Tucker, Bunnell; Dr. Robert Love, Mon- FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL COUNCIL-Ralph nano Beach; Scott French, Loxahatchee; Charles
ticello. Cellon, Jr., Delegate, P. 0. Box 457, Alachua; G. Mitchell, Lake Helen; E. D. Gregory, DinsBEEF GRADING-Dallas Dort. Chairman, 3466 Arthur L. Higbie, Alt. Del., Kissimmee. more; E. L. Yates Sr., Orlando; John Humphress,
Gulfmead Drive, Sarasota; Elliott Whitehurst, FLA. AGRICULTURAL TAX COUNCIL-Lati- Tallahassee; Kell Williams, Pinellas Park; J.
Vice Chairman, Williston; John Alexander, Zolfo mer H. Turner, Delegate, Rt. 1, Box 333, Sarasota; W. Lowrey, Panama City; G. D. Jernigan, Springs; J. B. Frazer, Jr., Lake City; R. B. Oxer, Arthur Bissett, Alt. Del., Winter Haven. Milton.
Lake Placid; Max Hammond, Winter Haven; G. C. FLORIDA BEEF COUNCIL-Cedrick M. Smith, RESOLUTIONS Billy Peeples, Chairman,
Perry, Belleview; Charles Hardee, Chiefland: J. H. Jr., General Chairman, Rt. 1, Micanopy; John Moore Haven; Pat Corrigan, ice Chairman,
"Bill" Nichols, Oxford, Phillip P. Hood, Brooks- Alexander, Vice Chairman, Frostproof; Robert Vero Beach; Bob Griffin, Fort Pierce; Harry Hamville; John DuPuis, Miami; Harold McLeod, Lox- Price, Jr. N. W. Area Chairman, Graceville; Art mond, Kissimmee; John Pons, Tallahasee; Tommy ahatchee; B. Edmund David, Winter Haven: Schultz, Central Area, Chairman, Brooker; Carey Bronson, Brooksville; Pat Wilson, Frostproof; ArS. L. Crochet, Clewiston; Russell Lauck, Sarasota; Carlton, Southern Area Chairman, Sebring; Pat thur Bissett, Winter Haven; John Trinson, Vero Martin Whidden, Bradley; Tommy Clay, Palatka. Wilson, Treasurer, Frostproof; Arthur L. Higbie, Beach; Charles Hardee, Chiefland; Andrew JackBRANDS AND THEFTS-John DuPuis, Chair- Exec. Sec'y. P. 0. Box 656, Kissimmee, Allied son, Lake Placid.
for June, 1969 53




STATE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE-Louis
Gilbreath, Delegate, Drawer 291, St. Augustine. Arthur L. Higbie, Alt. Del., Kissimmee. TAX-Billy Peeples, Chairman, Moore Haven Bruce Blount, Vice Chairman, Lake Placid; James Rooks, Jr., Floral City; J. W. Lowery, Panama City; George Oliver, Stuart; A. C. Wright, Jr. Fort Meade; Murray Harrison, Palmetto; W. T. Harrison Jr Sarasota; Bill Krusen, Tampa; Henry Mangels, Miami; E. D. Gregory, Dinsmore; Jack Peeples, Tallahassee; Bill Barber, e a 0 Kissimmee; F. R. Edwards, Plant City; Howard
Oden, Zolfo Springs Arthur Bissett, Winter Haven; Pat Corrigan, Vero Beach; John Finlayson, Greenville; R. B. Williams, Wilmington, Del.; Lat R YOOURFTurner, Sarasota; Pat Wilson, Frostproof; R. S.
Dressel, Avon Park; Vick Blackstone, Parrish; FO R Y O U R Buck Bird, Monticello; Glenn Sumner, Brandon;
Jim K. Tillman, Sarasota; Tom Chaires III, Cross City.
TRANSPORTATION Al Bellotto, Chairman,
ANNUAL CONVENTION! _Olo
Rt. 5 Box 200, Lakeland; R. C. Dressel, Vice
* Crairman, Sebring; W. D. Roberts, Immokalee;
Ralph Cellon, Sr., Alachua; Jim Kemper, DeFuniak Springs; Ed Mason, Marianna; Z. W. Hamilton, Brooker; E. L. Yates, Sr., Orlando; Bill Padrick, Fort Pierce; Charles Lykes, Tampa; Carey Carlton III, Arcadia; Tommy Crum, Moore Haven; J. D. Odom, Starke; S. L. Crochet, Clewiston.
Gro i w t MARKET DEVELOPMENT-Doyle E. Carlton,
(G 0w 7n wt Jr., Chairman, P. O. Box 385, Wauchula; Elliott
Whitehurst, Vice Chairman, Williston; Ralph the .ld s" W. Cellon, Sr., Alachua; Gilbert Tucker, Cocoa;
the Glades" Alto Adams, Jr., Fort Pierce; Dr. T. J. Cunha,
Gainesville; Dallas Dort, Sarasota; R. D. Bennett, Greenwood; Elliott Whitehurst, Williston; Art Higbie, Kissimmee; Andrew Tucker, Rockledge. UNITED STATES LIVESTOCK SANITARY COMMITEE-J. O. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee, member of Anaplasmosis committee; Art Higbie, Kissimmee, member.
SUGAR CANE GROWERS Officers of .Lo al
Cattlemen's Associations
ALACHUA-Pres.: W. P. "Bill" Baker, Hawthorne; Sec'y.: Wilburn Farrell, Gainesville;
COOPERATIVE OF FLORIDA Dir.: Jimmy Price, Micanopy.
BAKER-Pres.: Lloyd Register, Glen St. Mary, Sec'y.: Luther Harrell, MacClenny, Dir.: Wassie BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA Fish, Glen St. Mary.
BRADFORD-UNION Pres.: Art Schulz,
Brooker: Sec'y.: Julius Marlowe, Starke; Dir.: Rex Smith, Starke.
BREVARD-Pres.: Andrew "Andy" Tucker,
Rockledge; Sec'y.: James T. Oxford, Cocoa; Dir.: Gilbert Tucker, Cocoa. BROWARD-Pres.: Martin Woodward. Fort
SLauderdale; Sec'y.: Frank Jasa, Fort Lauderdale; Do you ow w at ou're a n Dir.: Martin Woodward, Fort Lauderdale.
CHARLOTTE-Sec'y.: W. L. Hatcher. Punta Gorda: Pres.: H. P. Wright, Punta Gorda; Dir.:
* Bayard Toussaint, Punta Gorda.
S.. For w a you're e n CITRUS-Pres.: Julian Kelly, Iverness
Sec'v.: Quentin Medlin, Inverness; Dir.: Mike Van Ness, Inverness.
CLAY-Pres.: Al Sanchez, Penny Farms;
Sec'v.: E. D. McCall Green Cove Springs Dir.: OUR SPECIALTY: 24% & 32% Pasture Balance, 60% Cattle Walter Williams. Middleburg. Kiser, Immokalee;
SCOLIE Pe.: Dalla Townser, Immokalee;R.A
and Dairy Concentrates, Protein Blocks, Cattle Cubes and Roberts Daaoaenend, Immokalee ; Dir.: R. A.
. COLUMBIA-Pres.: Rufus Ogden Jr.. Lake
(H Mixes) City; Sec'y.: Neal M. Dukes, Lake City; Dir.:
Conrad Womble, Lake City. DADE Pres.: Henry Mangels, Miami; Sec'y.: John D. Campbell, Miami; Dir.: John HIGH SPRINGS MILLING CO. DuPuis, Mi Ce a r
HIGH SPRINGS MILLING CO. DESOTO-Pres.: K. O. Welles, Arcadia;
Sec'y.: Ed Russel, Arcadia; Dir.: Philip Turner P. O. Box 985 HIGH SPRINGS, FLA. Phone 454-1203 Arcadia.
DIXIE-Pres.: Tom Chaires III, Cross City; Sec'y.: E. J. Cowen, Cross City; Dir.: John O'Steen. Horseshoe Beach. DUVAL-Pres.: Warren Alvarez, Jacksonville; See'y.: Tom Braddock, Jacksonville; Dir.: E. D. Gregory, Dinsmore.
FLAGLER-Pres.: Raymon Tucker, Bunnell come or a a emen Sec'y.: Donald F. Jordan, Bunnell; Dir.: C. H.
Welcome, Florida Cattiemen CwrBnel
Cowart, Bunnell.
GILCHRIST-Pres. Clyde R. Colson, Bell;
Langford, Trenton.
GLADES EQU IPMENT COMPANY agodSec'Y.:LDJameSn. YelvingtOn,Pe. TomTrenton;rnsDir.:MrCarl
GLADES EQUIPMENT COMPANY GLADES Press : Tommy Bronson Moore
Haven; Sec'y.: Billy Bass, Moore Haven; Dir.: Billy Peeples, Moore Haven. Your Ranch and Farm Equipment Dealer in Palm Beach County HARDEE Pres.: Howard Hopper, Ona;
Sec'y.: Jack C. Hayman, Wauchula; Dir.: J. Pershing Platt, Ona.
HENDRY-Pres.: John Stitt, Clewiston; Sec'y.: Raymond H. Burgess, LaBelle; Dir.: Joe Marlin DHilliard, Clewiston.
HERNANDO-Pres.: J. H. Boyd, BrooksLILLville; Sec'y.: G. M. Owens, Jr., Brooksville; Dir.: John R. Culbreath, Brooksville. smARVST HIGHLANDS-Pres.: Andrew B. Jackson,
Lake Placid; Sec'y.: B. J. Harris Jr., Sebring; BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA 33430 PAHOKEE, FLORIDA 33476 Dir.: R. C. Dressel, Avon Park.
HILLSBOROUGH-Pres.: Joe Armor, Plant
PHONE 996-3095 PHONE 924-5595 City; Sec'y.. Wayne T. Wade Plant City; Dir.:
54 The Florida Cattleman




The Florida Angus Association...
Extends A Warm And Cordial Invitation To All FCA Members
And Request Their-Presence At A Get-Acquainted Hospitality Hour To Be Co-hosted With The' Palm Beach County Cattlemen's Association June 19 at 6:00 P.M. on the Colonnades Lawn of the Colonnades Hotel in Palm Beach Shores
We Wish Every Success to FCA and Its Local Affiliates!
We would like to take this opportunity to invite you to attend the "Off-the-Grass" Sale to be held at the Gainesville Livestock Market, Gainesville, Florida, Friday, August 22, and the 22nd Annual Florida Angus Feeder Calf Sale, also at the Gainesville Market on Friday, September 5, 1969. The consignments to the feeder calf sale, the oldest of its type in Florida, features top quality calves for- feeder and stocker buyers and others wanting the best in Angus-bred calves. Make your plans to attend both of these sales!
WE INVITE YOU TO CALL ON US IF WE CAN BE OF SERVICE
Black lulls Boost Beef Profits
FLORIDA ANGUS ASSOCIATION, INC.
R. D. Bennett, President
Bill Gephart, Secretary, 221 Poinciana Cirrfe, Kissimmee, Florida 32741




Glenn Summer, Brandon. INDIAN RIVER-Pres.: Manuel Garcia Jr., Fellsmere; Sec'y.: Forrest N. McCullars, Vero Beach: Dir.: Manuel Garcia Jr., Fellsmere. JACKSON-Pres.: Robert H. Milton, Marlanna; Sec'y.; Willis Evans, Marianna, Dir.; J. R. Thompson, Marianna. JEFFERSON-Pres.: James Yarn. Monticello; Sec'y.: Albert Odom, Monticello; Dir.: John Finlayson, Greenville.
LAKE-Pres. C. B. Ogden, Groveland; Sec'y.: Mack Jones, Tavares; Dir.: C. B. Ogden, Groveland.
LEE-Pres.: Ruth Baucom, Fort Myers;
Sec'y.: Ron Shafer, Fort Myers; Dir.: Nat Hunter, Fort Myers.
LEON-Pres.: W. D. Hopkins, Tallahassee; Sec'y.: Lloyd Rhoden, Tallahassee. E LEVY-Pres.: J. P. Sandlin, Williston; Sec'y.:
Leonard C. Cobb, Bronson. MADISON-Pres.: Howell Waring, Madison;
Sec'y.: Jackie Bass, Madison; Dir.: Larrie Crerry, Lee.
MANATEE-Pres.: Robert Harrison, Arcadia: Sec'y.: Roger Murray, Palmetto; Dir.: Vick Blackstone, Parrish. MARION-Pres.: Carey A. Robbins, Ocala; Sec'y.: Edsel W. Rowan, Ocala; Dir.: G. C. Perry, Jr. Belleview.
MARTIN-Pres.: P. L. Hinson, Indiantown; Sec'y.: Levi M. Jornson, Stuart; Dir.: P. L. Hinson. Indiantown.
NASSAU Pres.: Frank Shaffer, Callahan, Sec'y.: D. R. Cook, Callahan; Dir.: E. D. Gregory, Dinsmore.
NORTHWEST CATTLEMEN (Santa Rosa
Escambia) -Pres.: G. D. Jernigan, Milton; Dir.: James D. Cunningham, Molino. OKEECHOBEE-Pres.: Winston B. Carlton,
Basinger; Sec'y.: C. R. Boyles, Okeechobee; Dir.: Forest Pearce. Okeechobee. ORANGE-Pres.: Howard Rybolt, Orlando;
Sec'v.: Jay Hebert, Orlando; Dir.: E. L. Yates Sr., Orlando.
OSCEOLA-Pres.: Ham Brown. Kissimmee;
Sec'y.: James B. Smith Kissimmee; Dir.: M. M. Overstreet. Kissimmee. Bring Your Camera! PALM BEACH-Pres.: G. W. Putnam Jr.
Belle Glade; Sec'y.: R. Kent Price, West Palm See Pet's Corner! Beach; Dir.: K. D. Eatmon, Pompano Beach.
Hippo Isle Boat Ride! PAN-HANDLE CATTLEMEN (Walton-Okaploosa) Sec'y.: Edsel Thomaston, DeFuniak
Spend an hour or the day! Springs; Pres.: Bob Lawton, DeFuniak Springs.
...... .Dir.: Lance Richboury, Crestview.
PASCO- Pres.: Albert A. Barthle, San Antonio; Sec'y.: A. D. Dawson, Dade City; Dir.: H. C. Douglas. Zephyrhills. PINELLAS Pres.: Burdett Schee, Largo;
Sec'v.: Charles Rowan, Largo; Dir.: Dr. Charles Murphy, Largo.
POLK-Pres.: A. L. Bellotto, Lakeland; Sec'y.: SMartin Whidden, veBradley; Dir.: M. E. HamO1IV E OFI *I moUTNAiM-res.: H. M. Tilton, San Mateo;
U'l i FlllterSec'y.: R. T. Clay, Palatka; Dr. Lloyd Osteen, Hollister.
GI T ORK ,e eED C 0 .q. SARASOTA-Pres.: Mabry Carlton Jr., Arcadia;
Sec'y.: Ken Clark, Sarasota, Dir.: L. H. Hawkins, Sarasota.
SEMINOLE-Pres.: Ed Yarborough, Geneva;
Sec'v.: Frank J. Jasa, Sanford; Dir.: R. W. Williams. Sanford.
ST. JOHNS-Pres.: Louis Gilbreath, St. AuA COMPLETE LINE OF CATTLE FEEDS AND MINERALS gustine; Sec'y.: Paul L. Dinkins, St. Augustine;
Dir.: Louis Gilbreath, St. Augustine.
CUSTOM MIXED TO FIT YOUR NEEDS St. Lucie-Pres.: J. R. Norvell Jr. Fort
Pierce; Sec'y.: Hugh C. Whelchel Jr., Fort Pierce; Dir.: Robert L. Griffin, Fort Pierce. We now sell FASCO CATTLE "BUTT" BAGS SUMTER-Pres.: Delouie Wells, Bushnell;
Sec'y.: D. A. George, Bushnell; Dir.: Aubrey Your most economical way for horn fly control Carnthers, Oxford.
VOLUSXA-Pred.: W. T. McDonald, New Smyrna Beach; Sec'y.: Gerald Martin, DeLand; P.O. BOX 756 OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA Ph. RO 3-3337 Dir.: Elvin Daugharty, DeLand.
WASHINGTON-Pres.: E. D. "Buddy" Neel,
_ Chipley: Sec'y.: J. E. Davis, Chipley; Dir.:
U. S. Harrison. Chipley. WEST FLORIDA-Pres.: Tillis Strickland
dAJr., Tallahassee; Bobby R. Durden, Crawfordville: Directors: (Calhoun) Elbert Shelton, Alg tha: (Gulf) Dave Gaskin, Wewabitchka; (Bay)
J. W. Lowrey, Panama City; (Franklin) C. C. Land, Carrabelle; (Liberty) Allen Woodward, Bristol; (Wakulla) Tillis Strickland, Tallahassee.
K IRC H MAN COMPANY Don Chittenden Dies
DoN CHITTENDEN of Kansas City, Missouri, purebred livestock consultant Pand former secretary of the American Phone 996-2033 Polled Hereford Association, died recently after an extended illness.
He was appointed APHA secretary
Belle Glade, Florida in 1946 and in 1962 turned the reins
d over to Orville Sweet and became a
consultant to breeders.
56 The Florida Cattleman




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mW
ULTRA MODERN PROGENY
SIREIJ BY GAY JINGO
Ar ~ ~ ~:THE ULTRA MODERN SIRE
ANKONIAN GAY JINGO
1966 International Calf Champion
1967 International Grand Champion
Welcome Cattlemen, to Palm Beach County. Our Asso- any.) Our brood cow herd and herd bulls are as modern
ciation is planning a convention you will enjoy, and one as tomorrow. You will appreciate their EXTRA that can be profitable to you. LENGTH, SIZE AND MEATINESS. These animals
While you're here, reserve a little time to visit Cara- have been selected and culled for their FERTILITY, velle Ranch to see our growthy, heavy-muscled Angus PRODUCTIVITY, MILKING AND MOTHERING
bulls. Ask about our program using computer data and ABILITY. modern management methods for producing the most PROFITABLE BEEF BULL possible-a bull that will transmit to his calves GROWABILITY, CARCASS Our ranch is located west of West Palm Beach on HighCUTABILITY, AND PHYSICAL SOUNDNESS. way 441 (one half mile west of Lion Country). Write
Our cattle are acclimated to the toughest tropical en- to us at P. 0. Box 15708, West Palm Beach, or call vironment. (While grass is usually abundant here, the David Wynn, Cattle Manager, or Larry Ridinger, Diviweather and cattle pests make our cattle as rugged as sion Manager, 305/683-4933.
CARAVELLE LAND AND CATTLE COMPANY INC.




Jubilee Angus
Sale Scores
$352 Average
Top 25% Averaged $585 Top 50% Averaged $461
THE ELEVENTH annual Florida Angus
Association Jubilee was held at the livestock pavilion, Manatee County Agricultural Center, Palmetto, April 26,
with 88 head selling for a gross of $30,
995 and an average per head of $352.
Topping the sale was the lot 13 bull,
Black Watch President 125, a consignment of E. J. Gibbs & Sons of Pensacola. The bull, a member of the 1967
reserve champion carload at the National Western Show in Denver, was FLORIDA ANGUS Association members held their annual election meeting in
tionaster So iAnus Denr, as Palmetto recently. From left are, J. M. Edwards, Jr., vice president; R. D. Bennett,
purchased by T&P Angus Ranch, Ar- president; Bob F. Deriso, retiring president and member of the board, and William
cadia, for $1125. A. Gephart, secretary-treasurer.
At the annual election meeting of the
breed group held the preceding night at sponsored by the American Angus As- The sale was managed by M&G Livethe Ramada Inn, Palmetto, R. D. Ben- sociation. Bill Elliott of Okeechobee stock Sales, Tampa and Kissimmee, and
nett of Greenwood, wa& elected president, the Florida winner last year, placed sec- the auctioneers were Phil Sanders of succeeding Bob F. Deriso of Tampa, ond in the 1968 national contest. The Laurel, Mississippi, and Bobby Wilson
who had served for three consecutive contest this year was under the super- of Quitman, Georgia.
terms, vision of B. Edmund David of Winter Buyers, with number of head bought
Other officers include J. M. Edwards, Haven and was judged by J. E. Pace, in parentheses, if more than one, and
Jr., Starke, vice president, and William extension animal husbandman, Univer- amount paid, follow:
A. Gephart, Kissimmee, secretary-treas- sity of Florida, Gainesville.
u re r w h w a re e e ct d e w d re c o rsB lack W atch F arm s, Inc., W appingers F alls,
urer, who was reflected. New directors Top selling female was Pride 27 of New York (12) $5155; W. W. Ragg, Tampa (12)
named are: Darwin N. White, Fort Ramsey, consigned by Tropical Sky, Se- $2920; Pioneer Cattle Co pany, Belle Glade (11)
Myers; E. J. Gibbs, Jr., Cantonment; b $3965; Herman Bronson, Oala $285; Royal Scot
bring. The buyer was Frank Hyden Of Farms, Senatobia, Mississippi (8) $2645; L. T.
J. R. Thompson, Marianna; Marlin Clearwater who paid $775 for the daugh- Johnston, Tampa $375; T&P Angus Ranch,
Jornston,$T12pa Henry TP Burrys Laeanch,
Nicely and Arky Rogers, Lake City, ter of Ballot of Belladrum. $1 125; Hnry t $4ury L (5
$1400; Mijo Farms, Monticello $435; L. H.
and Deriso. High buyer at the sale was Black Hawkins & Sons, Sarasota $520; M. B. Stovall,
The annual youth showmanship con- Watch Farms, Inc., of Wappingers Falls, Ellenton $735; Selene Trading Company, Citra $300;
Kevin Bronson, Ocala $270; F. H. Beuseman,
test was held the morning of sale day at New York, with purchases of 12 head Arcadia $810; Frank Hyden, Clearwater $775;
Hughes Angus Ranch, Ellenton with 15 for $5155. Black Watch was represented Hidden Acres, Myakka City $450; Prevatt Angus
Ranch, Gibsonton $585; James B. Fowler, Okeecontestants entered. Winners were by Victor Puig, Jr., of Miami, general crobee (2) $445; Charles E. Dyches, Lakeland Donna Weingarden of Monticello and manager of the firm's international di- $220; J. R. Pitt', Ruskin (3) $665; Dr. S. W
Stout, Sarasota (4) $1515; Wendell Smith, LakeTom Edwards of Starke. Alternates vision. Second high buyer was Pioneer land (3) $1115; Ralph Robinson, Wilsonville,
named were Larry Sweat of Gibsonton Cattle Company of Belle Glade with 11 Alabama $430; Circle R Ranch, Lake City $255;
MB Angus Company, Bradenton (2) $670; Joe
and Rick Williams of Lakeland. head and an outlay of $3965. Martinez, Tampa (2) $450; Suwannee Revere
The two top winners will compete in The seven bulls selling grossed $4365 Ranch, Bell $250; Suncoast Farms, Bradenton
$310; John Sweat, Gibsonton $300; B. Moore &
the National Junior Showmanship com- and 23 cows with calves at foot brought Comany, Lutz $290; F. E. Durrance & Sons,
petition held during the Angus Futurity $9340 and averaged $406. The overall Mya ka City $250; B. W. Waynewight, Lake
at Lexington, Kentucky, in August, female average was $327. Wreton, vile Misfemae avragewas 327.sissippi.
BOB F. DERISO, at left, retiring presi- NEW Auxiliary officers named at R. D. BENNETT, newly elected president of the Florida Angus Association the meeting in Palmetto are, from left: dent of the Florida Angus Association, receives congratulations from Frank Bin- Mrs. J. M. Edwards, Jr., Starke, presents the showmanship trophy to Donford of Thomaston, Georgia, vice presi- president; Mrs. Joe Etter, Monticello, na Weingarden, 4-H member from Mondent of the American Angus Association president elect; Mrs. Bob F. Deriso, ticello while Tom Edwards, a 4-H'er from
following the annual election meeting of Tampa, secretary-treasurer2 and Mrs. Starke at left, the other winner, waits to
the Florida breed group. Marlin Nicely, Lake City, vice-president, accept his trophy.
for June, 1969 59




Over 900 Persons at
Annual Beef Cattle
Short Course
Get Word on Production
"WHAT KIND of beef should we pro- nent with producers and packers Pierce noted that beef carcass deduce?" This was the principal topic Salmonella and insecticides. Salmo- mand is for lean meat, but he warned and theme of the 18th annual Beef nella infects cattle and other domes- producers not to sacrifice meat quality Cattle Short Course held at the Uni- tic and wild animals and can be to get less fat. "Cattle type must be versity of Florida's Livestock Pavil- passed on to man through consuming bred and fed in a more red meat type ion, Gainesville, May 1-3. the organisms in food. "The serious- manner," Pierce said. He urged proOver 900 persons were on hand for ness of the problem is pointed up by ducers to obtain carcass data on cattle. the event including representatives the fact that present food and drug The present status on the pre-confrom a number of Latin American regulations state that any food for ditioning of beef calves was the next countries., human or animal use containing Sal- topic, discussed by H. L. Chapman,
Dr. T. J. Cunha, chairman of the monella is adulterated, and thus can head of the Range Cattle Experiment animal science department at the be seized and condemned," Sleeth Station, Ona. Chapman said that University, and Short Course chair- said. "The loss of product is bad preconditioning refers to management man, officially opened the program enough, but the loss of consumer con- systems wherein calves are weaned on with welcoming remarks and intro- fidence is even worse." the farm before shipment and handuced J. W. Sites, dean for research, Sleeth noted that there is increasing dled in such a way to enable the calf agricultural experiment stations, who concern about intake of insecticides in to withstand stresses occurring at gave the official welcome. food. "It is important that we recog- weaning. 'He said that a calf experiFrozen and pre-cooked meats in the nize the possible dangers to consumers ences a 24 to 78 hour starvation period future was the prediction of Rhule B. and to the industry," he said, "and immediately after weaning that adSleeth, assistant director of the Food exercise caution in insecticide appli- versely effects the performance of the Research Division for Armour and cation." calf in the feedlot. "This starvation
Company. Sleeth addressed the short Sleeth concluded his talk by saying period must be prevented," Chapman course on future trends in beef proc- that producers and processors must Said. essing and merchandising and what anticipate the future consumer trends their effects would be on future beef and adjust their operations to meet Records Needed.. production. Sleeth noted that insti- new needs. Chapman said that the loss from
tutional firms were already using a John C. Pierce, director of USDA's shrink, feed utilization and efficiency, substantial amount of frozen and pre- Livestock Division, Consumer and plus a one to two percent death loss cooked meals. In the future pre- Marketing Service, spoke on U.S. beef in prevailing management practice packaged retailed meats will be frozen grading standards. Pierce said that reportedly cost feedlot operators $10 because it retains meat color and pre- present yield grades may be too wide to $20 yer animal and as a result, vents drip problems, Sleeth said, and and predicted that yield grade quality feedlots are developing record systems
quik feezngpreervs eatquait. and quantity values would change in to tell them which groups of cattle do
Some Problems ... the future, and that electrical devices well and which do poorly. "Florida
would probably be used for grading cow-calf producers will be faced with Sleeth told of two problems, promi- in the future. the fact that their reputation will be
built on the way their cattle do in
feeedlot or in grass-fattening proJ grams," said Chapman. "As management systems continue to become
more intensive, Florida cattlemen will
find that they will be carrying out
many of the steps of preconditioning
as normal management policy."
Chapman said there were many unV, answered questions about preconditioning and the economics of preconditioning, but, he added, the feedlots
want preconditioned cattle and predicted they would pay a premium for
them in the future. He outlined the
many factors involved in preconditioning calves and said the degree that
any cattleman utilizes it will depend
THE SHORT COURSE program featured speakers from out'-of-state as well as on the individual situation. "It is a Florida speakers. Shown above, from left, are: Rhule B. Sleeth; H. L. Chapman, Jr.; step forward in management which Dr. T. J. Cunha, and John C. Pierce. will become more widespread as better
60 The Florida Cattleman




communication develops between the rancher, the buyer, the feeder, the
animal nutritionist, the veterinarian
and all other people involved in beef
cattle production," Chapman concluded. 4
A. C. Warnick, animal physiologist
from the University, told short course guests that there is an outstanding
potential for improving beef cattle k through the use of artificial insemina- tion. Warnick cited that in dairy
cattle milk production has increased
200 pounds per cow in 20 years, part
of which is due to improved genetic
potential through the use of A.I. He
told the cattlemen that in one beef
herd using proven A.I. sires during a PREMIER WINNERS received their awards during the Beef Cattle Short Course at four year period, weaning weights in- Gainesville. Shown here from left are: Harry Hammond, editor of The Cattleman, creased from 518 pounds to 605 who presented the awards; Leroy Baldwin; Mike Milicevie, U. S. Sugar Corporation;
pounds and the percent calves grading K. D. Eatmon; Danny Lyons, Mar-K Charolais, who also accepted for LH Bar Ranch; and Roy Gregg, southeastern fieldman for APHA, who received the awards choice went from 50 to 97 percent. for Sunny Acres Ranch.
There are also problems involved
with A.I. Warnick said, one of which energy, protein, minerals and vita- that estrus control will not be effective is detecting cows in heat. He said mins in order to have a high rate of and economical in the future. that cattlemen planning to start an conception. Nutrition is a vital part of estrus
A.I. program would face such prob- Estrus control in beef cattle was synchronization, Bartlett said, and
lems as finding and evaluating sires, discussed by David E. Bartlett, Amer- pointed to studies conducted at the training personnel and rearranging ican Breeders Service, Inc., Madison, Fort Robinson Beef Cattle Research pastures to fit the program. Wisconsin. Bartlett said that estrus Station, Crawford, Nebraska, where it
Warnick outlined some practices synchronization was under study but was found that the amount of energy
necessary for a successful insemina- had not been proven effective to date. cows obtained before and after calving tion program emphasizing that an It must be understood, he added, that effected cycling.
adequate nutrition program is neces- less than desirable results from ex- Bartlett said that successful estrus sary so that cows are getting sufficient periments do not necessarily imply control, even more than A.I. relates
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SANTA Annual FSGA Field Day Slated
THE ANNUAL summer meeting and field day of the Florida Santa Gertrudis Association has been slated for June 27-28 at Belle Glade, according to Ed G ER TR U D Watson, Clewiston, president. Headquarters will be the Holiday Inn at Belle
Glade.
F DC Watson said there would be a board of directors meeting at 4:00 p.m.
Friday, June 27 and a "Dutch Treat" supper set for that evening.
The annual meeting will get underway at 10:00 a.m. Saturday, June 28. Watson said that Don Wakeman, associate professor in the animal science
SALE department, University of Florida, would give an illustrated talk on how the
modern steer should look. Then Dr. A. Z. Palmer, meats scientist at the University, will describe the carcass characteristics of the modern steer. Fida July Following luncheon, the members will be given a tour of Big B Ranch,,
Friday, Jlocated 15 miles south of South Bay.
Watson has also announced that the association will sponsor two feeder 1:00 P.M. calf sales this season. One is set for the Glades Livestock Market, Belle Glade,
Glades Livestock Market on July 25, and another at the Mid-Florida, Livestock Market, Orlando,
BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA August_15.
O V ER directly to the level of herd manage- in the A.I. herd during the breeding
ment and reproductive efficiency pre- season," Crane said, and following 6A D vailing. "As yet, no herd managers this program he is breeding about 70
have demonstrated capability to percent of his A.I. herd on the first achieve high level and completely sat- service. Crane said that he is detectisfactory results with estrus synchro- ing about 85 percent of the cows on This is a special all-Santa Gertru- nization over successive years," Bart- the first heat period and 95 percent dis purebred and Santa Gertrudis lett said. "Based upon experience, few on the second.
crossbred feeder calf sale spon- are showing the desire and intention Max Hammond addressed the auto try. It would appear, even though dience next with a talk on artificial sored by the Florida Santa Ger- imperfect, that the concept and the insemination with Brahman cows at
trudis Association. There will be hormones may have been more ready the W. H. Stuart Ranch, Bartow.
over 600 head 'offered in this than the herds in which they have Hammond gave the results of work
special sale. Consignments will been tried." done at the ranch for a five year
period from 1959 through 1963. In
be accepted from all cattlemen A. 1. Programs... all cases, Hammond reported, includthat have steers carrying Santa Five Florida ranchers appeared on ing a time in 1961 when estrus conGertrudis blood. Plan to consign the program next to give first hand trol was tried, unsatisfactory results
or plan to buy at this all-Santa information on their experience with were obtained.Gertrudis feeder calf sale. artificial insemination. Azel Lewis of During -this time, Hammond said,
A. Duda and Sons Ranch, Cocoa, semen was collected and frozen at the
For further information, contact gave the group some background on ranch and a professional inseminator
his uses of A.I. He said that four working in the area was used, Heat JOHN D. CHAMBLEE, four years of using A.I. at the ranch detection was done twice a day with
Sale Chairman had improved the quality and weight those detected in the afternoon bred
of the calves considerably. Lewis the next morning and those detected Box 509, Belle Glade, Fla. pointed out that they were having in the morning bred the next afterOr call the Glades Market some problems in heat detection, but noon. Results varied, according to
that 84 percent of the original herd Hammond, from a 9.7 percent concepAlso, there will be Santa Gertrudis feed- had been bred A.I. to date. The pro- tion rate to a 56 percent conception er calves consigned by members of the gram now includes progeny test on rate during the five year period on Florida Santa Gertrudis Association and bulls used in the program, Lewis different groups of cows. other cattlemen to the Mid-Fla. Feeder added. Hammond said the results were not
Calf Sale at the Mid-Florida Livestock Market, Orlando, on August 15, 1969. Robert F. Crane, Jr., managing encouraging and no further
partner of Rock Hollow Farm, Ocala, using A.I. at the ranch were made Watch for further information told the cattlemen that the results of until this year. The program was
a sound A.I. program could be seen in altered somewhat with trained ranch on both of these Sales. the performance of heifers sired by personnel doing the insemination and
A.I. bulls. Crane usually breeds about semen collected at the ranch and sent 150 head per year artificially. Per- to an A.I. laboratory for processing F L 0 R I D A formance and disposition are the fac- and returned to the ranch for storage.
tors Crane looks for when selecting The feeding program was also intensiSanta Gertrudis Ass'n for his A.I. herd, and if a cow does fied for the A.I. cattle, according to
not breed A.I. she will not be used the Hammond, feeding a minimum of 16 1943 Tyler St., Hollywood, Fla. following year. pounds of TDN per day for the wet
Members of Santa Gertrudis Breeders "We increase the protein and TDN cows and about 11 or 12 pounds for
Internatioal, Kengsvlled Texas
62 The Florida Cattlemenl




dry cows and two year old heifers. In addition the cattle were given access to rye pasture. U'S
A 54 day breeding season was observed beginning January 19 and con- EVEN WHEN
tinued until March 14. Hammond
said that 88 percent were detected in heat and bred but that it was too early to tell the conception rate.
Hammond said the experience had shown the necessity of adequate nutrition for A.I. and natural service programs, and that it had proven that "We can make A.I. work." "But
first," he said, "let us be sure that the bulls used are genetically superior and not just highly promoted for sales purposes. Then, let us be sure that we have feeding conditions that will permit the expression of the superior genetics."
Herb C. Lloyd covered the A.I. program for Big B Ranch, Belle Glade. Lloyd said each year for the past four years Big B Ranch had selected 25 to 30 head of their most promising young bulls and bred them artificially. This, Lloyd said, enabled them Grass has been short around Prattsville, Ala., the past two years, but Ed Wadsto obtain progeny data on the bulls. worth is still selling those heavy calves. He started using Santa Gertrudis bulls
He said that four years experience back in 1954, and getting 95% calf crops. The calves are big fellows, the kind
had been a wonderful teacher and gave the audience some of his conclu- that make the profit. His commercial cows are Angus and native Alabama
sins on A.I. He said the number of Santa Gertrudis crosses. Here's the way the averages look!
cattle in their program varied from YEAR NO. CALVES WEIGHTS
1000 to 5000 and that during the four STEERS HEIFERS
year period using A.I. a 42 to 64 per- 1966 320 616 lbs. 608 lbs.
cent conception rate had been main- 1967 315 600 lbs. 567 lbs.
gained. Lloyd said that he was not 1968 319 581 lbs. 547 lbs.
completely satisfied with conception rate but that it had improved consid- In three years the steer calves averaged over 2.4 Ibs, per day from birth to
erably since the start of the program. weaning and the heifer calves gained over 2 lbs. Average weaning age was 7Yh
United States Sugar Corporation's months and the calves were on creep feed.
A.I. program was explained by Mike Find out more about the great results on good grass or bad, with or without
Milicevic, superintendent of cattle at creep feed, from Santa Gertrudis crosses all over the country. Ask for a free
the Clewiston ranch. Milicevic said beef chart.
that the ranch started its A.I. program in 1967 primarily in the purebred Charolais herd to take advantage of all French bulls. He said they en- SANTA GERTRUDIS
countered some problems in labor and BREEDERS INTERNAT|0ONAL'
pasture layout at first but both were now satisfactory.
Milicevic said that trained ranch BOX 1257E KINGSVILLE, TEXAS 78363
personnel seemed to work out better in the A.I. program, rather than using FOR SALE SANTA GERTRUDIS
outside technicians. Pasture units a Gertrudis
divided into 40 and 80 acre units Saia Geiiri*i EL RANCHO
have been set up, Milicevic said, with Purebred heifers and bulls
each unit connecting to driving lanes John Thornhill Plant Co. GRANDE
leading to a centrally located corral TIFTON, GEORGIA INDIANTOWN, FLA.
where insemination is done. P.O. Box 193 PH. AC 912/382-1474 GRADY CROSBY, FOREMAN, 305-597.2346
"Nutrition is probably the most es- _P.O._Box193 PH._A_ 912/382_474_GRADYCROSBY,_FREMAN,_30-__7-234
sential factor of a successful breeding program," Milicevic noted, whether Santa Gertrudis S A N T A G E R T R U D I S
an A.I. program or natural service The kind that WEIGH and PAY on
Program. He said dry cows should R h.n EENo loriGadPA
bee fed eight to nine pounds of TDN LAZY R BAR RANCH
daily, and wet cows should receive 16 Kirby Hancock, Forman, Ph. 847-2O BLOUNT & HYDE
(Continued on page 65) KISSIMMEE FLORIDA
Located 3 miles east on Boggy Creek Road B. Blount, Mgr., Phone Lake Placid FO 4771 for June, 1969 63 Certified Bang's Free Herd No. 533 Rt. 1, Box 525, Lake Placid, Florida




,
SANTA
GERTRUDIS
STAGE COACH RANCH
Dade City, Florida IRVIN SANDERS, Mgr.
P. 0. Box 65 Ph: 567-2095
Located on No. 581, between Brooksville &
Dade City ELECTED DURING the annual meeting of SGBI in San Antonio, Texas were, from
left: Tom O'Connor, secretary; K. D. Eatmon, treasurer; B. K. Johnson, vice presiPurebred Santa Gertrudis dent; Frates Seeligson, president, and Governor of Arkansas Winthrop Rockefeller,
director, and retiring president.
E. H. Chapman
Box H.8, Pmat Eatmon, Watson Elected to Posts
Van Road. west of Knights
Visitors Welcome
752-7722 PHONES 752-2268 In SGBI at Annual Meeting
MEMBER: FCA-SGBI-FSGA
Two FLORIDIANS were elected to of- told the members that the association fices in Santa Gertrudis Breeders In- experienced a year of unprecedented Purebred Santa Gertrudis ternational at the organization's an- success. "A total of 16,530 cattle
Pounds-Perormance nual membership meeting held April were classified which is the highest
BLACKWATER FARMS 12 in San Antonio, Texas. Elected since organization-a total of 12,268
as treasurer was K. D. Eatmon of cattle were sold on association records
Mr. & Mrs. J. T. Flagg, owners Pompano Beach, who had been serving and the membership reached an all
Ph: (205) 384-4595 & 6
RT. 4, JASPER, ALA. 35501 as a director, and Ed Watson of time high of over 1100."
RT._4,__ASPER,_ALA. ____01 Clewiston, elected to the board of di- The keynote speech was made by
rectors. John Chohlis, general manager of the
Try Santa Gertrudis From Frates Seeligson of San Antonio, International Cattlemen's Expo,
Texas, the newly elected president, Linkletter Productions, who said that SLEEPY HOLLOW FARMS announced that attendance was a near cattle production goes beyond the
TELEPHONE 92-1521 record with members coming from pasture and feedlot and includes atti1943 TYLER STREET throughout the U.S. and other coun- tude, salesmanship, advertising and
JAKE WATSON
Owner tries such as Guatemala, Australia, other promotional efforts.
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA Mexico and Argentina.
Ranch located near DeLand on Hwy. 42 West Also elected were B. K. Johnson, Young Herd Bulls
La Pryor, Texas, vice president, and
secretary, Tom O'Connor of Cam- Require Care
B R I G G S R A N C H E S bridge, Massachusetts. Reelected for YEARLING BEEF herd bulls need
P. 0. Box 1981 three year terms as directors were W. proper feeding and care for best perSAN ANTONIO, TEXAS W. Callan of Waco, Texas and Ro- formance and long life in the herd.
"It's Performance That Counts" berto Berger of Guatemala City, This is the word from Haley M.
Guatemala. Also elected for three Jamison, University of Tennessee asR. W. Brggs, Sr. R.W. Brigg, Jr.
San Roque Ranch Broken X Ranch year terms were Winthrop Rockefel- sociate animal husbandman. Catarina. Texas San Antonio. Texas ler of Morrilton, Arkansas and Hilmer "Proper care is a must in order to Moore of Richmond, Texas. Rocke- get a high calf crop percentage and
feller, who is Governor of Arkansas, to yield maximum returns to the herd For was the outgoing president, having owner," he advises.
served two consecutive terms. "Your newly-purchased yearling
SANTA GERTRUDIS During the meeting it was decided bull should be acclimated to his new
With The Mark Of to increase the board of directors home and properly conditioned for
Quality Breeding from 12 to 15. In order to fill these several weeks before you place him in
added positions, the following were the cow herd," Jamison recommends. elected: Vernon Smith, Dallas, Texas; Limit the yearling bull to 10 to 12 PICNIC Watson; and J. T. Flagg of Jasper, cows for a period of 90 days, he cauGROVES and RANCH Alabama. Robert Shelton of Kings- tions. During the breeding season,
L. H. Keene, Ranch Manager ville, Texas was elected to fill the va- feed a concentrate ration at the rate of
Ph: Tampa 689-3302 cancy created by Eatmon's election one pound per 100 pounds of body
RANCH LOCATED as treasurer. weight. Good pasture will not supply
18 miles South of Plant City
Box 420, Route 1, Lithia. Fla. Executive Secretary R. P. Marshall sufficient nutrients to a working bull
Herd No. U 64 The Florida Cattleman 1
Charter Member SGBI and FSGA




For Sale
Purebred Bulls and Heifers at reasonable prices. All bulls semen tested and ready for service. All cattle raised on large pastures
H. C. DOUGLAS, at right, was the win- an climatized.
ner of the Florida Bankers' Association "One Hundred Square Miles of Good Cattle and Gross"
award for the best production tested herd
in Florida. Louis Gilbreath presented A. D. Griffith, Owner
the award. Eddie Roulerson Tom Fitzgerald, Mgr.
General Manager Purebred Operations
Short Course I, Rt. 3, Box 3000, Okeechobee, Florida Ph. RO 3-4727
(Continued from page 63) Member of Santa Gertruts Breeders International
t---Kingsville, Texaspounds per day of TDN for best Ki__ _ _,_Te__s_
results.
Milicevic said that on the first Breeders of Purebred Santa Gertrudis
year following an A.I. program Sugar- Quality Santa Gertrudis
land Ranch had a 92.2 percent preg- WINNSTEAD PLANTATION
nancy rate, 10.4 percent of which was H. L. HARVELL RANCH Philip P. Rust Phone: 226-1528
owner 226-6304
due to the use of clean up bulls. P. 0. Box 215 Phone 796-4153 Route #3
"We consider the above results to be BROOKSVILLE, FLORIDA
fairly satisfactory when considering 2 Mi. So. On US 41-Visitors Always Welcome Thomasville, Georgia that initially we had personnel problems and were novices in this field,"
he noted. SANTA GERTRUDIS Produce the Typo of Calves You Want
(SIZEPROFITS) Smith Ranch
Premier Awards... BLUE CYPRESS LAKE SHORTHORNS
The annual presentation of THE Ranch, Inc. Featuring Acclimated Bulls With Size
FLORIDA CATTLEMAN'S premier H. R. Holman, Owner P. 0. Box 698 H. L. & P. N. Smith, Owners
awards were made by Harry Ham- ram Moody, Mgr. Ph.:305/562-6267 Phone 293-2930, Winter Haven, Fla.
VERO ,BEACH, FLORIDA Ranch on Poinsettia Park Road; five mils N.E.
mond, editor. Accepting the awards 1this year were: Leroy Baldwin of
Baldwin Angus Ranch, Ocala; Dr. SANTA GERTRUDIS BULLS
Mike Milicevic, U.S. Sugar Corpora- Of All Ages for Sale
tion, Clewiston; K. D. Eatmon of JOSCO PELLETS
Pompano Beach; Danny Lyons of HARLEY WATSON
Mar-K Charolais, High Springs, who
also accepted for LH Bar Ranch, RANCH Citrus Pulp
Newnan, Georgia; and Roy Gregg, ARCADIA Ph: WAlnut 9-6681 FLA. Coastal Bermuda Hay
southeastern representative for the
American Polled Hereford Associa- Santa Gertrudis Cattle For information and prices write or
tion, who accepted for Sunny Acres Charter SINCE 1941 FSGA call:
Ranch, Polk City. Member SGBI
I. S. JOSEPH CO., INC.
Developing Calves.. P.. Box 19127
The Thursday evening program, LL ANCR Phone 813/839-5431
Th Turda eein pogam . A A T IDA TAMPA, FLORIDA 33616
presided over by James E. Pace, extension animal husbandman, got un-
derway with discussions by four Flor- ida cattlemen on programs to keep PRODUTION R TmTE
weaned calves and develop them to PODCTON R
feedlot weights of 600 to 800 pounds. BANTA A
First to speak was Jock Sutherland of R I N G 0 Homo of
Immokalee. Sutherland outlined his "RINGO REDS" R N0o
program for taking 450 pound weaned JAMES W. RINGO, Owner C Box 1047
Immokalee, Florida 33934 H Ph: (813) OL 7-232
for June, 1969 65 _____________________________________




calves to feedlot weights Under
the program steer calves are processed, sorted and put on three
different type programs. The first,
Sutherland said, was a full feed proC LONESTARgram consisting of a ration *of corn silage, citrus pulp, molasses and a
protein supplement. Average daily
~gains of 21/4 pounds per day were Fast, Permanent, recorded on this program according to
Sutherland. The second program
Economical consisted of fertilized pasture with a
Animal/Identification|supplement feed of corn silage, moAniml Ientiicaionlasses and a protein supplement. UnInstant application. older r this program average daily gains
One-piece, flexible. of 11/2 pounds per day were recorded.
Always legible. The third program is fertilized pasWon't hair ture without supplement and average
over. e daily gains of one pound were reGua ranted corded.
to stay in. Covering the economics of the proSnag-proof. gram, Sutherland said that calves on
Permanently- the full feed program were ready for
welded numbers. 3 feedlot in about 100 days. He estiSizes-cows, calves, mated the cost per pound of gain on
sheep & goats. 7 full feed at 25 cents. The combina*Patent pendIng e a t r tion grazing and feed program takes
about 192 days, according to SutherSland, and costs apout 22 cents per N, pound of gain. The program of grazP. 0. Box 9385 ing without supplement takes about
San Antonio, Texas 78204 250 days, he said, at a cost of 15 cents
per pound of gain.
As the steers reached weights of
700 pounds they were fed finishing rations in dry lot for approximately 100
Malloy Hereford Ranch Quarter Horses Polled Herefords days.
PldHers J. 0. Pearce, Jr., of Okeechobee,
Polled Herefords spoke next on his program for develChief Herd Sire a'V hoping feeder calves on pasture. Pearce
Gay Hills Victor L58 uses only calves from his breeding
Mr. and Mrs. Dallas *Malloy, Owners R A N C H ue nycle rmhsbedn
r.nr 2-2s or wner8Rt. 1, Box 182B, Polk City, Fla. program and feeds them on grass and
P. O. Box 490, Phone U 2-2626 or 2438 J. M. WELLMAN, Owner Phone clover combination pastures to about
MARIANNA, FLORIDA Joe B. Armstrong, Mgr. Auburndale 967-1419 900-1000 pound weights. He keeps
HEREFORD BULLS FOR SALE his program flexible enough that he
They're coming two's and three's and are ready Registered Herefords can sell the calves to feedlots or dito go to work for you[ rectly to slaughter. Following this
SHUMAN'S JO-SU-LI FARMS program, Pearce reported, the majorClarence Cross Owner ity of the calves will grade high
Ralph Thompson, battl. Mgr. standard. Pearce said he was conPhone PLaza 8-3637 vinced that developing feeder calves
Plant City Phone Georgia
Florida 7524311 Colquitt, Georgiaon pasture would be economical for
Ranch located 3 mi. S. of Plant City most areas of Florida.
The key to success in raising lightPolled Herefords weight calves to feeder weights is to
PALMETTO -Big Boned and Growthy provide a good level of supplemental
HEREFORD RANCH feed, was the word from Lat Turner
Established in 1930 ARTHUR S, GARBER & SON of Sarasota. Turner said that several
BELLEVIEW, FLORIDA years ago, faced with a depressed calf
SERVICE AGE BULLS FOR SALE Rt. 2, Box 142, Ocala e Ph. 245-3468 market, he decided to keep lightYears of experience in line-breeding clear pedigree RANCH 11/2 MILES W. OF BELLEVIEW weight calves and develop them on Plato Domino 1 Polled Herefords with the best in
Prince Domino, Hazlett, Battle Mischief, "om-stic and
other proven bloodlines have permitted us to perfect a "beef producer" of the finest quality. P Performance Tested
Breeding Age Stock for sale at all POLLED HEREFORDS HEREFORD BULLS
times It's Performance That Counts
Herd Sire: CVH Silver Victor 85 For Sale
at
CALHOUN FALLS, S. C. Circle Z Ranch CORRIGAN RANCH
N. W. TRASK, Owner Geo. A. Zellner, Owner P. 0. Box 3130, Beach Station
Ph: Iva, S. C., AC 803/348-7691 FLORAL CITY, FLA. Ph: 567-7141, 567-2442
Located 7 mi. North of Calhoun Falls on #81 Rt. 1, Box 63, Ph. 726-2339 Vero Beach, Florida




GLADES
FEEDER CALF SALE
FRIDAY, JULY 11, 2:30 p.m.
FOUR FLORIDA ranchers who appeared on the Short Course program were, from MARKET
left. Ralph Sexton; Jeannette Chitty; Jock Sutherland, and K. D. Eatmon.
pastures. Turner said the calves 1000 HEAD
weighed about 350 pounds and were put on non-irrigated Pangola pastures 800-1000 SELL IN BOARD SALE
and fed about two pounds per head (TOTAL APPROXIMATELY 2000 HEAD)
per day of urea-molasses. They were sold in the fall of the following year weighing about 725 pounds each. Heavy Steer and Heifer Calves of
"The main advantage of this type of program is the enlarged carrying All Breeds-Quality Will be Stressed
capacity per acre, the low intake of feed, and the relative high per acre beef production received," Turner This sale will be a good source of top quality
said. He said it was difficult to ob- feeder calves due to the early calving season
tain exact costs and returns since the in south Florida.
program was lumped together with his cow-calf operation, but, he added, "we find it is extremely profitable."
R. D. Bennett of Greenwood ex- PLAN NOW TO ATTEND
plained his program for developing calves to feedlot weights with winter grazing. Bennett said he preferred to buy lighter weight calves ranging For late details, call
from 250 to 400 pounds. The calves are brought to the farm and put in GLADES MARKET
small holding pens, Bennett said, LIVESTOCK
where they are given vitamin and combiotic shots and fed plenty of hay Harold Brough, Ph: AC 305/996-3028
and water. After about three days, feed troughs are brought in and the Belle Glade, Florida
calves are taught to eat a ration of ground ear corn, hulls and molasses, Pete Clemons, Ph: ROdeo 3=3127
with hay fed free choice. At first, Bennett brings in calves that are al- Okeechobee, Florida
ready eating and usually within five days all calves are eating well. They are then turned on to well fertilized pasture, either permanent or tempo- POLLED HEREFORD BULLS
rary, whichever is available. One or a Carload BULL
Bennett's winter grazing program O F R a
consists of oats, rye and Rye grass WINDSWEEP FARM
combinations. In the summer months Ph. 647-3807
he uses millet for temporary pasture Ben & Jane Smith Bud Dmyaey Herd Sires In Service:
and Coastal Bermuda for permanent Owners Anaer
pitdTHOMASTON, GA. 30286 TWD Super Rollo 32
pasture. Bennett pointed out that CMR Superol 20
CPH Woodrow 16
lots of fertilizer and lots of seed must CMR Supe Rollo 76
be used to obtain a good grazing pro- CA A A XSFR CEK Superol CAN AFA FA MSSFR Crail Perf Victor gam. Following-this program 900u to SFR Superior Victor
ram. oRegistered Herefords CMR Super Domino 136
1000 pounds of live weight cattle cal HERD SIRES CMR Rollotrend 56
be maintained per acre, according to Upstream Real Onward 31st CEK Rex Mixer 151
Upstream Mischief A147 CMR Rollotrend 129
Bennett. "I have found that the tim- Domini n Cruiser 34th
CF Colorado 555 Phone 462.1453
ing in planting small grains and man- Dudley Cannafax Owner, Oscar Craft, Gen.
Mgr., Ed Samuels: Cattle Mgr.
for June, 1969 67 BARNESVILLE, GEORGIA




agement of pastures (including rotaPERFORMANCE TESTED tion) is most important to obtain best
results," he concluded.
Hereford Cattle High Moisture Corn...
That Perform Well in Florida F. S. Baker, Jr., of the North
Florida Experiment Station, Quincy,
Come See Our Young Bulls was next to appear with a talk on
various methods of storing and processing high moisture corn. Baker
PINE ACRES RANCH said that thoroughly ensiled high
moisture shelled corn has given faster
Citra, Florida gains and improved feed efficiency,
H. A. BEDFORD, Owner Box 222 as compared with dry corn, for finG. P. LEITNER, Herdsman Phone: 595-3806 ishing steers at the North Florida ExRanch located 12 mfles No. of Ocala on U.s. 301 periment Station. He referred to
three trials completed at the station
which showed that cattle fed high
POLLED HEREFORDS moisture corn have gained 10.7 per"Our 27th Year" HEREFORD BULLS cent more efficiently with $2.88 less
CIRCLE T RANCH FOR SALE AT THE FARM feed cost per 100 pounds gain.
Baker said that in reconstituting
Clermont, Florida SAM SELLS & SONS corn, be sure to have enough water
Located 5 miles S. of Groveland off Hwy. 33 Farm Phone 782-5227 P. 0. Box 174 available. He recommended applying Phone: adof3 w.3 Mo u I t r i e, G e o r g io about one gallon of water per bushel
T. F. Thompson, Owner MEMBER. GEORGIA B.C.I.A. of shelled corn or 50 gallons of water
per ton of ground snapped corn.
Herefords are just naturally better! Registered Polled Herefords Heating the water as it is applied
Ask us about breeding Herefords and Clean Pedigrees causes better absorption, Baker said.
become an active breeder. He recommended exposing the grain
Florida Hereford aWso Cattle Co. to water for about two minutes with
ASSOCIATION Box 65 Phone 635-3787 some agitation such as given by an
J. PAT CORRIGAN. President Frostproof, Fla. auger.
P. 0. Box 3130, Vero Beach, Fla. Polled Husker Mischiefs stored from 10 to 21 days in sealed
POLLED HORNED storage before feeding is begun. If
HEREFORDS IRODGIER S stored in upright sealed storage, he
REGISTER ORD ERES said, rolling or grinding grain as it
SINGLETARYSTERED HORNED HEREFORDS comes out of the structure seemed to
And Complete Livestock Management Service work much better than grinding going A. J. and R. C. Singletary Mr. & Mrs. Bill Rodgers, Jr.
BLAKELY, GEORGIA Rt. 1, Box 172 Dumneioo, Fla. into storage.
Ph. 723-3525 (Office)-723-3196 (Res.) Selling feeder calves by tour sales
Russell Nash, herdsman-Ph: 723-3481 Ph: Williston 904/528-8142
Residence: Phone 723-3196 Located at King Ranch of Florida on SR 464. was the next topic, discussed by B. J.
2 MI. NW OF BLAKELY ON HWY. 27 Harris, Highlands County Agricultural
Agent. Harris said the Highlands
RWJ PRACTICAL POLLED ,County Cattlemen's Association esHEREFORDS tablished the tour sale in 1958 to cre22 bulls fed out In 1968 averaged.- D ate better marketing of feeder calves
22bulsfe ot n 96 aerge--DONALSONVILLE, GA in the area. He said that the tour
596 lbs. adjusted 205 day weight REGISTERED HEREFORDS SINCE 1913 type sale had worked well for both
per the Georgia BCIA. The Pioneer Herd of the Southeast the seller and buyer for many reasons
3.22 lbs. daily gain on feed with a Mr. and Mrs. John J. Cummings andepoind spefcal y o sn
top of 4.23 lbs. Mr. and Mrs. Paul S. Stout and pointed specifically to shrinkage
1086 lbs. actual weight at 365 days and the condition in which the calves
with two over 1200 lbs. arrive at the feedlot. Harris referred
Service Age Bulls For Sale H OUST N to research conducted at Michigan
R. W. JONES, JR. FARM HEREFORD FARM Inc. State University which showed
Box 157, Rt. 1 Ph. 912/874-6105 H shrinkage of cattle going through
LESLIE, GEORGIA 31764 "20 Years Experience in Horned feeder sales at 11.1 percent and calves
*Here fords"fedrsesa1.1pretadcls
Sam A. Nua. Owner s. w. Feer, Igr. shipped direct from the ranch to feedPhone 987-1612 lot had a shrinkage of 9.6 percent.
+Advertise! + PERRY, GEORGIA
ON HWY. 341, 4.5 MI. S. of PERRY Feeding Programs . .
Warnick presided at the Friday
RUSH BROTHERS HEREFORD FARM morning session while J. F. Hentges,
. st Production Sale December 9, 1969 Jr., animal nutritionist at the UniAt The Farm Offering Bulls and Females versity, opened the session with a
All sale animals suitable for reproduction No Private Sales. Plan now to comparison of feeding programs for attend, growing beef calves after weaning.
BOB, KEN and LEE RUSH Hentges reported on research conPhone: Perry Georgia 912/987-1796 or 912/987-3342 Write: Kathleen, Ga. 68 The Florida Cattleman




ducted at several experiment stations
on growing feeder calves. "It is
wise," Hentges said, "to avoid adopting only one feed formula or one feed- :
ing program because flexibility is essential if least-cost diets and leastcost gains are to be achieved." A ; !
cattleman must determine what kind
of feeding program his situation is best '~
suited for, Hentges said, either full
feed, grazing, or a combination of
both. He said that maximum flexibility would require that the enterprise have the capacity and facilities
to do either or both, depending on
which provided the least-cost gains.
"Feeding programs," Hentges told the
group, "for growing beef calves should VARIOUS METHODS of growing and finishing cattle were discussed in topics prebe custom-made to fit the situation." sented by the above speakers at the Short Course. From left are, J. E. Bertrand;
J. E. Bertrand, assocaite animal A. C. Warnick; F. S. Baker, and J. F. Hentges, Jr.
nutritionist, West Florida Experiment, Jay, then spoke on programs eraged only 18 bushels per acre for Summer Grazing .. for finishing cattle using sorghum the ensiled corn, Baker said, and sisilage, high moisture corn and sor- lage harvested per acre was nine tons. Bertrand appeared again to report ghum, and pasture. He discussed five He said that drought silage compared on the performance of beef calves experiments conducted at the West very favorably in estimated TDN and grzgsumranlgase.H Florida Station on finishing steers. contained more crude protein than si- compared the performance of steers Groups of cattle fed high moisture lage with normal grain content har- grazing millet and sorghum-sudan grains proved to convert more efficient vested during other years.wihusplentlfdwthter gains, grade higher and have a higher Baker gave the results of a feeding grazing with supplements. Bertrand dressing percentage than those fed trial where one group of cattle was said in all cases steers fed suppledry matter or supplemented on grass. fed corn silage supplemented with ments out-gained those unsupplementAll steers involved in the experiments grain at a level of 1.1 percent of their ed, and in some cases the supplewere implanted with diethylstilbes- body weight per head daily, plus pro- mented steers returned a higher profit. trol. Bertrand said that it appeared tein, minerals, and vitamin A. An- W. C. "Cal" Burns, superintendent from the experiment that all steers other group was fed a high concen- of the Brooksville Beef Cattle Reshould each be implanted in the ear trate ration with a daily grain level search Station, was next on the prowith 36 mg of diethylstilbestrol. as a of 2.1 percent of their body weight gram. He gave a five year summary standard practice prior to finishing in with the same supplement. During a of the genetic environmental results drylot or on pasture. 112 day feedlot period the cattle fed with Hereford cattle exchanged becorn silage gained just as well and tween Brooksville and Miles City, Feeding Corn Silage ... had similar carcass data as the cattle Montana. He said that no firm conBaker returned to discuss the use of fed the high concentrate ration. T1he clusions can be made at this time with
cornsilge n seer rowng nd in-cost per 100 pounds gain was $2.28 respect to the adaptability of the catcosihgein gastee growingrad finr- lower and net return was $6.93 higher tie to Florida and that more time fishing progras.Hreered todu Unvr- for the cattle fed corn silage, Baker would be required to do this. He said searcher codute wsfutat Puruenr said. He estimated the cost of the that results to date, however, suggest
silgewhe prpery blanedcanre-corn silage at $10 per ton and the that the Miles City cattle are genetiPlace up to 75 or 90 percent of the ground snapped corn used in the high cally less well adapted than the Florcorn in a fattening ration. Feed costs concentrate feed at $40 per ton. ida line. and TDN requirements per pounds of Bertrand then returned to discuss gain are almost always less with corn programs for growing stocker beef Early Calving.. silage than with high grain rations, calves using sorghum silage, fescue, Calving heifers at two years of age Baker noted. He said although the wheat, and rye. He gave the results versus three years of age was the next cost of producing corn silage in North of studies using various grazing pro- topic discussed by Marvin Koger, Florida had not been accurately de- grams, both supplemented and unsup- animal geneticist at the University. termined that there was a good pos- plemented, for growing stockers. He He said that the University of Florida sibility that beef production could be pointed out that tall fescue and rye Beef Research Unit had been breeding increased and costs lowered by mak- grazed in rotation without supplement heifers to calve at two years of age ing maximum use of corn silage in revealed more profit return per head successfully. He said there was an cattle growing and finishing programs. Over Other combination grazing pro- economic advantage In calving heifers Baker said corn silage was particu- grm sn ml risadspl- at two years old and he outlined some
larly attractive where grain yields menting with protein, minerals, vita- of the practices that should be folwere relatively low. He cited an ex- mnadcoetre.lowed. ample at the North Florida Station D. L. Wakeman, associate animal Koger said that feeding and nutriin 1968 when corn yields were se- husbandman, University of Florida, tion was very important in this type verely damaged by drought and part presided at the Friday afternoon pro- program and you should know when Of the drought damaged corn was gram which featured various topics of to feed and when not to feed. "Exharvested for silage. Grain yield av- interest to cattle producers. treme caution should be exercised in
for June, 196968




anticipating favorable results under
less favorable conditions," Koger said.
He noted that under unfavorable con- New Brands Law Approved by FCA
ditions the practice of calving heifers
at two years of age is still not to be CATTLEMEN WILL be allowed to brand only with brands which are registered recommended. with the Florida Department of Agriculture under provisions of Marks and
Jock Sutherland appeared again on Brands Law amendments approved by the Legislative and Thefts and Brands
the program to give his observations Committees of the Florida Cattlemen's Association at Kissimmee on May 14.
on calving heifers at two years old. A bill prepared by the Division of Animal Industry of FDA and introSutherland said that in his experience duced in both the Florida House and Senate as UB 1213 and SB 6295 was the more English blood in the heifer generally approved except for two sections: the better results he obtained. He At the request of the Florida Association of Livestock Markets, a section
said that English cattle seemed to requiring markets to keep a record of drivers, their license numbers and truck
tag numbers was removed. This information will be collected by state inbreed faster and have a higher con- spectors instead.
ception rate at earlier ages. Suther- In another section, a requirement that cattle moving by truck be accomland said that if two year old heifers panied by information as to brands was eliminated. were kept in good shape they would Under the new law, effective January 1 if passed, use of unregistered
perform as well as three year old heif- brands will be illegal, law enforcement officers will be given authority to imers. pound cattle where there is insufficient proof of ownership, and truckers will
Jeannette Chitty of Stardust be licensed by FDA annually.
Ranch, Micanopy, was next on the All cattle moving on Florida highways must be accompanied by "satisfacprogam o exlai herreslts ith toryr evidence" as to their ownership. FDA is preparing a special form for
progam o exlai herreslts ith this purpose.
calving heifers at two years of age.
Mrs. Chitty said that although the-_____________ _______________program requires additional feed and
attention, it also returned investments since 1957 in which several materials rectangles. "Muscles are oval," faster and seemed to contribute to were tested for the control of these in- Wakeman said, "not square." He herd improvement. She said that sects. He said that Ronnel, Tiguvon, used colored slides to illustrate the
heifers calving at two years old con- Co-Ral, Ciodrin, Neguvon, Ruelene, modem type steer. On foot pictures ceive faster, produce more milk, and and Famophos had been found effec- and cross-sections of the carcass were are more consistent regular calvers tive in the control of horn flies and shown so that cattlemen could view than heifers bred to calve at three. cattle grubs. the muscle development and fat deNext to speak on the same subject posits. Wakeman said that livestock
was Ralph Sexton of Vero Beach. Production Testing . people must change their concepts in
Sexton said that he started his pro- 'One of the highlights of the Friday order to keep up with consumer gram for calving heifers at two years afternoon program was the annual changes. old 10 years ago. He said that out- prsnaino h lrd akrs A. Z. Palmer, University of Florida
standing results had been obtained prsentiation ofar teforid Bankbespr's meats specialist, covered the carcass except for a period when Vibriosis in- Assction awadsfrthnes pro-rmiFoia characteristics of the modern meat fected his herd. He said that extra ductio tresting pogram Gineah Flora type steer. Palmer also used slides attention and feed was necessary but, Pace presented LoistGioret chir-ee to compare carcass cuts of different that little or no difficulty had been manof FA'sene liestockdcommittee type steers. He said that one of the experienced in early calving. Death wouprsented the aardh to H. Cl. biggest problems in the livestock inlosses in heifers bred to calve at two, .Dglao -BrnRnch, Zephstyr's dustry was the wasty, excessively over Sexton said, have averaged 3.3 percent K.ard.Eo, wnne of l tn ra yer' finished cattle. In 1967, Palmer said, over the 10 year period,.wrtl fth etn rga in the beef industry produced almost
Pat Corrigan, Vero Beach rancher, effect at his ranch at Pompano Beach. 2.4 billion pounds of excess fat. He was next to appear with his vesosEatmon cited the increase in weight said that even a modem type carcass
of calving heifers at two years of age. ocavsndprrm cefctle could be over finished, and that both
He said that in order to make the since initiating the production testing breeders and feeders must tailor their program work it is necessary to pro- program on his ranch. Eatmon said programs to fit consumer demands. vide plenty of feed economically. one major accomplishment that he A panel discussion was held next
Corrigan reiterated that extra atten- achieved with production testing consisting of Ralph Cellon, Jr., tion was needed but that calving diffi- was gettLing his heifers large enough Alachua, cattle feeder; Fred Goedert, culties were seldom experienced if the to breed toecalveh atw earn otds. Jones-Chambliss Packing Company, heifers were in proper condition. "I Hversaideir weght at cavngdtim Jacksonville, packer; W. F. Snead, feel that breeding heifers to calve at aegsabu100pnd.Jr., Winn Dixie Stores, Jacksonville, two years of age has paid off for me," CocpsMust Chne.. retailer; Bob Crane, cattle breeder;
Corrigan said, "and in the near future, CnetCh geKoger, geneticist; and Reddish, meats
as pastures are improved by the use R. L. Reddish, associate extension specialist. The panel moderator was of summer legumes, frost resistant meats specialist from the University, Palmer. strains of grass, and by better man- presided over the Friday evening sesagement, it should pay even better." sion. Wakeman was the first speaker Avoid Extremes.
Ben W. Hayes of the Everglades and covered the subject of the "Mod- Wakeman summarized the discusExperiment Station, Belle Glade, was em-type Steer." Wakeman said that sion saying that all facets of the livenext on the program with a report on a better name for the modem-type stock industry have problems and the the control of horn flies and grubs. steer might be "high-profit" steer. He modern type steer must fit in with all Hayes gave the results of experiments said the old concepts of ideals for beef phases of the industry. He warned conducted at the Everglades station cattle have been shaped like cubes or cattlemen to avoid extremes and to
68B The Florida Cattleman,




maintain the quality that the housewife demands. All areas of the livestock industry, Wakeman said, must be geared to consumer needs.
Cunha presided over the final session on Saturday morning, May 3, which was held at the University of Florida Beef Research Unit, near Gainesville. Cunha gave the group some background on the organization of the Beef Research Unit and introduced the first speaker, W. G. Blue of the University of Florida Soils Department. Blue discussed lime and fertilizer recommendations for white clover-grass forage production on flat woods soils. Blue said that white clover-grass pastures had been grown at the Beef Research Unit for the past 17 years without irrigation. Some irregularity in forage yields has occurred, he said, but the clover has HIGHEST QUALITY BRAHMANS
never failed to produce forage, fix significant amounts of nitrogen or re- From our constructive, selective, breeding program
seed. He said no replanting had been done except where pastures had been Adaptable Dependable
renovated. "To insure success," Blue recommended, "soil pH must be main- Dist. of the TECO Cattle Squeeze TECO Calf Chute
gained at approximately 6.0 with cal- The best of cattle handling equipment
cic lime. Dolomitic lime should be applied within approximately five _years of the initiation of pasture production on new land, and approxi- C A VIU CATTLE COMPANY
mately each 10 years thereafter." He P. 0. BOX 1088 OCALA, FLOIDA PHONE 622.7151
said that phosphate and potash must _.__._B_______-.___A__,_LORIA._.... ..........___N_____.__be applied annually and gave recommendations on amounts to use. Charolais Charbray MANSO BRED
Pasture Production LIVE OAK PLANTATION, LTD. Brahman Bulls & Commercial Cattle
Pt FOR SALE
The next speaker was G. B. Killin- Jack King, Manager (2 & 3 yrs. old-ready for breeding)
ger, from the Department of Agron- Home of Pancho's Pride
omy at the University. Killinger's Ph: (AC 904) REMSBERG RANCH
"Pasture Production Rec- Ocala, Fl. 237-2550 Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33314
topic was 237-3401 4600 W. Broward Blvd. Ph: 583-3891
ommendations." He told the group __that Leon fine sand and closely related soils as found on the Beef Re- Registered
search Unit support excellent grass HEART BAR RANCH Brahmans &Quarter Horses
and legume pastures when properly Still producing top quality
limed and fertilized. He said that BRAHMANS BABTHLE
experiments had shown Pensacola Ba- Brothers Ranch
hia grass and Argentine Bahia grass Henry 0. Partin & Sons San Antoio, Florida
best suited for this type soil, and that KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA Phones: 588-220, 588-2207
white clover seems to do best in the legume species.
Killinger said that grass-clover Registered Brahman Cattle Florida
combination pastures had yielded BRAHMAN
more beef per acre per dollar invested Association
than grass pastures without clover at J K. STUA IRT sScay
the research unit. "There is no sub- Kelly Lyons, Secretary
stitute in pasture performance," he Livestock Exchange Building
said, "for an adapted, palatable, di- BARTOW FLORIDA KISSIMMEE FLORIDA
gestible, nutritious grass and legume coupled with the correct fertilizer applied at the right time, lime, minor elements, moisture, favorable temper- FLORIDA RANCH ENTERPRISES, INC. Telephones:
ature, sunshine and management." MIAMI
J. M. Myers, Agricultural Engi- RH1SF SA
neering Department, gave the audi- ,.SOUTH BAY
(Continued on page 85)
for June, 1969 69




Brahman Men
NTTT~TF-R-M SUPER CREEP TWENTYTo r W le
ALL NEW The most efficient known Tour Wolfe,
method to creep feed calves Tucker Ba uches
WHY CREEP FEED CALVES? BRAHMAN BREEDERS and commercial
cattlemen from Florida and Georgia
Extra calf weight, Extra profit over feed costs, Calves are gathered at St. Augustine for an
pre-conditioned, Weaning creep fed calves is simpler, Extra cow annual meeting of the Florida Brahcondition, Increased calf crop the following year. man Association and a field day
tour of Wolfe Ranch near St. AugusF-R-M SUPER CREEP TWENTY is a combination of tine and Haw Creek Ranch, Bunnell,
grain, supplement, milk products, vitamins and trace minerals on Saturday, May 10.
made into a pellet form containing a minimum of 20% protein The tour started at Wolfe Ranch,
to hold the consumption rate down and to help calves better where the visitors saw the cow-calf
utilize pasture. operation, using crossbred brood cows
with purebred British bulls. Herschel
Parrish, ranch manager, told the
PRODUCES GROWTHY CALVES WITHOUT EXCESS FAT group that it was necessary to carry
Brahman blood for efficient production of beef in the area.
At the ranch feedlots cross bred
Returns from the "extras" gained from creep steers were being finished for the
feeding can result in profits equal to one extra slaughter market. The visitors excalf for every 10 calves creep fed. pressed interest in the silage program.
A forage type of sorghum is interFEEDS Buy your supply now from your local F-R-M Dealer planted with corn, increasing producMAFEEDS Buy ytion to an average of over 20 tons of
SAFMB- S A silage per acre at the time of harvest.
FLINT RIVER MILLS, INC. Two tractors with forage harvesters
R. keep seven dump wagons busy haul_____ ing the forage to the horizontal silos,
which are located near the fields.
Parrish said that steers are preShorthorns-Polled Shorthorns PUREBRED BRAHMANS pared for the feedlot by supplementfeaturing more flesh, stronger bone, ing them on pasture with approxiMore of the essentials practical cattle- larger size, with gentle dispositions mately four pounds of concentrate per
men everywhere are demanding. day, so that when they go into the
For a list of the top sources of supply in A Dud& S s feedlot there is no time lost in adjustGeorgia, Alabama. Florida, and South
Carolina address D. ing them to the ration, and they finish
Richard Irwin, Sec'y, SE Shorthorn Breeders faster.
Ass'n. P.O. Box 110. Sandersville, Ga. Phone: NE 6-3966 A eRanch,
the group gathered at the St. Johns
REGISTERED SHORTHORNS Registered BRAHMAN CATTLE County Fair Grounds for a barbecue
---Of Size and Quality- lunch and the business meeting of the
See the results from Ton Herd association. It was voted to hold the
bulls and Selections since 1953 next field day in Tifton, Georgia, in
The C F Ranch MPhone 334727 coooperation with Max Tucker, a
The F RnchPhon rm-727Brahman breeder from that area.
Corrie & Fred Tilden M.E. (Max) Hammond Th t eede is set rea
Ph: 876-2482, P. 0. Box 472 The tentative date is set for early
WINTER GARDEN. FLA. 32787 BARTOW FLORIDA September, and the tour will include,
besides a visit to the purebred operaFOR SHORTHORN INFORMATION tion of Tucker, a visit to ranches in
Registered-Purebred CONTACT the area where Brahman bulls are
used on British type cattle.
BRAHMANS Florida Shorthorn A visit to Haw Creek Ranch, owned
Breeders' Ass'n by Raymon Tucker, wound up the
A lw ays a good selection of top M H. Sm h, ereoytour. H ere the visitors saw a pur eqult ulsfrsl.300 Lake Elbert Drive bred Brahman herd, a commercial
WINTER HAVEN, FLORIDA herd made up of Brahman x Angus
* crossbred cows, and some of the QuarSM
REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORNS ter Horses produced on the ranch, Growthy-Rugged among them Go Dick Go, the winner
P.0. Bx 0, imi la 31 5Fully Acclimated for of the All American Futurity in 1966.
Southern Conditions
9843 4-14PINEVIEW FARMS PuT roLE acres to work. Plant
achlctdoSttRd83,wtofPaul Ragans, ownerpiefopri.
Route 2 Ph: 971-5417 piefoprit
sOMadison, Florida
5 miles east on U. S. 9 70 The Florida Cattleman




BEEF $1.1 Million
BUILDERS! Sale Announced L RANCH
By Ayavalla Home of Charolais and
Get Acquainted With . Charbray Cattle
CHAROLAIS & CHARBRAY JACK PONS, manager of Ayavalla
America's Plantation, Tallahassee, recently re- FOR SALE
Modern Beef Producing Cattle ported the sale of 16 pure French We presently have some good
Eastern Charolais females to Beckwith-Hutch- bulls available . also, some
CHAROLAIS-CHARBRAY kins Charolais Ranches at Progresso young pureblooled heifers and
and Raymondville, Texas. The sale good young 15/16 heifers and
Association price for the 16 animals, all with good young 15/16 heifers and
HAROLD BRITT, Secretary calves at side, was $1.1bulls.
P.O. Box 1197 Winter Garden, Fla. 32787 cVs at side, was $1.1 million, for an Affiliated with the American International average of $68,750 each. All heifers calfhood vaccinated
Charolais Association Pons said that as far as available
records show, the transaction prob- Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Land ably represents the highest price ever Phone Eastpoint 670-4462
Charolais paid per cow in any private treaty CARRABELLE, FLORIDA
Home of sale in the world. American International Charolais As'n
Imported Cattle "There are only about 100 pure American Charbray Breeders Ass'n
Ayavalla Plantation French Charolais females in the Etern Charolai & Charbray An
United States," Pons said, "and this
Jack Pons, Mgr., Phone 385-4477 or 385-2068 16 head will put Beckwith-Hutchkins Box 3166, Tallahassee, Florida somewhere close to the top in the
Number owned. a
Practical, Florida raised Ralph Hutchkins and Art Beckwith, co-owners of the Texas opera- :
tion, visited Ayavalla in March to AT
--araas-C.arrar make the purchase. eS
Ayavalla Plantation is owned by
EL MAXIMO RANCH John H. Phipps of Tallahassee, who
Pat Wilson, Mgr. Ph. 635-3708 also operates ranches in the Bahamas
FROSTPROOF, FLORIDA and Canada. According to Pons, ALL FRENCH Herd
there are still 10 head of pure French M CHAROLAIS Charolais females at the Tallahassee
location, and they are maintaining 85 Cao/h- Jih s .o.da
and CHARBRAY CATTLE head in Canada and 20 head in the
K RANCH Bahamas, totaling the largest herd of Tom and Marlene McLeod Owners
- pure French Charolais cattle in the Ph: Ranch Office: 904/454-2106
H. C. Douglas Western Hemisphere.
Ph: 813 782-2569 Ph: 813 782-1936 western Hemisphere.
ZEPHYRHILLS, FLORIDA
8 MI. SW of Zephyrhills On Morris Bridge Rd. Nowak Heads NW. Purebred Charolais & Charolats.Cross
100 Head Young 1/2-7/8 Charolais Florida Ass'n PX Ranch
Cows (many with calves). A Good Deal TEGeorge & Agnes Taylor, owners if all are Taken. THE NORTHWEST Florida Cattlemen'sOffice Phone 263-7221
ialrTa. M B TAssociation met at the Experiment Oe Phone 263-7221
T. M. BRITT Station at Jay recently and named E. Quitman, Georgia 31643
P. 0. Box 308-Office Ph: 305/656-1553 0. Nowak as president for the ensuWINTER os N :D O. Nowak as president for the ensuLEO FAUROT, MANAGER ing year. Santa Rosa and Escambia
Phone: Orlando 305/277-4908 Counties rotate officers each year in + Advertise *
Sthe association.
Hankins Mathews was elected vice
Phone 904-439-2136 KINGS ROAD president, Vonzie Godwin, treasurer Registered Purebred
T Double L Ranch and Lowell Loadholtz, secretary. DiBREEDER OF PUREBRED rectors for the group are G. D. JerniCHAROLAIS gan and Juverne Howell.
Owners P.O. BOX 656 As one of its primary projects, the CATTLE
Mr. and Mrs. Bunnell, Fla. Northwest membership has scheduled
Thomas L. Lenssen 32010 a feeder calf sale at the Jay Live- Exclusively
___--_._....stock Market, September 11, to join
W. L. Timons and Son in with 19 other sponsored sales of LAZY W RANCH
W.L. Tiinmons and Son stockers and feeders to be held
throughout the state this summer and Land O'Lakes, Florida
Timbrook Forms fall. Mr. and Mrs. Otto Weaver, Owners
Phone 892-5241, 800 26 Avenue North
FRENCH Charolais DOMESTIC PINES STAND tall in Florida's future. ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
Brooksville, Florida Plant pines for profit. HERD IS BRUCELLOSIS CERTIFIED
Phone: 796-9913 for June, 1969 71 AND TB ACCREDITED




Cattlemen- 1~
Custom Artificial Insemination
For Your Beef Herd
by T. J. CUNHA
Department of Animal Science, University of Florida
The World's Food Problem
LET'S LOOK at the world food picture. The world population will double in the next 35 to 40 years. If we do not produce enough food now, what are the consequences going to be then. To focus this on a personal basis, Experienced inseminators available suppose we have a son or grandson being born now and he lives his normal Liquid nitrogen kits available an a life span of 70 years. -He will see a doubling and redoubling of the popumonthly rental basis. lation in the U. S. This means he will live to see about 800 million people
in the U. S. If he does, can we assure him of an adequate supply of food TOP NOTCH during his lifetime? I don't know. It will depend on many factors. InProgeny Tested Bulls Available creased productivity per animal unit and per acre will definitely be needed.
Angus Horned Hereford This means that an aggressive program in research and education will be
Beef Shorthorn Polled Hereford a must. By the year 2,000, or even earlier, we may be requiring the folBrahman Red Angus lowing productivity in the livestock field mn the United States.
Charolais Simmental Santa Gertrudis a) That a beef cow raise 2 calves (200 percent calf crop) per yearas compared to 85 percent calf crop now.
Ask about our Horse A. 1. program. A new b) That a sow raise 30 or more pigs per year--as compared to 15
development with ADS! pigs now.
c) And that a ewe raise seven or eight lambs per year-as compared to 1.3 now.
V ~d) That a mare have a foal per year-instead of 50 percent foal
NOTC crop now.
OTI C These goals can be accomplished if vigorous research programs are
ABS will sponsor an Artifi- followed. Similar increased production goals will be needed with grains
cialInseinaors raiI and other farm crops. Without an aggressive research program, the day
cialInsenintorsTraiingwill be speeded up when we will have to make, the choice of whether to
School at Orlando June 25- feed our grain to animals or to ourselves. In Asia, this choice was made
27. a long time ago. They feed the grain to themselves and are on an "Asi% atic grain-type diet." They cannot afford to feed eight to 10 pounds of
grain to get a pound of beef in return. The calories in the grain relieve more hunger by being fed directly to humans. I am sure, however, that For Details Write or Call: the American people will not want to start consuming a "grain-type diet"
any sooner than they have to. They will want to be able to produce enough grain to feed it to animals and get steak, roast, ham, bacon, eggs, Phone or write: milk, cheese and other animal products in return. These appetizing and
George Moister highly relished foods are an important part of our diet and they give
4138 Piper Drive pleasure and satisfaction to eating. This is part of our high standard of
Jacksonville, Fla., Ph: 733-2882 fB0living and we will want to keep it as long as possible. Wilbur Alkens AN It is estimated that 10,000 children die from hunger and starvation
1822 Maywood Road every day. Child mortality is very high in the developing countries. In
Winter Park, Fia., Ph: 671-3838 Chile for example, 140 out of every 1000 children born die before they
reach their first birthday. In the northeastern part of Brazil, where 1/3 of
_________________________their population lives, from 300 to 600 out of each 1000 children born die before they reach one year of age. Thus, it's quite clear that poor and CHAROLAIS inadequate food and nutrition take a heavy death toll in the developing
Certified bruceilosis-free herd. countries. It is also estimated that in these countries, almost 1/2 of the children surviving their first birthday will die before they reach 16 years Circle Y Ranch of age. Those who live past 16 will have a life span of 30 to 35 years.
Oscar and Yvonne Heil They will, in most cases, be hungry, tired and sick most of their lives.
A good selection of young bulls for saleMoevronyasalpretgofhmwllernoradnd ri.
lt3,Bx162 Phone: AC 904 1lant edadwie
Monticello, Fin. 997-2226 Many will have to live in tents, mud huts or shacks. Thus, a good share
_________________________of these children don't have much to look forward to by U. S. standards.
IThese few facts make it clear that hunger, or a lack of food, is one of
J A1 ar Ranch the biggest problems faced throughout the world. In my opinion; it's our
-cn AkOAIS CATTLE -biggest problem today. We don't think of it as such in the United States
Herd Sires: Imported French Bulls: because most of us are concerned about "eating too much" rather than
FCI 8461: RI B31; Ayavalla. "not enough to eas." I am sure that many of the social upheavals and
Lisle R. Bowers, Manager many of the world's problems trace to billions of hungry people desperRI. 3 Smokey Road Tel: 404/253-0328 ate for food.
NEWNAN, GEORGIA 7 h lrd atea




4A 04
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GRAND CHAMPION stallion at the LADY LUCKY BAR was the grand GELDING champion at Lutz was Leo's
Lutz show was Coffee Bar King, owned champion mare at the Lutz show. She is Doubletime, owned by E. R. Crossman
by A. R. Hill of Miami. owned by 0. T. Daniel of Winter Garden. Farms of Plantation.
Quarter Horse Events at Lutz and Tampa
Highlight Activities During April
Two QuARTER HORSE Shows were high- Kaufman, took the senior event. Hia Rosa Twist, a Jay's Feed & Westlighted during the month of April at Junior English pleasure was won by ern Store entry, was picked as reserve
Lutz and Tampa, with excellent com- Senator's Pigeon, ridden by Linda Ly- champion. petition seen in all the classes, man and owned by Oscar Alvarez, with Another Stephenson entry, Rusty
April 19 was the date for the Lutz the senior event being won by Tenn Squirrel, was named grand champion
show held at the Hillsborough County Cody Noche, ridden by Tommy Fair- gelding, with the reserve championship
Sheriff's Posse Arena on the North Dale cloth and owned by C. W. Bockelman, going to Red Mac Bee 3, owned by Mabry Highway. The show saw 250 New Smyrna Beach. Shela K. Ellis of Pompano Beach.
registered entries and a total of 345 en- Taco Lee Ann, ridden by Jack Hennig The performance classes saw Cash'em tries competing in the various events and owned by Adrian Chapman, Wau- Roan, ridden by Faircloth and owned by
with Mike Rutherford of Houston, chula, took first place in junior reining, Green, winning the junior western pleaTexas, doing the judging, while the senior event was won by Jay's sure event, with the senior event going
Coffee Bar King, owned by A. R. Hill Sugar Bars, ridden by Carol Harris and to Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Fairof Miami, was named grand champion owned by Carol & Buck Harris, Bockelman.
stallion winning out over Eight to the Reddick. Marc De Champlain rode Redigo
Bar, owned by Oddis Reeves of Talla- The trial class saw Pine's Holly Boy, Priest to win the western riding event,
hassee, who took the reserve stallion ridden by Danna Sawl and owned by while the trail class was won by Poco
honor. Jay's Feed & Western Store, Davie, tak- Penrose, ridden and owned by Tom
The grand champion mare was Lady ing the first spot, and the open barrel Deserable of Lithia. The open barrel
Lucky Bar, owned by 0. T. Daniel of race was won by Reese's Star, ridden race winner was Tenn Cody Noche, Winter Garden, while Dottie Bar Bob, and owned by Mary Ann Fortner, ridden by Faircloth and owned by owned by Mrs. John Olinger, Lake Odessa. Faircloth and owned by Bockelman.
Park, was named reserve champion mare. Redigo Priest, ridden and owned by Junior western pleasure competition
In the gelding competition, Leo's Marc De Champlain, Winter Garden, was won by Hia Rosa Twist, ridden by
Doubletime, owned by E. R. Crossman won the western riding event. First Danna Sawl and owned by Jay's Feed Farms, Plantation, was selected as place in the open cutting competition & Western Store, with Tenn Cody grand champion, with Dyna Go Boy, went to Speck Daniel, ridden by Buck Noche, ridden by Faircloth and owned
owned by H. W. Curtis of Fort Lauder- Daniel and owned by D. R. Daniel & by Bockelman, taking the senior event.
dale, taking the reserve champion rib- Sons, Okeechobee. Two entries from Jay's Feed & Westbon. Top honors in senior cutting went to ern Store took both the junior reining
In the performance events, Deal's Josie Cody, ridden and owned by C. F. and senior reining events. Sissy Pete Favorite, ridden by Lee English and Fuller of Catasuagua, Pennsylvania, was winner of the junior class while
owned by Flying Dutchman Ranch, Le- while Misty Romance won the junior Cocoon took top honors in the senior
canto, won the junior western pleasure cutting event for owner and rider Spen- competition. Both entries were ridden class while Ben's Black Boy, ridden by cer Harden of Sanford. by Caponey.
Lee English and owned by Richard The youth all-around winner at the George Williams was the all-around
Lutz show was George Williams of West youth champion at the Tampa show and Palm Beach. Tenn Cody Noche, the C. W. BockelAt the Tampa show, held April 20, man entry, was named the all-around
Horse Cover there were 200 entries and 58 youth en- champion horse for both shows.
tries. Sonny Minges of Fayetteville, Complete results for the two shows
OuR COVER picture for this month North Carolina, judged all the classes to three places, with number of entries
shows riders putting their horses and he picked Eagle Man, owned by in parentheses, are as follows:
sho h r ir puttin the huors Herschel Williams of Tampa as grand Tampa
through their paces in the junior champion stallion and Eight to the Bar, 1968 stallions (13) -Talleyho Ton, Alfred
western pleasure class at the 1969 owned by Oddis Reeves as the reserve Meeks. Belle Glade; Eternal Flicker, Carol &
Florida State Fair Quarter Horse champion. Buck Harris, Reddick; Poco Chobee, Gene
Show Grnd campon are as iss Jackson, Belle Glade:
Show. Grand champion mare was Miss 1967 stallions (8)-Cutter Daniel, John Drenik
Brown Bego, owned by Stephanie Kay Ranch, Okeechobee; Bar Eternal, F. E. Stanfield, Dade City; Wrangler Bonanza, Kelai Farm,
Stephenson, Anderson, Indiana, while Sparr;
74 The Florida Cattleman




1966 stallions (5) -Double Boomer, Olin Mott, Tampa; Golden Luck Tuno, Mildred Klink, Orlando; Starkey's Star, Fred Ditzian, Miami;
Aged stallions (9)-Eagle Man (grand champion), Herschel Williams, Tampa; Eight to the Bar (reserve grand champion), Oddis Reeves, Tallahassee; Jimbo San, Buck Mann, Bartow;
1968 mares (8)-Eternal Luv, Carol & Buck k.
Harris. Reddick; Lady Lee Hill, C. G. Parker, Gainesville; Dutchess Eagle, Flying Dutchmanthe Ranch, Lecanto;
1967 mares (12)-Lady Lanora, Linetta Di- L
Pietro & Beverly Grubb, Pompano Beach; Renee's Luck, Meeks; Tyson's Beauty, Robert Freeman. Ocala; 1O Q
1966 mares (10) -Wimpy Doodlum, Robyn W Ds
Holbert, Coral Gables; Clarion's Joy, Niki Freeman, Ocala; Princess Boss, Bobbi Deserable, Lithia: W t r e
Aged mares (17)-Miss Brown Bego (grand sterner
champion), Stephanie Kay Stephenson, Anderson, Indiana; Hia Rosa Twist (reserve grand champion), Jay's Feed & Western Store, Davie; Lady Lucky Bar, O. T. Daniel, Winter Garden; A NEW style Western Suit
1968 geldings (1)-Unnamed William C. Clark, ... the latest in fashion!
Hialeah Gardens; Meticulously tailored for
1967 geldings (5)-Mr. Rust Bars, Charles R. rfecti f fit i choe fo
Leonard, Hialeah Gardens; Hickory Bar Bert, perfection of fit, in choice o
James C. Thompson, Pompano Beach; War Boots, Imported ultra fine iridescent
Robert Freeman, Ocala; worsteds, sharkskins and
1966 geldings (6)-Red Mac Bee 3 (reserve wool and silk blends.
grand champion), Shela K. Ellis, Pompano Beach; Leo's Doubletime, E. R. Crossman Farms, Plantation; Readmeador, Arnold F. Saraw. Tampa;
Aged geldings (9)-Rusty Squirrel (grand champion), Stephanie Kay Stephenson; Dyna Go Boy, H. W. Curtis, Fort Lauderdale; Leo Tan, Robert Warren, Lexington, Kentucky;
Junior western pleasure (27) -Cash'em Roan, ridden by Tommy Faircloth, owned by Jack D. Green, New Smyrna Beach; Lady Lanora, ridden by Beverly Grubb, owned by Linetta DiPietro & Beverly Grubb; Hia Rosa Twist, ridden by Jay Caponey, owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store, Davie;
Senior western pleasure (21)-Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by C. W. Bockelman, New Smyrna Beach; Poco Penrose, ridden and owned by Tom Deserable, Lithia;
Pampa's Leo, ridden by Roy Nolan, owned by C. M. Whitfield, Perry;
Western riding (5) -Redigo Priest, ridden and owned by Marc De Champlain, Winter Garden; Golddust Gal, ridden and owned by Kathleen Stanfield, Dade City; Red Mac Bee 3, ridden by Donna Wright, owned by Shela K. Ellis, Pompano Beach;
Trail class (10)-Poco Penrose, ridden and owned by Tom Desesable, Lithia; Tenn Cody
Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by Bockel- T
man; Dapple Rey, ridden and owned by Jere Miller, Riverview;
Barrel race (all ages) (2)-Tennrm Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by Bockelman; Cocoon, ridden by Jay Caponey, owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store;
Junior English pleasure (12)-Hia Rosa Twist, ridden by Danna Sawl, owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store; Deal's Favorite, ridden by Lee English, owned by Flying Dutchman Ranch; Senator's Pigeon, ridden by Linda Lyman, owned by Oscar Alvarez, Tampa;
Senior English pleasure (10)-Tenn Cody Sold only everybody know s
Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by Bockel- Through
man; Lady Senior, ridden by Martha Bennett, Authorized
owned by E. R. Crossman Farms; Dyna Go Boy, H Bar C
ridden by Linda Curtis, owned by H. W. Curtis; Dealers
Junior reining (7)-Sissy Pete, ridden by HALPERN & CHRISTENFELD, INC.
Caponey, owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store;101 W. 21st St., New York/Denver/Los Angeles Taco Lee Ann, ridden by Jack Hennig, owned by Adrian Chapman, Wauchula; Breezing Cool, I
ridden by Joe Lott, owned by Doyle Conner, --~--_----_-"----Jr., Tallahassee;
Senior reining (3)-Cocoon, ridden by Canoney, owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store; Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by Boc-kelman; Dime Belle, ridden by Marc De Champlain. owned by Barbara Penney. Orlando; See these H-Bar-C Dealers:
Youth showmanship at halter (14)-Little McLelland Shoe & Saddle Shop, Lake Worth Ranchland, Fort Pierce
John Doe, George Williams, West Palm Beach; Sowega Sue, Mary Calire Kendall, Delray Beach; Quality Shops, Clearwater
Sowega Sinda Bar, Sally Bruce, West Palm SBea Sinda Bar, Sally Bruce, West Palm Gainesville Stockman Supply, Gainesville B. E. Purcell Co., Orlando
Youth western pleasure (23)-Kay Bell Bar, The Fair Store, Okeechobee Hardee Livestock Mkt., Wauchula
Michelle Meehan, West Palm Beach; Bob's Pick, Karen Pridemore, Pompano Beach; Rusty J
Som, Bruce Nigels, Jacksonville; Youth Horsemanship (21)-Little John Doe, BWillams; Sowega SueJr., T pKendall; Foxi Shot, Florida Cattleman Advertising Makes Dollars
Buddy Morales, Jr., Tampa.
Lutz
1968 stallions (17)-Eternal Flicker, Carol reading Beefmaster Cattle In Florida STETSON & BAILEY HATS
& Buck Harris, Reddick; Talley Ho Tom, Alfred For Feoria Cattlemen
Meeks, Belle Glade; Unnamed, Norma Corbett, For Florida Cattlemen STETSON & BAILEY HATS
Sebring; Se RANCH & WESTERN WEAR
1967 stallions (7)-Cutter Daniel, John Seven Lazy Eleven Ranch LEVIS WRANGLER'S BOOTS
Drenik Ranch, Okeechobee Chapeppy Buck, E. LEVIS WRANGLER'S BOOTS
R. Crossman Farms, Plantation; Wrangler Bo- 7
nanza. Kelli Ai Farm, Sparr; M. O
1966 stallions (8)-Double Boomer, Olin Mott, Carl Glidden. Owner Madison J. McKay, Mgr.
Tampa; Golden Luck Tuno, Mildred Klink, Or- Telephone: AC 813/LY 7-3755 26 Broadway Kissimmee, Fla.
for June, 1969 75 NAPLES, FLORIDA 33940




lando; Starkey's Star, F. M. Ditzian, MAiamni; Aged stallions (12)-Coffee Bar King (grand champion), A. R. Hill, Miami; Eight To The Bar (reserve grand champion), Oddis Reeves, Tallahassee; Eagle Man, Hershel Williams, Tampa;
1968 mares (10)-Dottie Bar Bob (reserve grand champion), Mrs. John Olinger, Lake
Park; Eternal Luv, Carol & Buck Harris;
Dutchess Eagle, Flying Dutchman Ranch, Lecanto;
1967 mares (17)-Renee's Luck Meeks; Full Star, H. A. Lewis, West Palm Beach; Tyson's Beauty, Mr. & Mrs. Robert Freeman, Ocala1966 mares (13)-Hickory Bar Lady, Hickory Hill Farm, Gainesville; Clarion's Jay, Mr. & Mrs. Robert Freeman; Wimpy Doodlum, Robyn Holbert. Coral Gables;
Aged mares (20)-Lady Lucky Bar (grand champion), O. T. Daniel, Winter Garden; Present Me, Wayne Bell, Fort Worth, Texas; Katie's Dream, Gerald McKinney, Miami; 1968 geldings (1)-Unnamed, William Clark, t Hialeah Gardens;
1967 geldings (6)-War Boots, Mr. & Mrs.
Robert Freeman; Copper Jing Jing, Dr. Graydon Cloud. Lakeland; Rudy Lee's King, Jack Alvarez, Perry;
1966 geldings (6)-Leo's Doubletime (grand champion), E. R. Crossman Farms, Plantation; Readameador. Arnold Saraw, Tampa; Red Mac Bee 3, Shela Ellis, Pompano Beach; Aged geldings (8)-Dyna Go Boy (reserve grand champion), H. W. Curtis, Fort Lauderdale; Cocoon, Jay's Feed & Western Store, Davie; Lightning Lad, Linda Lou Dytes, Tampa; The e Junior western pleasure (31)-Deal's Favorite,
They'll Spoil You ridden by Lee English, owned by Flying Dutchman Ranch; Cash'em Roan, ridden by Tommy Faircloth, owned by Jack Green, New Smyrna Our 16th Annual Beach; Starkey's Star, ridden and owned by
Our 16th Annual Fred Ditzian, MiamiSenior western pleasure (20)-Ben's Black Boy, ridden by Lee English, owned by Richard KaufQuarter Horse Productison Sale rs- "y oee ud~ny8
man, Inverness; Poco Delleda, ridden by Carol Quarter Horse Production Sale Harris, owned by Carol & Buck Harris; Little
John Doe, ridden and owned by George Williams, West Palm Beach;
t da '1 2 P Junior English pleasure (8)-Senator's Pigeon,
Saturday, June 21-12:30 P.M. ridden by Linda Lyman, owned by Oscar Alvarez; King's Nite Out, ridden by Doran At Our Ranch Zazueta, owned by A. Zazueta, Tampa; Deal's
Favorite, ridden by Lee English, owned by Flying Dutchman Ranch;
They've Got The Nerve, and They've Got The Blood. Look at the lines of our Senior english pleasure (10)-Tenn Cody
stallions Noche, ridden by Faircloth owned by Bockelman; Miss Swen 89, ridden and owned by
Monika Treadway, Island Grove; Girl Freckle TENNESSEE, P-43,874--by Hot Rock, out of Little Breezy D 130, ridden and owned by Jay Franke, Davie;
TENNESSEE STUD, 171,187 Trail class (9)-Pine's Holly Boy, ridden by
TENNESSEE STUD, 171,187-by Tennessee, out of Carrie Nation B Danna Sawl, owned by Jay's Feed & Western
Store; Wapala June, ridden and owned by CathKENTUCKY, 195,378-by Roman Sword, TB, out of Cow Lady oerine Deaker, Lutz; Cocoon, riddened by Jay
(CIWBOY TURP, P-146,218-by Poco Turp, out of Cow Lady Caponey, owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store;
Junior reining (12)-Taco Lee Ann, ridden by Jack Hennig, owned by Adrian Chapman,
EDDIE DEXTER, P-76,900-by Teddy Dexter, out of an Eddie mare Wauchula; Sisy Pete, ridderin by Capmoney
owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store; Arrow Step, ridden by Salty Langford, owned by WilWrite for catalog-Please include your Zip Code lham P. Bali, Sanford;
Senior reining (6)-Jay's Sugar Bars, ridden by Carol Harris, owned by Carol & Buck Harris; Miss Swen 89, ridden by Salty Langford, owned by Monika Treadway; Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by Bockelman; Barrel race (all ages) (3)-Reese's Star, ridden and owned by Mary Ann Fortner, Odessa; Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by jr K 4ABockelman; Cucaway, ridden and owned by
David Mitchell, Plant City; Western riding (13)-Redigo Priest, ridden and owned by Marc De Champlain, Winter R. B. CAROTHERS Chairmn of the Board CLIFFORD WYATT In Charge of Horses Garden: Red Mac Bee 3 ridden by Donna Wright, owned by Shela Ellis, Pompano Beach; Rusty J Sam, ridden and owned by Bruce Nigels, Jacksonville;
Open cutting (13)-Speck Daniel, ridden by Buck Daniel, owned by D. R. Daniel & Sons, Okeechobee; Amber's Jay Bay, ridden and owned MILKING SHORTHORNS "TEST and WEIGH by Bill Cone, Ocala; Mas Chlquita, Luskey &
McDonald, Clyde, Texas; Highest $ and Average Value TO MAKE BEEF CATTLE PAY" Junior cutting (3)-Misty Romance, ridden
and owned by Spencer Harden, Sanford; John International Carcass Contest 1966: High Ask about Joining-Contact Daniel, ridden by Ben Gill, owned by Daniel
Cutability %-only %i" fat thickness of av. ___ & Sons; Kitty's Holly, ridden by Joe Lott,
steers in Kansas Carcass Evaluation Center. J. E. PACE owned by White Construction Company, ChiefMILK MAKES THE DIFFERENCES FBCIA Sec'y land;
FMcartHall Senior cutting (1l)-Josie Cody, ridden and
For substantiating facts and literature write: B McCarty Hall, U. of Fla. owned by C. F. Fuller, Catasuaqua, Pennsyl3S ,. Gainesville, Florida vania; I'll Dance, ridden and owned by Spencer
818 S. Glenstone, Springfield, Mo. 65802 A,e Harden, Sanford; Plain Slates, ridden by Walter
___Mann, owned by Oscar Alvarez; Novice horse ($500 limit) (14)-Ponder's Ace, ridden by Walter Mann, owned by Oscar
Milking Shorthorns (Durhams) Alvarez; Cathy's Hollywood, ridden and owned
For Cross-breeding by Salty Langford, Belleview; John Daniel, ridRIDGECREST FARMS U U 0 S den by Ben Gill, owned by Daniel & Sons;
HERD SIRE: KA FANTASTIC ADAIR.. Novice rider ($500 limit) (12)-Misty MelColor-Roan; Weaning Wt.-745 lbs.; Wt. at Service Boars & Gilts For Sale ody, ridden and owned by Don Beverly, West
13 mo.-1190 lbs.; Present wt.-over 2000 "Export Orders Our Specialty" Palm Beach; Jim's Daisey, ridden and owned
lbs.; Gain tested-4 lbs. per day in official by Joe Yates, Vero Beach; Silver Margo, ridden
Kansas feed test. BUL M: Polled and GATRE D R Aby Eddie Young, owned by J. O. Phillips,
Horned usually for sale-come & see. GATRELL DUROC FARM Christmas;
PAUL R. LEWIS & SONS Phone (Fred) 591-1452, (Henry) 501-1709 Youth all-round champion-George Williams.
Rt. 1, Box 233, Monticello-Ph. 997-1592 FAIRFIELD, FLORIDA 32634
76 The Florida Cattleman




W6r4
A GREAT BIG
/3
..to Mar-K Ranch of High Springs for their generous contribution of $1 per head for every animal sold in their recent dispersal of domestic Charolais. Shown above is John Culbreath, Brooksville, manager of the sale presenting the check to Beef Council Chairman Cedrick Smith, Jr. Others in the picture are from left: FBC Area Chairmen John Alexander' and Cary Carlton; Culbreath; FCA 1st Vic President R. D. Bennett; Smith; and 2nd Vice President Tommy Sloan. At left is Mar-K's French Charolais herd sire Alger.
We also gratefully acknowledge Mr. Culbreath's volunteering to contribute $1 per head sold in all Florida sales which he manages in the future. This kind of enthusiastic help will get the word to even more Florida beef eaters. Our thanks to both of these concerns and all others whose contributions help us promote FLORIDA BEEF!
Floricda Beef Council
:
1
~A Committee of the Florida Cattlemen's Association
~P. 0. Box 656, Kissimmee, Florida
(Published service the industry by The Florida Cattleman magazine)




Two Florida
k Horses Named
LEn R IAQUA Champion
Two FLORIDA horses were named AQHA champions recently by the American Quarter Horse Association. ...and feel how soft and luxurious They are Nemo's Two Bits and No it can be. Dignity.
Clean and condition your saddle and Nemo's Two Bits is a sorrel mare
harness, boots and bridles with owned by D. R. Daniel & Sons,
LEXOL. See how the leather becomes Okeechobee. Sired by Quarter Pole stronger, softer, more comfortable and out of Nemo's Gal, by Bee Play, for you and your mount ... even after she was foaled in the spring of 1965 long exposure to drying sun, wind and was purchased by Daniel in the
and salt air. Protects metal parts, too! first annual White Farms production Preserve all your tack with LEXOL, sale at Chiefland, as a two year old.
Dianne Gill, Daniel trainer, trained
and let leather live. Insiston LEXOL and showed Nemo's Two Bits in at your nearest saddle & harness halter and performance events. The
dealer. mare earned 27 halter points and 131/2
performance points in one year to receive the coveted title. Eleven of the performance points earned were in LE O western pleasure and 21/2 in western
e Criding, the only performance events
The LEXOL Corporation she was shown in.
West Caldwell, N.J. 07006 In 1968, Nemo's Two Bits was the
(LEXOL is available at Herzberg's in Kissimmee, McLelland Shoe & Saddle in Lake Worth, Mildred Langford's in Hialeah and Draper's Western Store in Sarasota. For Florida Quarter Horse Association reother LEXOL dealers near you, write: THE LEXOL CORPORATION, West Caldwell; serve champion mare. She placed N. J. 07006.) second during the same year in junior
_ ___western pleasure and third in western -riding.
Reg. Quarter Horses-Halter & Performance Nemo's Two Bits was purchased recently by T. L. Sloan of Fort Pierce. W WHITE FARMS Sloan owns and operates the Cow
L. M. White. owner. Home Ph: 493-4461 Creek Ranch and plans to use the Barn & Office, Days, Ph: 493-4477 mare on the ranch and later place her White Construction Co., Inc. Ph: 493-4400 in his carefully selected broodmare CHIEFLAND FLORIDA band.
No Dignity is owned by Sandy &
Dennis Smith of West Palm Beach. For Registered BRAHMANS She is a six year old sorrel mare, sired
and QUARTER HORSES by Clabber Bar by Three Bars, and
see her dam is Cinnamon Cub, by Cub
HAW CREEK RANCH Bear.
HA R EK T Owner No Dignity was trained and shown
Phone (904) 437-3562 in western pleasure by Sandy Smith
BUNNELL, FLORIDA 32010 and in halter by Dennis Smith. The
Good Using Horses ____ ________ mare was bred by Norman B. Johnson of Days, Kansas and the Smith's ... Our Specialty purchased her from Joe Lindholm of
Audubon, Iowa in March 1968. Five months later she made AQHA champion with nine wins in halter and eight Registered Quarter Horses wins in pleasure to give her 191/2
Santa Gertrudis Cattle Orange Ave. at U.S. 1, FT. PIERCE points in western pleasure and 25 halPhone HO 1-5335 ter points. She has earned two grand
For Sale at all times championships and three reserve
championships during her show career.
D. R. Daniel & Sons' B. E. PURCELL CO.
SOME EIGHT million acres of Florida R Bar Ranch We clothe the family; we furnish the home. forest land still need planting with
PHONE' (813) ROdeo 3-2089 "Complete Western Department" seedling trees before full forest proROUTE 3, BOX 4005 301-321 W. Church St., Orlando, Fla. auction can be reached.
OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA 33472 Phone GArden 2-3261
78 The Florida Cattleman




Correction!
In an article on the top 20 horses inCircle D Ranch
the National Cutting Horse Association appearing in the May issue of
THE CATTLEMAN, a rider for one of
the Florida horses listed was in 2ND PRODUCTION SALE
error.
Swen Miss 16, owned by White
Construction Company of Chiefland, August 2nd, 1969 at 1:30 p.m.
was in seventeenth place among the
nation's top cutters, and was ridden MARIANNA, FLORIDA
to that honor by Joe Lott of Lott's
Training Stables, Williston. Lott
has trained and shown both per- Selling 40 Registered
formance and halter horses for
White Construction Company owner APPALOOSA'S
Luther White for a number of years.
We sincerely apologize for the
mistake. IKE HAMILTON, Auctioneer
For further information contact:
Bailey Horse MATT C. DRYDEN
Gains Points Rt. 2, Box 1000 Phone 904/352-4952
MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32446
A FLORIDA cutting horse, Rooster Always
Clegg, owned by C. W. "Mann" Bai- Visitors Welcome
ley of Oxford, has moved from sixteenth to fourteenth place among the COMPLETE WESTERN SHOP
nation's top 20 cutters, according to Also
figures recently released by the Na- Complete Appaloosa Show August 3rd at Ranch
tional Cutting Horse Association.
The standings, as compiled by NCHA, show that Bailey's horse has won $1218.92 in seven shows. "THE BEST FOR LESS"
In first place in the top 20 list is Supporters of Fla. Cattlemen, Poultrymen, BONA ALLEN & SIMCO SADDLES Jose Uno, owned by John Bradford of Pork and Dai Producers
Tucson, Arizona, and ridden by Roy PICK THE
Huffaker. The leader has earned a WINN-DI SADDLE OF
total of $8169.26 in 19 shows. STORES, INC. YOUR CHOICE
General Offices: Jacksonville
Men Like To NO MONEY DOWN
only $8.65 per mo.
Use Cooking Skill REGISTERED QUARTER HORSES Don't Have The Cash?
MosT MEN (98 percent) gave their AT STUD Use Our Easy Payment Plan
wives high marks on cooking, accord- Lee's Rock 257812
ing to a recent survey, but 10 percent Midnight Taylor 253832 laimd t at nthrey, u ck ber we like our horses, come a" if you do. MAKINSON SADDLE SHOP
claimed that they could cook better Visitors Welcome The Store With The Horse Out Front
than their wives. Mr. & Mrs. J. J. Wynn & Sons
The National Live Stock and Meat H o. M Haven, Fla. 33471
Board says 85 percent of the men admitted they read articles on cooking. Two-thirds said they would like to S
know more about this culinary art.
Men like to add creative touches of their own to strict recipes and straight prepared foods. They shy away from foods which are complicated or take Complete Outfits for the Entire Family
too long to prepare.
Foods which the male cook concen- Featuring name brands only:
trates on include meats, eggs, barbe- LEVI H BAR C LASSO JUSTIN NOCONA D. J.
cued foods and sandwiches. TEX-TAN TONY LAMA AMERICAN BRADFORD TREGO'S
FARM REAL estate in Florida has increased 41 percent in value since 1960, U F
according to the Florida State Cham- P S O F R 3
ber of Commerce.
for June, 1969 79




WE FEATURE Farming and Ranching
OIDING PRO 0 Is Background of
The Lees
FOR THOSE WANTING QUALITY RIDING EQUIPMENT
of Wildwood
* Bona Allen !
Saddles C By ETHEL HALES STANCIL The Circle Arrowhead L has QuarIT/' Ater Horses and mixed Braford cows JohnsonA. W. LEE, SR., now 80 years old, and Hereford bulls. The ranch
htsn of Wildwood, is sorta retired, but he ake Pango d lycecloe ay,
Halters still operates his Arrowhead L Ranch. makes Pangola and Alyce clover hay,
The A. W. Lee, Jr.'s also of Wildwood and plants rye for winter pasture. 16
* Plymouth call thi ac h iceArwed year old Wayne is a "regular hand"
their ranch the Circle Arrowhead after school, on Saturdays and during
Ropes-LariatsMrs. Lee (Jr.), Nellie, grew up in the summer. He has been active in
* Blankets and Brushes Sumterville, while her husband A. W., 4-H and Mrs. Lee has served as a
grew up in Wildwood. She too has leader.
* North & Judd Saddle Hdw. a farm-and-ranch background. Mrs. Wayne and Sherilyn attend Howey
Lee was an only child. Her mother, a Academy-28 miles away. This is
* Renalde-Crockett-Kelly widow, Mrs. Vera Traylor, still lives Wayne's second year there and SheriBits-Spurs in Sumterville. lyn's first. The children drive daily.
The Lees have four children: Wayne A Doctor of Law influenced Wayne to Write for the name of your nearest dealer. (16), Sherilyn (13), Drennan (a son, take Latin by telling him the value of
9) and Vernell (a daughter, 5). 1 the dead language to one interested
was interested in the name Vernell in studying other languages and in and learned it to be a combination learning the meaning of words. INCORPORAWED of Nell (Mrs. Lee's name) and Vera Wayne could not get Latin in the
Post Office Box 70 (the name of Mrs. Lee's mother). Wildwood schools and so the decision
KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA 32741
FOR SALE AT THE RANCH For the CowBelles
Young Registered Quarter Horses
A bargain is a bargain if it is needed, will be used and costs less than the
THUNDERCLOUD RANCH usual price. I found a slip in my size but in a "tall girl" length marked down to
ARNOLD SARAW, Owner a dollar. It was good quality and I bought it and hemmed it up. I am wearing
RAY TURNER, Mgr. it. But had I not hemmed it up and put it to use it would not have been a
Rt. 2, Box 95 Ph. Palmetto bargain!
BOlin Green 776-1510
located E. of Parrish on Hwy 62 Grandson Alex presented me with a lovely construction paper bouquet. Made of tall flowers (stems creased to stand) which stand in a circular pot sealed to a square of the same type of paper with staples. Registered Quarter Horses I was inspired to experiment with such paper. He and I had much fun!
How long since you cut paper dolls? Snowflakes? Working with young McDAVI D FARMS children will teach you how smart they are!
Fred McDavid, Owner
Residence Phone: 485-2681 The birth of a colt on a horse farm may be an ordinary experiment but on
Business Phone: 485-2471 our farm not so! April is the mother of a lovely such animal. I never cease
Box 36, Brooker, Florida to be amazed at the length of a colt's legs. Truly this bay's are nearly as long
as his mother's. We have named him Ike.
The next time you are mentally tired try baking a cake or working in the yard. Or, if you are physically tired, try a mental exercise. + A advertise! *Variety is not only the spice of life but it tends to rest us and allows for great productivity. (And who has enough time to accomplish all that he or she would?)
Interested in Do you ever feel humble and blessed when you learn the trials of another?
Today I met an aged woman who cared for her invalid daughter for 16 years and QUARTER HORSES? the son of that daughter who came to her as an infant. Only recently the
daughter passed on. I learned no word of complaint ever crossed the mouth of The best horse for WORK, for PLEASURE, the woman and today she is only grateful for the love and devotion of the grandfor quarter-mile RACING. Write son, who calls her blessed.
There is a fascination about the spring. The new fresh beauty of the world truly sparkles as it tells us God is very much alive. F L O R ID A noticed a waitress in a restaurant sprinkling salt on a wet spot on the
QUARTER HORSE ASSOCIATION floor. The gritty substance is said to provide traction and help prevent slips.
Route 1, Box 555
Chiefland, Florida 32626
__________________ 80 The Florida Cattleman




FLORIDA
COWBELLES ASSOCIATION
1033 Orange Ave., Ft. Pierce, Fla.
President ",
Mrs. Thomas L. Sloan, Fort Pierce
First Vice President
Mrs. Carey F. Carlton, Sebring 4
Second Vice President Mrs. D. F. LeFils, Osteen Third Vice President
Mrs. G. C. Perry. Jr., Belleview
Secretary-Treasurer
Mrs. Don H. Robertson, Fort Pierce
Recording Secretary
Mrs. Robert C. Hutches
.CATTLE DUST
to attend Howey was made-where Gain extra pounds of milk or beef from your herd by
of course he takes Latin! combating harmful, annoying horn flies, stable flies and
Sherilyn enjoys the challenge of lice. Dr. Rogers' DARI-BEEF DUST combines several potent
math at the school, where schedules are patterned after those in colleges. ingredients, kills fies normally resistant to single insect
Most classes are 11/2 hours long and cides, yet is safe. Keep your cattle pest-free use in dust
are attended every other day. Wayne gun, rub on by hand, or sprinkle from can. In 1 lb. shaker
and Sherilyn leave home about 7:30 cans and 4 lb. bags.
in the morning and return about 4:30
-which means their day is little longer than that of the usual high school student. S
Sherilyn has been very active in P 0 BO 2 T FOIA
4-H. She has had rabbit and hamster projects and those which involve cooking. Wayne fed out two steers. REG. QUARTER HORSES GLASS TRUCKLE (TB)
Drennan's daily chore is the feed- At Stud
DERY AAMS318113Fee for 1970: Sire-Fair Truckle ing of the horses and cattle which DERBY ADAMS 318,113 $500 Dam-Glass Bars by Three Bars
are currently penned. He also assists BLACKBURN BUCK 100,571 Sire of 2 AAAT, 6 AAA, and 9 AA, Sire of
with the other feeding and drives the Bar D Ranch Glass Chirp AAAT. Booked full for 1969.
tractor for hay to be picked up, etc. ORLANDO, FLORIDA CLAY NEEL
Vernell loves horses, as the others. T. M. Deal, Owner W. E. Campbell, Mgr. Box 203 Ph: AC 904/482-2969
Though just five she thinks she can Rt. 5, Box 586 PH: 277-1149 Greenwood, Fla. or 352-4495
do all that the others can (and nearly can!). She began school last Sep- SADDLES TRAILERS
member. Little Dude Western Store
Mrs. Lee likes to sew but finds CHARLES & SHARON PETTY, OWNERS QUARTER HORSES
little tim e for it. Phone 384-1210H a v y ob s O w e
The family are active Baptists and 902 South Edgewood Avenue Harvey Hobbs, Owner
Mrs. Lee currently is a Sunday Jacksonville, Florida Lynn Brewer, Manager
WESTERN LEATHER Ph. WYS-5914 alter 6:00 P.M.
School group leader. WEAR GOODS 906 NARCISSUS, N. FT. MYERS, FLA. 33903
Active in the local CowBelles association, Mrs. Lee serves as secretary of that group. She is also active in The SOUTH'S LARGEST W ESTERN STORE
the Wildwood Homemakers Club.
With the handicap of being without a county homemaker's agent, the club recently won second place at the Webster show.
Oven stew is a family favorite. Mrs. Lee makes it easily. One square of aluminum foil is used for each serv- Select all your Western needs from The Ranchers wide variety. For your
ing. Onto this she places bite size convenience, The Rancher offers complete MAIL ORDER SERVICE. Write or
pieces of boneless stew, sliced onion phone for quick mail delivery.
and carrots, chopped celery and seasonings and about 1/5 or 1/6 of a can 7 4e I )CA J01 4 qc o
of tomatoes. These "individual stews" are sealed and baked for 1 hour. 7 t ~ a c e~ 9w
4281 N.W. 6th STREET GAINESVILLE, FLA. 32601 PHONE 376-4595
for June, 1969 81




ALET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SELL FOR YOU
Rate 154 per word, minimum charge $3.00. Classified display $8.00 column inch. Deadline 5th of month. In circulation about 25th of month. Send copy and remittance to:
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN, BOX 1030, KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA
AUC I'ONEElING MISCELLANEOUS
LEARN AUCTIONEERING, term soon. Free OLIVER 1250 New diesel tractor, power steering
Catalog. Reisch Auction College, Mason City 13, live power differential lock, $3,080.00. Market Iowa. 253tf Implement Company, 3112 East Lincoln Street, George's Scale Service
Canton, Ohio 44707. Phone 454-1522. 669p
EMPLOYMENT Box 97, Pahokee, Florida
NEW WATER SAVING Agent, Fairbanks Morse Scales
BOOKKEEPER DEVICE Sales & Service on Livestock and
A -orqalise Motor Truck Scales; also all types and
S for quality 400 head registered ECONO 'I'_ /makes of Industrial Scales.
Black Angus ranch in Florida. Must FLUSH
have experience in showing cattle to
buyers and keeping complete records. REGULAR j 24-hour phone: 305/924-7147
Living quarters for husband and wife. FLUSH IGEORGE GERAGHTY
Apply to Florida Cattleman, Box
1030-P, Kissimmee, Fla. 32741. Designed to reduce water usage thereby saving on water bills and adding to useful life of
cesspools with less maintenance costs. Simple
dual action handle automatically activates
REAL ESTATE water saving mechanism for liquid waste etc.
Manufacturer estimates approximate saving of Aerial Dusting & Spraying-Pasture Seeding
1/3 water usage by lifting handle. Depress & Fertilizing-Grove & Vegetable Crop Care
WANTED-300-700 Acres anywhere in Florida. handle for normal flush. Easy to install with by Air-Land Clearing & Fence BuildirAlso up to 600 head of Dairy or Beef cattle. Will screw driver and pliers, by homeowner. Fits also take equipment and machinery. Contact P. 0. all conventional waterclosets and is fully AMERICAN AIRCRAFT CORP.
Box 461, Altamonte Springs, Florida 669p guaranteed. $9.95 post-paid. Water Save
Inc., Dept. FC, 3181 N.E. 3rd Ave., Ft. Ph. NE 9-1468 Punta Gorda; 675-1988 LaLauderdale, Fla. 33308. Belle; 983-9342 Clewiston
LAND AUCTIONEERS
Get Your Ranch-Farm-Dairy-Acreage SOLD FOR SALE-Lewis cattle foottrimming stocks by
You name the time and date, we do the rest Kansas Exp. Sta. Semi-portable all steel frame VETERINARY SUPPLIES-at wholesale. Send
by our proven nation wide advertising pro- of 4" std. pipe welded connections. Rear posts card for complete catalogue. Eastern State
grams and contacts. Phone or write for free back out of the way of trimming the hind feet. Serprm Company, 1727 Harden Street, Columbia,
appraisal of your real estate. GRISSOM Front windlass to pull animal forward into stan- South Carolina 29204, 568p
REALTY AUCTION CO. Inc. Silver Springs, chion. Heavy wooded floor and trimming rails DOGS
Fla. 32688. Phone Ocala 904/236-2515. of treated lumber. Four heavy canvas belts
hanging from two roller drums held by ratchets, LEOPARD COW DOGS-I have some good young
dogs in training now and some three month
FOR SALE-Completely equipped cattle/horse as new, $500. 4" x 3" Berkley Centrifugal Pres- old pups. Will train him to suit you if you can ranch in operation. Corral, pens, scale, squeeze sure Pump 350 GPM 220/440 V GE $220. 10 used tell me about your country and type of cattle. and loading chutes. All posts and timbers penta cattle back oilers $300. Contractors, Surveyor's I am a rancher and run Brahman type cattle. pressure treated. 50' x 200' sale and feed barn level, Bosrom 4-IC57, tripod, leveling rods and Bobby Yancey, Conroe, Texas Phone PL 6-0116 with office. Power and telephone. 16,000 GPM case $50. 80 used V-crimp galv. roofing sheets or PL 6-5013. 67669c
fully automatic Caterpillar two-way sub-irrigation $64. Electric fencer. Steel office furniture, checkand drainage system. 200 acres in clover-bahia- protector, typewriter, duplicator, printing calcula- TRAINED REGISTERED CATAHOULA-Leoppangola fenced and crossfenced; 160 acres virgin, tor, Route 1, Box 291-A-Vero Beach 305-567-2927. ard Cowhogdogs. Money back guarantee. 30 day trial. Pups. Charles Whitener, Route 1, Paris,
620 acres semi-improved (ditched, diked and RANCH EQUIPMENT AND STJ'PrLI Texas 75460, Phone 214-785-4724. 1168p
stumped). Fronting half mile on Cross-State 60,
2 miles west of 1-95 $385 per acre. For informa- NEW EASY WAY-to treat Pink Eye. Guaran- ENGLISH SHEPHERDS-Border Collies, Amerition and appointment contact owner. Box 291-A teed or money back. Details free. AMC, 404 ca's most useful dogs. Puppies all ages. Choice
Route 1 Vero Beach. 32960 5669c Main, Box 888, Kerrville, Tex. 78028 669tf colors. Faithful workers. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Free rabies vaccination, training instruction. FairLE mount Farms, Cedar Falls, Iowa. 50613. 567869p
NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA RANGE RIDE'..TAGSEU LIVESTOCK
PERMANENT N 1R
*PE/ ANUNBREAKABLE FOR SALE-30 cattle. 3 registered others high
9 0 re a hEA OLEA NYLONgrade. Fine bull $5,000. All-young. 488-1758. 900 LOW PRICES Clinton Williams, Rt. 1 Box 1026, Venice, Florida.
.FREE FOLDER- 669p
Active cattle & hay operation crossed SAMPLE 25 FOR INFORMATION-on Pure Brad Rod
by Hiway 26, 1 mile frontage. Three DEALERS WANTED
WESTERN TAG CO. Box 744 Vista, Calif. 02083 Cattle contact J. H. Holben, Florida's first homes, barns, shops, all facilities. purebred breeder. Lake Wales, Florida. 811ft
Farm machinery and equipment in- FARROWING STALLS-Complete $26.75. Dealcluded. $350,000 Principals only. For erships available. Free literature. Dolly Enappointment call Gainesville 376-9020 terprises, 238 Main, Colchester, Ill. 62326. 569p REGULAR PREGNANCY TESTING
or write to Dr. A. E. Salazar, Ash- PICK-UP TRUCK STOCK RACKS-All steel . will save you money and imford Medical Center, Santurce, P.R. construction $109.50. Dealerships available, prove your herd. Let us help with
00907. Free literature. Dolly Enterprises, 238 Main,
Colchester, Ill. 62326. 56%p pregnancy testing and custom artificial breeding. 15 years exp. in Fla.
CALF CREEP FEEDERS-30 Bushel capacity JOHN O'STEEN
LOOKING FOR A RANCH? For the beat. sk $92.0. Dealerships available. Free literature. (904) 794-3575, Rt. 2, Box 63, Mayo, Fla.
Bill Thach, Southern Colorado Land & Livestock Dolly Enterprises, 238 Main Colchester, Ill. Company, Bank Bldg., Walmenburg, Colorado. 62326. 569p
158tf
FOR FLORIDA Ranches, Groves or Homes, contact J. H. Holben, Realtor. LakeWaiss4P3 WISCONSIN DAIRY CATTLE
FEATURING TRI-STATE ARTIFICIALLY SIRED HEIFERS
LOANS ALL TYPES FOR
$10,000 to $100,000,000 SALE
Anywhere In USA & Canada Flnaneing
FISHER Estate-Mortgage Available
FISHER Corp.
Phone (Tampa) WILLIAM 0. CAREY 8 mi. E. of Tampa on Hwy. 60
Mortgage Brokers, Joy, III. 689-1249 689-5472 BRANDON, FLORIDA




AFF M 0. Box 427 Bartow, F-loria
BUYERS' PHONES FEDERALLY INSPECTED
Al Kaplan-Lakeland 683-4836 Don Kaplan-Lakeland 688-3174
Tom McPhillips-Plant City 752-9237 L. C. Hendrick-Ft. Meade AT 5-9875 PLANT PHONE
Clint Stokes-Lake Wales 638-1318 Bartow 533-2108
ANGUS & RED ANGUS BULLS BUY AND TRY MIAMI FT. LAUDERDALE
888-4575 922-2265
1 and 2 years old. BCIA tested. 90 to Wye Plantation
select from, reasonably priced. Aberdeen-Angus frozen semen from
GEORGE W. GIBSON Advanced Register P. R. I. sires officiRt. 5, Rome, Ga. 30161 ally gaining over four pounds per
day or whose 365 day weights are
I__ above 1200 pounds.
PREGNANCY TESTING (Performance tested sires always PROVISION C O INC.
for sale.) MEAT PACKERS
Sell your free boarders and increase P.O. Box 335, Miami Springs, Fla.
your calving percentages, through WYE PLANTATION
annual pregnancy testing. Let us Telephones:-301/827-7166, 827-7160 CATTLE BOUGHT
show you facts to prove we can help Queenstown, Maryland 21658
A. G. LEWIS632.1460DIRECT
A. G. LEWIS Rt. 1, Box 1373-C, Cocoa, Fla. DIRECT
_ __ --ICALL OUR BUYERS: RED ANGUS REGISTERED-We're overloaded A dve tiDON STIENS ......... MO 5-3902
with fine Bulls. Cane Creek Farm, 307 E. 10th RUDOLPH FISCHELMAYER CE 5-1302
Street, Anniston, Alabama. Phone 205-237-1618 Daytime. 469p
RED ANGUS
PERFORMANCE TESTED BULLS READY-DAILY L & G
AND THEIR SISTERS
Most leading Bloodlines CA(LOEB & GOTTFRIED, INC.)
NATIONAL RED ANGUS LISTING SERVICE MARKET
Bx69GEORGE CHIGA, Manager
Box699Guthrie, Oklahoma Buys Direct
" CUSTOM FREEZING BULL SEMEN Central Packing Co. Inc. PHONE OR BUYERS,
" SEMEN MOTILITY TESTING P.O0. Box 138 ROBERT W. LOEB
CENTER HILL, FLORIDA AT MIAMI 238-2138
SOUTHEASTERN FROZEN IDon Schiesier
SEMEN SERVICE 904-765-8894, Phone these buyers at home or office. ED STETLER
765-4085
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 3221 P.O. Box 35 Erwin Bryan, Jr., 793-4601 AT LAKELAND 646-1320
_W. L. "Billy" Ward, 793-4771 EST J. L. Gaff, 787-5716 (Leesburg) P. 0. Box 273, Phone TU 7-5588
96 Office Phones: HIALEAH, FLORIDA
793-3671 or 793-4681
+ Advertise! M
FEDERAL INSPECTION
Means a Better Market LY KE S
For Your Florida Beef
markets more meat
Contact than any other
300 HEREFORD BULLS Florida packer.
LFEDERAL We buy direct from
100 head performance tested, 200 producers in truckload
pasture developed. Ready to go to PACKING CO., INC. or larger lots.
work, fertility tested and guaranteed (Formerly Max Bauer)
breeders. Also 400 Bull Calves. Contact tYKES BROS., INC.
Write or call for price list. P. 0. Box 704 Phone 248-1121, Tampa, Florida
Phones: 888-5231-32-33 752-1102, Plant City, Florida
CODDING CATTLE RESEARCH HIALEAH, FLORIDA Ask forz
John McKay, L. L. Watson,
Foraker, Oklahoma 74638 or phone these buyers at home E. G. Morgan or J. B. Hawkins
Phone (918) 722-4277 Dick Helton JU 5-1589 Lantana, Florida
Kurt Frank 444-4758 Miami, Florida |




Vaccinate Now
Buyer's Guide To Stop
A Glades Chemical .0 Palmetto Hereford Ranch 66 A n aplasm osis
A-Bar-B Ranch ......... 32 Glades Equipment ......54 Partin, Henry 0 .......69
Agri-Guard .............. 14 Glades Feed & Supply ... 3 Paxton, L. S. Co-Op ....52 by D. E. COOPERRIDER, D.V.M.
American Angus ........17 Glades Market ........ 52.67 Petty, Charles .......... 81 Florida Dept. of Agriculture
American Breeder Service 72 Goold's .. ........75 Phillips Livest'ck Hauling 18
American-Int. Charolais .71 Gotham Provision 83 Picnic Ranch .......... 64
Am. Milk S'horn ........ 76 Graham Angus Farm ... 23 Pine Acres Ranch ....... 67 THE DIAGNOSTIC laboratories again
Arcadia L. S. Mkt. 52 Griffith Ranch .........65 Production Credit ........ 16
Ayavalla Plantation 71 Grissom Realty ......... 82 Purcell, B. E. ......... 78 showed an increase in the number of
Grovelane Farm ......... 25
B Gulfstream Farm 27 R cases handled during April. The total
Bair, Dr. Roy A. 85 Rafter L Ranch ......... 25 increase has been about 10 percent
Bank of Pahokee 33 H Ragans, Paul ............ 70
Baldwin, Leroy ....... 25 Hardee Market .......... 52 Ralston Purina .......... 8 overall with the greatest in cattle acBar D Ranch ........... 81 Harvell, H. L. .......... 65 Ramsey, Frank L ........ 27 cessions. The number of cattle autopBarnett Angus ..........27 Haw Creek Ranch ........ 78 Rancher, The ........... 81
Barthle Bros............69 H-Bar-C Cooperative .....75 Ranchland .............. 78 sies doubled during this month.
Bennett, R. D...:.......25 H-Bar-C Inc ............. 75 Rmsber Ranch 69 Clostridium infections in cattle conBig B Ranch ........... 48 Hear. Bar Ranch .. 69 Rico/.. ....... 57
Bingham Seed Co....... Hector Feed Mills. 37 R James w .. 65 tinue to be diagnosed with red-water
Blackwater Farms ....64 Heldenbrand & Sons ..... ,9 i-Ock Hollow Farm. 27
Blount & Hyde .......... 63 Hendry Tractor ..........5 Rodgers, Bill5.0....... 67 and malignant edema accounting for
Blue Cypress Lake ....... 65 Herlong Ranches ........ 15 Royal Fert........... 46 five cases. These were both cases of
Book Ad ............. 20B Herzberg's, Inc ........ 80 Rush Bros.............67
Boyett, Lee .............. 23 High Springs Milling ....64 longstanding diarrhea but the ranchBriggs Ranches .......... 64 Holben, J. H ........... 82 S
Britt, T. M ............. 71 Houston Herefords ...... 61 Sanders, Phil ........... 23 ers did not think of this particular
Brooks Hill Farm ........ 27 Hughes Angus Ranch .... Z3 Santa Fe River Ranch ...67 disease. Typical autopsy lesions inHughes Feed & Grain ... 40 Schearbrook Farms ..... 49
C S. G. B. I ............. 63 dicated the disease and confirmation
C. F. Ranch ........... 70 I Sells, Sam & Sons ...... 67 was not difficult. Pasteurellosis and
Cannafax Farms ......... 67 Interstate Market 52 Seminole Farms ......... 67
Caravelle Ranch ......... 58 Seven Lazy 11 ......... 75 salmonellosis were found in seven and
Carey, William 0. 82 J Shuman, R. W.........66
Cattlemen's L. S. Mkts. .52 J. C. Western Store 40 Silver Lake Estates ...... 22 eight cases respectively and calf diarCentral Packing ......... 83 Jay L. S. Auction .... 52 Silver Spurs Rodeo ..... 30 rhea-pneumonia complex was seen in
Chapman, E. H ......... 64 Jones, R. W., Jr. Farm .67 Singletary Farms ..... 67
Chemagro Corp .......... 7 Joseph Co., I. S ........ 65 Sleepy Hollow .......... 64 one animal. There are research reChipley L. S. Mkt. 52 Jo-Su-Li Farms ......... 66 Smith Ranch...........65
Chitty, H. M............ 39 South Bay Equipment ... 42 ports that this disease is initiated by
Chutes-Heldenbrand ...... 39 K S. E. Frozen Semen .....82 a specific virus invasion which "trigCircle D Ranch .......... 79 Kaiser Chemical .......19 Southeastern Shorthorn ..70
Circle R Ranch .........27 K Bar Ranch ........... 71 Spinks, H. C .......... 76 gers" bacterial infection. Serology
Circle T Ranch ......... 67 Keene, R. D .......... 63 Stage Coach Ranch ...... 64
Circle Y Ranch ......... 72 Kirchman Cotechniques showed the presence of
Circle Z Ranch ......... 66 Kissimmee Market ....... 52 Stalvey Enterprises ...... 20 bovine virus diarrhea antibodies in
Clark Seed Co ........... 1 Stuart, J. K ............ 69
Codding Cattle Research .82 L Stuart, W. H .......... 70 nine herds and infectious bovine rhiColumbia Market ........ 52 L Bar Ranch .......... 71 Stardust Ranch ..........39 notracheitis antibodies in thirteen
Conibear Equip. Co ...... 36 L H Bar .............. 72 Stocker-Feeder Sales .... 51
Corrigan Ranch ......... 66 Land, C. C ........... _71 Sugar Cane Gro. Co-Op. 54 herds. This means the herds had
Cosby-Hodges ........... 41 Larkin, W. M. ......... 65 Sumter County Market .52
Cutter Lab .............16 Lazy W Ranch .......... 71 Suni-Citrus Products .... 85 some previous exposure and that new
Lazy X Ranch ........ 23 Sun-Mar-C Ranch ....... 25 animals or unexposed animals added
D Lenholt, Dr. E. H. ..25 Sunny Acres ............ 66
Daniel, Russell .......... 78 Lenssen, T. W .......... 71 Superior Fertilizer ....... 88 to the herd should be watched closely.
Deep River Ranch ....... 25 Lewis, A. G ............ 82 Super-Mol .............. 29
Deere Acres ............ 23 Lewis, Paul R .......... 76 Suwannee .Farms ........ 27 Total cases involving parasites
Deriso Angus ........... 23 Lexol ................. 78 Suwannee Valley Mkt. .. .52 showed a great increase in the numDewey Polly Realty .... 10 Lion Country ........... 50 Sykes Angus Ranch ...... 36 b e o "uey" animas fnd.
Dexter Farms ........ 25,82 Little Everglades ......65 ber of "flukey" animals found.
Dolomite Products ...... 46 Live Oak Plantation ...... 69 T
Duds, A. & Sons ........ 70 Loeb & Gottfried ........ 83 Texas Pheno .... 14,81,85,86 Equine cases remained at about' the
E Lykes Bros., Inc ......... 83 Thompson Bros ......... 27 same number and 16 animals were
E Thornhill, John ........ 63
E. Charolais & Charbray .71 M Thundercloud Ranch .... 80 suspicious or positive for infectious
Eatmon, K. D ........44.45 M & M Supply Co. .... 20 Timbrook Farms ........ 71 anemia. One case of salmonellosis
El Maximo Ranch .......71 Madison Stockyards ..... 52 Tindel Livestock Mkt. .. .52
El Rancho Grande (SG) .63 Makinson Hardware ..... 79 Triangle Iron Works .....48 was seen and four cases of StreptococEnresco ................. 18 Malloy, Dallas ......... 66 Triple Z Angus Ranch ...23
Everglades Farm Supply 40 Manning, L. T.......... 6 Tucker, Raymon ...... 78 cus equi (strangles). This organism
Mar-K Ranch ......71 Tyler,. John H .......... 27 has been recovered recently from
F Maxcy Corp., The Latt ...71
F & W Enterprises .....12 McDavid, Fred ..........80 U aborted foals and cervical cultures
Fairmeadows ........... 25 Meincke .............. 21,46 U. S. Sugar Crop ........ 5
Fair Store ............... 79 Mid-State Packers ....... 93 and should be considered when an
Falcon Irrigation ........ 18 Mid-Florida Market ... 52 V abortion occurs. There were two conFASCO ................. 13 Mercury Angus Farms ...23 V M S Corp ............. 61
Federal Packing ......... 83 MiJo Farms ............ 23 firmed cases of piroplasmosis from
Fisher Real Estate ...... 82 Millarden Farms ....... 25 W
Flint River Mills ........ 70 Mills Market ........... 52 Watson, Harley, Ranch .65 the general area where the disease is
Fla. Angus Ass'n ........ 5 M5 ixon Milling Co ........ 9 Weaver, Otto ........... 71
Fla. Ass'n L. S. Mkts .. ..52 Monarch Ranch ........ 25 Wedgeworth's ........... 42 now apparently being confined.
F. B. C. I. A........... 76 Monticello Market. 52 Western Tag..82 Porcine cases also showed a subFlorida Beef Council .....77 Montura Ranch .......... 70 W. Fla. L. S. Mkt . 52
Florida Brahman ........ 69 White, William A ....... 82 stantial increase because of the hog
Fla. Favorite Fertilizer ... 20 N White Farms ............ 7S cholera outbreak in west Florida. A
Florida Fence Post .... 85 NACO .................. 41 Wilson, Pat ............. 67
Florida Hereford Ass'n .. .67 National Red Angus .....82 Wilson Pure Oil Co ....33 total of 25 were recorded with three
Fla. Qtr. Horse Ass'n .... 80 Neel, Clay .. ....... 81 Windsweep Farms ....... 67
Florida Ranch Enter ... 69 NOBA .............. 47 Winnstead Plantation .. .65 still in the investigation stage. There
Fla. Santa Gertrudis .... 62 Norris Cattle Co .._39,69 Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc. ..79 were eight cases of swine erysipelas
Fla. Shorthorn ..........70 Nutrena ......... 2 Wisconsin Livestock ..... 82
Flying H Ranch ......... 86 Wye Plantation ......... 82 and two of pasteurellosis. Salt poisonFulton-Cole Seed ...... 86 ........20A Wynn, J. J ............ 79 ing accounted for two more and there
G Okeechobee Market ...34,52 Y were fifteen cases of various types of
Gadsden L. S. Mkt ...... 52 O'Steen, John ........... 82 Yazoo Valley Oil ....... 27
Gainesville L. S. Mkt. .. .52 Y-Tex Corporation 66 parasites.
Garber, Arthur S ......... 66 P
Gatrell's Duroc Farm ... .76 PDQ .................... 87 ZWith the onset of warmer temperaGator Feed ............. 56 P X Ranch ............. 71 Zambito,'Joe ............ 23 tures and good pasture, there will be
Georgia Angus .......... 27 P. Bch. Co. Ct'men Ass'n 35 Zellner, George A ....... 66
George's Scale Service ... 82 P. Bch. Co. Com .. quite a bit of cattle movement and
1 84 The Florida Cattleman




handling. This will stress the animal and make it more susceptible to bacterial infections. Close watch should be kept for signs of pneumonia (pasturellosis). Anaplasmosis season is almost at hand and if vaccination is Use sts
contemplated, now is the time to vaccinate since two injections are needed to produce immunity.Pr uu, n A 1
ProUU Or o A
Short Course
(Continued from page 69)
ence the results of irrigation studies e Solid to the core Bugs and rot resistant
conducted at the Beef Research Unit. Double trimmed Complete penetration
He said that sprinkler irrigation can- 0 Uniform size Field tested for long life
not be generally recommended as an economical practice for cow-calf beef ALSO AVAILABLE Barn poles, Piling, Lumber, Structural production operations. Seepage irri- timbers, Lowest prices on Condor Brand Foreign wire. Chec
gation is usually a profitable practice, with us for wholesale prices. he said, where all physical requirements can be met, because of the rela- FLO RIDA FENCE POST CO., INC.
tively low initial cost and labor requirement. PLANT and SALES OFFICE IF NO ANSWER-CALL
Recommendations on the econom- P. 0. Box 5645-Ph. RE 5-1361 P. 0. Box 38-Ph. PR 3-6858
ics of beef production was the next ONA, FLORIDA 33865 WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873
topic discussed by R. E. L. Greene, L agricultural economist at the University. Greene gave the audience the r
investments and returns on three dif- aDr. Roy A. Bair, Ph. D.
ferent programs for beef production AGRICULTURAL
at the research unit. The results var- Both plain and protein fortiied considerably on the cost to produce a pound of beef and the return fied. Best quality. New CONSULTANT
per pound of beef 'produced. supplies will be available Pasture problems o Ensilage, Hayat beginning of season, lage, Hay Production Ranch CapaFeed Vital ..,. bilities 9 Soil Fertility 0 Forage
Koger appeared as the final speaker Quality Research
on the 1969 Short Course program WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
with some recommendations on breed- 256 Alhambra Place, Ph: JUstice 2-2933
ing and management. He said that problems experienced in a cow-calf operation could usually be solved by one word, "feed." Koger said that Advertise in The Florida Cattleman!
since the Beef Research Unit had solved its winter feeding problem that virtually all their problems had disappeared. The unit now winters cows on corn silage. He urged cattlemen I I
to study the possibilities of growing some sort of winter feed for their operation.
Sarasota Elects Easy-to-useB-DEAT
MEmBEs op the Sarasota County Highly Effective FlY KIlLER
Livestock Association met recently to Use Blue-Death Fly Killer
elect officers for the new year. as is and see how fast it controls
Named to head the group was Ma- pesky, bacteria carrying common house flies. You scatter
bry Carlton, Jr., with Russell Lauch lightly from can in strips along window sills, floors or other areas around dairy barns, poultry houses, stables, assuming the vice presidency. Re- garbage areas and outside buildings where flies are
elected secretary was Ken, Clark while found. May be applied to moistened surfaces for faster Marion Southern was elected treas- action. Ask your dealer for Blue-Death Fly Killer now.
urer. ---__ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _
State director is L. H. "Buck"
Hawkins and alternate is B. T. Longino, Jr. Named as director of the P 0 B 2
Sarasota County Fair was Max Carr.
for June, 1969 85




FASTER!Cunha and Company Broke Every Record
---.Mod EVERY CATTLEMAN inl Florida could have learned something specific that
I~J would pay off in profit almost immediately at the 18th Annual Beef
ir Cattle Short Course sponsored by the University of Florida and the FloriI da Agricultural Extension Service.
BL E- 3OLJELOTIOW Dr. T. J. Cunha and the entire staff of the Institute of Food and
B14 Agricultural Sciences and the extension service put together the most
LOTIONvaried, most practical and best attended short course in the 18 years it
Lu TID ~has been conducted.
B 0 IV B ~ .More than 900 cattlemen and ladies sat through the various sessions
... BO B which began at 9:00 a*im. each morning and ended after 9:00 p.m. each
Use Bue- Ltionnight, and still braved the rain for a tour and questions on the beef reBomb to dry super- search unit Saturday morning.
ficial wounds, cuts, Especially noteworthy is the changing attitude we see in research
Cowpox sores, and men at the University toward being very specific and very practical in
abrasions on all livestock. Antisep- their recommendations. Research scientists often live with so many tic action promotes faster healing, variables that it is difficult for them to make precise recommendations reduces possibility of superficial until proven several times over, but cattlemen aren't above taking a infection. Pressurized one pound chance on trying something that is less than 100 percent proved for can permits easy treatment. Ask them. Many comments were heard to the effect that, "That sounds like I your dealer for TPC Blue-Lotion might make it work. I'm going to try it." Given the facts as they are Bomb tomorrow. known ("It seems to be working at the research farm."), cattlemen are
I prone to do a little of their own experimenting. This short course certainP. 0 BO 231 ESTR IVSO ly gave them plenty to get their teeth into. The only question now is
TALLHASSE, FORID 3234 what can Cunha and company produce for an encore. (Several cattlemen
_____________________ ___ on the slight side suggested next year's program might start with more comfortable chairs. Another $5 added to the registration fee for better chairs might make more of the sessions a little more educational. Or
*Cover Crops would some cattle group be interested in expanding the permanent seating
S u Pasture Grass at the pavilion?)
- Palm Beach County Beckons!
ruLTON-COLE 'SEED, CO. ONE OF the largest (in area and income) agricultural counties in the
ALTURA$, FLORIDA United States is the site of the annual Florida Cattlemen's Association
convention.
Palm Beach County has lots of everything. Cattlemen probably
think first of the rich Glades muckiand with it high carrying capacity ~for cows. Or they may think of the sugar cane that is so evident from 0 every highway in the Belle Glade and Pahokee areas. Not as often seen
because they're off the highway or covered by windbreaks are the salad vegetables inland, and the green beans, corn, tomatoes and other truck LEADS IN SEEDS crops running parallel to the coast line.
To others more urbanized, Palm Beach County means Palm Beach, the playground of super-millionaires, or West Palm Beach, a substantial city made up of all stratas of citizens.
The Palm Beach County Cattlemen's Association is going to offer I~i)'I!Ihyou the whole load-take your pick. Come to the convention with the W~~W 7 ~e C~o family and plan to spend the weekend following the meetings enjoying
whatever strikes your fancy. It's all there!
s~EEZ\ /Important business is to be conducted at this now 'once a year' meeting Evrymember of FCA is needed with his ideas, opinions and effort, SE ED COMPANY to make sure that his association goes in the direction most satisfactory
Phn 3-331 to him. Election of officers, legislative matters, state and national, and
Phone539-1other areas will be covered. Participate in the committees to which you've
ALTURAS, FLA. been appointed,'and make yourself heard when questions are opened for
COMPLETE HARVESTING SERVICE discussion.
_____________________ 86 The Florida Cattleman




What Plans Are You Making
For the Future of Your HERD ?
HEIFERS BORN on your ranch this spring them to start eating at an early age, which
are your future cows. Insure your future also insures an early breedback of your
by giving them the chance to develop in size cows.
and soundness of bone for your future pro- STEER CALVES fed P. D. Q. will weigh more duction at a profit. at weaning time. (Ask your neighbor, he
HAVE P.D.Q. SUPPLEMENTS available for knows.)
them in feeders placed low enough for
Remember, P.D. Q. Company was the first to start ,
balancing pasture grasses in Florida. V%
Keep it Out-They'll Eat Less!
See Your Local Dealer or Phone MU 2-6144, P. 0. Box 116 PROTEIN FoRb Poo it f~v~
WRT WIR PHON
S..Q Company3




the
grass
is
always
greener
6..
...on Superior Sam's side of the fence.
Superior Extra Value Fertilizers make pastures lusher
and greener. You can always count on higher quality SUPERIOR SAM SAYS:
to help you upgrade stock for more profits or help FERTILIZE IMMEDIATELY thin stands
of improved grass pastures and "rest." you increase milk production and butterfat content. DO NOT FERTILIZE grass pastures that
will be overseeded to clover this fall. Check Call your Superior Pasture Representative to make a with your Superior Representative.
detailed study of your fertilizer and grazing rotation AVOID SMOTHERING CLOVER this
summer. Do not let grass grow over 8-10 needs. Fertilizers will be custom-blended for you and inches tall. Mow if necessary.
delivered bagged or in bulk when and where you
want them.
FERTILIZERS DIVISION
TO INSURE YOUR LIVESTOCK PROFITS
CALL THE FOLKS_ WITH KNO W-HO W
CLEARWATER Sam MdAurray-Ph. 446-9650 OKEECHOBEE Ben Dixon-Ph. RO 3-3257 DELRAY BEACH Cecil Welch-Ph. 278-1605 ORLANDO Fred Donaldson-Ph. 851-1344 EAGLE LAKE Walter Stoltz-Ph. 293-7476 SARASOTA LeRoy Fortner-Ph. 958-5614 FT. MYERS Tumley Rucker-Ph. ED 4-6631 SEBRING John Fennell-Ph. 385-5248 FT. PIERCE Sherwood Johnston-Ph. 464-3320 TAMPA Charlie Little-Ph. 920-2922
Woly Lang--Ph. 461-0636 Ed Green-Ph. 689-6018
Cl ye N'ton-Ph. 461-7099 Paul Bearss-Ph. 935-0236
Bob Williams-Ph. 461-1392 VERO BEACH Dorman Sellers-Ph. 567-5139
LAKE ALFRED Wade Wiggins-Ph. 372-1433 W. PALM BEACH R. H. Howell-Ph. TE 2-8583 LEESBURG Charles Ramsey-Ph. 787-3857 WINTER GARDEN Pete Stearns-Ph. 876-2351
PLANTS:
Tdmpa--13 -2484131 Fort Pierce-305 461-2230 No. I NAME IN FERTILIZERS AND CHEMICALS SINCE 1936




Full Text

PAGE 1

) .A~A

PAGE 2

ANNOUNCING A CURE FOR THE DISEASE CALLED Li~'f At a time when profit margins are growing slimmer, you'll want to have available all the know-how you can possibly get. Couple this with improved efficiency, and you're a long way toward a successful year. Nutrena's many years' experience on Florida ranches and dairies means that you can be assured of feeds that are proven right for Florida, feeds which give you maximum efficiency, help you to close the profit gap. And, Nutrena's know-how, plus Nutrena's rather exceptional (and free) prescription service, management counsel, and recordkeeping systems can assist you in planning a complete program -a program in which you can have confidence, a program which will work. 4014 -40 St., Tampa, Florida 33601 Phone 813/626-5173 A talk with your Nutrena man may show the way to cure "profit-shrink" by reducing costs for better profits. No obligation-just call or write today.

PAGE 3

FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION ART HIGBIE has tendered his resignation as Executive Vice President of the Florida Cattlemen's Association, which took effect May 15. With regret we accepted it so that Art can be employed in a similar capacity with the Mississippi Cattlemen's Association. At this writing it isn't possible to completely assess how much we will miss Art. As we begin to understand firsthand the details he has managed to handle with little help from the association members, it becomes very evident that he is going to be a hard man to replace. On reflection, it seems amazing that FCA should be fortunate enough to get a man like Art in its first attempt in hiring a full-time executive, especially considering that we didn't really know what such a man could do for us or what we actually wanted him to do. Much credit is due the officers and directors whose foresight created the job and whose dedication led to a man like Art Higbie. IN THE MEANTIME, (until a new executive is hired), the FCA offices will remain open and functioning thanks to Mrs. Sylvia Marshall who was secretary for Art. She will receive correspondence and direct it to the proper parties. LAT TURNER, your former President, is chairmaning committee to receive applications for the Executive Vice Presidency. He would like as wide a choice as possible, so if you know of a man whom you think will fit the job, please ask him to submit three copies of his complete work and personal history to Lat Turner,P. 0. Box 656, Kissimmee. ALLIED MEMBERSHIPS are coming in daily. We presently have 17 firms who have paid $100 annual membership dues. Most of your suppliers and banks have received letters inviting their participation. As you talk to them on other :natters, please remember to assure them of your interest in their helping the association both financially and with their professional counsel. Bill Voss of Cutter Laboratories has accepted the post of temporary chairman of the allied members committee and has called for a meeting of those who have joined at the annual convention. ALLIED MEMBERS paid to date are the following, Bank of Seminole, Seminole; Capital National Bank of Tampa, Tampa; Cody Publications, Inc., Kissimmee; Cutter Laboratories, Berkeley, California; DeLand State Bank, DeLand; Dolomite Products, Ocala; First National Bank of Leesburg, Leesburg; First National Bank in Palm Beach, Palm Beach; Gotham Provision Company, Miami Springs; Loeb & Gottfried, Inc., Hialeah; M & M Supply Company of Florida, Inc., Thonotosassa; John V. McCarthy and Company, Chicago, Ill.; Mid-State Meat Packers, Inc., Bartow; Okeechobee County Bank, Okeechobee; P. D. Q. Company, Lakeland; SuperMol Division of National Molasses, Tampa; Winn-Dixie Stores, Jacksonville. ANUAL CONVENTION has been practically finalized. Remember that this will be the only meeting of the entire membership during the year. We have much important business to handle, including the election of officers. Since it will be a full year before you will have another opportunity to get your views across to the membership, come and bring your family. PALM BEACH COUNTY Cattlemen's Association has a good and enjoyable program on tap for you, you won't want to miss it! --Charlie Lykes, President for June, 1969 IFLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION 847-4511. Box 656, Kissimmee President Charles Lykes, Tampa Phone 223-3981 First Vice President it. D. Bennett, Greenwood Second Vice Presidents Thomas L. Sloan. Fort Pierce 0. L Prtin, Kissimmee Secretary J. C. Bass, Okeechobee Treasurer Pat Wilson, Frostproof Past Presidents G. H. Prather (Deceased) P. E. Williams, Davenport Dave Turner (Deceased) irlo Bronson, Kissimnee Cushman S. Radebaugh, Orlando Ben Hill Griffin, Jr., Frostproof Jay B. Starkey, St. Petersburg B. J. Alderman, Grandin J 0. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee Louis Gilbreath, St. Augustine George Kemofer (Deceased) Ralph Cellon, Sr. Alachua W. D. Roberts, Immokalee Latimer H. Turner, Sarasota Local Association State Directors Jimmy Pnce, Alachua Wassie Fish, Baker J. W. Lowrey, Bay i Rex Smith, Bradford-Union Gilbert Tucker, Brevard Martin Woodward, Broward E. G. Shelton, Calhoun Bayard Toussaint, Charlotte Mike Van Ness, Citrus Walter Williams, Clay R. A. Roberts, Collier Conrad Womble, Columbia John Do Puais Dade Phil Turner, DeSoto John Obe Osteen, Dixie E. D. Gregory, Duval C. H. Cowart, Flagler C. C. Land, Frnkin Carl Langford, Gilchrist Billy Peeples. Glades Dave Gaskin, Gulf J. Pershing Platt, Hardee Joe Marlin Hilliard, Hendry John Culhreath, Hernando R. C. Dressel, Highlands Glen Sumner, Hillsborough. Manuel Garcia, Jr., Indian iver J. R. Thompson, Jackson John Finlayson, Jefferson C. B. Ogden, Lake pm Nat Hunter. Lee John Humphress, Leon J, P. sandim, Levyvmj Allen Woodward, Liberty are Cherry. Madison Vick Blackstone, Manatee G. C. Perry, Jr., Marion P. L. Hinson, Martin E. D. Gregory, Nassau James D. Cunningham, Northwest gi Forrest Pearce, Okeechobee E. L. Yates, Sr. Orange M. M. Overstreet. OScola K. D. Eatmon, Palm Beach Lance Richbourg, Panhandle H. C. Douglas, Pasco Charles Murphy, Pinellas M. E. Hammond, Polk Lloyd Osteen, Putnam Louis Gilbreath, St. Johns Robert L. Griffin, St. Lucie L, H. Hawkins, Sarasota R. W. Williams, Seminole C Aubrey Caruthers, Sumter Mattox Ward. Suwannee Elvin Daugherty. Volusia U. S. Harrison, Washington i 3

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JUNE June 12-White Bros. P.H'fd Disp. Chester, S.C. June 19-20-FCA Mid-Year Coal Palm Bch. Shores June 24-27-ABS Training School .Orlando June 27-28-F.S.G.A. Field Day ..Belle Glade June 28-Magic Valley Char. Sale .Dallas, Tex. JULY July 4-FFA Rodeo .Ocala July 11-Feeder Calf Sale.Belle Glade July 19-Tanner Char. Sale Beaumont, Alb., Can. July 25-S'Gertrudis Feeder Sale ..Belle Glade AUGUST Aug. 1-Manatee Ass'n Feeder Sale .Tampa Aug. 2-Circle D Appaloosa Sale .Marianna Aug. 8-Stocker-Feeder-Veal Sale .Ocala Aug. 9-L & L Farms Q'Horse Sale. .Dothan, Ala. Aug. 14-United L/S QH Show ..Tampa Aug. 15-Clover Leaf QH Show .Odessa Aug. 15-Mid-Fla. Feeder Calf-Yrlg. Sale Orlando Aug. 15-S'Gertrudis Feeder Sale .Orlando Aug. 16-Tampa Cutting Ass'n Cutting .Tampa Aug. 17-Sheriff's Posse QH Show ..Lutz Aug. 22-Fla. Angus "Offthe-Grass" Sale .G'ville Aug. 22-Madison Ass'n Feeder Sale .Madison Aug. 22-St. Lucie-Oke. St'r Calf Sale Okeechobee Aug. 23-Highland-Hardee Feeder Sale. Wauchula Aug. 26-1st Columbia Feeder Calf Sale.Lake City Aug. 28-Jackson Ass'n Feeder Sale ..Marianna Aug. 29-Jefferson Ass'n Feeder Sale. Monticello Aug. 30-QH Halter Futurity ...Gainesville SEPTEMBER Sept. 4-Leon Ass'n Feeder Sale ..Quincy Sept. 5-Fla. Angus Feeder Sale ..Gainesville Sept. 6-Suwannee Valley Feeder Sale. Live Oak Sept. 8-Beckton Red Angus Sale ..Sheridan, Wy. Sept. 10-Feeder-Stocker-Veal Sale ..Kissimmee Sept. 11-N.W. Fla. Ass'n Feeder Sale .Jay Sept. 12-Marion Ass'n Feeder Sale .Ocala Sept. 13-Lazy H Prod. Sale .Decherd, Tenn. Sept. 18-Schearbrook Angus Sale.Dayton, Ohio Sept. 19-Hereford & Cross Sale ..Gainesville Sept. 23-2d Columbia Feeder Calf Sale.Lake City Sept. 23-Deere Acres Angus Sale. .Monroe, Ga. Sept. 26-Polk Ass'n Feeder Sale .Lakeland Sept. 27-Canadian Royal Sale .London, Ontario OTHER DATES Oct. 1-Arkansas Charolais Sale .Little Rock, Ark. Oct. 3-2d Stocker-Feeder-Veal Sale .Ocala Oct. 8-Aberan's "Classic" Sale ..Shadwell, Va. Oct. 9-White Hall Angus Sale Charlottesville, Va. Oct. 12-White Farms QH Sale .Chiefland Oct. 11-Gildea Charolais Disp. ...Potosi, Mo. Oct. 17-Ramsey Angus Prod. Sale.Colquitt, Ga. Oct. 20-Va. Breeders Sale ..Charlottesville, Va. Oct. 21-Brandy Rock Prod. Sale. Brandy Sta., Va. Oct. 29-30-1969 DARE Conference .Gainesville Oct. 31-Tested Bull Sale.Brooksville Nov. 1-Blue Denim Angus Sale. Scottsville, Va. Nov. 1-Ky. Nat'l Charolais Sale -Louisville, Ky. Nov. 1-U of F Tested Bull Sale .Gainesville Nov. 3-Burch Angus Sale .Mill Creek, Ok. Nov. 6-Jo-Su-Li Hereford Sale .Colquitt, Ga. Nov. 12-Singletary Hereford Sale .Blakely, Ga. Nov. 14-Black Watch Bull & Female Sale. .Tulsa Nov. 14-Millarden Ang. Bull Sale.Woodbury, Ga. Nov. 19-Seminole Hereford Sale.Donalsonville, Ga. Dec. 5-6-Black Magic Bull Sale. Nashville, Tenn. Dec. 6-Sunny Acres Bull Sale .Polk City Dec. 8-Black Watch Bull Sale .Como, Miss. Dec. 10-Rollins Hereford Sale .Atlanta, Ga. Dec. 10-Rush Bros. Her. Prod. Sale, Kathleen, Ga. Dec. 13-Fla. Angus Bull Sale .Kissimmee Jan. 5-Monarch Angus Sale .Wildwood Jan. 10-Black Angus Bull Sale ..Citra Jan. 17-Santa Fe Hereford Sale .Alachua Feb. 7-Black Watch Bull Sale. Hawk Springs, Wy. May 7-9-Beef Short Course .Gainesville Service Issues of Tihe Florida Cattleman for 1969-70 July .Better Bulls August Markets September .Shorthorns October .Herefords November .Aberdeen-Angus December .Charolais January .....American Breeds February .Florida Horses March .Brahmans May .Forestry June .Better Pastures The Florida Vol. XXXIII, No. ROBERT S. CODY President and Publi, IIAT TLEIIAN 9 JUNE, 1969 HARRY E. HAMMOND sher Editor Associate Editor-James J. Flanagan. Field Representative-Donald E. Berry. Advertising ManagerRod Hammond. Advertising Coordinator-Mrs. Jane Stanko, Circulation Manager-Mrs. Margaret Schield. Write Box 1030, Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Phone (Area 305) 847-2803. FCA Convention Section Convention Program .33 Palm Beach Association Tours .34 Convention Plans Set .38 County Agriculture Biggest .40 CowBelles Program Told .40 FCA to Vote on By-Laws Change. .46 Alabama Pledges Theft Help .48 CowBelle Officer Active .50 Officers, Committees Listed .53 General News Higbie Resigns .39 Court Reverses Bang's Case .38 Short Course Sets Records .60 Theft Laws Recommended .68 Horse, Rodeo News Tampa, Lutz QH Shows Reported. .74 Two AQHA Champs Named .78 Bailey Horse in Top Twenty .79 Regular Departments FCA Reports .3 Editor's D esk .6 Latest Statistics .6 Now It's History .22 Livestock Notebook-T. J. Cunha ..72 For the CowBelles-Stancil .80 Lab ReportsCooperrider .84 E ditorials .86 Shows and Sales Palmetto Angus Disperses ..23 Jubilee Angus Sale Held .59 Pasture Features ... It Takes More Than Grass .24 Grow Steers on Pastures-Bertrand.26 Get pH Right-Gammon and Blue.28 Breed Information ... SGBI Elects Officers .64 Brahman Men Tour NE Fla .70 Ayavalla Sale Tops $1 Million .71 The Cover for June, 1969 OUR COVER picture for this month shows a group of purebred Angus cows grazing in the White Dutch clover and Gulf Rye grass pasture at Dexter Farms, Crescent City. The Angus operation is owned by Thomas A. and J. Mildred Dexter. OFFICIAL PUBLICATION Florida Cattlemen's Association, Charles Lykes, President, Tampa e Florida Brahman Association, Andrew L. Duda III, President, Cocoa e Southeastern Brangus Association, Zeb Parker, President. Sarasota -Florida Angus Association, R. D. Bennett, President, Greenwood -Florida Quarter Horse Association, Luther M. White, President, Chiefland -Florida Santa Gertrudis Association, Ed Watson, President, Clewiston -Florida Shorthorn Breeders' Association, Jack Hooker, President, Plant City e Florida Hereford Association, J. Pat Corrigan, President, Vero Beach -Florida Meat Packers Association, Dan Stowe, President, Tampa -Eastern Charolais & Charbray Association, Dr. Harlan B. Rogers, President, Collins, Miss. -Florida Beef Council, Cedrick Smith, Chairman, Micanopy e Florida Cutting Horse Association, G. Spencer Harden, Sanford o Florida Guernsey Cattle Club, Carroll "Bud" Ward, President, Winter Park -Florida Holstein Cattle Club, Henry B. Ebersole, President, Eustis Florida Association of Livestock Markets, Terry McDavid, President, Lake City. Published monthly by Cody Publications, Inc., at 410 West Verona Street, Kissimmee, Florida 32741 Subscription price $2.00. 1 year; $3.00 2 years; $4.00, 3 years; $5.00, 4 years. Second Class Postage paid at Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Aldus M. Cody, Chairman of the Board, Robert S. Cody, President, G. Kelly Lyons, Vice President, Dorothy G. Cody, Secretary-Treasurer. Rate Card mailed on request. Closing date 10th of preceding month; in circulation 25th of preceding S month. Member Agricultural Publishers Association, Florida Press -12e # 5 Association, American Agricultural Editor's Association, Florida Magaf i. zine Association, Audit Bureau of Circulations, Advertising Representatives: East-Stuyvesant Bayard, 20 Vesey St., New York 7; Midwestp Frank W. Finn & Associates, 155 N. Wacker Dr., Chicago 6; WestMurray Bothwell, 2801 W. Sixth St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90057. CHANGES of address and undeliverable copies should be sent to Drawer 1030, Kissimmee, Florida 32741. The Florida Cattleman

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USSC's PHENOTHIAZINE IN UREAmineral-Vitamin A Blackstrap Molasses Mix 2-A PASI rnE 'SSCFour pounds per day of No. 2-A or No. 5-A supplies the approximate percentage of the minimum daily nutrient requirements of a 600-pound steer for normal growth (gaining 1.4 pounds per day) shown in black on the graph below. Pasture and/or other supplement will provide the portions shown in green. References: (1) National Research Council Publication 579, (2) "Minerals for Beef Cattle in Florida," Bulletin No. 683, Everglades Experiment Station. YOUR MOST ECONOMICAL SUPPLEMENT: It is normally priced significantly below its equivalent feed value when compared with corn; and can be handled, stored, distributed and self-fed to cattle on pasture at considerably less cost than other conventional supplements. 813-983-8121 CLEWISTON FLORIDA

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How Much Will YOUR Cattle Be Worth This Summer? Even if prices don't increase, they'll still be worth more if they've been fed GROFAST (hybrid sorghum X sudangrass) forage. FIRST your cattle will weigh more. SECOND they'll have better finish than on plain pasture. You can plant GROFAST now and make silage and have summer's benefits this winter! In fact you can Plant. (HYBRID SORGHUM X SUDANGRASS) Now! and graze it-or chop it-or ensile it-OR-do any combination of these things for increased profits. Florida's Finest Sorghum for Grain (equal to corn) is: 1 BIRD-GO (HYBRID GRAIN SORGHUM) Bird-Go outproduced all other varieties in 1968 with an average yield of over 4500 pounds of grain, in all trials at all locations in Florida. If your dealer can't supply you, contact: B I N G H A M Seed Company, Inc. Box 1166 Ph. 904-768-1503 Jacksonville, Florida we can also offer: Cert. Starr Millet Japanese Millet Browntop Millet Rice Game Bird Mix Cover Crops Reader Correctly Identifies March Photo Subjects Arcadia I've been intending for some time to write you regarding the picture enclosed (March, 1969 "History" photo), which was run in a recent issue of THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN. I remember this one well. I have the glossy print of this picture hanging in my office, and have often said that you would never get this group together again. It was taken at a Flood Control meeting at Funie Steed's camp on Lake Wilson, and I believe it would have been in about March of 1950. Standing left to right are: B. Elliott of Pahokee, Speaker-Elect (at that time) of the Florida House; W. J. Funie Steed, Orlando; and Irlo Bronson, Kissimmee. Seated, Spessard Holland, U.S. Senator; Claude Pepper, U.S. Senator at the time and now a U.S. Congressman; Fuller Warren, Governor of Florida at the time and Millard Caldwell, former Governor of Florida. Burton Thornal Disappearing Quail Not Caused by Bobcats Gainesville As a senior at the University of Florida majoring in wildlife ecology, I was interested in Mrs. Otto Weaver's letter in the May CATTLEMAN STEAKS "in appreciation for cattlemen using citrus by-products" were on the menu of the recent meeting of Florida Citrus Mutual. concerning the bobcats on her ranch. Chances are the decrease in quail numbers she mentioned was due to reasons other than predation by bobcats. According to Murray and Frye in "The Bobwhite Quail and it's Management in Florida," out of 281 stomachs or droppings from Florida bobcats, only 2 or .7 percent contained traces of quail. Latest Statistics Commercial Slaughter and Average Weight (USDA) Cattle Calves Sw M Head Wt. M Head Wt. M Hea Mar. 1969 (Fla.) 32.0 946 14.3 345 46.0 Mar. 1968 (Fla.) 34.0 938 16.0 314 43.5 Mar. 1969 (U.S.) 2813.5 1014 451.5 213 7539.0 Mar. 1968 (U.S.) 2716.6 1028 481.8 211 7134.4 Slaughter Under State Inspection, Head (AITC) Cattle Calves April 1969 7195 1068 April 1968 10,607 1783 Livestock Prices Per Hundred (USDA) Fla., Apr. 15, 1969 Fla. Mar. 15, 1969 U.S., Apr. 15, 1968 U.S., Apr. 15, 1969 Cattle $24.80 22.90 23.60 26.40 Cows $20.60 19.80 17.80 19.20 ine d Stars, Hfrs. Calves $26.40 $32.80 25.40 31.50 25.40 28.10 28.50 32.10 Wt. 186 225 233 234 Sheep M Head Wt. .2 59 863.8 106 883.9 105 Swine 38,393 37,055 Swine $18.70 18.80 18.50 19.60 C'kens $14.00 14.00 14.10 14.70 Field Crop Prices Per Bushel (USDA) Fla., Apr. 15, 1969 Fla., Apr. 15, 1968 Corn $1.30 1.25 Oats $.85 .90 Soybeans $2.55 2.60 The Florida Cattleman LIVESTOCK HAULING "8 Trucks To Serve You" Local or Long Distance Straight Job Loads Single or Double Deck L. T. MANNING 3352 Blitchton Road PHONE 629-1649 OCALA, FLA. 6 Afi

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"We can't afford not to treat for grubs," say these cattlemen who all use *CO-RAL insecticide. "Packers know we treat for grubs, so they buy our cattle without question and usually give us a premium price." "We maintain a brood herd of about 800 cows and also have a feeding operation where we finish-out better than 2,000 head a year. CO-RAL Pour-On did a good job for us, but spraying with the Emulsifiable Concentrate fits our operation better. We treat for grubs in the Fall. Then we spray with CO-RAL again in the Spring for lice, and continue to use it to control horn flies. As a result of this program, packers tell us that our cattle yield-out better." G. B. Howell, Jr., Manager Normandy Cattle Ranch Leesburg, Georgia "After using CO-RAL for grub control, our cattle came through the winter gaining-instead of just maintaining." "We keep about 1,300 head of brood cows, but also feedout around 1,600 head a year. We sprayed with CO-RAL Wettable Powder for the first time last year and got good results. Our calves and cow herd did a lot better this winter on the same amount of feed. In the feedlot, we have to treat for grubs because the packers warned us that they were going to start docking for grub damage. We've also had good results with CO-RAL Emulsifiable Concentrate in our fly control program." Neither can you. With more and more packers docking for grubby cattle .with treated animals commanding a premium at the auction barn. cattlemen everywhere agree that treatment for grubs is essential. Records gathered from producers who have used CO-RAL systemic insecticide during the past 11 years consistently show that these animals gain better and return a higher profit in undamaged meat and hides. 6985 CO-Rhn, phUA ICI CO-RAL CATR ISCTICIDE Herschel Parrish, Manager H. E. Wolfe Ranch St. Augustine, Florida Only CO-RAL offers a treatment that's just right for every size and type of operation. SPRAY CO-RAL 25% Wettable Powder controls grubs, lice, horn flies, screw-worms and ticks. CO-RAL Emulsifiable Concentrate controls grubs, horn flies, lice, ticks and screw worms. POUR-ON CO-RAL Pour-On controls grubs and reduces lice. This ready-to-use formulation requires no further dilution or mixing. DIP VAT CO-RAL 25% Wettable Powder is the only systemic insecticide registered for this method of application. BACKRUBBER CO-RAL Emulsifiable Concentrate may be mixed with oil for use in backrubbers to provide excellent control of horn flies and face flies. First with the best in grub control C O R O R A IO and other quality animal health products. W .ANA C MSSOU 6CP2

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SUCK BLOOD WORRY CATTLE CUT WEIGHT GAINS COST UP TO 100 PER HEAD PER DAY kills flies for 30 to 60 per spraying Contains both Toxaphene and Lindane for doubleaction killing. Lasts for weeks. Kills ticks, lice and mange mites, too. From your Purina dealer with the Checkerboard sign. ONE OF 190 HEALTH PRODUCTS FROM YOUR PURINA DEALER D@ Actually, one of the main staples of the bobcat's diet is the cotton rat, Sigmodon hispidus, one of the worst predators on quail eggs in Florida. All the additional information I could locate on quail predation in Florida closely bears this out. The quail decline could more likely be attributed to poaching or a serious lack of food and/or cover. Bill Frankenberger American Horse Council Seeking Information Washington, D.C. As you can tell from the letterhead, the American Horse Council is slowly taking form. We would appreciate having comments and suggestions from both you and your readers concerning matters of national importance to the horse industry. Immediately, we would solicit your help and assistance in forwarding all matter which in any way reflects the economic impact of the horse industry on the total economy. Henry Durham Executive Director YThe council is making a strong effort to develop economic data that will show the value of horses and allied industries to the states and the country. Up till now, this kind of facts have been sorely lacking, and we feel probably underestimated. Florida, fortunately, has been ahead of most of the country in horse production studies as well as studies of the impact and future growth of horses, thanks to the department of animal science at the University of Florida and the Florida Extension Service. Polk County Agent Davis Says Thanks for Coverage Bartow I certainly want to thank you for the fine and excellent coverage you gave our 1969 Polk County Youth Fair in your May issue of THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN. We certainly appreciate your accurate up-to-date reporting of the livestock news for the state. Robert M. Davis Polk County Agent It's nice to be thanked. Especially when it gives us a chance to say that we try to personally cover every major New Reader Service Offered MANY OF our readers tell us they would like more detailed information on products or services described in our "Editor's Desk" column. Starting with this issue, we will provide the "coupon" below which may be completed and returned to THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN if you wish more details on an item. We will forward your name and address to the proper source asking that they rush the requested material to you. Most items won't have a charge for them, but if there is a charge, we will say so and how much. You may send a check or ask to be billed. We will keep records on types of information requested and make an effort to use the kind most helpful to you. r------------------------------------------I Want More Information? THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN DRAWER 1030 KisSIMMEE FLORIDA 32741 Please get me information on the material below. (Check more than one box if you wish.) E] 1. Merck Memo E 5. Cattle Chute L 2. QH Racing Book E 6. Liquid Supplement Book F 3. Feedlot Automation L 7. New Protein Source E 4. Grain-O-Vator L 8. Anchor Lepto Vaccine N am e .. Address C ity .State .ZIP ---The Florida Cattlemain 8

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NOW IS, TrE IME AwA 1A/ TO START YOUR FLY and WORM PROGRAM Here's the simple, proven and profitable way to CONTROL ...and ELIMINATE costly flies and worms in your herd. Just feed BEST MAID FLY AND WORM CONTROL SUPPLEMENT, free choice, and your animals will take over from here. The larvicide in BEST MAID FLY AND WORM CONTROL SUPPLEMENT is consumed by each animal-AS IT EATS-and is passed out in.the manure where it KILLS THE FLY AND WORM LARVAEI The BEST MAID Program gives you everything in one package-in one feeding, a complete Pasture Supplement-rich proteins, balanced minerals and vitamins-PLUS the "built in" FLY AND WORM CONTROL. It's the proven-safe, economical and PROFITABLE way to feel cattle the year 'round. Now is the time to investigate this program to enhance your profits this year. SUPPLEMENTS RANGE WITH ESSENTIAL PROTEINS, MINERALS AND VITAMINS AID IN PREVENTING FOOT ROT AND SOFT TISSUE LUMPY JAW J. COSTS AVERAGE ONLY ABOUT 2 CENTS PER HEAD DAILY PREVENTS THE BREEDING OF FACE AND HORN FLIES e G, P0 r18NdCLLING \AIGGEOG P. o. Box 118 MIXON MILLING CO. CAIRO, GEOR617k'A

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DEWEY P COL LY CHOICE BRANGUS CATTLE RANCH 543.4 acres-80% Pensacola Bahia 150 Head of Blue Ribbon Cattle Three Lakes Plus Artesian Well LOCATION Glades County, 4 1/2 miles South of intersection of State Road 29 at Harrisburg, Directly on U. S. 27. Permanently located ranch foreman's mobile home with C.B.S. paneled cabana. Loading chutes and additional structures necessary to operation. Contact:. Ted Anderson Randall Polly DEWEY POLLY REALTY 99 NINTH STREET NORTH NAPLES, FLORIDA PHONE (813) 642-4356 Price and Terms on Application presents The Florida Cattleman livestock event in Florida, including the youth fairs of which Polk County's is excellent. Reader Asks About Stamping Machine Winter Haven At one time I saw an item advertised that removed the top of ground area of stumps by use of a cutter head attached to the PTO shaft of a tractor. Can you advise the manufacturer's name and address? S. L. Schutt 4We just can't seem to find the ad if it ever ran in THE CATTLEMAN. If any of our readers can help us or Mr. Schutt, please drop a line with whatever information you have. Thanks. Milking Shorthorn Breeder Expanding Herd Monticello .The ad is very satisfactory and I would like for it to run for 12 issues or until cancelled. I believe this should do us a great deal of good and as we expand (our herd) the size of our ad can be increased perhaps. Paul R. Lewis YMr. Lewis is taking advantage of the discount we offer regular advertisers as well as practicing the consistency that we preach. Citrus Men Appreciate Use of By-Products Ocala Here is how "we" citrus growers thank "us cattlemen" for using our by-products -citrus pulp and molasses. This (picture) was taken at our annual meeting of Florida Citrus Mutual. I belong to FCM and the Putnam County Cattlemen's Association. T. C. Holden Mr. Holden's photo shows something like 420 beef filet mignons being prepared over charcoal for the FCM meal. We thank him and them! 4-New "Grain-O-Vator" Handles 275 Bushels NORTH AMERICAN Manufacturing Company, Sioux City, Iowa has announced the addition of a new "Grain-O-Vator 275" to its line of self-unloading wagons. The new wagon allows feeders to 10

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DON'T BE CAUGHT SHORT! otCo Th]?AIN ROT ,.0 3 82 Wes !f y 8gg wa st 's Ves o is a Wat t J.e "i2uca 'ite 2sagood tj "Ia be hi -Igyou, *Oveli ime to plantein tr Vth O er up epts ofall. Seed 1 s O asture GRAS leg e asses P a r a g 7 R S S .S I pen ste Bahia S ola Bahia A-.S S. RL1n 2 ZZ EWS -' Asz Alyce ) Hai Oer.s iRc L0rpy nd SI Aes y g' AS Z Chb norn X2, h2 I -*.As] eve Wh eas 2ed 001, la I ite ate Clove .ASg 12e Call~2 oZ se p s4 .p y o. a, ~ yo antl .11g V t 9 1y2 ZIs S .3 -FIQu i l i s A S Z u P,, e u 00 4-ban o Sales nt needs e can be of ser i s m Sof Lalwn and P Seed sturesSeds alvesting and Proces 7555923 i z v rz CO~ PR1?IC Es C7 P II% Z u 7 .0 TONC P 01 Ct AD VANT

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f1yCO BRAND O R 1'I The bait that flies love and will not become immune to! COIDRIN & VAPONA (DDVP) Concentrate. ..One or both can be used as stock sprays or back-rubber concentrates! FLY-CORD. .Season-long control with ONE application! When installed on a 450 angle, 75% of the flies leave the cord to die. No Mess! FLYCO BRAND DUST ..Rid your premises of fleas. FLYCO*M BRAND MOLE CRICKET BAIT .A sure kill for crickets, cut worms, ants, etc. CATTLE BACK OILERS .Four gallon capacity-price subJect to size of order. "Flies WIorst Enemy" Quality Products From F & W ENTERPRISES, INC. / DEALERS: AID LABORATORIES, INC. 498 N.E. 46th St., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 Ph. 305/395-2771 (AND) 708 N.E. 21st Ave., Ocala, Fla. Ph. 904/622-4753 (AND) 7319 Kingsbury Circ e, Tampa, Fla. Ph. 813/626.0736 LAKELAND CASH FEED CO., INC. Mirror Lake Drive, Lakeland, Fla. 33802, Ph. 813/MU 26144 GUARDIAN CHEMICAL CO. 694 Jefferson St. Atlanta, Ga. 30301 PENNINGTON GRAIN & SEED CO. P.O. Box 290, Madison, Ga. 30650, Ph. 404/342.1234 (AND) Box 9474, Market Center Branch, Columbia, S.C. 29201 WHEELER RANCH SUPPLY Rt. 8 Box 309-M, Pensacola, Fla. 32506 STANDARD FEED CO. 1282 Kings Road, Jacksonville, Fla. 32204 FLINT RIVER MILLS Box 401, Ta ahossee. Fla. 32302. Ph. 904/877-1 155 MILLER MACHINERY & SUPPLY CO. 1104 Twigg St., Tampa, Fla. 33601 (AND) 601 E. Church St., Jacksonville, Fla. 32201 SOUTHEASTERN LABORATORIES, INC. 512 College St., Jocksonvilke, Fa 32203 PRIDDY BROTHERS 1231 W. 18th St., Houston, Texas 77008 ALLEN BROS. OF MARION, I NC., P.O. Box 24 Marion, La. 71260 MAGNOLIA SEED HARDWARE & IMPLEMENT CO. 8401 Sovereign REm, Dallas, Texas. MEYER-BLANKE CO. 2620 Hollywood Ave., Shreveport, La. THE VOSS CO. P.O. Box 94, 802 N. Jefferson, Enid, Okla., WESTERN DAIRY SUPPLY CO., Kentwood, La. 70444 WOOD-FRUITTICHER CO., 3610-3rd Ave. S., Birmingham. Aa. BRUNDIDGE MILLING CO., Brundidge, Ala. P.O. Box 15392 Tampa, Florida FLORIDA PEST CONTROL & CHEMICAL, Crystal River, Fla. KARSTON & DENSON, Macon, Go. MERLIN, INC. Atlanta, Ga. MIXON MILLING CO., Cairo, Ga. NELSON WHOLESALE CO., Brownwood, Texas. PAPER CHEMICAL & SUPPLY CO., Savannah Ga. COCHRAN BROS. CO., INC., Dublin Ga. SPALDING FARM SERVICE, Griffin, Ga. INDEPENDENT B U Y E R S ASS'N., Prompton, Penn. BIRCHMORE DAIRY SUPPLY, Athens, Ga. CARBISCO FLOUR & FEED MILLS, INC., Rocky Mount, N.C. CAUGHMAN FEED & SEED CO., Columbia, S.C. CENTRAL CAROLINA FARM. ERS, INC., Durham, N.C. SAIL CHEMICAL CO., 570 Indlian St., Savannah, Go. The Florida Cattleman GRAIN-0-VATOR 275 has been added to the line of self-unloading-wagons offered by North American Manufacturing Company of Sioux City, Iowa. haul and unload a full 275 bushels, the company says, and the box is divided into two compartments each of which can be unloaded separately. 30 to 40 bushels per minute unloading time is claimed. Standard equipment includes roof doors, rear mounted ladder, heavy duty oscillating tandem axle with 20inch rims and a fold-up jack. Other features are a front or rear mounted unloading auger elevator with a fold out spout, self-locking elevator control and a heavy channel frame that runs the length of the unit for strength and durability. An overhead boom type elevator system is available at extra cost. For more information, check Number 4 and return the form on page 8. 7-Dow Chemical Announces New Protein Source A NON-PROTEIN nitrogen source for beef.cattle has been developed by the Dow Chemical Company of Midland, Michigan. Called Kedlor feed grade biuret, it has received clearance from the Food and Drug Administration. Dow says it will soon be available to ranchers as an ingredient in minerals and other conventional range supplements. Compared to urea, the company says it is safer to use and contains 37 percent nitrogen, equal to 230 percent protein equivalent. "One pound of Kedlor is equal on a nitrogen basis to 5.6 pounds of cottonseed meal at 41 percent protein. When biruet is fed to ruminants, the organic nitrogen is slowly released as ammonia by enzymes in the rumen, the company explains. Bacteria then use the ammonia to synthesize protein which is in turn digested in the digestive system of the animal. "An important advantage is that 12

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E)t 4 K)91~f iLi 11 iVi / LI ~ ( C. 91 ii (f-il Revolutionary method proven highly effective against Horn Flies by the Everglades Experiment Station. After testing, fly counts averaged only 12 per cow for treated animals against an average of about 500 flies per cow on ranches outside the test area! Other tests show that the FASCO Butt-Bag also aids in reducing Face Fly populations. As modern as tomorrow, the Butt-Bag comes ready to use. Just hang it up .cattle do the rest, saving you important labor costs. It's weather-resistant with a special anti-wet dust containing dependable Co-Ral, that treats up to 50 cattle for 30 days! -_ It makes good sense to take this proven protective step now. For best results read the label and follow directions. E~. FASCOe FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL SUPPLY COMPANY JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA Co-Ral is a registered Trade Mark a g apro .d or f _ly control on

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A New, Highly Effective Insecticide g MAL-PHENE Recommended Where insect Resistance Has Become a Problem Stop insect pests and external parasites that steal profits from your livestock by spraying with Dr. Rogers' MAL-PHENE. Contains highly effective Malathion and Toxaphene. Excellent residual effect helps control horn flies, sheep keds, lice and ticks. Use Dr. Rogers' MAL-PHENE to spray your cattle, sheep, and goats. Profit Minded Cattlemen Feed Their Cattle AGRI-GUARD'S High Protein Liquid Feed Supplement Rich in Protein, Vitamins, Minerals and other Nutrients 1 LIC,_ 0 Your most economical Supplement WA Y Made and stored locally to save you money Save $30-40 per ton over other liquid feeds Meter printed tickets to assure full measure Eliminate your labor and inconvenience We Guarantee our prices through May, '69 We Fill the Feeders Plant Location: E. Hwy. 92 and Fishhatchery Rd. Across from Cattleman's Mkt. The Cows Feed Themselves rAoI FEEDO SERVICE o 9 Mail to: Agri-Guard Corp. 2822 Dixie Road Lakeland, Fla. Ph. 813/688-3325 NEW, hydraulically operated chute is now available from the My-D Han-D Company of Dodge City, Kansas. It operates left or right handed, the company says, and is ideal for dehorning, treating and castrating cattle. Kedlor feed grade biruet, unlike urea, releases ammonia slowly in the rumen. This prevents the presence of excess ammonia which can be toxic and create poor nitrogen utilization. Palatability is not a problem because the ingredient is practically tasteless." For more information on Kedlor feed grade biuret, check Number 7 and return the form on page 8. 5-New Hydraulically Operated Chute Marketed by My-D Han-D A NEW, hydraulically operated cattle chute weighing 1200 pounds is now available from My-D Han-D Company of Dodge City, Kansas. The company says it can be portable or stationary, and operates right or lefthanded, and is designed for dehorning, castrating and veterinary treatments. Constructed of two-inch pipe and designed not to choke an animal, the company says it is easy to operate and sells for $995. To get more information on the chute, check Number 5 and return the form on page 8. 6-Pfizer Publishes Liquid Supplement Reference Book WHAT IS claimed to be the first comprehensive reference book on liquid supplements for livestock feeding has been published by the Pfizer Agricultural Division. It provides an in-depth review of the new feeding concept that has attracted world-wide interest. The author is Robert C. Wornick, director of the agriculture development labThe Florida Cattleman 14 / 1As

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crion CHARTER MEMBER OF THE FLORIDA BEEFMASTER BREEDERS ASSOCIATION BYRON HERLONG 11 General Manager Our herds consist of crossbred and straight-bred cattle including Charbray, Brahman, Charolais, Brangus, Braford and more recently .Beefmaster. HERLONG RANCHES. A DIVISION OF A. S. HERLONG & CO. -P.O. BOX 418 -LEESBURG, FLORIDA -PHONE 787-3421, EVENINGS 787-7550

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.4 e ucai 0 Sd If you obtain an educational loan from your local PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOCIATION. PCA lends money for any worthwhile farm credit need, including higher education. With a PCA educational loan, you obtain the money as you need it -at the beginning of the college year or during the year. Interest is figured on the outstanding balance. As the balance decreases, the interest decreases. Saves you money! Because you're a farmer, grower or rancher, see your PCA representative first for your farm family credit needs. Arcadia Gainesville Madison Orlando Belle Glade Innokalee Marianna Palatka Bradenton Jacksonville Miami Pensacola Clewiston Lakeland Monticello Quincy Dade City Lake Wales Ocala Sebring Eustis Live Oak Okeechobee Vero Beach Wauchula 2 exclusive from CUTTER over two decades of DEEP TAN( Bacterins. So potent, pure and uniform, they are incomparable! oratory at Pfizer's research center, Terre Haute, Indiana. The 96 page book is entitled Liquid Supplements for Livestock Feeding. It covers ration formulations, nonprotein nitrogen sources, product formulation advantages and problems with liquid supplements, vitamin addition, antibiotic addition, equipment and materials of construction and regulatory considerations, along with a number of other topics. Initial issue of the book is in short supply, but to get your order in, check Number 6 and return the form on page 8. 8-Antchor Offers Vaccine For New Lepto Strain ANCHOR SERUM Company has announced ARS approval to market a new Leptospirosis vaccine aimed at two strains not covered by LeptoPomona bacterins. Field studies indicate that the two strains-Leptospira Canicola and Icterohemorrhagie -are becoming increasingly prevalent in cattle, the company said, so the new vaccine is aimed at them. It is recommended that the new bacterin, Lepto-Canic, be given to cattle and swine at the same time Lepto-Pomona bacterins are given, when both new organisms are present, to give complete protection. Anchor warns that Lepto is an infectious disease that can cause kidney trouble, loss of appetite, abortions, and breeding problems. It is usually spread through water runoff, stagnant ponds and drinking water that has been contaminated by the urine of infected livestock or wild animals. For more information on LeptoCanic, check Number 8 and return the form on page 8 of this issue. 1-Cow-Calf Business Is Moving East Merck Says STATES LIKE Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana are moving up fast as major producers of feeder calves according to The Merck Livestock Memo, published as a service to feedlot operators, by the animal health products department of Merck Chemical. Texas is still the largest ranching state, the report said, with almost 5 million beef cows in 150,000 herds, but the other states in the southeast are growing. Reasons given in the article include lack of rainfall in the traditional western states, high cost of land, and high operating costs. In Texas, for The Florida Cattleman 16

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Prepotent Production Tested -.Angus Bulls BREED IMPROVEMENT Angus Herd Impr ovement Rwlecords BUILDS BETTER BEEF Look for this symbol This symbol of progress can only be used by Angus breeders in the proven AHIR program. It tells you that these breeders can show you production records on their Angus cattle. Now you can buy good Angus bulls backed by good production records ...yes, bulls that are proven to sire heavier, faster-gaining calves with more red meat. You see, many progressive Angus breeders are participating in the AHIR (Angus Herd Improvement Records) program, designed to measure the economically important traits in their herds. They can supply you with gain and grade facts, conformation scores, and carcass cutability and quality information. The AHIR program is the most comprehensive herd improvement program in the beef industry. It helps assure you of bulls that will improve weaning and yearling weights, production efficiency and carcass quality. Of course, Angus bulls, more than any other breed, are prepotent. They breed the horns off your calves and breed your herd Black. But more important, they produce heavily muscled calves with deep, full hind quarters and wide, full loins ...calves with less wasteful bone, belly and brisket. So, for increased efficiency and more profits, next time buy prepotent Angus bulls with good production records. Look for the AHIR "symbol of progress" in Angus breeder ads. It tells you he's using the best records program in the country to help him breed higher quality, more efficient cattle. They're worth more if they're Black rmerican association 3201 FREDERICK 8LVO ST. JOSEPH. MO. 64501

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/ HIGROMATIC COMES TO -V FLORIDA MORE HEAD PER ACRE. NOT MORE ACRES Does it matter whether your crop is measured in bushels .or pounds? Pasture irrigation by HIGROMATIC Self-Propelled means an opportunity to vastly increase beef production on land that requires practically no preparation. Terrain, before considered unsuitable for crops, now becomes increasingly valuable for beef production. You can add profitable pounds on conservatively four to seven head per acre in the lush pastures made green and nutritious with HIGROMATIC and HIGROMATIC has the design capabilities to operate in the traditionally rough pasture acreage. Whether you consider yourself a stockman. or a farmer, whether beef is your second crop, or your only crop .HIGROMATIC is a profitable investment in your land. hWGROmatic SELF-PROPELLED ENRESCO An Agricultural Product by Enresco YOUR FLORIDA DEALERS: Falcon Irrigation 813-646-5761 P.O. Box 1897, Lakeland, Florida 33802 Farm Service Center 904-629-3419 2940 W. Broadway, Ocala, Florida 32640 FOR FAST DEF CALL li:: : I Phone 528-3575 Fletcher Farm Equipment Co. 904-472-2112 Highway No. 41, Newberry, Florida 32669 Groover Tractor Company 904-973-2245 P. 0. Box 568, Madison, Florida 32340 West Florida Equipment Co. 904-482-3033 West Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida 34246 )ABLE SERVICE MODERN RELIABLE EQUIPMENT Williston Florida PHILLIPS LIVESTOCK HAULING CO. example, the report quotes producers as saying it costs $90.50 to keep a beef cow for a year, excluding labor and management. Based on the number of calves per cow, average weight and beef prices in recent years, the hypothetical return per cow has been only $82, or a loss of $8.50 per animal. For a free copy of The Merck Livestock Memo, check Number 1 and return the form on page 8. 2-Quarter Horse Racing Stakes Book Now Available A PERMANENT history of major Quarter Horse races from 1949 through 1967 has been published by Renee H. Smelker. The volume is divided into four sections entitled: 1) Sires of stakes and feature event winners and placers; 2) Maternal grandsires and dams; 3) History of stakes and feature events; and 4) Index of stakes and feature horses and their sires. This first volume will be followed by yearly publications starting with 1968, enabling students of Quarter Horse racing bloodlines to trace winner-producing families through several generations. The price of the first book is $15. For more detailed information, check Number 2 on the form on page 8 and return to THE CATTLEMAN. County Agents Becoming Commodity Specialists COUNTY AGENTs and their assistants are gradually moving away from the shotgun approach to helping agriculturalists, according to Dr. M. 0. Watkins, director of the Florida Extension Service. Instead of trying to be all things to all people, county agents are now specializing in one or two commodities, Watkins says. "Today, it's possible to be a specialist in only one field such as beef cattle or vegetable crops. In some areas, the sub-division of specialities goes even further. That's why we require most of our agents to have at least a master's degree and some now hold doctoral degrees." Watkins says that ranchers who stayed away from the generalist agent now welcome those who can help them solve highly technical problems. "Cross-line agents" are being developed. These are specialists who may assist in two or more counties in their field of special training. So far, there are 15 agents who are working in more than one county. The Florida Cattleman ---18

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Gator C.A.N MEN M. the end of ,rawboned" Lastureland!. Scrawny underfed pastureland isn't fit for man or money-beast. But Florida has its share. Maybe you do, too. Before you write-off that land, try GATOR C.A.N. (Calcium Ammonium Nitrate). It can help cure those acid acres, the nitrogen balance that's out of whack. GATOR C.A.N. is completely neutral. No harmful salts allowed. It pumps calcium and nitrogen into the earth. Balanced nitrogen, toohalf nitrate, half ammoniacal. Specify GATOR C.A.N. in your mixed fertilizer. Just ask ..and your fertilizer manufacturer will mix it! Or use it direct as a top dresser. And forget waste. There's no padding. Every pound is forage food. GATOR C.A.N.-it's just what Florida needs. It'll beef-up your pastureland but good. KA7 A.'Efl AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS

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1111111i helps insure a sound start The best time to protect against the costly effects of mastitis is when cows are drywhen the dosage of antibiotic can be increased -when action can be concentrated In a smaller mass of tissue-and when milk production Is not Interrupted by treatment. And the best way to treat dry cows Is with a product specifically formulated for that purpose. The one we recommend Is Blodry stop in and let us tell you why. AWARNING: Blodry Is for dry cows only. Use no later than 4 weeks prior to calving. ndSUPPLY COMPANY Rt. 1, Box 255 of FLORIDA INC. Thonotosassa, Florida PHONE TAMPA 988-3154 Fast, Prompt Delivery DIRECT TO YOUR RANCH BIG ENOUGH TO SERVE YOU properly seasoned and treated to meet SMALL ENOUGH TO KNOW YOU your needs. All posts are treated You can get all standard posts and with creosote or Penta to last for years. poles delivered to your ranch in less For all types of posts, treated lumber, than a week. Posts are selected from and other timber products, phone or straight, sound, Southern Pine Timber, write Stalvey's for complete price lists. Dealer Inquiries Invited STALVEY ENTERPRISP. .BOX 88 PH. 912/487-2369 HOMERVILLE, GEORGIA 31634 v~2 The 15 include: Seymour Goldweber, associate Dade County agent, citrus and subtropical fruits; Kent Price, associate Palm Beach County agent, dairying; William E. Collins, assistant Jackson County agent, swine; Lenzy M. Scott, associate Washington County agent, beef cattle; Charles M. Walthall, assistant Okaloosa County agent, beef cattle; James E. Bellizio assistant Hendry County agent, citrus; Oscar J. Hebert, Jr., acting assistant Orange County agent, dairying; William J. Phillips, assistant Marion County agent, citrus; John L. Jackson, Jr., assistant Lake County agent, citrus; Edward Allen, associate Duval County agent, ornamentals; Thomas H. Braddock, Jr., associate Duval County agent, dairying; David DeVoll, assistant Seminole County agent, vegetables and ornamentals; Gerald G. Martin, assistant Volusia County agent, dairying; John F. McGuire, assistant Brevard County agent, citrus; and Jim Dilbeck, assistant St. Johns County agent, ornamentals. Watkins said the extension service also has three regional specialists based at the experiment stations. They work with cross-line agents and with agents limited to one county. 3-New Book Called "How to Automate Your Feedlot" THE H. C. DAVIS Sons Manufacture ing Company of Bonner Springs, Kansas, has just published a 100 page booklet describing plans and equipment for feedlot automation. The company says the book is designed to assist livestock feeders in determining more efficient methods of preparing and handling feeding rations. A special feature of the book is a listing of every installation of Davis equipment in the U.S. and Canada, so that other cattlemen can contact owners and go see equipment in use. (A substantial number of units are located in Florida.) The book includes drawings of recommended placement of units, along with pictures and complete specifications of machinery the company makes. To receive a free copy of the book, check Number 3 and return the form on page 8 of this issue. Horse Industry to Get Economic Survey THE ECONOMIC value of the horse business is going to be studied by Spindletop Research of Lexington, The florida Cattleman M 20

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Have recently purchased herds of LaCrosse Angus Farm and Wade Ranch. These cattle are now located at Drew Ranch on State Road 206, five miles east of Hastings, Florida, and five miles west of Interstate 95. Will sell all or any number desired -by the head or by the pound. Also, approximately 150 good two-year-old cross-bred heifers for sale, out of the C. L. John Herd of Live Oak. If Intereste d Contact: J. D. Odom, Starke, Fla. Phone: Hastings 692-1030 Starke 964-5476 e Mobile Phone JR 4-9263 C L S L

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Order The Stockman's Book Of Your Choice Today! 1 Beef Cattle Science Ensminger .514.35 2 Crossbreeding Beef Cattle Cunha, Koger, Warnick .8.50 3 Cowboy Economics Oppenheimer .6.95 4 The Stockman's Handbook Ensminger ..14.75 5 Using Commercial Fertilizers McVickar.6.75 6 Livestock Judging Handbook Nordby, Beeson & Fout ..7.75 7 Forming Programs for Small Acreages, E. M. Juergenson 5.25 8 Leadership for Action in Rural Communities, Kreitlow, Alton and Torrence .7.25 9 Farm Tractor Maintenance Brown and Morrison .5.50 10 Factors Affecting Calf Crop Cunha, Warnick, Koger .12.50 11 The Form Management Handbook, Hall and Mortenson. 8.00 12 Horses and Horsemanship Ensmingnr.11.75 13 When You Preside Sutherland .4.95 14 Approved Practices in Beef Cattle Production Juergenson .6.25 15 Soil Conservation Kohon & Bertrand .6.75 16 Breeding and Improvement of Form Animals, Rice .9.95 17 Swine Science, Ensminger 11.75 18 Cowboy Arithmetic Oppenheimer .6.95 19 Contract Farming U.S.A. Roy.9.25 20 Sheep and Wool Science Ensminger.11.75 21 Animal Nutrition, Maynard 8.50 22 Law for the Veterinarian and Livestock Owner, Hannah and Storm.7.50 23 Soil Fertility & Animal Health, Albrecht .3.98 24 How to Make Money Feeding Cattle, Simerl and Russell. 2.50 25 Animal Science, Ensminger 14.75 26 Approved Practices In Dairying Juergenson & Mortenson .6.25 27 Approved Practices in Farm Management, Hall & Mortenson .6.25 28 Swine Feeding and Nutrition Cunha .5.75 29 Selecting, Fitting & Showing Beef Cattle, Lottig & Norby. .1,95 30 Approved Practices in Pasture Monogement. McVickor & McVickor .6.25 31 Approved Practices in Feeds, Feeding, Cossard .6.25 33 Selecting, Fitting & Showing Horses, Lattig & Norby .1.95 34 Beef Production in the South, Fowler. 12.75 35 Careers in AgriBusiness & Industry, Stone.7.00 36 Cowboy Litigation, Oppenheimer .8.95 37 Mechanics in Agriculture, Phipps. 10.75 39 Animal Sanitation and Diseose Control, Dykstra. 10.00 40 Pastures fo the South, King 6.50 41 Feed Formulations Handbook, Perry .6.00 42 The Meat We Eat, Ziegler. .9.25 43 The Western Horse, Gorman 9.00 45 Beef Cattle (5th edition) Snapp.8.50 47 Animal Breeding (5th edition) W inters .6.50 51 Cattle Computers Bonelli. 6.00 52 Approved Practices in Swine Production, Juergenson & Cook .6.25 53 The Stockman's Handbook, Ensminger ..14.75 54 Veterinary Handbook for Cattlemen, J. W. Bailey .7.50 57 Farm Machinery & Equip. Smith.*. .BO 58 Monoging the Farm Business Beneke .4.50 60 An Introduction to Ag. Eng. McColly & Mortin.8.25 64 Swine Production Carroll & Kreider .9.50 66 Leather Braiding, Grant .3.00 67 The King Ranch Tom Lea (2 volumes) .20.00 68 New Lucian Cary on Guns Lucian Cary .2.50 69 Veterinary Drugs in Current Use, Seiden .2.75 70 Livestock Health Encyclopedia, Seiden, 2nd Edition 9.50 71 Southern Hog Growing Scarborough .5.25 -"" -"" USE THIS BLANK TO ORDER BY NUMBER-----Enclosed is (check or money order) for $ Please send me the books as indicated by the numbers I have encircled 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Staying 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 131 33 34 35 36 37 39 40 Upt-D t 1 42 43 45 47 51 52 53 54 57 58 60 1 64 66 67 68 69 70 Pays Off I Send to I Adrs In More Ad' Profits! Include 4% Clip out and mail to I F Soles Tax on THE CATTLEMAN PRESS BOX 1030, KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA The Florida Cat;leman Kentucky, according to Theodore R. Broida, president. "There have been a number of studies performed dealing with particular breeds, but there have been few attempts to sum up the many segments of the horse industry operating in the country," he said. Breeds to be included in the study are: Quarter Horse, Thoroughbred, Standardbred, Tennesee Walking Horse, American Saddle horse, Appaloosa, and Arabian. Phases of the industry to be surveyed are: economic activities of horse breeding; racing and showing horses; impact of breeding, racing and showing, and effects of taxation on the horse industry. Cooperating with the research will be the American Horse Council, recently formed, representing most American horse breeds. Feed Horses Automatically With Florida Made Unite HORSES CAN be fed unattended and automatically for periods up to five days according to Technical Industries of Fort Lauderdale which makes a "Feed-O-Meter." The unit has a hopper which holds 100-125 pounds, and a timing device that allows up to eight pre-set feedings per day. Technical Industries has been manufacturing specialized dairy feeding equipment for some time, and now they are entering the horse feeding field. The company says the Feed-O-Meter is of extremely rugged construction, mounts easily on a wall and is also available in a portable model which can be just plugged into a wall socket. The timing device operates on a 24 hour basis and is designed for the horseman who has specific ideas on the timing of feedings for his horses. AUTOMATIC feeding of horses is possible with Technical Industries Feed-OMeter timing and bulk holding unit. 20B

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The ')feincke SPREADD -MRS TER 44wA ACCURATE SPREADING LOW MAINTENANCE CONTINUOUSLY RELIABLE BUILT TO LAST Accurate Poundage Control System Hydraulically Controlled One Man Operation 3-ton to 10-ton Models Available TELEPHONE: TAVARES MEINCKE SPREADER WORKS, INC. ASTATULA, FLA. (904) 343-2641

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Made in Florida for Florida Conditions CHECK THESE FEATURES -Made from 1-1/8" OD tubular galvanized (inside and out) steel and woven wire. -Heavy 3/4" lag screws -they stay! -Adjustable hinges-easy to install. 1/4" Diagonal brace rod. -Light, Strong, Tough. -Don't warp from heat of summer. -12'x4'2" 19.95 -10'x3'2" $16.95 -14'x4'2" 22.95 -12'x3'2" 18.45 -16'x4'2" 24.45 -14'x3'2" 20.95 -1 O'x4'2" $18.45 -16'x3'2" 22.95 Order Today and $ave! -BUY DIRECT You save middleman's prof it5% discount on 10 or more in one order. CLIP THIS AD FILL IN QUANTITIES NEEDED and MAIL TOSILVER LAKE ESTATES Rt. 2, Box 153 LEESBURG, FLORIDA 32748 Prices FOB Leesburg, Fla. Phone (904) 787-4165 1939: When You Grow Your Own "THE MAN who raises his own cattle and feeds his own feed is the hardest for adverse circumstances to whip," said an article quoting from the Shorthorn World. ...Calcium must be replaced in the soil over which cattle graze if their quality is to be maintained, said T. J. Durrance, Jr., in an article on nutrition. ...As pasture improvement programs got under way, "one of the toughest problems ...is the lack of experience and knowledge ...research did not precede actual development to any great extent." 1944: U.S.S.C. Gets First Purebreds U. S. SUGAR Corporation at Clewiston moved in the first of four purebred herds of cattle-Angus, Hereford, Shorthorn and Brahman-to supply seed stock to Florida cattlemen and to experiment with in molasses feeding trials. ...Kingan & Company (forerunner of Midstate Packing Company) opened a new plant at Bartow. ...Value of Florida's cattle (1.136 million head) was estimated at $51 million. 1949: Electricity on the Farm MORE THAN 65 percent of Florida farms were receiving electric service. Florida cattlemen were warned of the danger of overgrazing young or short grass. ...Henry 0. Partin & Sons' Heart Bar Ranch was the subject of an. article in Parade, nationally distributed newspaper supplement. .Norris Cattle Company of Ocala shipped 14 Brahmans to California by air. 1954: Irrigation Values Cited IRRIGATION WAS reported good for 1) early grazing; 2) adequate grazing; and 3) hay crops. ...Florida State Cattlemen's Association began its first efforts at promoting beef by hiring June Gunn on a part time basis to work with the association and retailers. ...Improved pastures mean plenty of headaches-but they also provide the easiest means to increase production, said M. M. Overstreet of Kissimmee. WORKING CATTLE in the old days was just as tough and hot a job as today. This group being handled back around 1920 was down in the Immokalee area. The picture was sent in by W. D. Roberts, past president, Florida Cattlemen's Association. The Cattleman will pay $2 for old photos and will return the picture undamaged after used. 22 The Florida Cattleman

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Palmetto Angus Herd Is Dispersed Top 25% Averaged $338 Top 50% Averaged $306 THE ANGUS herd of Palmetto Angus Farms, Palmetto, was dispersed on May 9 at the Manatee Ag Center at Palmetto with the 76 lots grossing $19,190 to strike an average of $253 per head. Joe Jordan of Cookeville, Tennessee was the largest buyer with purchases of 15 head for $3445. Second high buyer was Pete Fulton of Palmetto who bought 11 head for $3145. Top selling animal, a bull, went to L. H. Hawkins & Son of Sarasota, on the high bid of $560. The herd was owned by Don Courtney and Jack Travis of Bradenton. The auctioneer was Bob Cooper of Sarasota. Buyers at the sale, with number of head bought, shown in parentheses, if more than one, and amount spent, follows: Joe Jordan, Cookeville, Tennessee (15) $3445; Pete Fulton, Palmetto (11) $3145; Roger Musgrave, Bradenton (5) $1440; L. H. Hawkins & Son, Sarasota (4) $1530; W. H. Trawick, Arcadia (4) $1080; Bill Talley, Ellenton (5) $1095; Reagan & Son, Bradenton (5) $1010; R&R Ranch, Tampa (3) $715; Pitts Angus Ranch, Tampa (4) $1185; W. W. Ragg, Tampa (2) $620; W. H. Lester, St. Petersburg (4) $1120; Elmer Stebbins, Valrico (2) $515; M&B Angus Company, Bradenton (3) $710; G. W. Harmon, Arcadia (2) $360; J. Woodward, Moore Haven $200; Suwannee Revere Farm Bell (3) $495; Russell Reagan, Bradenton, $160; Keystone Ranch, Palmetto $180; Larry Davidson, Bradenton, $185. Kinner Annonees Change In Operation BILL KINNER, formerly of St. Cloud, and presently manager of Gospel Meadows Angus Farms, Salisbury, Connecticut, has announced a major expansion in the Angus operation which is owned by Sydney and Jo Carter. The change involves the purchase of an additional 400 acre farm 1/2 miles away at Sheffield, Massachusetts. The new farm will be known as the Four Square Division of Gospel Meadows Angus Farms. Adding force to the expansion is the purchase of 36 head of cows and calves from 15 herds in nine states recently. The purchase raised the total of breeding age females at Gospel Meadows to 71. Ankonian Jester is the senior herd sire. Kinner said the new farm will be used as a base to fit cattle. TOTAL VALUE of all land and buildings in Florida farms is about $5.1 billion. This is an average of $139,372 per farm -the highest of any state east of the Rocky Mountains. for June, 1969 NO CREEP No. 1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 Graham Bulls Gain 4 2.80 7 2.60 8 2.63 6 3.12 Gain Ratio 112% 108 108 115 WDA 2.57 2.51 2.59 2.67 WDA Ratio 109% 106 109 109 ATI NO NURSE COWS GRAHAM ANGUS FARM Floyd Wagner, Mgr. Rt. 3, Box 587 Albany, Georgia Home of M. H. Maximilian 1139 and Ankonian Black Engraver DERISO ANGUS RANCH Mr. and Mrs. Bob F. Deriso, Owners Ph: 229-8085 Frank Smith, Herdsman Ph: 229-2200 North Casey Ave. off Gunn Highway P. 0. Box 415 Tampa, Florida ANGUS OF PROMINENCE LAZY X RANCH T. B. Bradshaw, owner Woodstock, Ga. James "Red" Thompson, Mgr. Ph: 926-6191 BOYETTS ANGUS BROOKSVILLE, FLA. SAT or SUN 796-2289 Phil Sanders P. 0. Drawer A, Laurel, Miss. 39440 Phone 601/428-0648 PRIVATE TREATY AND AUCTION SALES "It's not how big you make them, it's how you make them big." Ph: 432-7728 Registered Aberdeen-Angus Cattle MERCURY ANGUS FARMS Shelbyville, Tennessee Phone: 615/684-2767 PROGRESSIVE BREEDING WITH Our Herd Sires: MM Eileenmere 32; Bobo Parallel; Primus Heckettier 99. TRIPLE ''Z'' Angus Fanch Joe and Sara Zambito, owners Rt. 5. Box 136 Ph: 884-9636 Located on Linebsugh Ave. Tamoa 5 M. off Dale Mabrv Fla. "Proving Ground for John Deere Farm Equipment ...and the Beat in Angus Cattle" DEEREACHES C. M. HAASL DOYLE MITCHELL Owner (404) 267-3570 Manager MONROE, GEORGIA MIJO FARM Performance Tested Reg. Angus Herd Sire: Mijo Blackcap Terry "The Ton of Beef Bull" Sire of the Grand Champion Carcass at the 1968 Florida State Fair, Tampa. U. S. 19 N. of Monticello, Fla. 904/997-2998 HUGHES ANGUS RANCH Ellenton, Florida 33561 Quality Breeding Stock, Scotch and Domestic Bloodlines Herd Classified 86.5. Fully Certified for Your Protection. Quality Doesn't Cost, It Pays! Over 50 years experience breeding quality cattle Curtis Hughes, Owner Phone 722-3168 or 722-3139 GRAHAM BULLS DO PERFORM Look at our record at Tifton Performance Test: 23

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It Takes More Than Hay Now! "You JUST can't do it on hay alone any more if you want to produce more beef per acre," is the observation made by Bob F. Crane, Jr., managing partner of Rock Hollow Farm near Ocala. This view was what prompted a look at the advantages of forage crop planting on selected acreage at the ranch along with an irrigation system that would do the job effectively, efficiently and within reasonable cost figures. Crane says that after considering several types of irrigation, it was decided to go with the overhead self-propelled, circular irrigator. Background in the decision to irrigate ties in with the idea of producing more beef per acre. Crane right now is irrigating a pasture area of 133 acres where winter oats and rye were raised this past season with marked success. Plantings have recently been made of Millex 22 and SX 16 Sudax and a selected variety of corn will also figure in the crop program. Heavy application of fertilizer is noted in these plantings with 1000 pounds per acre of 5-10-20 laid on. Silage will be made and stored in a bunker silo from these crops at an overall estimated cost of $9.50 per ton, Crane says. The Rock Hollow operation features a purebred Angus herd and a 2The Florida Cattleman T 24

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purebred Polled Hereford herd as well as a crossbred commercial herd on which registered purebred Angus, Polled Hereford and Charolais bulls are used. The method observed in irrigating winter oats and rye is heavier fertilization, heavier seeding and green chopping. It's delivered in that form direct to the cattle in Oswalt forage wagons with no grazing involved. Added cuttings have been realized under the irrigation program, and it was noted that some acreage with Elbon rye was being cut the third time for the season. Crane points out the cattle clean up the green chop and there's little or no waste involved. Some Facts THE IRRIGATION system installed by Crane is the hyGROmatic, a centerpivot type which can put out one inch of water in 66 hours or 1/2 inch in 32 hours. As the pivot system swings its main line around a circular area, it could be compared to the second hand on a clockface. The sprinkler heads on the main line near the center of the circle are moved over the field relatively slowly; those out on the end of the main line are moved at a faster rate. They must apply water at a faster rate than those toward the center. Running on rubber tired wheels, the system at Rock Hollow covers 133 acres in one circular sweep. Operating costs run to just over $1 per hour, Crane estimates, including diesel fuel. He operates the unit at night to save on evaporation, usually starting at 6:00 p.m. and running for 12 hours. Crane says a good water pattern figures out to one inch every 10 days in the winter and one inch every seven days in the summer. When it's very dry and there's been little or no rainfall for an appreciable time, the system is in operation every night. A unique feature of the system is the liquid nitrogen hookup with the sprinklers. It's the Inject-O-Meter Injector and in addition to liquid nitrogen, any other liquid fertilizer can be used and fed through the irrigation nozzles to the soil, along with the water. The complete system is powered by an Allis-Chalmers 2900 engine. A 10 inch well is used going 264 deep with the water coming up 38 feet. Sprinkler head outflow is adjusted and the pump operates on 85 continuous horsepower. A Few Reasons CRANE POINTS out the main reason (Continued on page 30) for June, 1969 25 DEXTER FARMS 3 miles north of Crescent City, Florida Registered Angus Cattle Featuring JINGO 36, son of the $600,000 Bull JINGO 2, and ANKONY PRESIDENT QUEEN MOTHER, son of ANKONY PRESIDENT, the $1,000,000 Bull. FOR SALE YOUNG BULLS and WORKING BULLS Some Good 4-H Club Bargains DEXTER JAMES PRINGLE MANAGER On The Farm Ph. 904/698-2212 FARMS THOMAS A. DEXTER OWNER 168 Oak Grove St. Ormond Beach, Fla. Ph. 9041677-4583 Summer Address 58 Turner Road Pearl River, N.Y. Ph. 914/735-2623 Registered Angus Cattle RANCH Mr. & Mrs. Lem Crofton, Owners Route 1 Phone: 485-2642 Box 114 Gainesville. Florida Grovelane Farms Home of MEADOW LANE BELLMAN Owned jointly with Meadow Lane Farm HARRY FRIEDLANDER, Owner P. 0. Box 272, Lake Wales. Florida Registered, Top Quality Angus Bennett's Angus Ranch P. 0. Box 8, Phone 594-5202 GREENWOOD, FLORIDA 150 REGISTERED ANGUS Deep River Ranch E. H. and Robert Lenholt Phone Daytona Beach CL 2-8478 DELAND, FLORIDA RANCH 6 MILES WEST ON HIGHWAY 44 Eva's Bandolier Lad This great sire and progenitor of the BARDOLIERMERES is the foundation breeding of our cow herd ...and our top herd sires also descend from this same propotent bloodline. FAIRMEADOWS HUGH & FRONITA SCHNEIDER HAMPTON, GEORGIA Ph. Atlanta 355-5364 BALDWIN ANGUS RANCH Our Herd Sire: Bardoliermere 60PP3 "Nugget"-the only two-time Florida Premier Bull winner. We are breeding him to daughters of Dor Macs Bardoliermere 65 "A Ton of Angus Type." Ranch 5 Miles North of Ocala off 1-75. Ph: 629-4574. Leroy & Jane Baldwin, owners. Quality Registered Angus SUN -MAR -C RANCH Zephyrhills, Fla. Phone Tampa 949-4294 featuring Meadow Lane Mascot PERFORMANCE TESTED ANGUS MILLARDEN FARMS WOODBRIY, GA. 404/553-5375 James E. Cushman Bob Blalock Owner Managing Partner BREEDERS OF REGISTERED ANGUS CATTLE (904) 748-1856 Visitors Always Welcome

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Raising Crops for Forage Can Prove To Be Profitable for Cattlemen by J. E. BERTRAND and L. S. DUNAVIN, JR. W. Fla. Experiment Station THERE ARE certain cool-season pasture grasses which can be grown for grazing such as small grains (wheat, rye, and oats), fescue, and Rye grass, but each has certain disadvantages often magnified by weather conditions. The growing of these pasture grasses for grazing is quite vulnerable to economic situations in that temporary grazing crops face competition with harvesting of prior crops for establishment, while permanent grasses tie up valuable land which might otherwise be used during the summer for a cash crop. Mostly in the fall, a large supply (over 800,000 in 1968) of light-weight calves (around 300 pounds) are available in Florida. By utilizing coolseason forage feeding programs (pasture or harvested forage), many of the better quality stocker beef calves can be grown to desired feedlot weights of 600 to 800 pounds instead of being shipped out of state or slaughtered. The growing of stocker beef calves can fit in as an off-season enterprise in rotation with early-maturing soybeans. Five Programs Tried IN THE fall of 1967, a study was initiated at the West Florida Experiment Station to evaluate five different cool-season feeding programs for growing fall-weaned, light-weight stocker beef calves. The treatments were as follows: 1) Sorghum silage plus concentrate supplement (protein, mineral, vitamin) in drylot. 2) Sorghum silage plus concentrate supplement protonn, mineral, vitamin) plus high-moisture corn in drylot. 3) Tall fescue (Kentucky 31) and wheat (Hadden) grazed in rotation (supplemented with a 12 percent crude protein high-energy supplement fed at the level of 1 percent of bodyweight). Stocking rate: eight calves Five Feeding Programs Evaluated EVALUATION OF Five Different Cool-Season Feeding Regimes for Growing Florida (1967-68) Stocker Beef Calves in Northwet I (a) 16(f) 173 330.6 597.2 266.6 1.54 No. of animals Length of trial, days Av. initial wt., lb. Av. final wt., lb. AV. gain/animal, lb. Av. daily gain, lb. Feed/cwt. gain (h) Sorghum silage Concentrate supplement High-moisture corn Pasture supplement Feed/animal/day, lb. (h) Sorghum silage Concentrate supplement High-moisture corn Pasture supplement Feed cost/cwt. gain Sorghum silage(i) Concentrate supplement (j) High-moisture corn(k) Pasture supplemental) Pasture(m) Total Av. cost/head of feeder Av. feed cost/head of feeder Total cost/head of feeder(o) Gross value/head(p) Profit per head 2362.0 108.8 36.38 1.68 $ 11.81 $ $ 5.36 $ $ $ 17.17 $ 88.01 $ 45.78 $ 133.79 $ 152.20 +$ 18.50 $ $ $ $ $ Treatment I -sorghum silage + concentrate supplement (pro(g) tein, mineral, vitamin) in dry lot. Treatment II -sorghum silage + concentrate supplement (pro(h) tein, mineral, vitamin) + high-moisture corn in drylot. () Treatment III -tall fescue and wheat grazed in rotation -(j) pasture supplemental ration was fed at the level of 1% of (k) bodyweight. (1) Treatment IV -tall fescue and wheat grazed in rotation -(in) unsupplemented. Treatment V -tall fescue and rye grazed in rotation -(n) unsupplemented. Two pens of eight animals (seven steers and one heifer) each (n) per treatment group. (p) One animal broke a leg during the course of the experiment; the data for that animal were disregarded. Does not include pasture. Sorghum silage -$10.00/ton. oncentrate supplement (protein, mineral, vitamin) = $98.53/ton. High-moisture corn -$44.00/ton. Pasture supplemental ration = $51.57/ton. Pasture cost -$61.25/acre for tall fescue, $45.38/acre for wheat and $48.88/acre for rye. Feeder cost = $26.62/cwt. (includes initial cost of animals, hauling, and ve-erinary cost). Does not include labor. Based on an animal value of $25.50/cwt. at the end of the trial. 26 The Florida Cattleman Treatments III (c) 16(f) 173 328.4 609.7 281.3 1.63 IV (d) 16(f) 173 339.4 530.3 190.9 1.10 V (e) 16(f) 173 323.4 561.9 238.5 1.38 II (b) 15(f) (g) 173 329.3 635.7 306.4 1.77 1778.7 102.5 168.0 31.49 1.81 2.98 8.89 5.05 3.70 17.64 87.66 54.05 141.71 162.10 20.39 276.6 4.49 $ $ $ $ $ $ (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) 7.14 11.85 18.99 87.42 53.42 140.84 155.47 14.63 $ 17.45 $ 17.45 $ 90.35 $ 33.31 $ 123.66 $ 135.23 -$ 11.57 $ $ $ $ $ 14.43 14.43 86.09 34.42 120.51 143.28 22.77

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Board Sales Held BOARD SALES for large lots of cattle are getting interest in South Florida according to Pete Clemons, manager of the Okeechobee and Belle Glade livestock markets. 200 steers sold April 21 at the Glades Market for $25.90. Ray Leach, marketing reporter said they were Standard crossbreds weighing 775 pounds. They were sold by McDaniel's Ranch at Clewiston to U.S. Sugar Corporation at Clewiston (which plans to finish them), with a five percent cut and three percent shrink. Okeechobee saw a board sale of two lots consigned by Williamson Ranch at Okeechobee May 6. 147 head were bought by Nathan Holmes of Fort Pierce for $29. They weighed 480 pounds and he was allowed a five percent cut. 75 head were bought by U.S. Sugar for $28.10. Weights on the last group weren't available at presstime. on 2.5 acres of tall fescue and 2.5 acres of wheat. 4) Tall fescue (Kentucky 31) and wheat (Hadden) grazed in rotation (unsupplemented). Stocking rate: same as in treatment 3 above. 5) Tall fescue (Kentucky 31) and rye (Explorer) grazed in rotation (unsupplemented). Stocking rate: same as in treatment 3 above. Tall fescue pastures received annually 500 pound/acre of a complete fertilizer (0-14-14) and three applications of 200 pound/acre of ammonium nitrate. It can be noted in the chart that calves fed sorghum silage, a concentrate supplement, and high-moisture corn (approximately 3 pound/head/ day) in drylot had the largest gain. Cheapest Gains? THE CHEAPEST gain ($14.43/cwt.) was produced by unsupplemented calves grazing tall fescue and rye in rotation. The most expensive gain $18.99/cwt.) was produced by supplemented calves grazing tall fescue and wheat in rotation. If the feedlot industry in Florida is to ever grow to sufficient size to take care of the state's demand for fed beef, a large supply of high-grade, heavy-weight feeder cattle will have to be available for feeding. Feeding programs, similar to those mentioned in this paper, for growing and conditioning light-weight calves to desired feedlot weights will need to be thoroughly tested and evaluated. For years we have promoted the type of Angus cattle which are becoming popular today! When in need of Angus with length, muscling and grow-ability, we invite you to visit our herd. Barnett Angus Farm Phone: 678-2264 Washington, Georgia GEORGIA ANGUS ASS'N Cattle listed at all times (Both reg. and commercial) JIM VOGT, Fieldman P. 0. Box 593 Phone AC 912 Perry, Georgia 31069 987-3319 Edwin Elite Perth Champion -A TON BULL; Centurion Barron -A SON OF THE Immortal 100; K. B. Eclipse 2nd -Reserve Champion Dixie Nati. Service Age Bulls for sale sired by the above. FRANK L. RAMSEY FARM Jim Griffin, Mgr., Ph. AC 912/246-5412 COLQUITT, GEORGIA SIZE -TYPE -QUALITY ABERDEEN-ANGUS THOMPSON BROS. FARM J. R. and Bruce Thompson, Owners Rt 1 Box 323 Marianna PH: 482-8522 Florida Angus .featuring the breeding of Whitneymere 512 and Meadowmere 1632. Gulfstream Farm 8401 S.W. 30th St., Phone LU 3-3759 FT. LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 33314 REGISTERED ANGUS Circle R Ranch Arky E. Rogers, Owner 752-2103 RFD 3, Box 118 LAKE CITY, FLORIDA Located 7 miles south on U.S. 41 BROOKS HILL FARM Quality Angus John H. Tyler, owner Ph. 226-1675 Verlyn Denney, Mgr.-Partner Ph. 735-3350 Thomasville, Ga. ROUTE 1, BOX 267-A, OCALA, FLORIDA 32670 TELEPHONE (904) 237-2815 ROBERT F. CRANE Jr., MANAGER e/-, it' ,4.1., -,t. Performance Tsted Registeed Angus Per'. Tested Reg. Polled Herefords W C. St. .600 lb. Ymiine wt,. -,. I100 1b. 00 d.dn C .5,,,,, /)rocen ;J/erc .erP-o1-c. Pet onnance Tested Comme,,rcial Cattle Outstanding Feedr cales For Sale or Lease -Fine Improved Stock Farm WITH HERD OF TOP QUALITY CATTLE Approximately 1500 to 2000 acres of fine brown loam well improved pasture stock farm with 350 to 400 good quality Angus cows bred to Charolais bulls. The range is well improved with sod and this year some 600 acres of soybeans are being planted on same. The ranch will care for 400 head of brood cows easily and plant 300 to 500 acres of beans or grain on the side. This ranch has ample management and labor, push button automatic feeding silo to care for cattle in winter. Can finance same with reasonable interest rates if bought. If leased, lease will be in keeping with ranch improvements and type oi range. This property has 11/2 miles frontage on good blacktop road. Also option to purchase approximately 2500 acres of adjoining lands with 65 per cent improved pasture and balance in timberland or area suitable for clearing. Also 800 acre ranch with improvements second to none in the South and lands as productive and fertile as any in the southland, with sizeable top quality purebred Charolais herd of cattle bred largely to French bulls for lease only, term of years. This ranch has nice show or preparation barn, ample separating pens, and a $35,000 concrete feed lot with automatic operating silos. 100 acres Coastal Bermuda, 200 acres of soybeans and silage planted this year. Reason for selling or leasing is because of age and desire to retire. This ranch located 1/4 mile off U.S. highway with good road leading to some. All lands individually owned. If interested, contact P.O. Box 1320, Greenwood, Mississippi or telephone day 453-4312, or night 453-3493, or 237-6158, area code 601. for June, 1969 27

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Soil pH of 5.8 Minimum For Clover-Grass Pastures by N. GAMMON Jr. & W. C. BLUE University of Florida ALTHOUGH IT has been known for many years that lime was necessary to produce a satisfactory soil pH for good clover growth in Florida, it has been difficult to specify the minimum pH necessary for optimum growth. An experiment initiated in the Fall of 1956 has now provided the data that establish a soil pH of 5.8 as the minimum necessary for optimum white clover (Trifolium repens) Pensacola Bahia grass (Paspalum notatum) pasture production. In this experiment, lime at rates of 1, 21/2, 4, and 51/2 tons per acre was thoroughly mixed to a six-inch depth in a flatwoods soil Leon fine sand; then the entire area was seeded to white clover and Pensacola Bahia grass. The area was fertilized annually in November with 0-10-20 fertilizer at the rate of 400 pounds per acre. The 0-10-20 was formulated from potassium chloride and ordinary superphosphate, since use of the latter insures an adequate supply of sulfur. The only other fertilization was a micronutrient frit containing copper, zinc, manganese, iron, molybdenum, and boron applied to the entire area in the Fall of 1957 at the rate of 35 pounds per acre. Herbage samples were taken five or six times a year. How Much Lime? FROM THE beginning it was evident that one ton of lime was not sufficient for good clover growth, but all other lime rates produced herbage at rates that were not significantly different from one another. However, in 1962 the herbage yields on the 2 ton per acre plots began to decline. Then in 1966 the plots that originally received four tons of lime per acre also showed a significant yield decrease. Although there were variations in yield from year to year associated with rainfall and other weather changes the significant differences based on average yields can be diagrammed as shown in the graph. Note phrticullarly that there seemed to be no improvement in yield as long as the soil pH was in the range 5.8 to 7.0 but that soil pH values below 5.8 resulted in a decrease in forage production. The major factor in the reduced total forage production was the reduction in clover growth. Nitrogen is fixed by the bacteria (Rhizobium) living attached to the clover roots. Poor clover growth results when less nitrogen is fixed and the subsequent grass growth is also poorer. Basic laboratory studies with white clover inoculating bacteria (Rhizobium) have shown that it grows best and fixes most nitrogen in a pH range of 5.8 to 7.0. At lower pH values growth rates and nitrogen fixation gradually decline, becoming almost completely ineffective below 5.0. A significant reduction in white clover-grass herbage production and quality can be expected whenever the soil pH in the surface 0 to six inch layer drops below 5.8. Additional lime should be applied whenever the soil reaches a pH of 5.8 or lower. On the soil studied, which was fairly representative of most of the flatwoods soils in Florida, the average annual calcium loss from the surface six inches of soil was equivalent to about 200 pounds per acre of agricultural limestone. This rate of calcium loss was measured at a soil pH of 5.8 to 6.0. Of particular interest was the fact that calcium losses from the surface six inches increased with higher pH levels so that annual lime (D Z U z) In 0 IU 0 0 z z 11,000 10,000 9,000 8,000 pH pH pH PASTURES WITH clover in abundance can be seen in Palm Beach County. This scene is from one of K. D. Eatmon's pastures near Loxahatchee. losses approximated 500 pounds per acre at a soil pH of 7.0. Excess Lime Wasteful THIS INCREASED calcium loss at higher soil pH levels makes it wasteful and more costly to maintain the soil reaction much above the pH 5.8 to 6.0 level necessary for optimum clover-grass production. To maintain a soil pH of 5.8 or higher for an established white clover-grass pasture will require 1/2 to one ton of agricultural limestone every five years. Such a program constitutes a very minor part of the cost of good pasture maintenance but in a clover-grass pasture it is a major factor in obtaining maximum quality and quantity of herbage. 7.0 5Y2 tons lime/acre 6.7 4 tons lime/acre 6.2 2Y2 tons lime/acre 5', tfi. i.c, pH 5.8 H 5*1 pH 5.4 pH 5.6 o PH 5.4 PH 5.0. pH 4.7 7,000 I6,000 I I '58 YEARS DIAGRAM OF effects of lime rates and soil pH changes on annual oven-dry herbage production from white clover-Bahia grass pasture. The Florida Cattleman I I I I I I I I I '59 '60 '61 '62 '63 '64 '65 '66 '6/ L e 28

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Now -Made in TO MEET THE FEEDING NEEDS IN FLORIDA AND THE SOUTHEAST To better serve you, we have just completed our new Tampa facility a SUPER-MOL FLY CONTROL BLOCKS-Controls flies and stomach worms and prevents foot rot. Economical to feed-Self-fed-Saves labor. Also supples Molasses, Major Minerals, Trace Minerals and Vitamins A and D. (Not to be fed to lactacting dairy cows) SUPER-MIN BLOCKS (and sacked Mineral Supplements) for self-feeding on pasture or in confinement. Provides Major Minerals, Trace Minerals and Vitamins A and D. Economical and convenient. See your local distributor, or Write or Call Collect Super-Mo1Divisi Telephone 813 677-9181 J SUPER-LASS-Dried Cane (blackstrap) Molasses on a nutritious carrier ...free-flowing ...for mixing in Beef or Dairy rations. All the benefits of Molasses without the problems associated with wet molasses. SUPER-PRO BLOCKS-Protein Supplements for self-feeding or in confinement ...Supplies balance of Proteins, Minerals and Vitamins to supplement pasture or grains. o SUPER HORSE BLOCKS-Self-fed as a supplement to grain and roughage. Provides a balance of Proteins, Minerals and complete Vitamin fortification. MOLASSES Sn 101R Route 3, Box 498 Tampa, Florida 33619 \* V

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44th Semi Annual SILVER SPURS RODEO July 4, 5, 6 2:30 Friday 8:00 Saturday 2:30 Sunday at the SILVER SPURS ARENA MID-WAY BETWEEN KISSIMMEE & ST. CLOUD ON U.S. 441 4-Lane Highway 50 Acres of Free Parking FEATURING SILVER SPURS "QUADRILLE ON HORSEBACK" SADDLE BRONC RIDING BAREBACK RIDING CALF ROPING STEER WRESTLING BULL RIDING CLOVERLEAF BARREL RACE 12,000 RESERVED SEATS UNDER ROOF $3.00 $2.00 $1.00 For Rodeo Reservations Contact: Pat Allen's Insurance 124 Broadway Phone 305 847-5118 or 847-5119 Kissimmee COWS AND CALVES at Rock Hollow Farm clean up the green chop that's delivered fresh cut to pasture and leave very little on the ground. Irrigate Crops (Continued from page 25) for turning to irrigated winter forage and silage is to keep things level after his Coastal Bermuda and Coast cross summer pastures are gone. These grasses grow well on the farm's Lakeland fine sand soil from June to September and at times on into November when there is sufficient moisture. He observed that "the new Coast cross looks like it has the palatability and productivity of Pangola grass, or close to it, with greater frost resistance than Pangola." His success with growing the grasses goes back to good fertilization, coupled with careful control of grazing so that the grasses are neither overgrazed nor undergrazed. In the winter, after frost gets to the pasture grasses, there remains what Crane calls "standing hay or frosted grass." A molasses and urea supplement is fed to the cattle then and it seems to give them a taste for the "frosted grass." The breeding program at Rock Hollow is established so that the cows start calving in December. Feeding of rye or Rye grass, oats and hay is started with the arrival of the new calf crop. This is part of the background from which Crane reached his decision to go with an irrigation program. He explained, "We couldn't see irrigating a lot of acres, but to get the maximum production per on this small acreage, we felt we must have irrigation." Costs run to not less than $30 per acre, and with irrigation, to $45 per acre, Crane figures. This includes the heavier fertilization and heavier seeding. The ultimate goal is the production of at least 35 tons of forage per acre per year on the irrigated land, Crane pointed out. He said, "I see no way we can do this on a hay system or on a grass system." The carrying rate of pastures under the previous system was three acres to the cattle unit. Under the new system, the carrying capacity has been changed to two cow units per acre and Crane confidently feels that he will be able to eventually carry a unit per acre. In Florida, under conditions where water tables don't permit use of seepage irrigation, this represents a significantly favorable ratio of cattle to land. Looking Ahead CRANE BELIEVES the sprinkler irrigation method is the most efficient, and that it will do the job of providing feed for the cattle in a shorter time than previously, and with added tonnage. Going from being strictly a producer of beef to a combination rancher-farmer has nettled Crane a bit as he doesn't consider himself a farmer in the sense of the word. But he sees the value in the step he's taken and is willing to assume the role to attain the goal of more beef production. Crane speculates that the operation might eventually become a "semi-drylot" one, with six months of mechanical feeding and six months of grazing in a year's time. A number of different crop varieties have been experimented with at the farm including Florida Black Rye; Florida 500 oats; Florida 501 oats; Elbon rye; Pennington Winter Grazer rye; McNair's Vita Grazer rye, an experimental "8-11" rye (the last three all being hybrids), and Gulf Rye grass. With the good results received this season from the rye, it appears that it will be used heavily along with oats and Rye grass together to make up the major portion of forage production each spring. Looking to the future, Crane says that in addition to feeding the cow herd, the farm may feed out bulls and may also get into the feedlot business with the steers it raises. At any rate, conditions look promising for Rock Hollow's cattle, with crops being raised for feed 12 months of the year under a modern system of overhead irrigation. As Crane puts it, "The land will never be idle." PLANT PINES in Florida for profit. Ask your County Forester. The Florida Cattleman 30

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?H SHORES o JUNE 1 orida I'LEIM iIN for June, 1969 COIN E.1 '10A I

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The Mq rn Equipment For, Tday's Cattleman BOX 728-DR DODGE CITY, KANSAS ELIMINATE HIGH COST OF RANCH LABOR WITH k4'/44 'h ej t Beef Master W-W Calf Cradle CATTLE HANDLING EQUIPMENT Designed For Abuse-No Injury To Cattle sm ouLnC MPLETE LINE OF W-W *-r hue* Portable Corrals O.Cqf Crades Stock Oilers oading hi es Farm and Ranch Scales 9 Feed Bunks Pick-up Stake Racks Branding Iron Heaters AI Loading Chute Pick-up Stake Rack a -RA NC11 Jack Cullison Phone 629-5050 or 629-4759 4900 N.W. Blitchton Rd. OCALA, FLORIDA (U.S. HIGHWAY 27 -JUST WEST OF 1-75)

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Annual Convention Program Florida Cattlemen's Association Palm Beach Shores, Florida WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18 8:30 p.m.-Animal Industry Technical Committee Meet .TBA THURSDAY, JUNE 19 8:00 a.m.-'til-Registration .Colonnades Beach Hotel 9:00 a.m.-Florida Cattlemen's Ass'n Committee Meetings* .Colonnades 12:00 noon-FCA Exec. Com.-Breed Ass'n Pres. and Sec'ys Lunch.Fla. Room (Courtesy Hector Feed Mills) 2:00 p.m.-Florida Cattlemen's Ass'n Directors' Meeting. .Palm Beach Room 2:00 p.m.-Florida CowBelles Business Session .French Room 4:00 p.m.-Address: Honorable Claude Kirk, Governor .Crystal Ball Room 5:00 p.m.-Cattlemen's Sweetheart Swimsuit Revue .Poolside 6:00 p.m.-Get Acquainted Hospitality Hour .Colonnades Lawn (Courtesy Fla. Angus Ass'n and PBCCA) FRIDAY, JUNE 20 7:00 a.m.-Breakfast for the Cattlemen .Marine Terrace (Courtesy Cutter Laboratories) 7:30 a.m.-Florida CowBelles Breakfast .French Room (Courtesy Jo-Su-Li Farms, Colquitt, Georgia) 8:00 a.m.-'til-Registration .Colonnades Beach Hotel 9:00 a.m.-General Business Session .Ocean Room Call to Order: President Charles Lykes Invocation: John R. Sanderson, N'wood United Methodist Church Welcome: Dan Gaynor, Chairman, Board of Commissioners Response: First Vice President R. D. Bennett Program Presiding Officer: R. D. Bennett, 1st Vice President 9:30 a.m.-Committee Reports: (5 minutes maximum) Brand and Theft: John DuPuis Research: R. D. Bennett Beef Grading: Dallas Dort Beef Council: Cedrick Smith, Jr. Marketing: Gene Felton Legislative: Latimer Turner Disease: J. 0. Pearce, Jr. Others 10:00 a.m.-Report by Executive Committee: President Charles Lykes 10:15 a.m.-Preliminary Resolutions Report: Billy Peeples 10:30 a.m.-Presentation of Sweetheart Contestants: JoAnn Smith 11:00 a.m.-Address and Film, John C. Duncan, Jr. 11:30 a.m.-Address: Ray Wilkinson 12:00 noon-Cattlemen's Lunch (Dutch) .Marine Terrace 12:30 p.m.-CowBelles Luncheon and Fashion Show .Palm Beach Room (Courtesy Florida Ass'n of Livestock Markets) 1:30 p.m.-General Business Session .Ocean Room Presiding Officer: T. L. Sloan, 2nd Vice President 1:30 'p.m.-"Livestock Thefts Program," N. H. Gregory, Ala. Dept. of Ag. 1:45 p.m.-"U. of F. Veterinary College" Dr. G. T. Edds 2:00 p.m.-Address: Honorable Doyle Conner 2:45 p.m.-Resolutions Committee Final Presentation and Vote Election of Officers 6:30-7:00 p.m.-Hospitality Party .Colonnades Lawn (Courtesy Dolomite Products Division of Dixie Lime and Stone Co.) 7:00 p.m.-Banquet .Crysstal Ball Room Invocation: Robert Johnson, Lay Leader, Calvary Meth. Church Master of Ceremonies: Ralph Cellon, Jr. Sweetheart Winner Introduction: Commissioner Doyle Conner Drawing for Loin of Beef, Courtesy Florida Beef Council 9:30 p.m.-Dance .Crystal Ball Room (Band Courtesy Caravelle Land and Cattle Company) During the Convention, Enjoy a Coffee Break (Courtesy Singletary Hereford Farms, Blakely, Georgia) Enjoy an Orange Juice Break (Courtesy Ben Hill Griffin, Inc.) FOR THE TEENAGERS Movies, Music, "Do the Milk Thing," Games, Fun (Courtesy U. S. Sugar Corp., Syfrett Feeds and McArthur Jersey Farm) *Meeting Sites Will Be Posted In Colonnades Lobby A Warm Welcome, Cattlemen to Palm Beach County We wish you every best wish for a successful convention and hope you enjoy your visit in the area. BANK OF PAHOKEE "THE OLDEST BANK IN PALM BEACH COUNTY" Pahokee, Florida MEMBER: F.D.I.C. Welcomte We hope you have one of the best conventions yet! Distributor of Pure Oil Products J. E. WILSON & SON, Inc. BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA S Box #836 Ph: 996-2585 for June, 1969 33

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WELCOME FLORIDA CATTLEMEN from Okeechobee and Glades Livestock Markets Pete Clemons, Manager We extend our sincere best wishes for a most successful convention to all our cattlemen friends. If we can be of any assistance to you at any time, please let us know. Okeechobee Livestock Market Auctions Every Tuesday Phone 763-3127 Pete Clemons OKEECHOBEE, FLA. Glades Livestock Market Auctions Every Monday Phone 996-3028 Pete Clemons Harold Brough BELLE GLADE, FLA. CROSSBRED CATTLE at Double D Ranch, Nine Mile Bend, are shown grazing in the Rye grass pastures provided under the ranch program. Palm Beach County Has Strong And Active Cattlemen's Group IN THE almost 30 years of its existence, the Palm Beach Cattlemen's Association has an exceptional record of accomplishments in helping solve some of the many problems facing cattlemen in addition to being a closeknit group in programming various events. The association was originally formed as the Palm Beach County Livestock Producer's Association. The name was changed to the present one in 1945. First president was Roscoe L. Braddock of Belle Glade who served for five years. In addition to Braddock, the original group of men who were instrumental in forming the association included H. L. Speer, Fritz Stein, Sr. (deceased); Howard Haney; John L. Evans (deceased); and M. U. Mounts who was county agent for almost 40 years. Some of the early work was boosting the necessity for drenching cattle and the use of minor elements, both in fertilizer and the mineral box. Other activities included helping with the tick eradication program and the disaster feed program during 1958. The association has been active in putting on barbecues in conjunction with field days held at the Everglades Experiment Station and other events. A recent program put on by the group was a ranch tour type field day held on April 16. The tour started at Double D Ranch at Nine Mile Bend, followed by a visit to the McArthur Jersey Dairy at Loxahatchee 34 and K. D. Eatmon's Loxahatchee ranch. The tour concluded at the Delray Beach ranch of Eatmon. A welcome to Double D Ranch was given by A. Richard Diebold, owner, who introduced Dave Young, the manager and Dudley Diebold, assistant manager. The group saw the pastures where Florida Certified Rust Resistant Rye grass was planted and where the crossbred cattle graze on a rotational basis. The pastures are set up in 70 acre plots and figures out to a cow and a calf per acre or 140 head. The plots are fertilized in the spring and fall with 200 pounds of 0-8-24 per acre. Other grasses in use at the ranch are Argentine Bahia and Coastal Bermuda. The cattle operation is the cow-calf type and Angus, Hereford, Charolais and Santa Gertrudis bulls are used in the crossbreeding program observed. At McArthur's dairy the members were told how the operation functions by Al Stokes, manager. A total of 1000 cows are milked twice a day at the dairy with 100 head in the stanchion barn at a time, 50 on each side. Each 100 cows have their own pasture and replacement heifers are raised on the farm. Complete A.I. is observed in the breeding program. Stokes said that 414 Jersey calves were raised last year and only four were lost. They're started on special feed the day following birth and are raised in 3x5 pens until six weeks old. A total of 1,038.000 gallons of milk was produced at The Florida Cattlensn

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CATTLEM"N' ASSOCIATE N Wekome to your 1969 CONVENTION Your hosts, the members of the Palm Beach County Cattlemen's Association, will be looking forward to seeing you in Palm Beach Shores. Our sincere appreciation to the following for their assistance in sponsoring various events of this convention, for your pleasure and benefit: Gleason Stambaugh & Son, Florida Music Company, West Palm Beach Singletary Farms, Blakely, Georgia Okeechobee Livestock Market, Okeechobee Glades Livestock Market, Belle Glade J. C. Western Supply, Farmers Market, West Palm Beach Caravelle Land & Cattle Company, Loxahatchee A. Duda & Sons, Belle Glade U.S. Sugar Corporation, Clewiston Syfrett Feeds, Lake Park Florida Association of Livestock Markets, Kissimmee Florida Angus Association, Kissimmee Hector Supply Company, Deerfield Beach and Okeechobee McLelland Boot & Saddle Shop, Lake Worth Palm Beach County Commissioners Jo-Su-Li Farms, Colquitt, Georgia Cutter Laboratories Palm Beach County Convention Committee Naco Fertilizer Company, Deerfield Beach a

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Welcome FCA from all of us at Sykes Angus Ranch Here is our main herd sire, Black Watch President 239, son of President, the 1964 International Grand Champion. He has been used extensively in our breeding program and his first calves look just great. While you're down here in our area, why don't you come by for a visit and we'll show you. If you're leaving the convention, take 1-95 South to Okeechobee Road and then West to the Ranch. Performance Tested Cattle Herd is TB and Bang's Accredited SYKES ANGUS RANCH Ph. 683-5134, 683-1464 Rt. 1, Box 358-0 WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA Located at Sunshine State Parkway Exit No. 9 in West Palm Beach GROVE & PASTURE SPREADERS (Also available in 5 & 6 ton models) CONIBEAR EQUIPMENT CO., INC. 7) P. 0. Box 376 Phone 858-4414 LAKELAND, FLORIDA 7 Miles North on U. S. 98 PUREBRED CATTLE numbers are on the increase in Palm Beach County. There are a number of large herds including the Santa Gertrudis cattle of K. D. Eatmon, some of which are shown above. the dairy last year, Stokes told the group. At Eatmon's Loxahatchee ranch, the group was given a pasture tour and saw the Santa Gertrudis cattle and the Quarter Horses. Eatmon and his manager, Harold McLeod, explained the breeding program in effect with the cattle and the procedures observed in the feeding and grazing. A special look at the Quarter Horses selected for Eatmon's annual sale next year was also given the visitors. The group then went to the Delray Beach ranch where owner Eatmon provided a steak dinner before resuming the tour portion of the program. The group next saw the Santa Gertrudis bulls on gain test and the results were exxplained by Eatmon, manager Charles Wolf and Jim Pace, extension animal husbandman, University of Florida. The top-gaining bull averaged 5.07 pounds per day for the 140 day period for 710 pounds total gain. The 26 bulls involved consumed 88,400 pounds of feed. The ranch tour event was concluded with looks at several of the pasture areas carrying the Eatmon purebred Santa Gertrudis cow herds. The Palm Beach County Association has had strong leadership over the years and a healthy membership. Heading the group this year is G. W. "Bud" Putnam of Sawyer Ranch. Vice president is John D. Chamblee and Rayburn K. Price is secretary. Harold McLeod is treasurer and Eatmon is state director. Alternate state director is Putnam. Local association directors are Putnam, Scott L. French; Bill Hair; McLeod; Chamblee; Jimmy Repper and Stokes. Immediate past president is French, who served for two terms. State director Eatmon also served as president for two terms preceding French. The Florida Cattleman 36

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especially in spring You can get everything you need to keep your cattle in top condition through the winter months ahead from Hector Feed Mills. Hector has PASTURE BALANCERS in 26 and 30 percent protein mixes. Use Pasture Balancers to compensate for low quality grass. They keep your protein up so your cattle don't lose weight. They help your cows raise healthy calves and rebreed quickly. We offer a complete range of MINERALS for Florida's climate, and for different soil conditions. Only with the proper mineral balance can you be sure your cattle are getting the full amount of nutrition from roughage and other feeds. Or use VITA-PRO BLOCKS which assure you that your cattle don't fail to get essential vitamins and protein. Keep them available to all animals during the short grass months. They're made to stand Florida's moist climate. 0 L4 .......fo L i 4 JV NJ W; A DIVISION OF HECTOR SUPPLY CO. DEERFIELD BEACH AND OKEECHOBEE, FLA. TELEPHONES: Boca Raton 399-3003, Okeechobee RO 3-3175 Tom Burdsall, Lake Worth 585-2179 Elton Lowe, Lake Placid HO 5-5361 Paul Kelly, Fort Pierce HO 1-4895 Oswald Forsee, Okeechobee RO 3-3175 Rod Peeples, Deerfield Beach 399-3003, or Boca Raton 395-0114

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I HEADQUARTERS HOTEL for the Florida Cattlemen's Association's 1969 convention is the Colonnades located on Singer Island, Palm Beach Shores. It's right on the beach and offers complete facilities for "holiday living." Governor Claude Kirk Will Address Annual Convention FLORIDA CATTLEMEN will see a revamped program and schedule of events at the annual-convention of the association, June 19-20 at Palm Beach Shores. The entire session has been shrunk to two full days with the exception of the Animal Industry Technical Committee meeting which is set for 8:30 p.m. Wednesday night before the conBlang's Ruling Reversed THE FLORIDA Supreme Court has ruled the Florida brucellosis law constitutional, reversing a Martin County Circuit decision rendered last September. Attorney for the original cattlemen defendants, Charles Damsel of West Palm Beach, says that a motion for a rehearing will be filed. The decision in Martin County had been under appeal since early December by the Florida Department of Agriculture. The Supreme Court granted the cattlemen involved-Reuben Carlton, Fort Pierce; H. C. Williamson, Indiantown; and G. W. "Bill" Hair of Belle Glade-15 days in which to seek a rehearing. If the requested hearing is turned down by the court, the ruling will then become final. Damsel said that the Supreme Court overruled the finding of facts by the circuit court, basing its decision in part on a book called Beef Cattle by Snapp and Neumann, fifth edition. Damsel said the book contains a "theory of eradication five years old" and raises the spectre of undulant fever in humans drinking contaminated milk, which "is impossible since pasteurization." Damsel continued, "The court recognized no distinction between reactors and diseased cattle, which was the basis of our defense in court-that a reactor should be proved diseased before slaughter." vention starts on Thursday. All meetings will be held at the Colonnades Beach Hotel, a huge sprawling structure, well designed for the numerous conventions it has hosted. Reservations for rooms should be made direct to the Colonnades, Box 12633, Palm Beach Shores 33403. Advance registration for the convention is being offered for the first time in an effort to eliminate standing in line for credentials on arrival. This will also help the hosting Palm Beach County Cattlemen's Association lay plans for "extra-curricular" activities available for adults and teenagers. Among the special attractions cattlemen can preregister for are deep sea fishing trips, Lion Country Safari, golf, as well as the usual convention meals and activities, including baby sitting service. Thursday REGISTRATION STARTS in the Colonnades lobby at 8:00 a.m., Thursday, June 19. Committee meetings are set for the balance of the morning, with The Florida Cattleman 38

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Art Highie Resigns ART HIGBIE resigned as executive vice president of the Florida Cattlemen's Association effective May 15. He has accepted a similar post with the Mississippi Cattlemen's Association. FCA President Charles Lykes of Tampa said the resignation was accepted regretfully by the association, and that he and the entire association wishes success for Higbie. Higbie was the first full time executive hired by the association. He began with FCA May 15, 1960, assuming the work of the late June Gunn and the late R. Elmo Griffin, both of Kissimmee. Gunn was the corporate secretary of the association and continued until his death in May, 1965. Griffin had been employed by the association part time as assistant secretary from 1947 until his death in May, 1960. Lat Turner, Sarasota, FCA's immediate past president, has been appointed chairman of a committee to receive applications from men interested in the vacated position. He has asked that interested applicants submit three copies of personal and work history to him at FCA headquarters, Box 656, Kissimmee. Turner said, "We are going to take our time and search the field. Art leaves with the office functioning in good shape." room numbers to be posted. At noon, FCA's executive committee will lunch with presidents and secretaries of the various breed associations in Florida, courtesy of Hector Feed Mills at Deerfield Beach. FCA directors will meet at 2:00 p.m. in the Palm Beach Room, and will adjourn to the Crystal Ball Room at about 3:30 p.m., to hear an address by Governor Claude Kirk. Following Kirk's speech, will be a hospitality hour sponsored by the Florida Angus Association and the Palm Beach County Cattlemen's Association. Friday FRIDAY IS a full day beginning at 7:00 a.m., with a breakfast for all cattlemen sponsored by Cutter Laboratories. The registration desk will open at 8:00 a.m. General business session of the membership is called for 9:00 a.m. Reports of standing committees will start at 9:30 a.m., followed by a report by President Charles Lykes of Tampa from the executive committee. The resolutions committee chairman, Billy Peeples of Moore Haven, will make a preliminary report of questionable or controversial resolutions, so the membership may have an opportunity to be heard before presentation for final action. At 110:30 a.m., Mrs. Cedrick (JoAnn) Smith of Micanopy will introduce the Cattlemen's Sweetheart contestants. John C. Duncan, director of Southern Railway System, Washington, D.C. will show a film and comment on the help Southern offers. Ray Wilkinson, a radio farm newscaster from Raleigh, North Carolina, will speak next, after which the meeting will adjourn to a Dutch luncheon for June, 1969 in the Marine Terrace dining room. The afternoon session will reconvene at 1:30 p.m., with a talk by N. H. Gregory, chief of stockyards and brands division of the Alabama Department of Agriculture, speaking on livestock theft problems. Dr. G. T. Edds, director of the veterinary science department at the University of Florida will discuss research on diseases and the proposed veterinary college at the university. Doyle Conner, Florida Commissioner of Agriculture will speak at 2:00 p.m. Final report of the resolutions committee is set for 2:45. Election of officers brought on by the change of the date of the annual convention will be next, followed by the formal approval of the state directors presented by the local associations. At 6:30 p.m., Dolomite Products of Ocala will sponsor its traditional hospitality party, after which the banquet will begin at 7:00 p.m. with the irrepressible Ralph Cellon, Jr., Alachua, acting as master of ceremonies. Feature of the evening will be the presentation of the crown to the winning contestant for the Cattlemen's Sweetheart, by Commissioner Conner. The banquet will be followed by a dance with the orchestra provided by Caravelle Land and Cattle Company, Inc., of West Palm Beach. Saturday THE CONVENTION will officially conclude with the banquet, but shopping and area visits of ranches and entertainment are ample to fill the weekend for those who have the time. Throughout the convention, orange juice will be provided by Ben Hill Griffin, Inc., Frostproof; coffee by Singletary Farms, Blakely, Georgia. 39 -K -K -K -K -K -V For Charolais and larger beef breeds Cattle Squeeze Now, the TECO cattle squeeze available in a longer model to handle the larger beef breeds quickly, and with safety to operator and animal. Automatic, adjustable, portable and efficient. Same famous TECO construction as standard model for the smaller breeds. Write for catalog sheet and prices. Florida Distributor NORRIS CATTLE CO. Box 1088 ....Ph. 622-7151 Ocala, Florida 32670 Registered Angus Performance and semen tested Bulls and select Heifers For Sale Now * * * * * STARDUST RANCH Henry and Jeannette Chitty Phone (Gainesville) 904/372-1650 MICANOPY, FLORIDA

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Welcome FCA To South Florida MANUFACTURERS OF Hughes Beefmaker Hughes 7 Percent Hughes 14 Percent Hughes 21 Percent PASTURE BALANCERS Hughes Protein Supplement HUGHES Feed & Grain Company. Boynton Beach Ph: 732-9712 Okeechobee Ph: RO 3-4110 P. 0. Box 10 BOYNTON BEACH, FLORIDA Greetings, Cattlemen EVERGLADES Farm Equipment, Inc. John Deere Equipment Firestone & Dunlop Tires Caldwell Manta-Ray Mowers Ph: 996-6531 P. 0. Box J BELLE GLADE, FLA. 33430 WELCOME FCA rop in while you're in the rea. We have ... A complete line of boofs, saddles, apparel and accessories for all. Also, STETSON hats. J. C. WESTERN SUPPLY, INC. FARMERS MARKET SUPER DISCOUNT 1200 S. Congress Ave. W. Palm Beach, Fla. PALM BEACH COUNTY has large areas devoted to the raising of ground tomatoes, such as shown here. Palm Beach County's Ag. Picture Looks Bright for Coming Years PALM BFACH County has a land area of 1,265,920 acres with less than 80,000 acres in urban development. The total acreage devoted to agriculture figures out to 1,169,104. Pasture and range land totals 161,658 acres. Two main areas make up the county's agricultural picture with the Coastal area and the Glades area. Vegetables are the main crops in the Coastal area with 41,680 planted acres on approximately 29,523 acres of land. There are 23 dairies with approximately 15,000 cows producing annually 120,000,000 pounds of milk. Cut flowers and sod operations occupy around 2400 acres and 18,000 acres of new citrus has been planted in the past four years. Kent Price, assistant county agent, points out that due to double-cropping over part of the land, 41,680 acres were harvested. Most of the double-cropping was by beans. The estimated payroll in the Coastal area comes to $26,500,000. The Glades area is noted for its sugar cane and winter salad vegetables. In 1966-67 there were some 20 different varieties of vegetables reported on 78,830 acres. Estimated worth of the 23,761 carlots involved is $48,646,852. Raising of sugar cane has been on the increase in the Glades with 632,976 tons of sugar produced on 173,114 acres in 1967-68. Seven sugar mills are in Palm Beach County. The county produces approximately 85 percent of all Florida's sugar and has an estimated payroll of some $30,000,000. Over 150 farmers are producing cane for these mills. Price says the gross worth of cane and molasses in 1967-68 was estimated at $99,003,914. The Glades area in 1960 had a large number of beef cattle. These dropped CowBelles' Meetings Set FLORIDA CowBELLES Association members will have their usual full schedule of meetings and entertainment along with FCA members at the annual convention, June 19-20, at the Colonnades Hotel, Palm Beach Shores. The program and schedule of events is as follows: THURSDAY, JUNE 19 8:00 a.m. 'til-Registration .Hotel Lobby 2:00 p.m.-General Business Meeting (all ladies invited) .French Room 5:00 p.m.-Sweetheart Contestants Swim Suit Revue .Poolside FRIDAY, JUNE 20 7:30 a.m.-Florida CowBelles Breakfast .French Room (Courtesy Jo-Su-Li Farms, Colquitt, Georgia) 10:00 a.m.-Sweetheart Contestants Coke Party* .Colonnades Hotel 12:30 p.m.-Luncheon and Fashion Show .Palm Beach Room (Courtesy Florida Ass'n of Livestock Markets) *Site will be posted in lobby of Colonnades Hotel The Florida Cattleman 40 'D a

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THE FLY IS A PROFIT ROBBER STOP HIM WITH THE ALL NEW qzz ANTI-FLY BLOCK Start Today! Put your cattle on JAZZ Anti-Fly Block, containing all the necessary mineral .vitamin ..protein supplement. ..and medication content needed to do the job. Easy and convenient to feed ...prevents the breeding of horn flies in the droppings of treated cattle. Aids in the prevention of stomach worms, hook worms and nodular worms. Also, aids in preventing foot rot and lumpy jaw. ISN'T IT TIME TO GET RID OF THE PROFIT ROBBERS! zz20% zz 37% Protein Horse Block Supplement Block Start now! Balance your pastures with Packed with high energy feed, balJAZZ 20% Horse Block. Easy and anced with high quality proteins from convenient to feed ...supplies the natural resources, supplemented with needed protein, mineral and vitamin minerals and vitamins. Free choice supplement for horses of all ages! feeding. Convenient and labor-saving. Feed free choice to horses in training, ...Buy some soon! on pasture, or stall-fed. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ...CONTACT YOUR LOCAL FEED DEALER OR ... COSBY-HODGES MILLING COMPANY 501 HAMES STREET, ORLANDO, FLA. 32802 PHONE 305/241-3353 a foo'd Colle'en ttk, Cattlemen. .and while you're looking over the fertile Palm Beach County area, remember that we supply what nature doesn't! Why not give us a call for satisfying service? W. R. G RACE &co. AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS FORT PIERCE TAMPA I,,, Y'S

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WEDGWORTH'S INC. SINCE 1932 Ph. 996-2076 Cattle Minerals Cane Molasses Fertilizers Pesticides 996-7635 SOUTH BAY EQUIPMENT COMPANY U.S. 27 at N.W. Ist St. South Bay, Florida STALNAKER FARM & RANCH SUPPLY, INC. TAMPA, FLORIDA PHONE COLLECT 248-6238 P. 0. Box 172 Come see us at 33rd and East Broadway, Tampa. Largest Inventory of Fencing for Farm & Ranch in Florida FARM FENCING BARBED WIRE GAUCHO BARBED WIRE POULTRY NETTING FARM GATES -Galvanized steel, wood panel, wire filled, aluminum. FENCE POSTS -Steel, pressure treated, creosoted. ORNAMENTAL LAWN FENCE GALVANIZED ROOFING Republic Steel Blue Ridge Channel Drain -29 gauge. Also 2/2 inch corrugated roofing. WELDED WIRE HARDWARE CLOTH NAILS -Bright or galvanized. STAPLES FREE DELIVERY PALM BEACH COUNTY'S coastal area alone accounts for 23,450 acres of beans planted in 1967-68. some because of the sugar cane expansion, but 1968 numbers are back up to the previous levels. The Glades development in agriculture has been influenced by the work of the Everglades Experiment Station at Belle Glade. Intensive cattle and vegetable research has been done at the station. With cattle production coming back up the estimate for the future appears bright with at least 35,000 head moved on new ranch operations during the past three years. Other ranches with drops in numbers in 1961 have also been increasing during the same period. There's no doubt that farming-including the raising of beef cattleis big business in Palm Beach County. Income in 1967-68 from agriculture totaled $223,526,510, of which over $6 million came from the beef cattle industry segment. Dairy production brought over $8 million. Agri-business accounts for a substantial part of the income with $36,200,000 coming from fertilizer, seed, feed and insecticide sources and another $9 million plus coming from landscaping and landscape service. The estimated labor payroll in 1967-68 for agriculture came to $78,500,00. Price says another 200,000 acres are available for agricultural development in the county and says that much of the land is quite suitable to the expanding beef industry. And he looks for the beef industry to grow even more in the next 10 years or so. He predicts a bright future for overall agriculture in Palm Beach County. FLORIDA HAD an estimated 60,000 cattle and calves on feed as of January 1, 1969, down three percent from a year ago. SAND PINE seedlings are well suited for transplanting on deep sand sites. The Florida Cattleman 42

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Welcome to Palm Beach County! FCA Mid-Year Conference JUNE 19-20 Palm Beach County Everglades soil still holds the record for pounds of beef production per acre per year. We're proud to join with the Palm Beach County' Cattlemen's Association in welcoming the cattlemen of Florida to growing Palm Beach County for another convention. It's a pleasure to have you here! ~~y~ ~ ~ ~ E. DAN GAYNOR, CHAIRMAN GEORGE V. WARREN, Vice Chairman ROBERT C. JOHNSON ROBERT F. CULPEPPER E. W. "BUD" WEAVER

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IT'S NOT HOW BIG YOU GROW THEMIt's How Quick You Grow'em Big welcome * cattlemen to Palm Beach County. We're going all the way to help you enjoy the convention. Hope you have a good meeting and a good time. While you're here, take time to stop by our ranches to look over our Santa Gertrudis cattle and our Quarter Horses. You may see some surprises if you aren't familiar with good Santa Gertrudis and Quarter Horses. Make your Calves bigger quicker, with Santa Gertrudis bulls. Whether you're selling vealers, feeder calves, grass fed steers, or bulls for commercial cattlemen to use -you'll get more pounds and more dollars with Santa Gertrudis. Let us show you some profit building bulls and heifers. You have everything to gain from a visit to our ranches.

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Introduce Your Best Mares to BEN de BAR 273,557-1961 Sorrel BEN de BAR is by Gay Bar King who is by Three Bars. He has been at stud in Texas since maturity, but with just a little training he is already responding better than we could have hoped. He's bred to show and perform and he'll do it. So will his colts. Look him over and try him on your top mares. Private Treaty. See our Santa Gertrudis at the Delray Ranch south of Delray Road on Military Trail. Quarter Horses and other Santa Gertrudis are at the Loxahatchee Ranch of McArthur's Dairy off Hwy. 441 and 98. Phone Pompano Beach 9426728. 413 N. E. 12th Avenue, Pompano Beach. X %

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BE OUR GUEST! kelcomne to Ou' #1ipitality &uP ARAGONITE o FAIRFIELD SLAG 996-6701 ROYAL FERTILIZER AND CHEMICAL CO. U.S. 27 at N.W. 1st St. South Bay, Florida SUPPORT THE A dertise! For Your Liquid Fertilizer Program MEINCKE "LIQUI-SPRED" truck mounted or tractor drawn nitrogen applicator or complete mix fertilizer applicator. 3 Models: 1000-1250-1600 gallon capacities .all fiberglass tanks, stainless steel agitators ..MP Flomax transfer pumps with Kohler all iron engine ..32 Ft. wide manual gravity boom system with dribble or flooding nozzles. M EINCKE Tel. Tavares 904/343-2641 SPREADER WORKS ASTATULA, FLA. 32705 CONVENTION committee chairman Scott L. French, at right, and Rayburn K. Price, assistant county agent, Palm Beach County, did yeoman work in arranging the 1969 FCA convention activities. FCA By-Laws To be Changed MEMBERS OF the Florida Cattlemen's Association will vote on a proposed by-laws change at the annual convention in Palm Beach Shores, June 19-20. The amendment, if adopted, will call for the annual meeting to be held in June of each year rather than October as has been the rule. Full text of the proposed amendment is as follows: "Sec. 2. The annual meeting of the Corporation shall be held in the month of June each year, and site for the next annual meeting shall be selected at this time, unless by action of the Board of Directors the date for the annual meeting may be changed and the membership is given written notice of such change at least thirty days prior to the time of such meeting. At this annual meeting the membership shall elect by a majority vote such officers as are provided for in the charter of this Corporation and shall transact such other business as may be properly brought before the meeting. At this annual meeting, the members shall confirm by a majority vote the members who are to serve on the Board of Directors." President Charles Lykes of Tampa has issued a plea to all members to make a special effort to attend the convention and suggests that the site and program will be of special interest to families. SINCE 1928, Florida's reforestation program has included the planting of two billion pine seedlings. TREES FOR tomorrow must be planted today. The Florida Cattleman 46

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Get Details From Danny Yant Box 10A, Hibernia Rt. Green Cove Springs, Fla. 32043 Ph. (904) 284-3982 Walter Oelfke 3385 10th Ave., North Palm Springs, Florida 33460 Ph. (305) 965-9384 John Kagel Route 3, Box 232-B Lake Worth, Florida 33460 '-1

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qeeting and Welcome Florida Cattlemen to your annual Convention here in Palm Beach County The staff of Big B Ranch wish to take this opportunity to extend our best wishes to you all., We know that you will enjoy your visit to the area and sincerely hope that you will have a most successful meeting for 1969 here in Palm Beach County. IG RANCH Alvaro Sanchez, Jr., General Manager P.O. Box 99 BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA 33430 Located 15 miles south of South Bay on Hwy. 27 CHUTES for CATTLEMEN (1) It can be used for all size animals, with both sides squeezing, and the sides easily movable to provide more or less space; (2) All side bars drop down -but are secured sa they can't get lost; (3) Floor is cleated to prevent slipping, and there's a blind at the front and so cattle won't attempt to jump out; (4) There are several special features: a drenching pully, leg catching hook, and a rocking tail gate with off-center spring which holds it both open and shut, but requires no latches. TRIANGLE IRON WORKS Phones: EV 5-0540, EV 5-0040 Owner: L. E. Selph, Jr. BOX 525, SEBRING, FLORIDA COMMISSIONER of Agriculture Doyle Connor, left, and his counterpart in Alabama, Commissioner Richard Beard, met recently in Montgomery, Alabama, and Alabama pledged its cooperation in Florida's cattle theft enforcement program. Alabama Pledges Support In Theft Program ALABAMA HAS pledged its cooperation and support to Florida in assisting in the creation of a strengthened cattle theft enforcement program. Alabama's Department of Agriculture and Industries, through its Commissioner Richard Beard and his staff, will be working closely with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Broward Coker, recently appointed by Commissioner Doyle Conner as the Department's chief livestock theft investigator. A meeting was held recently in Montgomery, Alabama, with Conner, Coker, Dr. Clarence L. Campbell, director of the FDA division of animal industry; Robert Chastain, FDA attorney; Joe Hilliard, member of the FCA brands and theft conunittee, and Art Higbie, executive vice president of the Florida Cattlemen's Association. The meeting was hosted by the Alabama Cattlemen's Association. Conner and his staff explained Florida's existing program and planned operations for cutting cattle theft losses to Florida cattlemen, estimated at $3.5 million yearly. W. H. Gregory, of the Alabama department's livestock and prands division, explained the Alabama cattle theft laws and how they are administered. The Alabama officials gave the Florida representatives several suggestions on protective measures that should be observed. Also that all cattlemen should become acquainted with local law enforcement officials. 48 The Florida Cattleman

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NOW IN FLORIDA ichearbrnook 4ngau We are pleased to take this opportunity and announce the expansion of Schearbrook Angus into Florida, an area we consider to be of vital importance to the ever-growing cattle industry. Schearbrook of Florida at Lake Worth will be managed by Andy Jones. Your visit and inspection will be welcomed. With this announcement goes our best wishes to the Florida Cattlemen's Association for a most successful and fruitful 1969 convention. Including Florida, Schearbrook Angus now operates at five locations in the U.S. We feature the breeding of JONAH 5,000,000, 1965 International Junior Champion, 1966 Denver Grand Champion, 1966 Dixie National Grand Champion, 1966 International Reserve Grand Champion; H H EILEENMERE 44, 1967 American Royal Grand Champion, 1968 Fort Worth Reserve Grand Champion, (He has Never Been Defeated in Class); BARDOLIERMERE WWF 51, 1962 Tulsa National Grand Champion, 1962 Eastern National Grand Champion, 1962 Dallas Grand Champion, 1963 National Western class winner. A quality selection of full 12 month old and younger, bull calves by Jonah and the Fabulous Fifty-First are presently available at all of our Schearbrook Angus locations. Make your selection now! Our Tenth ANGUSversary Sale will be held Thursday, September 18th at the Headquarters in Ohio. SCHEARBROOK OF FLORIDA Andy Jones, Mgr. Rt. 3, Box 1052 LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA 305/965-1473 Located 4 mile South of Lantana on Highway 441. GENE SCHEAR Managing Partner Home 513/837-8085 GENERAL OFFICES RR 1, Box 415, Clayton, Ohio Phone: 513/837-4128 Certified and Accredited Herds CHARLES HARA General Manager RR 1, Box 415 Clayton, Ohio Office 513/837-4128 Home 513/837-6533

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We/come Cattlemen to South Florida and Palm Beach County ACRICULTURAL CHEMICALS GLADES CHEMICAL 1000 No. Farmers Market Road, Ph: 924-7107 PAHOKEE, FLORIDA South Florida Headquarters for Ford Tractors & Implements e Oliver Tractors & Implements Servis Rotary Mowers Land Rovers Welcome, Cattlemen to Palm Beach County HENDRY TRACTOR COMPANY Ph. 305/996-6771 Drawer H BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA For The Very Best In Service QUICK THOROUGH ON TIME REASONABLE GLADES FEED & FARM SUPPLIES, INC. POULTRY, LIVESTOCK & FARM SUPPLIES 901 W. Canal St. North Phone 996-3024 BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA 0The Florida Cattleman Sharlene Perry Active Mother and CowBelle by MRS. ALAN J. BECKER SHARLENE PERRY, third vice president, Florida CowBelles Association, leads a busy, active life centered primarily around family, ranch and church. But you'll also find her going to junior college, substitute teaching, bowling, 'politicking' and what have you. The family, husband G. C., Jr., sons Greg, 11, and Mark, nine, and Sharlene's brother, Ted, make their home on the Flying G Ranch two miles north of Belleview in their n e w l y enlarged a n d remodeled home, and where the kids are encouraged to invite their friends out to romp in the open spaces. They MRS. PERRY all think the cow pasture is a wonderful ball field. Greg and Mark are in Little League, Sharlene keeps score and announces, and "G. C." assists in the cooking department. During the summer, they all enjoy swimming and skiing and try to spend some time at their Salt Springs cabin where they also like to net mullet and go crabbing. Music is also a big part of Sharlene's life. The family enjoys having young people in their home for "singins" and hearing their folk music. Brother Ted is minister of musicyouth director at the Wyomina Baptist Church in Ocala and Sharlene is music-youth director at the Belleview First Baptist Church where "G.C." teaches Sunday School and Greg and Mark are also active. A native Floridian, Sharlene was born in Webster and attended high school there. She was a majorette and was in the band. She was also active in sports and won several medals, primarily in basketball. Since, she has also won several trophies for league bowling, but now open bowls for fun. She has made her home in Belleview since her marriage in 1953. Aside from her duties with the state CowBelles, Sharlene is also second vice president and beef promotion chairman of the Marion County CowBelles. .50

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FL --~ --m -~ FEEDER M STOCEER AUCTION SALES F Cattle and Calf Sales Feeder Calf Sale Fri., July 11 Glades Livest6ck Market, Belle Glade Fla. S' Gertrudis Feeder Calf Sale Fri., July 25 Glades Livestock Market, Belle Glade Manatee Ass'n Feeder Stocker Sale Fri., Aug. 1 Cattlemen's Livestock Market, Tampa 1st Stocker-Feeder-Veal Sale Fri., Aug. 8 Mils Livestock Market, Ocala Mid-Fla. Feeder Calf-Yearling Sale (Including Santa Gertrudis Crosses) Fri., Aug. 15 Mid-Fla. Livestock Market, Orlando Madison Ass'n Feeder Sale Fri., Aug. 22 Madison Livestock Market, Madison St. Lucie-Okeechobee Steer Calf Sale and Board Sale Fri., Aug. 22 Okeechobee Livestock Mkt. Highlands-Hardee Feeder Calf Sale Sat., Aug. 23 Hardee Livestock Market, Wauchula 1st Columbia Feeder Calf Sale Tues., Aug. 26 Columbia Livestock Mkt., Lake City Jackson Ass'n Feeder Calf Sale Thurs., Aug. 28 West Fla. Livestock Mkt., Marianna Jefferson Ass'n Feeder Sale Fri., Aug. 29 Monticello Livestock Market Leon Ass'n Feeder Calf Sale Thurs., Sept. 4 Gadsden Co. Livestock Mkt., Quincy Florida Angus Feeder Calf Sale Fri., Sept. 5 Gainesville Livestock Market Suwannee Valley Feeder Sale mu Florida Feeders Perform Well in the Corn Belt Many thousands of Florida Angus and Hereford crosses have now been fed out in other states with good results. One group fed complete mixed-in roughage rations averaged 2.4 pounds average daily gain. Another fed on corn silage, supplement, and grain gained 2.15 pounds. We stand ready to help you buy Florida Feeders with quality and do-ability to perform for you. Some sales are mixed. Buyers should contact the livestock market for specific information on quality and number selling. Sat., Sept. 6 Suwannee Co. Livestock Mkt., Live Oak Feeder-Stocker-Veal Sale Wed., Sept. 10 Kissimmee Livestock Market NW Fla. Ass'n Feeder Calf Sale Thurs., Sept. 11 Jay Livestock Auction Mkt., Jay Marion Ass'n Feeder Calf Sale Fri., Sept. 12 Mills Livestock Market, Ocala Hereford & Cross Feeder Calf Sale Fri., Sept. 19 Gainesville Livestock Market 2d Columbia Feeder Calf Sale Tues., Sept. 23 Columbia Livestock Mkt., Lake City Polk Ass'n Feeder Calf Sale Fri., Sept. 26 Cattlemen's Livestock Mkt., Lakeland 2d Stocker-Feeder-Veal Sale Fri., Oct. 3 Mills Livestock Market, Ocala BROCHURE, WRITE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MARKETING DIv. MAYO BLDG. TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION, FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF LIVESTOCK MARKETS,@ WITH COOPERATION OF THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DA

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On Special Feeder Sales in Florida: Each season since 1962, special feeder calf sales have been held with growing success. A total of 173 sales have been held at the livestock auction markets across the State with a total of 137,179 head being sold for $13,603,600.00 in those years. This year 20 sales have been scheduled and it is expected that 20,000 head will be sold. Your Markets Association is proud to participate in these sales and happy to cooperate with the Florida Cattlemen's'Association and the Florida Department of Agriculture in establishing these events. And we welcome the opportunty of being of service to the industry again this year. CONTACT ANY OF THESE MARKETS, ALL MEMBERS OF THE STATE ASSOCIATION Arcadia State Livestock Market Auctions Every Wednesday Pat Kelly, Mgr., Ph. 929-3151, 928-6901 ARCADIA, 33821 Glades Livestock Market Auctions Every Monday Pete Clemons, Mgr. e Ph. 996-3028 BELLE GLADE, 33430 Chipley Livestock Company Auctions Every Tuesday E. D. (Buddy) Neel, Mgr. Ph. 638-0267, 638-4498 CHIPLEY, 32428 Gainesville Livestock Market Cattle Auctions Every Mon-Wed. Hog Auctions Every Tuesday J. W. "Buddy" Clark, Mgr. e Ph: 372-3442 GAINESVILLE, 32601 Tindel Livestock Market Auctions Every Monday Clyde Crutchfield, Mgr. James Ezell 0 Buddy Williams Phone 263-3224 GRACEVILLE, 32440 Jay Livestock Auction Auctions Every Tuesday Horace McCurdy, Mgr. Phones 675-8585, 675-6274 JAY, 32565 Kissimmee Livestock Market Auctions Every Wednesday Kenneth Caldwell, Mgr. -847-3521 KISSIMMEE, 32741 Columbia Livestock Market Auctions Every Thursday H. Tom Willis, Mgr., Ph. 752-1874 LAKE CITY, 32055 Cattlemen's Livestock Markets Monday 9 Sales Tuesday Harry McCollum, Mgr. Tampa 626-5164 Lakeland 682-0117 TAMPA, 33609 and LAKELAND, 32340 Suwannee Valley Livestock Market Auctions Every Wednesday J. Jones & C. Moore Ph. 362-1702 LIVE OAK, 32060 Madison Stockyards Auctions Every Tuesday George Townsend, 973-2310, 929-4605 MADISON, 33801 West Florida Livestock Market Auctions Every Tuesday Floyd Harris, Mgr. Phone 482-2229 MARIANNA, 32446 Monticello Livestock Market Auctions Every Monday W. C. Hawkins, Mgr. Phone 997-1711 MONTICELLO, 32344 Mills Livestock Market Hog Auction Every Wednesday Cattle Auction Every Thursday Clarence Mills, Manager Phone 622-4454, 629-3662 OCALA, 32670 Mid-Florida Livestock Market Auctions Every Monday Gilbert Tucker, Mgr. Phone 425-0432 ORLANDO, 32806 Okeechobee Livestock Market Auctions Every Tuesday Pete Clemons, Mgr. 9 Phone 763-3127 OKEECHOBEE, 33472 Paxton Livestock Cooperative Auctions Every Monday Phone: 4-5853 PAXTON, FLA. Gadsden County Livestock Market Auctions Every Wednesday Wayne Henry, Mgr. o Phone 627-8627 QUINCY, 32351 Interstate Livestock Auction Market, Inc. Sale every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. Phones 689-2424, 689-5995 G. H. Robison, President SEFFNER, 33584 Hardee Livestock Market, Inc. Auctions Every Thursday Jack Duncan, Mgr. Phone 773-9747 WAUCHULA, 33873 Sumter County Farmers Market Auctions Every Tuesday Lamar Hall e Ph. 793-2021 WEBSTER, 33597 For Further Information about Florida Livestock Auction Markets, Contact S Affiliated with the Certified Livestock Market Association Livestock Exchange Building, Kissimmee, Florida 32741

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FCA Leaders, Committees Are Listed FCA OFFICERS: President-Charles P. Lykes, Tampa; First Vice President-R. D. Bennett, Greenwood; Second Vice President-Thomas LI. Sloan, Fort Pierce; 0. L. Partin, Kissiinee. Secretary-J. C. Bass, Okeechobee; Treasurer' Pat Wilson, Frostproof; Executive Vice PresidentArthur L. Highie Kissimmee. Executive Commsittee-All officers; Lat Turner, Sarasota; Ralph Cellon, Alachua; Gilbert Tucker, Cocoa; Cedrick Smith, Jr., Micanopy. Past Presidents-G. H. Rather, Kissimmee (deceased) P. E. Williams, Davenport; Dave Turner, Bradley Junction (deceased); Irlo Bronson, Kissimmee; C. S. Radebaugh, Orlando; Ben Hill Griffin, Jr., Frostproof; J. B. Starkey, St. Petersburg; 13. J. Alderman, Grandin; Alto Adams, Jr. Fort Pierce; J. t. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee; Louis Gilbreath, St. Augustine; George Keipfer, Deer Park (deceased); Ralph Cellon, Sr., Alachua; W. 1). Roberts, Immokalee; Lat Turner, Sarasota. Honorary Directors-J. F. Sumner, Wimauma; J. A. Landrusm, Brooksville (deceased); A. C. Wright, Arcadia W. W. Carlton, Fort Pierce: C. A. Fulford, Okeechobee; it. Roberts, lima mokalee; S. A. Snyder, St. Augustine; W. F. Tilton, San Mateo; J. R. Henry, Ta pa; Ned Folks, Dunnellon; G. E. Bronson, Kissimmee (deceased); T. W. Brown, Webster: C. L. Murgan, Wewahitchka (deceased); J. Q. Thonmpson. Brandon (deceased): F. V. Whidden. Bradlevx J. D. Williams, Ocala; W. M. O'Dell, Oxford (deceased); Henry 0. Martin, Kissimnee; George C. Perry, Oxford; Walter F. Bronson, Orlando; Nathan Holmes, Fort Pierce; B. E. Alderman, Sr., Fort Pierce (deceased); James Durrance, Basinger: W. E. Pearce, Wauchula. J. J, Bronson, Kissimmee (deceased); John B. Daugharty, DeLand; P. 1.a Fore, Oxford (deceased); W. tM. Larkin, Dade City; Cedrick M. Smith, Sr., Wacahoota (de. ceased); 1-1. 1. Wolfe, St. Augustine; 13. B. Beck, Sanford; Charles S. Lee, Oviedo; 1. A. Krusen, Zephyrhills (deceased); G. E. Barkoskie, Fellsmere; J. A. Barthle, San Antonio; D. E. Cannon, San Antonio; A. B. Folks, Martel; W. F. Ward, Avon Park; V. E. Whitehurst, Williston; J. 0. Pearce, Sr. Okeechobee; L. R. Becker, Fort Pierce; W. M. Bridges, Clermont; C. H. Downs, Sarasota (deceased); N. B. Jackson, Sebring; R. E. Maxwell, Umatilla; A. B. Merritt, Okahumpka; John Norman, Okeechobee; Henry D. Perry, Hollywood; Luther S. Remsberg, Fort Lauderdale; Herman Turner, Sarasota; Dr. Tons Chaires, Bradenton (deceased); John N. McClure, Bradenton Ralph L. Griggs, Oxford (deceased): D. R. Crum, Plant City; J. R. Hammett, Dade City; It. L. Gainer, Cottondale: R. W. Kidder, Belle Glade; Dr. W. G. Kirk. Ona; II. -I. Ochiltree. Wildwood; H. D. Ryals, Fort Ogden; George Sewell, Cottondale; M. A. Smith, Avon Park. Chairmen and Members Of State Committees AMERICAN NATIONAL CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION-Charles Lykes, Tampa, memtier of board of directors; Lat Turner, Saraisota, member of board of directors; Cushman Radebaugh, Fort Pierce, past president. AMERICAN NATIONAL CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIPS-Lat Turner, Chairman, lit. 2, Box 333, Sarasota; Mrs. T. L. Sloan, Vice Chairman, Fort Pierce: Cushman Radebauqh, Sr., Fort Pierce; Alto Adams, Jr. Fort Pierce B. T. Longino, Jr., Sarasota; Carey Carlton, Jr., Sebring; Seth Aldemnan, Wimauma. ANIMAL RESEARCH-R. 1). Bennett, Chairian, Greenwood; L. H. Hawkins, Vice Chairman Sarasota; Ben Hill Griffin Jr., Frostproof: Donald McfIean, Babson Park; Dr. Charles Murfllhy. Largo; J. 0. Pearce, Jr., Okeechoee; Dr. H. E. Henderson, Wauchula; Billy Crum. Bartow; Dr. Robert L. Caldwell, Haines City: 1. 1). Odom, Stake; Fred Mosntsdeoca, Moore Haven; Ralph Sexton, Vero Beach; It. E. Padgett, Lake Wales; G. C. Perry, Belleview; C. D. Jernigan, Milton; Raymson Tucker, Bunnell; Dr. Robert Love, Monticello. BEEF GRADING-Dallas Dort. Chairman, 3466 Gulfmnead Drive, Sarasota; Elliott Whitehurst, Vice Chairman, Williston; John Alexander, Zolfo Springs; J. B. Frazer, Jr., Lake City; R. B. Oxer, Lake Placid; Max Hammond, Winter Haven; G. C. Perry, Belleview; Charles Hardee. Chiefland: J. H. "Bill" Nichols, Oxford, Phillip P. Hood, Brooksville; John DuPuis, Miami: Harol McLeod. Loxahatchee; B. Edmund David, Winter Haven: S. L. Crochet, Clewiston; Russell Lauck, Sarasota; Martin Whidden, Bradley; Tommy Clay, Palatka. BRANDS AND THEFTS-John DuPuis, Chairman, 6000 NW 32nd Ave., Miami: J. .Norvell, Vice -Chairman, Fort Pierce; W, v". "Mike' Vaai Ness, Inverness; Maurice Carlton, Wauchula; Marty Whidlaen, Bradley J1unct ion: Gene Felton, LaBelle; Billy P'eeples, Moor' Haven:a It. C. Dies.sel Sebring. Gilbert Harkiaskia', FelIsosere; Ray ltaulerson. Okeechobee B. J. Alderman, GIrand n; M. M. O~verstreet, Kissimmnee; Elvin agtiogairtv, I landd Coshnian I ailelatg Jr., Fort P iece; I) Clayton Welch, Cross City; 'Latimer 11, 'T'rner, Sarasota; George L. Carlisle, Green Cove SpringsW. (. Kilbee. Geneva; W. D Roberts, Immokalee Cletus Andrews, Bonifay; Donald S, McLean. Baba son Park; Ed Yarbrough Tallahassee; Albert Austin, Inunokalee; James H. Hendric, Hialeah Gene Turner, Arcadia: Phil Turner, Arcadia; J. C. Bass, Okeechobee; Pat Wilson. Frostpioof John Turner, Arcadia: J. W. "Buddy" Clark, Gainesville; Jim K. Tillman, Sarasota; Thomas M. Fortson', Fellsmnere; Carl Langford, Tallahassee: John McCarty IDade City; Andy Tucker, Rockledge; H. H. Pa rish, Jr., St. Augustine; Harold Einery, Bunnell; Buter Walker, Monticello: Tommy ]tronson, Moore Haven; J. D. Gatlett Jr. Malone; Dion Heet z, Venice; Charles Jenkins, Laheland; Joe Hilliard, Clewiston; Robert Hendry, Orlando, Jaliies 'Ucker, Miami: Broward Coker, Tallahassee IIEED ADVISORY GROUP-1. 1). Beiiett, Pres., Fla. Angos Assn P. 0. Box 8, Greenwood, Andrew L. Duda Ill, Pres., Fla. Brahman Ass'n RI. 1, Box 1370, Cocoa; Zeb Parker, Pres., Southeastern Braogus Ass'n, Rt. 2, Box 91, Sarasota; Dr. Harlan B. Rogers, Pres., Eastern Charolais & Charbray Ass'n, Collins, Miss.; J. Pat Corrigan. Pres., Fla. Hereford Ass'n, Drawer CR, Station 1, Vero Beach; Ed Watson, Pres., Fla. Santa Gertrudis Ass n, P. 0. Box 71, Arcadia; Jack Hooker, Pres., Fla. Shorthorn Ass'n, 605 W. Cherry St., Plant City. BUDGET AND FINANCE-Pat Wilson, Cochairman, Box 65. Frostproof; Thomas L. Sloan Co-chairman, 1033 Orange Ave., Fort Pierce: O. L. "Slim" Partin, Kissimmee: Robert Morris, Gainesville: Earl Gilbert, Parker: 1-. C. Douglas, Jr., Zephyrhills; J. B. Starkey, Sr. Odessa; Lois Gilbreath, St. Augustine: Norman Herron, Naples: J. C. Bass, Okeechobee: Bobi F. Deriso, Tampa; Carlyle Platt, Melbourne; Al Bellotto, Lakeland; Ralph Sumner, Brandon; Charles Lykes, Tampa: BUILDING AND MAINTENANCE -0. I_ "Slim" Partin. Chairman, RI. 1, Box 84, Kissimmlee; Carlyle Platt, Vice Chairman, Melbourne: Irlo Bronson, Kissinuinee; Arthur L. Higbie, Kissimniee: Billy Peeples, Moore Haven; R. B. Williams, Wilmington, Del.: Pat Wilson, Frostproof: Horace Fulford, Ocala. COMMIT'IEE OF 100-Charles Lykes, Delegate, 1'. 0. Box 2879, Tampa; Arthur L. Higbie, Alt. Del., Kissimmee. CONSERVATION OF NATIONAL RESOURCES-Albert Barthle, Chairman, Box 128, San Antonio: W. C. "Bill" Wing, Wildwood; Cedrick Smith. Jr., Micanopy; Henry Mangels, Miami; Jim Flanagan, Kissimmee: William E. Bippa, Jr., Greenville; Swanson Lockhart, St. Augustine; B. T. Longino, Sarasota: S. W. Stout, Sarasota; Marvin Kahin, Sebring: Al BellotIo, Lakeland; Earl Norton, Lake Wales. CONVENTION-Bob Deriso, Chairman, Box 415, Tampa; Ralph Cellon, Sr. Vice Chairmsan, Gainesville; J. B. Starkey Jr., Odessa; Francis Merrifield, Florala, Ala.; Pat Wilson, Frostproof; W. J. Boynton, Taillahassee; John Alexander, Frostproof; Chuck Downs, Sarasota; Bill Padrick. Fort Pierce: Thomas L. Sloan, Fort Pierce; Cedrick Smith. Jr. Micanopy: Vernan Ross, Bristol: J. B. Thornhill, Winter Haven; Gilbert Smith, Cellsisere; Tommy Bronson, Moore Haven: Iob' ert H. Milton, Marianna; Mrs. C. W. Smith, Micanopy; Mrs. T. L. Sloan, Fort Pierce; Carey Carlton, Sebring. FEEDER -Angelo Massaro, Chairman, .51i Bryan Circle, Brandon; Clyde Crutchfield, Vice Chairman, Graceville;. S. L. Crochet, Vice Chairman, U. S. Sugar Corp., Clewiston; W. M. Inman, Quincy; Ray Thompson, Wimauma; Ralph Sexton, Vero Beach; Lynwood Seay, Marianna; Henry Ward. Jr. Live Oak; Willis Evans, Marianna; James Alford, Tallahassee; Ralph Cellon. Jr. Alachua: W. C. Hawkins, Monticello: E. J. Cowan, Mayo; J. B. Starkey, Jr., Odessa; Elbert Shelton, Altha; Robert N. Morris, Gainesville; Jack Haymsan, Wauclsoa; Carl L'Orange, Vero Beach: J. Clayton Welch, Cross City; Bayard Toussaint, Punta Gorda; Lance Ricliburg, Crestview; W. M. Keen, Lake Wales; Robert Over, Lake Placid; Elliott Whitehurst. Williston. FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL COUNCIL-Ralph Cellon, Jr., Delegate, P. 0. Box 457, Alachua; Arthur L. Higbie, Alt. Del., Kissimmee. FLA. AGRICULTURAL TAX COUNCIL-Latimer H. Turner, Delegate, Rt. 1, Box 333, Sarasota; Arthur Bissett, Alt. Del., Winter Haven. FLORIDA BEEF COUNCIL-Cedrick M. Smith, Jr., General Chairman, Rt. 1. Micanopy; John Alexander, Vice Chainan, Frostproof; Robert Price, Jr. N. W. Area Chairman, Graceville; Art Schultz, Central Area, Chairman, Brooker; Carey Carlton, Southern Area Chairman, Sebring; Pat Wilson. Treasurer. Frostproof; Arthur L. 1ligaie, Exec. Sec'y. P. 0. Box 656, Kissimmee, Allied liilr Mesliers; Louaais Gilbert la Bank t ilers .XS ii St \Xoguis isi; I ilbri Tuliiier, I I i As'ii of Liv tock arkes, oco r a ll It J I'la) Dsa r i I I l laaga nl ]e .X s ic.sin F. meald i -i stsa.r.ant As ., Miai i;rs. Fi i;a. I I Ai oiiw lll s As n stlaittn Hl X G I NI XIRIC. l'RAXIlE COUNI .M. E andi]ara Ijelegate, .2, IBia x 581, XW itIl'er I vam i rii I laih All le.,, K -issammtee. HISTORR(A -C sliian Radelagli, Sc., (Iairian, I PO. Box M28, Orlaido: XN. I) ltbl erts, Vice Chairman, laammokalee; J. 1. Starky, Si-., St. IlerslUrg, Irlo Bronson, Kissiiiaiee; 11 0. Iart in Kissimismee, J. 0. Pearce Jr., Iecias eI i al tester PIlt, Melbourne; John IJulais, Miai Sau A. Sivder, St. Augusline; Bobl Gr1illfiii, lFort Pierci' ,1 -lVil Rhodeni. lla hassee W W. Glenn, Nlariamsa, It. M. X'llliims, Iiavard: Mabry Carl ton, Sr., MWatiala IM MOl S-Italph Cellon, Sr, Chairman, RI. 3, Box 8:3. Gainesville; W. I). ]3arron, Vice Chaira, Lalelle; Joe Piest, Ocala; .1. D. Odiais, St aluc Dallas Dort, Sarasota; Harris Fussell, Ialk Cit-; It. 13. Willams, Wilmngton, Del.; Earl CDllarI, Parker; Charles L ykes, ITampa; I. P. I orta, Sr. S>bring. Tommy Muiack, Citra; Fred C. Baacock, 'unta Gorda; Jav Shiier, Apalachicola; Leroy Pressley, Vero Beach; Ira Mason, Clewvistom. LE(GISLATIVE-Lat Turner, Chairman, Et. 2 Box ;333, Sarasota; Irlo Bronson (3 yrs.), Kissimaiee; Gerald Cayson (I yr.) Bliouitstown: uaiis Gilbreath A yrs.), St. AugUStine; Henry Mangels (2 yrs.). Miani; (FCA President, First Vice President and inusaediate Past President are also members). LIVESTOCK DISEASE AND TECHNICALJ. 0. Pearce, Jr., Chairman. 1'. 0. Box 251, Okeechobee; Clyde CrUtchfield, Vice Chairman. Graceville; L. H. "Buck" Hawkins, Sarasota: C. W. A Bellotto, Lakeland; Harris Fussell, Polk City; "Mann' Bailev, Ocala; Pay Raulerson, Okeecho Bunnell; ltAther S. Remssberg, Fort Lauderdale; lace; Gilbert Smith, Fellsmaere Raynaon Tucker, BUInell; Charles Haian, Moore Haven Gene Fulford, Avon Park: Dr. Robert Love, Monticello; 13. J. Alderman, Grandin; Ralph Sumner, Braiilon; Leo Kight, Hastings: 1Lyman Gage, St. AuguIstine; John Finlayson, Greenville; H. C. Douglas, Zephyrhills; Ruelaen Carlton, Fort Pierce; V. R. Simis, Lithia; S. W. Stout, Sarasota; Robert Hall, Venus; Gerald Cason, Blounstown; Louis Gilbreath, St. Augustine; Robert Griffin, Fort Pierce; Joseph O'Farrell, Ocala; J. 0. Pearce, Sr., Okeechobee. MARKETING -Gene Felton, Chairman, Box 327, la Belle; Gilbert 'Cocker, Vice Chairman, Ocala; Alto Adamss, Jr., Fort pierce: Joe Priest, Ocala; 0. W. Dixon, Tanmipa; W. C. Wing, Wildwood; Cedrick Smith, Jr., Micanopy; J. I). Odom, Starke; Earl Bryan, Alachua; John Hawkins, Monticello; Leo Kight, Hastings; Miles Scofield, Naples; G. C. Norman, Tallahassee; Francis Merriichl, Florala, Ala.; Pat Wilson, Frostproof; T. M. Ilewerton, Madison; R. W. Maxwell, Umatilla; Thomas M. Fortson, Fellsmere; Homer Harvey, Crawforaville; Ton Willis, Lake City; Henry Chitty, Micanopy; Pert Harris, Jr., Sebring; Carl L'Orange, Vero Beach; Martin Nicely, Lake Cit'; John Stiles. Tallahassee; Gifford Rhocdes, Tallahassee; I. E. Padgett Lake Wales; J. E. Pace, Gainesville; W. K. McPherson, Gainesville; T. J. Cmnha, Iiinesville; Joe Mullin, Orlando: A. Z. Paler, Gainesville; Ken Tefertiller, Gainesville; C. H. Downs, Sarasota; W. T. Stilt, Clewistii: laichard S. Kelly, Stuart; G. C. Perry, Jr., Belleview C. W. "Mann" Bailey, Oxford; Russ Kiser, Iamokalee. MiEMBE3FRSHIP -R. D. Bennett, Co-Chairman, Greenwood; J. Leroy Fortner, Co-Clhairmrian (allied members), P.O. Box 795, Sarasota; Marvin Kahn, Sebring: Carlyle Platt, Melbourne; Clyde 13. Colson, Bell; W. M. Keen, Lake Wales; Ed Yarborough, Geneva; Allied Membership Committee Members: Carl Glidden, Naples; Nornian Herron, Naples; Russell Kiser, Iumnolalee; Lat Turner, Sarasota; Joe Amor, Plant City; Ray Thompson. Gibsonton; Charlie Jenkins, Lakeland; Rudy Connor, Tampa; Henry Perry, Hollywood: Martin Woodward, Fort Laudalerdale; Henry Mangels, Miami: K. D. Eatason, Pomnano Beach; Scott French, Loxahatchee; Charles G. Mitchell, Lake Helen; E. D. Gregory, Dinsmore; E. L. Yates Sr., Orlando; John Humaphress, Tallahassee; Kell Williams, Pinellas Park; J. W. Lowrey. Planama City; G. D. Jernigan, Miltos. RESOLUTIONS -Billy Peeples, Chairman, Moore Haven; Pat Corrigan, Vice Chairman, Vero Beach; Bob Griffin, Fort Pierce; Harry H1ammond, Kissimmee; John Pons., Tallahaissee; Tommy Bronson, Brooksville: Pat Wilson, Frostproof: Ar1hur Bisselt. Winter Haven; John Trinson. Vero Beach; Charles Hardee, Chiefland; Andrew Jackson, Lake Placid. for June, 1969 53

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Do you know what you're Paying .For what you're getting? OUR SPECIALTY: 24% & 32% Pasture Balance, 60% Cattle and Dairy Concentrates, Protein Blocks, Cattle Cubes and (Hot Mixes). HIGH SPRINGS MILLING CO. P. 0. Box 985 HIGH SPRINGS, FLA. Phone 454-1203 Welcome, Florida Cattlemen GLADES EQUIPMENT COMPANY Your Ranch and Farm Equipment Dealer in Palm Beach County DETROIT INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA 33430 PAHOKEE, FLORIDA 33476 PHONE 996-3095 PHONE 924-5595 S6et Wm e * FOR YOUR ANNUAL CONVENTION! "Growing with the Glades" SUGAR CANE GROWERS COOPERATIVE OF FLORIDA BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA The Florida Cattleman STATE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE-Louis Gilbreath, Delegate, Drawer 291, St. Augustine. Arthur L Higbie, Alt. Del., Kissimmee. TAX-Billy Peeples, Chairman, Moore Haven Bruce Blount, Vice Chairman, Lake Placid; James Rooks, Jr., Floral City; J. W. Lowery, Panama City; George Oliver, Stuart; A. C. Wright, Jr. Fort Meade; Murray Harrison, Palmetto; W. T. Harrison Jr., Sarasota; Bill Krusen, Tampa; Henry Mangels, Miami; E. D. Gregory, Dinsmore; Jack Peeples, Tallahassee; Bill Barber, Kissimmee; F. R. Edwards, Plant City; Howard Oden. Zolfo Springs; Arthur Bissett, Winter Haven; Pat Corrigan, Vero Beach; John Finlayson, Greenville; R. 13. Williams, Wilmington, Del.; Lat Turner, Sarasota; Pat Wilson, Frostproof; R. S. Dressel, Avon Park; Vick Blackstone, Parrish; Buck Bird, Monticello; Glenn Sumner, Brandon; Jim K. Tillman, Sarasota; Tom Chaires 1Il, Cross City. TIANSIPOTATION -Al Bellotto, Chairman, L. 5 Box 200, Lakeland; It. C. Dressel, Vice Chairman, Sebring; W. D. Roberts, Immokalee; Ralph Cellon, Sr., Alachua; Jim Kemper, DeFuniak Springs; Ed Mason, Marianna; Z. W. Hamilton, Brooker; E. L. Yates, Sr., Orlando; Bill Padrick, Fort Pierce; Charles Lykes, Tampa; Carey Carlton III, Arcadia; Tommy Crum, Moore Haven; J. D. Odom, Starke; S. L. Crochet, Clewiston. MARIKET DEVELOPMENT-Doyle E. Carlton, Jr., Chainnan, P. 0. Box 385, Wauchula; Elliott Whitehurst, Vice Chairman, Williston; Ralph W. Cellon, Sr., Alachua; Gilbert Tucker, Cocoa; Alto Adams, Jr., Fort Pierce; Dr. T. J. Cunha, Gainesville; Dallas Dort, Sarasota; R. D. Bennett, Greenwood; Elliott Whitehurst, Williston; Art Higbie, Kissimmee; Andrew Tucker, Rockledge. UNITED STATES LIVESTOCK SANITARY COMMITTEE-J. 0. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee, member of Anaplasmosis committee; Art Higbie, Kissimmee, member. Officers of Local Cattlemten's Associations ALACI-IDPres. W. P. "Bill" Baker, Hawthorne; Secy.: Wilbur Farrell. Gainesville; Dir.: Jinussy Price, Micanopy. BAKEII-Pres.: Lloyd Register, Glen St. Mary, Sec'y.: Luther Harrell, MacClenny, Dir.: Wassie Fish, Glen St. Mary. BRADFORD-UNION -Pres.: Art Schulz, Brooker; Sec'y.: Julius Marlowe, Starke; Dir.: Rex Smith. Starke. BREIVARD-Pres.: Andrew "Andy" Tucker, Ruciledge; Sec'y.: James T. Oxford, Cocoa; Dir.: Gilbert Tucker, Cocoa. BROWARD-Pres.: Martin Woodward, Fort Lauderdale; Sec'y.: Frank Jasa, Fort Lauderdale; Dir.: Martin Woodward, Fort Lauderdale. CHAEILUiE-Sec'y.: W. L. Hatcher, Punta Gorda: Pres.: H. P. Wright, Punta Gorda; Dir.: Eavard Toussaint, Punta Gorda. CITRUS-Pres.: Julian Kelly, Inverness Sec'y.: Ouentin Medlin. Inverness; Dir.: Mike Van Ness, Inverness. CLAY-Pres.: Al Sanchez, Penny Farms; Sec'y.: E. D. McCall Green Cove Springs Dir.: Walter Williams, Middleburg. COLI, Za -Pres.: ti s Kiser, Immokalee; Se'y.: Dallas Townsend, Immokalee; Dir.: R. A. Roberts, Itmmokalee. COLUMBIA-Pres.: Rufus Ogden Jr., Lake City; Sec'y.: Neal M. Dukes, Lake City; Dir.: Conrad Womble, Lake City. DADE -Pres.: Henry Mangels, Miami; Sec'y.: John D. Campbell, Miami; Dir.: John Dupuis, Miami. DESOTO-Pres.: K. 0. Welles, Arcadia; Sec'y.: Ed Russel, Arcadia; Dir.: Philip Turner Arcadia. DIXIE-Pres.: Tons Chaires III, Cross City; Sec'y.: E. J. Cowen, Cross City; Dir.: John O'Steen. Horseshoe Beach. DUVAL-Pres.: Warren Alvarez, Jacksonville; Sec'y.: Tom Braddock, Jacksonville; Dir.: E. D. Gregory, Dinsmore. FLAGLER-Pres.: Raymon Tucker, Bunnell; Sec'v.: Donald F. Jordan, Bunnell; Dir.: C. H. Cowart, Bunnell. GILCHRIST-Pres. Clyde R. Colson, Bell; Sec'y.: J ats Yelvington, Trenton; Dir.: Carl Lasngfold 'I enton. GLAD! S -Ores.: Tomnmy Bronson, Moore Haven; Sec'y.: Billy Bass, Moore Haven; Dir.: Billy Peeples, Moore Haven. HAEDEE -Pres.: Howard Hopper, Ona; Secy.: Jack C. Hayman, Wauchula; Dir.: J. Pershing Platt, Ona. HENDRY-Pres.: John Stitt, Clewiston; Sec'y.: Raymond H. Burgess, LaBelle; Dir.: Joe Marlin Hilliard, Clewiston. HERNANDO-Pres.: J. H. Boyd, Brooksville; Sec'y.: G. M. Owens, Jr., Brooksville; Dir.: John R. Culbreath, Brooksville. HIGHLANDS-Pres.: Andrew B. Jackson, Lake Placid; Sec'y.: B. J. Harris Jr., Sebring; Dir.: 1. C. Dressel, Avon Park. HILLSBOROUGH-Pres.: Joe Armor, Plant City; Sec'y. Wayne T. Wade Plant City; Dir.: 54

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The Florida Angus Association Extends A Warm And Cordial Invitation To All FCA Members And Request Their Presence At A Get-Acquainted Hospitality Hour To Be Co-hosted With The Palm Beach County Cattlemen's Association June 19 at 6:00 P.M. on the Colonnades Lawn of the Colonnades Hotel in Palm Beach Shores We Wish Every Success to FCA and Its Local Affiliates! We would like to take this opportunity to invite you to attend the "Off-the-Grass" Sale to be held at the Gainesville Livestock Market, Gainesville, Florida, Friday, August 22, and the 22nd Annual Florida Angus Feeder Calf Sale, also at the Gainesville Market on Friday, September 5, 1969. The consignments to the feeder calf sale, the oldest of its type in Florida, features top quality calves forfeeder and stocker buyers and others wanting the best in Angus-bred calves. Make your plans to attend both of these sales! WE INVITE YOU TO CALL ON US IF WE CAN BE OF SERVICE Black Bulls Boost Beef Profits! FLORIDA ANGUS ASSOCIATION, INC. R. D. Bennett, President Bill Gephart, Secretary, 221 Poinciana Circle, Kissimmee, Florida 32741

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Bring Your Camera! See Pet's Corner! Hippo Isle Boat Ride! Spend an hour or the day! GATOR FEED COO.,INV. S 7: A COMPLETE LINE OF CATTLE FEEDS AND MINERALS CUSTOM MIXED TO FIT YOUR NEEDS We now sell FASCO CATTLE "BUTT" BAGS Your most economical way for horn fly control P.O. BOX 756 OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA Ph. RO 3-3337 Advertise! KIRCHMAN COMPANY l Phone 996-2033 Belle Glade, Florida Glenn Summer, Brandon. INDIAN RIVER-Pres.: Manuel Garcia Jr., Fellsmere; Sec'y.: Forrest N. McCullars, Vero Beach: Dir.: Manuel Garcia Jr., Fellsmere. JACKSON-Pres.: Robert H. Milton, Marianna; Sec'y.; Willis Evans, Marianna, Dir.; J. R. Thompson, Marianna. JEFFERSON-Pres.: James Yarn, Monticello; Sec'y.: Albert Odom, Monticello; Dir.: John Finlayson, Greenville. LAKE-Pres. C. B. Ogden, Groveland; Sec'y.: Mack Jones, Tavares; Dir.: C. B. Ogden, Groveland. LEE-Pres.: Ruth Baucom, Fort Myers; Sec'y.: Ron Shafer, Fort Myers; Dir.: Nat Hunter, Fort Myers. LEON-iPres.: W. D. Hopkins, Tallahassee; Sec'y.: Lloyd Rhoden, Tallahassee. LEVY-Pres.: J. P. Sandlin, Williston; Sec'y.: Leonard C. Cobb, Bronson. MADISON-Pres.: Howell Waring, Madison; Sec'y.: Jackie Bass, Madison; Dir.: Larrie Crerry, Lee. MANATEE-Pres.: Robert Harrison, Arcadia Sec'y.: Roger Murray, Palmetto; Dir.: Vick Blackstone, Parrish. MARION-Pres.: Carey A. Robbins, Ocala; Sec'y.: Edsel W. Rowan, Ocala; Dir.: G. C. Perry, Jr. Belleview. MARTIN-Pres.: P. L. Hinson, Indiantown; Sec'y.: Levi M. Jornson, Stuart; Dir.: P. L. Hinson, Indiantown. NASSAU -Pres.: Frank Shaffer, Callahan, Sec'y.: D. R. Cook, Callahan; Dir.: E. D. Gregory, Dinsmore. NORTHWEST CATTLEMEN (Santa Rosa Escambia) -Pres.: G. D. Jernigan, Milton; Dir.: James D. Cunningham, Molino. OKEECHOBEE-Pres.: Winston B. Carlton, Basinger; Sec'y.: C. R. Boyles, Okeechobee; Dir.: Forest Pearce, Okeechobee. ORANGE-Pres.: Howard Rybolt, Orlando; Sec'y.: Jay Hebert, Orlando; Dir.: E. L. Yates Sr., Orlando. OSCEOLA-Pres.: Ham Brown, Kissimmee; Sec'y.: James B. Smith Kissimmee; Dir.: M. M. Overstreet, Kissimmee. PALM BEACH-Pres.: G. W. Putnam Jr. Belle Glade; Sec'y.: R. Kent Price, West Palm Beach; Dir.: K. D. Eatmon, Pompano Beach. PAN-HANDLE CATTLEMEN (Walton-Okaloosa) Sec'y.: Edsel Thomaston, DeFuniak Springs; Pres.: Bob Lawton, DeFuniak Springs. Dir.: Lance Richboury, Crestview. PASCOPres.: Albert A. Barthle, San Antonio; Sec'y.: A. D. Dawson, Dade City; Dir.: H. C. Douglas, Zephyrhills. PINELLAS -Pres.: Burdett Schee, Largo; Sec'y.: Charles Rowan, Largo; Dir.: Dr. Charles Murphy, Largo. POLK-Pres.: A. L. Bellotto, Lakeland; Sec'y.: Martin Whidden, Bradley; Dir.: M. E. Hammond, Winter Haven. PUTNAM-Pres.: H. M. Tilton, San Mateo; Sec'y.: R. T. Clay, Palatka; Dr. Lloyd Osteen, Hollister. SARASOTA-Pres.: Mabry Carlton Jr., Arcadia; Sec'y.: Ken Clark, Sarasota, Dir.: L. H. Hawkins, Sarasota. SEMINOLE-Pres.: Ed Yarborough, Geneva; Sec'y.: Frank J. Jasa, Sanford; Dir.: R. W. Williams. Sanford. ST. JOHNS-Pres.: Louis Gilbreath, St. Augustine; Sec'y.: Paul L. Dinkins, St. Augustine; Dir.: Louis Gilbreath, St. Augustine. St. Lucie-Pres.: J. H. Norvell Jr. Fort Pierce; Sec'y.: Hugh C. Whelcbel Jr., Fort Pierce; Dir.: Robert L. Griffin, Fort Pierce. SUMTER-Pres.: Delouie Wells, Bushnell; Sec y.: D. A. George, Bushnell; Dir.: Aubrey Caruthers, Oxford. VOLUSA-Preti.: W. T. McDonald, New Smyrna Beach; Sec'y.: Gerald Martin, DeLand; Dir.: Elvin Daugharty, DeLand. WASHINGTON-Pres.: E. D. "Buddy" Neel, Chipley: Sec'y.: J. E. Davis, Chipley; Dir.: U. S. Harrison, Chipley. WEST FLORIDA-Pres.: Tillis Strickland Jr., Tallahassee; Bobby R. Durden, Crawfordville; Directors: (Calhoun) Elbert Shelton, Altha; (Gulf) Dave Gaskin, Wewahitchka; (Bay) J. W. Lowrey, Panama City; (Franklin) C. C. Land, Carrabelle; (Liberty) Allen Woodward, Bristol; (Wakulla) Tillis Strickland, Tallahassee. Don Chittenden Dies DON CHITTENDEN of KanSaS City, MisSouri, purebred livestock consultant and former secretary of the American Polled Hereford Association, died recently after an extended illness. He was appointed APHA secretary in 1946 and in 1962 turned the reins over to Orville Sweet and became a consultant to breeders. The Florida Cattleman 56

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=_,._, _-T -7 7 -2 6 ,PRO-LIX FERMENTED LIQUID FEED FORTIFIED HOMOGENIZED CHELATED PRO-LIX, a revolutionary breakthrough in the feeding of ruminant animals-America's Only Fermented Liquid Supplement-is often referred to as a 4 in I feed-35% Protein Equivalent (of which 96% is digestible), Carbohydrates (invert sugars), Vitamins and Minerals. A product manufactured exclusively for ruminant feed. Fermentation of a rich Tuna fish broth with an abundance of Brewers Yeast and Pure Cane Molasses-natural fermentation to preserve all the natural nutritional qualities, fortified with additional Proteins, Vitamins, and carbohydrates: then air agitated, double homogenized to insure stabilization and prevent sedimentation. Field results and tests from leading universities show that the fermented tuna fish broth produces not only enzymes and bacteria, but valuable growth factors. These factors stimulate bacterial growth in the rumen which promotes better feed conversion (tests show a 5-10% better feed efficiency) and improved animal health. PRO-4X trademark of AMERICA'S LIQUl' NUMBER ONE I DON'T GAMBLE ON the wheels! With Urea and Molasses Mixes FEED YOUR CATTLE With Highly DIGESTIBLE Natural Protein From FERMENTATION To Maintain Proper Balance under all Conditions

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ULTRA MODERN PROGENY SIREd BY GAY JINGO ANKONIAN GAY JINGO 1966 International Calf Champion 1967 International Grand Champion Welcome Cattlemen, to Palm Beach County. Our Association is planning a convention you will enjoy, and one that can be profitable to you. While you're here, reserve a little time to visit Caravelle Ranch to see our growthy, heavy-muscled Angus bulls. Ask about our program using computer data and modern management methods for producing the most PROFITABLE BEEF BULL possible-a bull that will transmit to his 'salves GROWABILITY, CARCASS CUTABILITY, AND PHYSICAL SOUNDNESS. Our cattle are acclimated to the toughest tropical environment. (While grass is usually abundant here, the weather and cattle pests make our cattle as rugged as any.) Our brood cow herd and herd bulls are as modern as tomorrow. You will appreciate their EXTRA LENGTH, SIZE AND MEATINESS. These animals have been selected and culled for their FERTILITY, PRODUCTIVITY, MILKING AND MOTHERING ABILITY. Our ranch is located west of West Palm Beach on Highway 441 (one half mile west of Lion Country). Write to us at P. 0. Box 15708, West Palm Beach, or call David Wynn, Cattle Manager, or Larry Ridinger, Division Manager, 305/683-4933. CARAVELLE LAND AND CATTLE COMPANY INC.

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Jubilee Augis Sale Scores $352 Average Top 25% Averaged $585 Top 50% Averaged $461 THE ELEVENTH annual Florida Angus Association Jubilee was held at the livestock pavilion, Manatee County Agricultural Center, Palmetto, April 26, with 88 head selling for a gross of $30, 995 and an average per head of $352. Topping the sale was the lot 13 bull, Black Watch President 125, a consignment of E. J. Gibbs & Sons of Pensacola. The bull, a member of the 1967 reserve champion carload at the National Western Show in Denver, was purchased by T&P Angus Ranch, Arcadia, for $1125. At the annual election meeting of the breed group held the preceding night at the Ramada Inn, Palmetto, R. D. Bennett of Greenwood, was elected president, succeeding Bob F. Deriso of Tampa, who had served for three consecutive terms. Other officers include J. M. Edwards, Jr., Starke, vice president, and William A. Gephart, Kissimmee, secretary-treasurer, who was reelected. New directors named are: Darwin N. White, Fort Myers; E. J. Gibbs, Jr., Cantonment; J. R. Thompson, Marianna; Marlin Nicely and Arky Rogers, Lake City, and Deriso. The annual youth showmanship contest was held the morning of sale day at Hughes Angus Ranch, Ellenton with 15 contestants entered. Winners were Donna Weingarden of Monticello and Tom Edwards of Starke. Alternates named were Larry Sweat of Gibsonton and Rick Williams of Lakeland. The two top winners will compete in the National Junior Showmanship competition held during the Angus Futurity at Lexington, Kentucky, in August, FLORIDA ANGUS Association members held their annual election meeting in Palmetto recently. From left are, J. M. Edwards, Jr., vice president; R. D. Bennett, president; Bob F. Deriso, retiring president and member of the board, and William A. Gephart, secretary-treasurer. sponsored by the American Angus Association. Bill Elliott of Okeechobee the Florida winner last year, placed second in the 1968 national contest. The contest this year was under the supervision of B. Edmund David of Winter Haven and was judged by J. E. Pace, extension animal husbandman, University of Florida, Gainesville. Top selling female was Pride 27 of Ramsey, consigned by Tropical Sky, Sebring. The buyer was Frank Hyden of Clearwater who paid $775 for the daughter of Ballot of Belladrum. High buyer at the sale was Black Watch Farms, Inc., of Wappingers Falls, New York, with purchases of 12 head for $5155. Black Watch was represented by Victor Puig, Jr., of Miami, general manager of the firm's international division. Second high buyer was Pioneer Cattle Company of Belle Glade with 11 head and an outlay of $3965. The seven bulls selling grossed $4365 and 23 cows with calves at foot brought $9340 and averaged $406. The overall female average was $327. The sale was managed by M&G Livestock Sales, Tampa and Kissimmee, and the auctioneers were Phil Sanders of Laurel, Mississippi, and Bobby Wilson of Quitman, Georgia. Buyers, with number of head bought in parentheses, if more than one, and amount paid, follow: Black Watch Farms, Inc., Wappingers Falls, New York (12) $5155; W. W. lagg, Tampa (12) $2920; Pioneer Cattle Company, Belle Glade (11) $3965; Herman Bronson, Ocala $285; Royal Scot Farms, Senatobia, Mississippi (8) $2645; L. T. Johnston, Tampa $375; T&P Angus Ranch, Arcadia $1125; Henry T. Burry, Lakeland (5) $1400; Mijo Farms, Monticello $435; L. H. Hawkins & Sons, Sarasota $520; M. B. Stovall, Ellenton $735; Selene Trading Company, Citra $300; Kevin Bronson, Ocala $270; F. H. Beuseman, Arcadia $810; Frank Hyden, Clearwater $775; Hidden Acres, Myakka City $450; Prevatt Angus Ranch, Gibsonton $585; James B. Fowler, Okeecrobee (2) $445; Charles E. Dyches, Lakeland $220; J. R. Pitts, Ruskin (3) $665; Dr. S. W. Stout, Sarasota (4) $1515; Wendell Smith, Lakeland (3) $1115; Ralph Robinson, Wilsonville, Alabama $430; Circle R Ranch, Lake City $255; MB Angus Company, Bradenton (2) $670; Joe Martinez, Tampa (2) $450; Suwannee Revere Ranch, Bell $250; Suncoast Farms, Bradenton $310; John Sweat, Gibsonton $300; B. Moore & Company, Lutz $200; F. R. Durrance & Sons, Myakka City $250; B. W. Waynewright, Lake City $300; Charles Wretston, Woodville, Mississippi. BOB F. DERISO, at left, retiring presiNEW Auxiliary officers named at dent of the Florida Angus Association the meeting in Palmetto are, from left: receives congratulations from Frank BinMrs. J. M. Edwards, Jr., Starke, ford of Thomaston, Georgia, vice presipresident; Mrs. Joe Etter, Monticello, dent of the American Angus Association president elect; Mrs. Bob F. Deriso, following the annual election meeting of Tampa, secretary-treasurer, and Mrs. the Florida breed group. Marlin Nicely, Lake City, vice-president. R. D. BENNETT, newly elected president of the Florida Angus Association, presents the showmanship trophy to Donna Weingarden, 4-H member from Monticello while Tom Edwards, a 4-H'er from Starke at left, the other winner, waits to accept his trophy. for June, 1969

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Over 900 Persons at Annual Beef Cattle Short Course Get Word on Production "WHAT KIND of beef should we produce?" This was the principal topic and theme of the 18th annual Beef Cattle Short Course held at the University of Florida's Livestock Pavilion, Gainesville, May 1-3. Over 900 persons were on hand for the event including representatives from a number of Latin American countries. Dr. T. J. Cunha, chairman of the animal science department at the University, and Short Course chair man, officially opened the program with welcoming remarks and introduced J. W. Sites, dean for research, agricultural experiment stations, who gave the official welcome. Frozen and pre-cooked meats in the future was the prediction of Rhule B. Sleeth, assistant director of the Food Research Division for Armour and Company. Sleeth addressed the short course on future trends in beef processing and merchandising and what their effects would be on future beef production. Sleeth noted that institutional firms were already using a substantial amount of frozen and precooked meals. In the future prepackaged retailed meats will be frozen because it retains meat color and prevents drip problems, Sleeth said, and quick freezing preserves meat quality. Some Problems Sleeth told of two problems prominent with producers and packers Salmonella and insecticides. Salmonella infects cattle and other domestic and wild animals and can be passed on to man through consuming the organisms in food. "The seriousness of the problem is pointed up by the fact that present food and drug regulations state that any food for human or animal use containing Salmonella is adulterated, and thus can be seized and condemned," Sleeth said. "The loss of product is bad enough, but the loss of consumer confidence is even worse." Sleeth noted that there is increasing concern about intake of insecticides in food. "It is important that we recognize the possible dangers to consumers and to the industry," he said, "and exercise caution in insecticide application." Sleeth concluded his talk by saying that producers and processors must anticipate the future consumer trends and adjust their operations to meet new needs. John C. Pierce, director of USDA's Livestock Division, Consumer and Marketing Service, spoke on U.S. beef grading standards. Pierce said that present yield grades may be too wide and predicted that yield grade quality and quantity values would change in the future, and that electrical devices would probably be used for grading in the future. THE SHORT COURSE program featured speakers from out-of-state as well as Florida speakers. Shown above, from left, are: Rhule B. Sleeth; H. L. Chapman, Jr.; Dr. T. J. Cunha, and John C. Pierce. Pierce noted that beef carcass demand is for lean meat, but he warned producers not to sacrifice meat quality to get less fat. "Cattle type must be bred and fed in a more red meat type manner," Pierce said. He urged producers to obtain carcass data on cattle. The present status on the pre-conditioning of beef calves was the next topic, discussed by H. L. Chapman, head of the Range Cattle Experiment Station, Ona. Chapman said that preconditioning refers to management systems wherein calves are weaned on the farm before shipment and handled in such a way to enable the calf to withstand stresses occurring at weaning. He said that a calf experiences a 24 to 78 hour starvation period immediately after weaning that adversely effects the performance of the calf in the feedlot. "This starvation period must be prevented," Chapman said. Records Needed. Chapman said that the loss from shrink, feed utilization and efficiency, plus a one to two percent death loss in prevailing management practice reportedly cost feedlot operators $10 to $20 yer animal and as a result, feedlots are developing record systems to tell them which groups of cattle do well and which do poorly. "Florida cow-calf producers will be faced with the fact that their reputation will be built on the way their cattle do in feeedlot or in grass-fattening programs," said Chapman. "As management systems continue to become more intensive, Florida cattlemen will find that they will be carrying out many of the steps of preconditioning as normal management policy." Chapman said there were many unanswered questions about preconditioning and the economics of preconditioning, but, he added, the feedlots want preconditioned cattle and predicted they would pay a premium for them in the future. He outlined the many factors involved in preconditioning calves and said the degree that any cattleman utilizes it will depend on the individual situation. "It is a step forward in management which will become more widespread as better The Florida Cattleman

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communication dev elops between the rancher, the buyer, the feeder, the animal nutritionist, the veterinarian and all other people involved in beef cattle production," Chapman concluded. A. C. Warnick, animal physiologist from the University, told short course guests that there is an outstanding potential for improving beef cattle through the use of artificial insemination. Warnick cited that in dairy cattle milk production has increased 200 pounds per cow in 20 years, part of which is due to improved genetic potential through the use of A.I. He told the cattlemen that in one beef herd using proven A.I. sires during a four year period, weaning weights increased from 518 pounds to 605 pounds and the percent calves grading choice went from 50 to 97 percent. There are also problems involved with A.I. Warnick said, one of which is detecting cows in heat. He said that cattlemen planning to start an A.I. program would face such problems as finding and evaluating sires, training personnel and rearranging pastures to fit the program. Warnick outlined some practices necessary for a successful insemination program emphasizing that an adequate nutrition program is necessary so that cows are getting sufficient PREMIER WINNERS received their awards during the Beef Cattle Short Course at Gainesville. Shown here from left are: Harry Hammond, editor of The Cattleman, who presented the awards; Leroy Baldwin; Mike Milicevic, U. S. Sugar Corporation; K. D. Eatmon; Danny Lyons, Mar-K Charolais, who also accepted for LH Bar Ranch; and Roy Gregg, southeastern fieldman for APHA, who received the awards for Sunny Acres Ranch. energy, protein, minerals and vitamins in order to have a high rate of conception. Estrus control in beef cattle was discussed by David E. Bartlett, American Breeders Service, Inc., Madison, Wisconsin. Bartlett said that estrus synchronization was under study but had not been proven effective to date. It must be understood, he added, that less than desirable results from experiments do not necessarily imply that estrus control will not be effective and economical in the future. Nutrition is a vital part of estrus synchronization, Bartlett said, and pointed to studies conducted at the Fort Robinson Beef Cattle Research Station, Crawford, Nebraska, where it was found that the amount of energy cows obtained before and after calving effected cycling. Bartlett said that successful estrus control, even more than A.I. relates IL Range Supplement Blocks BEST ANSWER TO YOUR FLY PROBLEMS Prevents breeding of horn flies. Prevents breeding of face flies. Controls Stomach Worms, Hookworms, and Nodular Worms. Contains Hi-Boots Organic Iodine which aids in preventing foot rot. Furnishes the proper levels and sources of Vitamins and Minerals for Spring and Summer range conditions. Self-limiting intake-yet palatable assuring proper drug intake. Economical-cost less than 2< per head daily. Before You Buy-See Your Kattle King Distributor KATTLE KING "The King of Blocks" P. 0. Box 406 9 For Further Information Write INC. NEW PRODUCTS AVAILABLE (For Prevention of Legume Bloat) AntiofAnaplasmo s s (For Prevention of Anoplasmosis) Montgomery, Alabama 0 (205) 264-1415

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SANTA GERTRUDIS FEEDER CALF SALE Friday, July 25 1:00 P.M. Glades Livestock Market BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA OVER 600 HEAD This is a special all-Santa Gertrudis purebred and Santa Gertrudis crossbred feeder calf sale sponsored by the Florida Santa Gertrudis Association. There will be over 600 head offered in this special sale. Consignments will be accepted from all cattlemen that have steers carrying Santa Gertrudis blood. Plan to consign or plan to buy at this all-Santa Gertrudis feeder calf sale. For further information, contact JOHN D. CHAMBLEE, Sale Chairman Box 509, Belle Glade, Fla. Or call the Glades Market Also, there will be Santa Gertrudis feeder calves consigned by members of the Florida Santa Gertrudis Association and other cattlemen to the Mid-Fla. Feeder Calf Sale at the Mid-Florida Livestock Market, Orlando, on August 15, 1969. Watch for further information on both of these sales. F L 0 R I D A Santa Gertrudis Ass'n 1943 Tyler St., Hollywood, F I a. Members of Santa Gertrudis Breeders International, Kingsville, Texas Annual FSGA Field Day Slated THE ANNUAL summer meeting and field day of the Florida Santa Gertrudis Association has been slated for June 27-28 at Belle Glade, according to Ed Watson, Clewiston, president. Headquarters will be the Holiday Inn at Belle Glade. Watson said there would be a board of directors meeting at 4:00 p.m. Friday, June 27 and a "Dutch Treat" supper set for that evening. The annual meeting will get underway at 10:00 a.m. Saturday, June 28. Watson said that Don Wakeman, associate professor in the animal science department, University of Florida, would give an illustrated talk on how the modern steer should look. Then Dr. A. Z. Palmer, meats scientist at the University, will describe the carcass characteristics of the modern steer. Following luncheon, the members will be given a tour of Big B Ranch, located 15 miles south of South Bay. Watson has also announced that the association will sponsor two feeder calf sales this season. One is set for the Glades Livestock Market, Belle Glade, on July 25, and another at the Mid-Florida Livestock Market, Orlando, August 15. directly to the level of herd management and reproductive efficiency prevailing. "As yet, no herd managers have demonstrated capability to achieve high level and completely satisfactory results with estrus synchronization over successive years," Bartlett said. "Based upon experience, few are showing the desire and intention to try. It would appear, even though imperfect, that the concept and the hormones may have been more ready than the herds in which they have been tried." A. I. Programs Five Florida ranchers appeared on the program next to give first hand information on their experience with artificial insemination. Azel Lewis of A. Duda and Sons Ranch, Cocoa, gave the group some background on his uses of A.I. He said that four four years of using A.I. at the ranch had improved the quality and weight of the calves considerably. Lewis pointed out that they were having some problems in heat detection, but that 84 percent of the original herd had been bred A.I. to date. The program now includes progeny test on bulls used in the program, Lewis added. Robert F. Crane, Jr., managing partner of Rock Hollow Farm, Ocala, told the cattlemen that the results of a sound A.I. program could be seen in the performance of heifers sired by A.J. bulls. Crane usually breeds about 150 head per year artificially. Performance and disposition are the factors Crane looks for when selecting for his A.I. herd, and if a cow does not breed A.I. she will not be used the following year. "We increase the protein and TDN in the A.I. herd during the breeding season," Crane said, and following this program he is breeding about 70 percent of his A.I. herd on the first service. Crane said that he is detecting about 85 percent of the cows on the first heat period and 95 percent on the second. Max Hammond addressed the audience next with a talk on artificial insemination with Brahman cows at the W. H. Stuart Ranch, Bartow. Hammond gave the results of work done at the ranch for a five year period from 1959 through 1963. In all cases, Hammond reported, including a time in 1961 when estrus control was tried, unsatisfactory results were obtained. During this time, Hammond said, semen was collected and frozen at the ranch and a professional inseminator working in the area was used. Heat detection was done twice a day with those detected in the afternoon bred the next morning and those detected in the morning bred the next afternoon. Results varied, according to Hammond, from a 9.7 percent conception rate to a 56 percent conception rate during the five year period on different groups of cows. Hammond said the results were not encouraging and no further attempts using A.I. at the ranch were made until this year. The program was altered somewhat with trained ranch personnel doing the insemination and semen collected at the ranch and sent to an A.I. laboratory for processing and returned to the ranch for storage. The feeding program was also intensified for the A.I. cattle, according to Hammond, feeding a minimum of 16 pounds of TDN per day for the wet cows and about 11 or 12 pounds for The Florida Cattleman 62

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dry cows and two year old heifers. In addition the cattle were given access to rye pasture. A 54 day breeding season was observed beginning January 19 and continued until March 14. Hammond said that 88 percent were detected in heat and bred but that it was too early to tell the conception rate. Hammond said the experience had shown the necessity of adequate nutrition for A.I. and natural service programs, and that it had proven that "We can make A.I. work." "But first," he said, "let us be sure that the bulls used are genetically superior and not just highly promoted for sales purposes. Then, let us be sure that we have feeding conditions that will permit the expression of the superior genetics." Herb C. Lloyd covered the A.I. program for Big B Ranch, Belle Glade. Lloyd said each year for the past four years Big B Ranch had selected 25 to 30 head of their most promising young bulls and bred them artificially. This, Lloyd said, enabled them to obtain progeny data on the bulls. He said that four years experience had been a wonderful teacher and gave the audience some of his conclusions on A.I. He said the number of cattle in their program varied from 1000 to 5000 and that during the four year period using A.I. a 42 to 64 percent conception rate had been maintained. Lloyd said that he was not completely satisfied with conception rate but that it had improved considerably since the start of the program. United States Sugar Corporation's A.I. program was explained by Mike Milicevic, superintendent of cattle at the Clewiston ranch. Milicevic said that the ranch started its A.I. program in 1967 primarily in the purebred Charolais herd to take advantage of all French bulls. He said they encountered some problems in labor and pasture layout at first but both were now satisfactory. Milicevic said that trained ranch personnel seemed to work out better in the A.I. program, rather than using outside technicians. Pasture units divided into 40 and 80 acre units have been set up, Milicevic said, with each unit connecting to driving lanes leading to a centrally located corral where insemination is done. "Nutrition is probably the most essential factor of a successful breeding program," Milicevic noted, whether an A.I. program or natural service program. He said dry cows should bee fed eight to nine pounds of TDN daily, and wet cows should receive 16 (Continued on page 65) for June, 1969 63 LONG ON POUNDS EVEN WHEN SHORT ON GRASS Grass has been short around Prattsville, Ala., the past two years, but Ed Wadsworth is still selling those heavy calves. He started using Santa Gertrudis bulls back in 1954, and getting 95% calf crops. The calves are big fellows, the kind that make the profit. His commercial cows are Angus and native Alabama Santa Gertrudis crosses. Here's the way the averages look! YEAR NO. CALVES 1966 1967 1968 320 315 319 WEIGHTS STEERS 616 lbs. 600 lbs. 581 lbs. HEIFERS 608 lbs. 567 lbs. 547 lbs. In three years the steer calves averaged over 2.4 lbs. per day from birth to weaning and the heifer calves gained over 2 lbs. Average weaning age was 71/ months and the calves were on creep feed. Find out more about the great results on good grass or bad, with or without creep feed, from Santa Gertrudis crosses all over the country. Ask for a free beef chart. G6SANTA GERTRUDIS BREEDERS INTERNATIONAL ROX 1257E FOR SALE Santa Gertrudis Purebred heifers and bulls John Thornhill Plant Co. TIFTON, GEORGIA P.O. Box 193 PH. AC 912/382-1474 Santa Gertrudis R. D.KEENE LAZY R BAR RANCH Kirby Hancock, Foreman, Ph. 847-2400 KISSIMMEE FLORIDA Located 3 miles east on Boggy Creek Road Certified Bang's Free Herd No. 533 KINGSVILLE, TEXAS 78363 SANTA GERTRUDIS EL RANCHO GRANDE INDIANTOWN, FLA. GRADY CROSBY, FOREMAN, 305-597-2346 SANTA GERTRUDIS The kind that WEIGH and PAY on good Florida pastu rest BLOUNT & HYDE B. Blount, Mgr., Phone Lake Placid HO 5-4771 Rt. 1, Box 525, Lake Placid, Florida

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-ii SANTA GERTRUDIS STAGE COACH RANCH Dade City, Florida IRVIN SANDERS, Mgr. P. 0. Box 65 Ph: 567-2095 Located on No. 581, between Brooksville & Dade City Purebred Santa Gertrudis E. H. Chapman Box 818, Plant City Varn Road, west of Knights visitors welcome 752-7722 PHONES 752-2268 MEMBER: FCA-SGBI-FSGA Purebred Santa Gertrudis Pounds-Performance BLACKWATER FARMS Mr. & Mrs. J. T. Flagg, owners Ph: (205) 384-4595 & 6 RT. 4, JASPER, ALA. 35501 Try Santa Gertrudis From SLEEPY HOLLOW FARMS TELEPHONE 922-1521 1943 TYLER STREET JAKE WATSON Owner HO L LYWOO D, FLORI DA Ranch located near DeLand on Hwy. 42 west BRIGGS RANCHES P. 0. Box 1981 SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS "It's Performance That Counts" R. W. Briggs, Sr. San Roque Ranch Catarina, Texas R. W. Briggs, Jr. Broken X Ranch San Antonio. Texas For SANTA GERTRUDIS With The Mark Of Quality Breeding PICNIC GROVES and RANCH L. H. Keene, Ranch Manager Ph: Tampa 689-3302 RANCH LOCATED 18 miles South of Plant City Box 420, Route 1, Lithia, Fla. Herd No. 55 Charter Member SGBI and FSGA 3, ELECTED DURING the annual meeting of SGBI in San Antonio, Texas were, from left: Tom O'Connor, secretary; K. D. Eatmon, treasurer; B. K. Johnson, vice president; Frates Seeligson, president, and Governor of Arkansas Winthrop Rockefeller, director, and retiring president. Eathon, Watson Elected to Posts In SGBI at Annual Meeting Two FLORIDIANS were elected to offices in Santa Gertrudis Breeders International at the organization's annual membership meeting held April 12 in San Antonio, Texas. Elected as treasurer was K. D. Eatmon of Pompano Beach, who had been serving as a director, and Ed Watson of Clewiston, elected to the board of directors. Frates Seeligson of San Antonio, Texas, the newly elected president, announced that attendance was a near record with members coming from throughout the U.S. and other countries such as Guatemala, Australia, Mexico and Argentina. Also elected were B. K. Johnson, La Pryor, Texas, vice president, and secretary, Tom O'Connor of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Reelected for three year terms as directors were W. W. Callan of Waco, Texas and Roberto Berger of Guatemala City, Guatemala. Also elected for three year terms were Winthrop Rockefeller of Morrilton, Arkansas and Hilmer Moore of Richmond, Texas. Rockefeller, who is Governor of Arkansas, was the outgoing president, having served two consecutive terms. During the meeting it was decided to increase the board of directors from 12 to 15. In order to fill these added positions, the following were elected: Vernon Smith, Dallas, Texas; Watson; and J. T. Flagg of Jasper, Alabama. Robert Shelton of Kingsville, Texas was elected to fill the vacancy created by Eatmon's election as treasurer. Executive Secretary R. P. Marshall 64 told the members that the association experienced a year of unprecedented success. "A total of 16,530 cattle were classified which is the highest since organization-a total of 12,268 cattle were sold on association records and the membership reached an all time high of over 1100." The keynote speech was made by John Chohlis, general manager of the International Cattlemen's Expo, Linkletter Productions, who said that cattle production goes beyond the pasture and feedlot and includes attitude, salesmanship, advertising and other promotional efforts. Young Herd Bulls Require Care YEARLING BEEF herd bulls need proper feeding and care for best performance and long life in the herd. This is the word from Haley M. Jamison, University of Tennessee associate animal husbandman. "Proper care is a must in order to get a high calf crop percentage and to yield maximum returns to the herd owner," he advises. "Your newly-purchased yearling bull should be acclimated to his new home and properly conditioned for several weeks before you place him in the cow herd," Jamison recommends. Limit the yearling bull to 10 to 12 cows for a period of 90 days, he cautions. During the breeding season, feed a concentrate ration at the rate of one pound per 100 pounds of body weight. Good pasture will not supply sufficient nutrients to a working bull. The Florida Cattleman SAGE CO CH RANJB u .masskY

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H. C. DOUGLAS, at right, was the winner of the Florida Bankers' Association award for the best production tested herd in Florida. Louis Gilbreath presented the award. Short Course (Continued from page 63) pounds per day of TDN for best results. Milicevic said that on the first year following an A.J. program Sugarland Ranch had a 92.2 percent pregnancy rate, 10.4 percent of which was due to the use of clean up bulls. "We consider the above results to be fairly satisfactory when considering that initially we had personnel problems and were novices in this field," he noted. Premier Awards The annual presentation of THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN'S premier awards were made by Harry Hammond, editor. Accepting the awards this year were: Leroy Baldwin of Baldwin Angus Ranch, Ocala; Dr. Mike Milicevic, U.S. Sugar Corporation, Clewiston; K. D. Eatmon of Pompano Beach; Danny Lyons of Mar-K Charolais, High Springs, who also accepted for LH Bar Ranch, Newnan, Georgia; and Roy Gregg, southeastern representative for the American Polled Hereford Association, who accepted for Sunny Acres Ranch, Polk City. Developing Calves. The Thursday evening program, presided over by James E. Pace, extension animal husbandman, got underway with discussions by four Florida cattlemen on programs to keep weaned calves and develop them to feedlot weights of 600 to 800 pounds. First to speak was Jock Sutherland of Immokalee. Sutherland outlined his program for taking 450 pound weaned -~ 'U -P .~ 4 'V '/ ( A'N For Sale Purebred Bulls and Heifers at reasonable prices. All bulls semen tested and ready for service. All cattle raised on large pastures and climatized. "One Hundred Square Miles of Good Cattle and Grass" Eddie Raulerson General Manager A. D. Griffith, Owner Tom Fitzgerald, Mgr. Purebred Operations Rt. 3, Box 3000, Okeechobee, Florida Ph. RO 3-4727 Member of Santa Gertrudis Breeders International Kingsville, Texas Breeders of Quality Santa Gertrudis H. L. HARVELL RANCH P. 0. Box 215 Phone 796-4153 BROOKSVILLE, FLORIDA 2 Mi. So. On US 41-Visitors Always Welcome SANTA GERTRUDIS ( SIZE=PROFITS) BLUE CYPRESS LAKERanch, Inc. H. R. Holman, Owner P. 0. Box 698 Tam Moody, Mgr. Ph.:305/562-6267 VERO BEACH, FLORIDA SANTA GERTRUDIS BULLS Of All Ages for Sale HARLEY WATSON RANCH ARCADJA Ph: WAlnut 9-6681 FLA. Santa Charter Member1 LITTLE E W. M. LARI Gertrudis Cattle SINCE 1941 FSGA SGBI H ,r7 Purebred Santa Gertrudis WINNSTEAD PLANTATION Philip G. Rust Phone: 226-1528 owner226-6304 Route #3 Thomasville, Georgia Produce the Type of Calves You Want Smith Ranch SHORTHORNS Featuring Acclimated Bulls With Size H. I & P. N. Smith, Owners Phone 293-2930, Winter Haven, Fla. Ranch on Poinsettia Park Road, five 'miles N.F. JOSCO PELLETS Citrus Pulp Coastal Bermuda Hay For information and prices write or call: 1. S. JOSEPH CO., INC. P. 0. Box 19127 Phone 813/839-5431 TAMPA, FLORIDA 33616 SANTA A GERTRUDIS 'RINGO REDS" R I N G 0 Home of "RN O ES Doubloon 201 JAMES W. RINGO, Owner Box 1047 Immokalee, Florida 33934 H Ph: (813) OL 7-2332 L for June, 1969 65

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LONE STAR EAR TAGS* Fast, Permanent, Economical Animal Identification Instant application. One-piece, flexible. Always legible. Won't hair over. Guaranteed to stay in. Snag-proof. Permanentlywelded numbers. 3 Sizes-cows, calves, sheep & goats. *Patent pending P 0. Box 9385 San Antonio, Texas 78204 Malloy Hereford Ranch Polled Herefords Chief Herd Sire Gay Hills Victor L58 Mr. and Mrs. Dallas Malloy, Owners P. O. Bax 490, Phone HU 2-2526 or 2-4388 MARIANNA, FLORIDA HEREFORD BULLS FOR SALE They're coming two's and three's and are ready to go to work for you[ SHUMAN'S Hereford Ranch Plant City Phone Florida 752-411 Ranch located 3 mi. S. of Plant City PALMETTO HEREFORD RANCH Established in 1930 SERVICE AGE BULLS FOR SALE Years of experience in line-breeding clear pedligre Plato Domino 1 Polled Herefords with the best n Prince Domino, Hazlett, Battle Mischief. )om-stic and other proven bloodlines have permitted us to perfect a "beef producer" of the finest quality. Breeding Age Stock for sale at all times CALHOUN FALLS, S. C. N. W. TRASK, Owner Ph: Iva, S. C., AC 803/348-7691 Located 7 mi. North of Calhoun Falls on #81 'I '5 4 Quarter Horses Polled Herefords .5umo lAoe4 Rt. 1, Box 182B, Polk City, Fla. J. M. WELLMAN, Owner Phone Joe B. Armstrong, Mgr. Auburndale 967-1419 Registered Herefords JO-SU-LI FARMS Clarence Cross Owner Ralph Thompson, battle Mgr. Phone PLaza 8-3637 Colquitt, Georgia Polled Herefords -Big Boned and Growthy ARTHUR S. GARBER & SON BELLEVIEW, FLORIDA Rt. 2, Box 142, Ocala e Ph. 245-3468 RANCH 1 MILES W. OF BELLEVIEW POLLED HEREFORDS It's Performance That Counts Herd Sire: CVH Silver Victor 85 Circle Z Ranch Geo. A. Zellner, Owner FLORAL CITY, FLA. Rt. 1, Box 63, Ph. 726-2339 L~ 4. One ppliato foralltots. calves to feedlot weights Under the program steer calves are processed, sorted and put on three different type programs. The first, Sutherland said, was a full feed program consisting of a ration of corn silage, citrus pulp, molasses and a protein supplement. Average daily gains of 214 pounds per day were recorded on this program according to Sutherland. The second program consisted of fertilized pasture with a supplement feed of corn silage, molasses and a protein supplement. Under this program average daily gains of 1%/2 pounds per day were recorded. The third program is fertilized pasture without supplement and average daily gains of one pound were recorded. Covering the economics of the program, Sutherland said that calves on the full feed program were ready for feedlot in about 100 days. He estimated the cost per pound of gain on full feed at 25 cents. The combination grazing and feed program takes about 192 days, according to Sutherland, and costs apout 22 cents per pound of gain. The program of grazing without supplement takes about 250 days, he said, at a cost of 15 cents per pound of gain. As the steers reached weights of 700 pounds they were fed finishing rations in dry lot for approximately 100 days. J. 0. Pearce, Jr., of Okeechobee, spoke next on his program for developing feeder calves on pasture. Pearce uses only calves from his breeding program and feeds them on grass and clover combination pastures to about 900-1000 pound weights. He keeps his program flexible enough that he can sell the calves to feedlots or directly to slaughter. Following this program, Pearce reported, the majority of the calves will grade high standard. Pearce said he was convinced that developing feeder calves on pasture would be economical for most areas of Florida. The key to success in raising lightweight calves to feeder weights is to provide a good level of supplemental feed, was the word from Lat Turner of Sarasota. Turner said that several years ago, faced with a depressed calf market, he decided to keep lightweight calves and develop them on Performance Tested HEREFORD BULLS For Sale at CORRIGAN RANCH P 0 Box 3130 Beach Station Ph: 567-7141, 567-2442 Vero Beach, Florida

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FOUR FLORIDA ranchers who appe. red on the Short Course program were, from left. Ralph Sexton; Jeannette Chitty; Jock Sutherland, and K. D. Eatmon. pastures. Turner said the calves weighed about 350 pounds and were put on non-irrigated Pangola pastures and fed about two pounds per head per day of urea-molasses. They were sold in the fall of the following year weighing about 725 pounds each. "The main advantage of this type of program is the enlarged carrying capacity per acre, the low intake of feed, and the relative high per acre beef production received," Turner said. He said it was difficult to obtain exact costs and returns since the program was lumped together with his cow-calf operation, but, he added, "we find it is extremely profitable." R. D. Bennett of Greenwood explained his program for developing calves to feedlot weights with winter grazing. Bennett said he preferred to buy lighter weight calves ranging from 250 to 400 pounds. The calves are brought to the farm and put in small holding pens, Bennett said, where they are given vitamin and combiotic shots and fed plenty of hay and water. After about three days, feed troughs are brought in and the calves are taught to eat a ration of ground ear corn, hulls and molasses, with hay fed free choice. At first, Bennett brings in calves that are already eating and usually within five days all calves are eating well. They are then turned on to well fertilized pasture, either permanent or temporary, whichever is available. Bennett's winter grazing program consists of oats, rye and Rye grass combinations. In the summer months he uses millet for temporary pasture and Coastal Bermuda for permanent pasture. Bennett pointed out that lots of fertilizer and lots of seed must be used to obtain a good grazing program. Following this program 900 to 1000 pounds of live weight cattle can be maintained per acre, according to Bennett. "I have found that the timing in planting small grains and manfor June, 1969 GLADES FEEDER CALF SALE FRIDAY, JULY 11, 2:30 p.m. GLADES LIVESTOCK MARKET 1000 HEAD 800-1000 SELL IN BOARD SALE (TOTAL APPROXIMATELY 2000 HEAD) Heavy Steer and Heifer Calves of All Breeds-Quality Will be Stressed This sale will be a good source of top quality feeder calves due to the early calving season in south Florida. PLAN NOW TO ATTEND For late details, call GLADES LIVESTOCK MARKET Harold Brough, Ph: AC 305/996-3028 Belle Glade, Florida Pete Clemons, Ph: ROdeo 3-3127 Okeechobee, Florida POLLED HEREFORD BULLS One or a Carload WINDSWEEP FARM Ph. 647-3807 Ben & Jane Smith Bud Dempsey Owners Maaer THOMASTON, GA. 30286 CANNAFAX FARMS Registered Herefords HERD SIRES Upstream Real Onward 31st Usram Mischief A147 Dominion Cruiser 34th CF Colorado 555 Dudley Cannafax, Owner, Oscar Craft, Gen. Mgr.v Ed Samuels, Cattle Mgr. BARNESVILLE, GEORGIA Herd Sires In Service: TWD Super Rollo 32 CMR Superol 20 CPH Woodrow 16 CMR Super Rolio 76 SFR CEK Superol SFR Croil Perf Victor SFR Superior Victor CMR Super Domino 136 CMR Rollotrend 56 CEK Rex Mixer 151 CMR Rollotrend 129 Phone 462.1453 .il Snad Mgr Ed -oedie --67

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PERFORMANCE TESTED Hereford Cattle That Perform Well in Florida Come See Our Young Bulls Box 222 Phone: 595-3806 H. A. BEDFORD, Owner G. P. LEITNER, Herdsman Ranch located 12 miles No. of Ocala on U.S. 301 POLLED HEREFORDS "Our 27th Year" CIRCLE T RANCH Clermont, Florida Located 5 miles S. of Groveland off Hwy. 33 Phone: 394-3053 T. F. Thompson, Owner Herefords are just naturally better! Ask us about breeding Herefords and become an active breeder. Florida Hereford ASSOCIATION J. PAT CORRIGAN. President P. 0. Box 3130, Vero Beach, Fla. POLLED HORNED HEREFORDS SINGLETARY FARMS A. J. and R. C. Singletary BLAKELY, GEORGIA Ph. 723-3525 (Office)-723-3196 (Res.) Russell Nash, herdsman-Ph: 723-3481 Residence: Phone 723-3196 2 MI. NW OF BLAKELY ON HWY. 27 RWJ PRACTICAL POLLED -HEREFORDS 22 bulls fed out in 1968 averaged596 lbs. adjusted 205 day weight per the Georgia BCIA. 3.22 lbs. daily gain on feed with a top of 4.23 lbs. 1086 lbs. actual weight at 365 days with two over 1200 lbs. Service Age Bulls For Sale R. W. JONES, JR. FARM Box 157, Rt. 1 -Ph. 912/874-6105 LESLIE, GEORGIA 31764 + Advertise! + HEREFORD BULLS FOR SALE AT THE FARM SAM SELLS & SONS Farm Phone 782-5227 P. 0. Box 174 Moult r i e, Georg i a MEMBER, GEORGIA B.C.L.A. Registered Polled Herefords Clean Pedigrees Wilson Cattle Co. Pat Wilson, Owner Box 65 Phone 635-3787 Frostproof, Fla. Polled Husker Mischiefs RODGERS REGISTERED HORNED HEREFORDS And Complete Livestock Management Service Mr. & Mrs. Bill Rodgers, Jr. Rt. 1, Box 172 Dunnellon, Fla. Ph: Williston 904/528-8142 Located at King Ranch of Florida on SR 464. GDONALSONVILLE, A. REGISTERED HEREFORDS SINCE 1913 The Pioneer Herd of the Southeast Mr. and Mrs. John J. Cummings Mr. and Mrs. Paul S. Stout HOUSTON, HEREFORD FARM, Inc. "20 Years Experience in Horned Here fords" Sam A. Nunn, Owner -S. W. Fisher, Mgr. Phone 987-1612 PERRY, GEORGIA ON HwY. 341, 4.5 MI. S. of PERRY PINE ACRES RANChLl Citra, Florida The Florida Cattleman RUSH BROTHERS HEREFORD FARM 1st Production Sale -December 9, 1969 At The Farm -Offering Bulls and Females All sale animals suitable for reproduction -No Private Sales. Plan now to attend. BOB, KEN and LEE RUSH Phone: Perry Georgia 912/987-1796 or 912/987-3342 -Write: Kathleen, Ga. agement of pastures (including rotation) is most important to obtain best results," he concluded. High Moisture Corn F. S. Baker, Jr., of the North Florida Experiment Station, Quincy, was next to appear with a talk on various methods of storing and processing high moisture corn. Baker said that thoroughly ensiled high moisture shelled corn has given faster gains and improved feed efficiency, as compared with dry corn, for finishing steers at the North Florida Experiment Station. He referred to three trials completed at the station which showed that cattle fed high moisture corn have gained 10.7 percent more efficiently with $2.88 less feed cost per 100 pounds gain. Baker said that in reconstituting corn, be sure to have enough water available. He recommended applying about one gallon of water per bushel of shelled corn or 50 gallons of water per ton of ground snapped corn. Heating the water as it is applied causes better absorption, Baker said. He recommended exposing the grain to water for about two minutes with some agitation such as given by an auger. Baker said that corn should be stored from 10 to 21 days in sealed storage before feeding is begun. If stored in upright sealed storage, he said, rolling or grinding grain as it comes out of the structure seemed to work much better than grinding going into storage. Selling feeder calves by tour sales was the next topic, discussed by B. J. Harris, Highlands County Agricultural Agent. Harris said the Highlands County Cattlemen's Association established the tour sale in 1958 to create better marketing of feeder calves in the area. He said that the tour type sale had worked well for both the seller and buyer for many reasons and pointed specifically to shrinkage and the condition in which the calves arrive at the feedlot. Harris referred to research conducted at Michigan State University which showed shrinkage of cattle going through feeder sales at 11.1 percent and calves shipped direct from the ranch to feedlot had a shrinkage of 9.6 percent. Feeding Programs Warnick presided at the Friday morning session while J. F. Hentges, Jr., animal nutritionist at the University, opened the session with a comparison of feeding programs for growing beef calves after weaning. Hentges reported on research con68

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ducted at several experiment stations on growing feeder calves. "It is wise," Hentges said, "to avoid adopting only one feed formula or one feeding program because flexibility is essential if least-cost diets and leastcost gains are to be achieved." A cattleman must determine what kind of feeding program his situation is best suited for, Hentges said, either full feed, grazing, or a combination of both. He said that maximum flexibility would require that the enterprise have the capacity and facilities to do either or both, depending on which provided the least-cost gains. "Feeding programs," Hentges told the group, "for growing beef calves should be custom-made to fit the situation." J. E. Bertrand, assocaite animal nutritionist, West Florida Experiment, Jay, then spoke on programs for finishing cattle using sorghum silage, high moisture corn and sorghum, and pasture. He discussed five experiments conducted at the West Florida Station on finishing steers. Groups of cattle fed high moisture grains proved to convert more efficient gains, grade higher and have a higher dressing percentage than those fed dry matter or supplemented on grass. All steers involved in the experiments were implanted with diethylstilbestrol. Bertrand said that it appeared from the experiment that all steers should each be implanted in the ear with 36 mg. of diethylstilbestrol as a standard practice prior to finishing in drylot or on pasture. Feeding Corn Silage. Baker returned to discuss the use of corn silage in steer growing and finishing programs. He referred to research conducted at Purdue University where it was found that corn silage, when properly balanced, can replace up to 75 or 90 percent of the corn in a fattening ration. Feed costs and TDN requirements per pounds of gain are almost always less with corn silage than with high grain rations, Baker noted. He said although the cost of producing corn silage in North Florida had not been accurately determined that there was a good possibility that beef production could be increased and costs lowered by making maximum use of corn silage in cattle growing and finishing programs. Baker said corn silage was particularly attractive where grain yields were relatively low. He cited an example at the North Florida Station in 1968 when corn yields were severely damaged by drought and part of the drought damaged corn was harvested for silage. Grain yield avfor June, 1969 VARIOUS METHODS of growing and finishing cattle were discussed in topics presented by the above speakers at the Short Course. From left are, J. E. Bertrand; A. C. Warnick; F. S. Baker, and J. F. Hentges, Jr. eraged only 18 bushels per acre for the ensiled corn, Baker said, and silage harvested per acre was nine tons. He said that drought silage compared very favorably in estimated TDN and contained more crude protein than silage with normal grain content harvested during other years. Baker gave the results of a feeding trial where one group of cattle was fed corn silage supplemented with grain at a level of 1.1 percent of their body weight per head daily, plus protein, minerals, and vitamin A. Another group was fed a high concentrate ration with a daily grain level of 2.1 percent of their body weight with the same supplement. During a 112 day feedlot period the cattle fed corn silage gained just as well and had similar carcass data as the cattle fed the high concentrate ration. The cost per 100 pounds gain was $2.28 lower and net return was $6.93 higher for the cattle fed corn silage, Baker said. He estimated the cost of the corn silage at $10 per ton and the ground snapped corn used in the high concentrate feed at $40 per ton. Bertrand then returned to discuss programs for growing stocker beef calves using sorghum silage, fescue, wheat, and rye. He gave the results of studies using various grazing programs, both supplemented and unsupplemented, for growing stockers. He pointed out that tall fescue and rye grazed in rotation without supplement revealed more profit return per head over other combination grazing programs using small grains and supplementing with protein, minerals, vitamins and concentrate. D. L. Wakeman, associate animal husbandman, University of Florida, presided at the Friday afternoon program which featured various topics of interest to cattle producers. Sunminer Grazing Bertrand appeared again to report on the performance of beef calves grazing summer annual grasses. He compared the performance of steers grazing millet and sorghum-sudan without supplemental feed with steers grazing with supplements. Bertrand said in all cases steers fed supplements out-gained those unsupplemented, and in some cases the supplemented steers returned a higher profit. W. C. "Cal" Burns, superintendent of the Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station, was next on the program. He gave a five year summary of the genetic environmental results with Hereford cattle exchanged between Brooksville and Miles City, Montana. He said that no firm conclusions can be made at this time with respect to the adaptability of the cattle to Florida and that more time would be required to do this. He said that results to date, however, suggest that the Miles City cattle are genetically less well adapted than the Florida line. Early Calving Calving heifers at two years of age versus three years of age was the next topic discussed by Marvin Koger, animal geneticist at the University. He said that the University of Florida Beef Research Unit had been breeding heifers to calve at two years of age successfully. He said there was an economic advantage in calving heifers at two years old and he outlined some of the practices that should be followed. Koger said that feeding and nutrition was very important in this type program and you should know when to feed and when not to feed. "Extreme caution should be exercised in 68A

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anticipating favorable results under less favorable conditions," Koger said. He noted that under unfavorable conditions the practice of calving heifers at two years of age is still not to be recommended. Jock Sutherland appeared again on the program to give his observations on calving heifers at two years old. Sutherland said that in his experience the more English blood in the heifer the better results he obtained. He said that English cattle seemed to breed faster and have a higher conception rate at earlier ages. Sutherland said that if two year old heifers were kept in good shape they would perform as well as three year old heifers. Jeannette Chitty of Stardust Ranch, Micanopy, was next on the program to explain her results with calving heifers at two years of age. Mrs. Chitty said that although the program requires additional feed and attention, it also returned investments faster and seemed to contribute to herd improvement. She said that heifers calving at two years old conceive faster, produce more milk, and are more consistent regular calvers than heifers bred to calve at three. Next to speak on the same subject was Ralph Sexton of Vero Beach. Sexton said that he started his pro.gram for calving heifers at two years old 10 years ago. He said that outstanding results had been obtained except for a period when Vibriosis infected his herd. He said that extra attention and feed was necessary but that little or no difficulty had been experienced in early calving. Death losses in heifers bred to calve at two, Sexton said, have averaged 3.3 percent over the 10 year period. Pat Corrigan, Vero Beach rancher, was next to appear with his versions of calving heifers at two years of age. He said that in order to make the program work it is necessary to provide plenty of feed economically. Corrigan reiterated that extra attention was needed but that calving difficulties were seldom experienced if the heifers were in proper condition. "I feel that breeding heifers to calve at two years of age has paid off for me," Corrigan said, "and in the near future, as pastures are improved by the use of summer legumes, frost resistant strains of grass, and by better management, it should pay even better." Ben W. Hayes of the Everglades Experiment Station, Belle Glade, was next on the program with a report on the control of horn flies and grubs. Hayes gave the results of experiments conducted at the Everglades station New Brands Law Approved by FCA CATTLEMEN WILL be allowed to brand only with brands which are registered with the Florida Department of Agriculture under provisions of Marks and Brands Law amendments approved by the Legislative and Thefts and Brands Committees of the Florida Cattlemen's Association at Kissimmee on May 14. A bill prepared by the Division of Animal Industry of FDA and introduced in both the Florida House and Senate as HB 1213 and SB 6295 was generally approved except for two sections: At the request of the Florida Association of Livestock Markets, a section requiring markets to keep a record of drivers, their license numbers and truck tag numbers was removed. This information will be collected by state inspectors instead. In another section, a requirement that cattle moving by truck be accompanied by information as to brands was eliminated. Under the new law, effective January 1 if passed, use of unregistered brands will be illegal, law enforcement officers will be given authority to impound cattle where there is insufficient proof of ownership, and truckers will be licensed by FDA annually. All cattle moving on Florida highways must be accompanied by "satisfactory evidence" as to their ownership. FDA is preparing a special form for this purpose. since 1957 in which several materials were tested for the control of these insects. He said that Ronnel, Tiguvon, Co-Ral, Ciodrin, Neguvon, Ruelene, and Famophos had been found effective in the control of horn flies and cattle grubs. Production Testing ... One of the highlights of the Friday afternoon program was the annual presentation of the Florida Banker's Association award for the best production testing program in Florida. Pace presented Louis Gilbreath, chairman of FBA's livestock committee, who presented the award to H. C. Douglas of K-Bar Ranch, Zephyrhills. K. D. Eatmon, winner of last year's award, told of the testing program in effect at his ranch at Pompano Beach. Eatmon cited the increase in weight of calves and performance of cattle since initiating the production testing program on his ranch. Eatmon said one major accomplishment that he achieved with production testing was getting his heifers large enough to breed to calve as two year olds. He said their weight at calving time averages about 1000 pounds. Concepts Must Change R. L. Reddish, associate extension meats specialist from the University, presided over the Friday evening session. Wakeman was the first speaker and covered the subject of the "Modern-type Steer." Wakeman said that a better name for the modern-type steer might be "high-profit" steer. He said the old concepts of ideals for beef cattle have been shaped like cubes or rectangles. "Muscles are oval," Wakeman said, "not square." He used colored slides to illustrate the modern type steer. On foot pictures and cross-sections of the carcass were shown so that cattlemen could view the muscle development and fat deposits. Wakeman said that livestock people must change their concepts in order to keep up with consumer changes. A. Z. Palmer, University of Florida meats specialist, covered the carcass characteristics of the modern meat type steer. Palmer also used slides to compare carcass cuts of different type steers. He said that one of the biggest problems in the livestock industry was the wasty, excessively over finished cattle. In 1967, Palmer said, the beef industry produced almost 2.4 billion pounds of excess fat. He said that even a modern type carcass could be over finished, and that both breeders and feeders must tailor their programs to fit consumer demands. A panel discussion was held next consisting of Ralph Cellon, Jr., Alachua, cattle feeder; Fred Goedert, Jones-Chambliss Packing Company, Jacksonville, packer; W. F. Snead, Jr., Winn Dixie Stores, Jacksonville, retailer; Bob Crane, cattle breeder; Koger, geneticist; and Reddish, meats specialist. The panel moderator was Palmer. Avoid Extremes Wakeman summarized the discussion saying that all facets of the livestock industry have problems and the modern type steer must fit in with all phases of the industry. He warned cattlemen to avoid extremes and to The Florida Cattleman 68B

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maintain the quality that the housewife demands. All areas of the livestock industry, Wakeman said, must be geared to consumer needs. Cunha presided over the final session on Saturday morning, May 3, which was held at the University of Florida Beef Research Unit, near Gainesville. Cunha gave the group some background on the organization of the Beef Research Unit and introduced the first speaker, W. G. Blue of the University of Florida Soils Department. Blue discussed lime and fertilizer recommendations for white clover-grass forage production on flat woods soils. Blue said that white clover-grass pastures had been grown at the Beef Research Unit for the past 17 years without irrigation. Some irregularity in forage yields has occurred, he said, but the clover has never failed to produce forage, fix significant amounts of nitrogen or reseed. He said no replanting had been done except where pastures had been renovated. "To insure success," Blue recommended, "soil pH must be maintained at approximately 6.0 with calcic lime. Dolomitic lime should be applied within approximately five years of the initiation of pasture production on new land, and approximately each 10 years thereafter." He said that phosphate and potash must be applied annually and gave recommendations on amounts to use. Pasture Production ... The next speaker was G. B. Killinger, from the Department of Agronomy at the University. Killinger's topic was "Pasture Production Recommendations." He told the group that Leon fine sand and closely related soils as found on the Beef Research Unit support excellent grass and legume pastures when properly limed and fertilized. He said that experiments had shown Pensacola Bahia grass and Argentine Bahia grass best suited for this type soil, and that white clover seems to do best in the legume species. Killinger said that grass-clover combination pastures had yielded more beef per acre per dollar invested than grass pastures without clover at the research unit. "There is no substitute in pasture performance," he said, "for an adapted, palatable, digestible, nutritious grass and legume coupled with the correct fertilizer applied at the right time, lime, minor elements, moisture, favorable temperature, sunshine and management." J. M. Myers, Agricultural Engineering Department, gave the audi(Continued on page 85) HIGHEST QUALITY BRAHMANS From our constructive, selective, breeding program Adaptable -Dependable Dist. of the TECO Cattle Squeeze -TECO Calf Chute The best of cattle handling equipment 10" 4 CATTLE COMPANY P. 0. BOX 1088 -OCALA, FLORIDA Charolais Charbray LIVE OAK PLANTATION, LTD. Jack King, Manager Home of Pancho's Pride Ph: (AC 904) flI 237-2550 Ocala, Fla. 237-3401 HEART BAR RANCH Still producing top quality BRAHMANS Henry 0. Partin & Sons KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA Registered Brahman Cattle J. K. STUART BARTOW FLORIDA PHONE 622-7151 MANSO BRED Brahman Bulls & Commercial Cattle FOR SALE (2 & 3 yrs. old-ready for breeding) REMSBERG RANCH Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33314 4600 W, Broward Blvd. Ph: 603-3691 Registered Brahmans & Quarter Horses BARTHLE Brothers Ranch San Antonio, Florida Phones: 8-2206 58-2207 Florida BRAHMAN Association Kelly Lyons, Secretary Livestock Exchange Building KISSIMMEE FLORIDA F LO I AR A NC H E N TE R PR ISES, I NC C eehns MIlAMI BRAHMANS FOR SALE 754-2955 A891-4494 EFL0RID ADHENEPRS __C Tlphn5 Wo SOUTH BAY 996-5186 I for June, 1969 69

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F-R-M SUPER CREEP TWENTY ALL NEW The most efficient known method to creep feed calves WHY CREEP FEED CALVES? Extra calf weight, Extra profit over feed costs, Calves are pre-conditioned, Weaning creep fed calves is simpler, Extra cow condition, Increased calf crop the following year. F-R-M SUPER CREEP TWENTY is a combination of grain, supplement, milk products, vitamins and trace minerals made into a pellet form containing a minimum of 20% protein to hold the consumption rate down and to help calves better utilize pasture. PRODUCES GROWTHY CALVES WITHOUT EXCESS FAT Returns from the "extras" gained from creep feeding can result in profits equal to one extra calf for every 10 calves creep fed. Buy your supply now from your local F-R-M Dealer FLINT RIVER MILLS, INC. FEED F AINRI E GILS IN. Shorthorns-Polled Shorthorns More of the essentials practical cattlemen everywhere are demanding. For a list of the top sources of supply in Georgia, Alabana, Florida. and South Carolina address Richard Irwin, Sec'y, SE Shorthorn Breeders Ass'n, P.O. Box 110, Sandersville, Ga. REGISTERED SHORTHORNS -of Size and QualitySee the results from Ton Herd bulls -and Selections since 1953 The C F Ranch Corrie & Fred Tilden Ph: 876-2482, P. 0. Box 472 WINTER GARDEN. FLA. 32787 Registered-Purebred BRAHMANS Always a good selection of top quality bulls for sale. P. 0. Box y06, Miami, Fla. 33145 Clewiston Phone: 983-7338 Miami Phone: 444-7184 Ranch located on State Rd. $33, west of CLEWISTON, FLORIDA PUREBRED BRAHMANS featuring more flesh, stronger bone, larger size, with gentle dispositions Phone: NE 6-3966 Registered BRAHMAN CAI=, Phone 533-4727 M. E. (Max) Hammond BARTOW FLORIDA FOR SHORTHORN INFORMATION CONTACT Florida Shorthorn Breeders' Ass'n Mrs. H. L. Smith, Secretary 300 Lake Elbert Drive WINTER HAVEN, FLORIDA REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORNS Growthy-Rugged Fully Acclimated for Southern Conditions PINEVIEW FARMS Paul Ragans, owner Route 2 Ph: 971-5417 Madison, Florida 5 miles east on U. S. 90 Brahman Men Tour Wolfe, Tucker Ranches BRAHMAN BREEDERS and commercial cattlemen from Florida and Georgia gathered at St. Augustine for an annual meeting of the Florida Brahman Association and a field day tour of Wolfe Ranch near St. Augustine and Haw Creek Ranch, Bunnell, on Saturday, May 10. The tour started at Wolfe Ranch, where the visitors saw the cow-calf operation, using crossbred brood cows with purebred British bulls. Herschel Parrish, ranch manager, told the group that it was necessary to carry Brahman blood for efficient production of beef in the area. At the ranch feedlots cross bred steers were being finished for the slaughter market. The visitors expressed interest in the silage program. A forage type of sorghum is interplanted with corn, increasing production to an average of over 20 tons of silage per acre at the time of harvest. Two tractors with forage harvesters keep seven dump wagons busy hauling the forage to the horizontal silos, which are located near the fields. Parrish said that steers are prepared for the feedlot by supplementing them on pasture with approximately four pounds of concentrate per day, so that when they go into the feedlot there is no time lost in adjusting them to the ration, and they finish faster. Following the tour of Wolfe Ranch, the group gathered at the St. Johns County Fair Grounds for a barbecue lunch and the business meeting of the association. It was "oted to hold the next field day in Tifton, Georgia, in coooperation with Max Tucker, a Brahman breeder from that area. The tentative date is set for early September, and the tour will include, besides a visit to the purebred operation of Tucker, a visit to ranches in the area where Brahman bulls are used on British type cattle. A visit to Haw Creek Ranch, owned by Raymon Tucker, wound up the tour. Here the visitors saw a purebred Brahman herd, a commercial herd made up of Brahman x Angus crossbred cows, and some of the Quarter Horses produced on the ranch, among them Go Dick Go, the winner of the All American Futurity in 1966. PUT IDLE acres to work. Plant pines for profit. The Florida Cattleman 70

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BEEF BUILDERS! Get Acquainted With ... CHAROLAIS & CHARBRAY America's Modern Beef Producing Cattle Eastern CHAROLAIS-CHARBRAY Association HAROLD BRITT, Secretary P.O. Box 1197 Winter Garden, Fla. 32787 Affiliated with the American International Charolais Association Charolais Home of imported Cattle Ayavalla Plantation Jack Pons, Mgr., Phone 385-4477 or 385-2065 Box 3166, Tallahassee, Florida Practical, Florida raised Charolais-Charbray EL MAXIMO RANCH Pat Wilson, Mgr. Ph. 635-3708 FROSTPROOF, FLORIDA CHAROLAIS and CHARBRAY CATTLE K RANCH H. C. Douglas Ph: 813 782-2569 Ph: 813 782-1936 ZEPHYRHILLS, FLORIDA 8 MI. SW of Zephyrhills On Morris Bridge Rd. 100 Head Young 1/2-7/8 Charolais Cows (many with calves). A Good Deal if all are Taken. T. M. BRITT P. 0. Box 308-Office Ph: 305/656-1553 WINTER GARDEN, FLORIDA LEO FAUROT, MANAGER Phone: Orlando 305/277-4908 Phone 904-439-2136 KINGS ROAD T Double L Ranch BREEDER OF PUREBRED CHAROLAIS Owners P.O. BOX 656 Mr. and Mrs. Bunnell, Fla. Thomas 1. Lenssen 32010 W. L. Timmons and Son Timbrook Farms FRENCH CharolaiS DOMESTIC Brooksville, Florida Phone: 796-9913 Z, $1.1 Million Sale Announced By Ayavalla JACK PONS, manager of Ayavalla Plantation, Tallahassee, recently reported the sale of 16 pure French Charolais females to Beckwith-Hutchkins Charolais Ranches at Progresso and Raymondville, Texas. The sale price for the 16 animals, all with calves at side, was $1.1 million, for an average of $68,750 each. Pons said that as far as available records show, the transaction probably represents the highest price ever paid per cow in any private treaty sale in the world. "There are only about 100 pure French Charolais females in the United States," Pons said, "and this 16 head will put Beckwith-Hutchkins somewhere close to the top in the number owned. Ralph Hutchkins and Art Beckwith, co-owners of the Texas operation, visited Ayavalla in March to make the purchase. Ayavalla Plantation is owned by John H. Phipps of Tallahassee, who also operates ranches in the Bahamas and Canada. According to Pons, there are still 10 head of pure French Charolais females at the Tallahassee location, and they are maintaining 85 head in Canada and 20 head in the Bahamas, totaling the largest herd of pure French Charolais cattle in the Western Hemisphere. Nowak Heads N.W. Florida Ass'n THE NORTHWEST Florida Cattlemen's Association met at the Experiment Station at Jay recently and named E. 0. Nowak as president for the ensuing year. Santa Rosa and Escambia Counties rotate officers each year in the association. Hankins Mathews was elected vice president, Vonzie Godwin, treasurer and Lowell Loadholtz, secretary. Directors for the group are G. D. Jernigan and Juverne Howell. As one of its primary projects, the Northwest membership has scheduled a feeder calf sale at the Jay Livestock Market, September 11, to join in with 19 other sponsored sales of stockers and feeders to be held throughout the state this summer and fall. PINES STAND tall in Florida's future. Plant pines for profit. for June, 1969 71 + Advertise + Registered Purebred CATTLE Exclusively LAZY W RANCH Land O'Lakes, Florida Mr. and Mrs. Otto Weaver, Owners Phone 892-5241, 800 26 Avenue North ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA HERD IS BRUCELLOSIS CERTIFIED AND TB ACCREDITED L RANCH Home of Charolais and Charbray Cattle FOR SALE We presently have some good bulls available ..also, some young pureblood heifers and good young 15/16 heifers and bulls. All heifers calfhood vaccinated Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Land Phone Eastpoint 670-4462 CARRABELLE, FLORIDA American International Charolai. As'n American Charbray Breeders A 'n Eastern Charolais & Charbray Assen ALL FRENCH Herd MAR-K Ctarofai3 -JA94 Springi, JYorida Tom and Marlene McLeod Owners Ph: Ranch Office: 904/454-2106 Purebred Charolais & Charolais-Cross PX Ranch George & Agnes Taylor, owners Office Phone 263-7221 Quitman, Georgia 31643

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CattlemenCustom Artificial insemination For Your Beef Herd Experienced inseminators available Liquid nitrogen kits available on a monthly rental basis. TOP NOTCH Progeny Tested Bulls Available Angus Horned Hereford Beef Shorthorn Polled Hereford Brahman Red Angus Charolais Simmental Santa Gertrudis Ask about our Horse A. I. program. A new development with ABS! mV 5 NOTICE ABS will sponsor an Artifi5 cial Inseminators Training School at Orlando June 2527. For Details Write or Call: Phone or write: George Manter 4138 Piper Drive Jacksonville, Fla., Ph: 733-2882 Wilbur Aikens 1822 Maywood Road winter Park, Fla., Ph: 671-3838 ARS CHAROLAIS Certified brucellosis-free herd. Circle Y Ranch Oscar and Yvonne Heil A good selection of young bulls for sale Rt. 3, Box 162 Phone: AC 904 Monticello, Fla. 997-2226 Z J/ 2. Ran/4 .CHAROLAIS CATTLE Herd Sires: Imported French Bulls: FCI B46; FCI B31; Ayavalla. Lisle R. Bowers, Manager Rt. 3 Smokey Road -Tel: 404/253-0328 NEWNAN, GEORGIA by T. J. CUNHA Department of Animal Science. University of Florida The World's Food Problem LET'S LOOK at the world food picture. The world population will double in the next 35 to 40 years. If we do not produce enough food now, what are the consequences going to be then. To focus this on a personal basis, suppose we have a son or grandson being born now and he lives his normal life span of 70 years. He will see a doubling and redoubling of the population in the U. S. This means he will live to see about 800 million people in the U. S. If he does, can we assure him of an adequate supply of food during his lifetime? I don't know. It will depend on many factors. Increased productivity per animal unit and per acre will definitely be needed. This means that an aggressive program in research and education will be a must. By the year 2,000, or even earlier, we may be requiring the following productivity in the livestock field in the United States. a) That a beef cow raise 2 calves (200 percent calf crop) per year--as compared to 85 percent calf crop now. b) That a sow raise 30 or more pigs per year-as compared to 15 pigs now. c) And that a ewe raise seven or eight lambs per year-as compared to 1.3 now. d) That a mare have a foal per year-instead of 50 percent foal crop now. These goals can be accomplished if vigorous research programs are followed. Similar increased production goals will be needed with grains and other farm crops. Without an aggressive research program, the day will be speeded up when we will have to make the choice of whether to feed our grain to animals or to ourselves. In Asia, this choice was made a long time ago. They feed the grain to themselves and are on an "Asiatic grain-type diet." They cannot afford to feed eight to 10 pounds of grain to get a pound of beef in return. The calories in the grain relieve more hunger by being fed directly to humans. I am sure, however, that the American people will not want to start consuming a "grain-type diet" any sooner than they have to. They will want to be able to produce enough grain to feed it to animals and get steak, roast, ham, bacon, eggs, mirk, cheese and other animal products in return. These appetizing and highly relished foods are an important part of our diet and they give pleasure and satisfaction to eating. This is part of our high standard of living and we will want to keep it as long as possible. It is estimated that 10,000 children die from hunger and starvation every day. Child mortality is very high in the developing countries. In Chile for example, 140 out of every 1000 children born die before they reach their first birthday. In the northeastern part of Brazil, where 1/3 of their population lives, from 300 to 600 out of each 1000 children born die before they reach one year of age. Thus, it's quite clear that poor and inadequate food and nutrition take a heavy death toll in the developing countries. It is also estimated that in these countries, almost 1/2 of the children surviving their first birthday will die before they reach 16 years of age. Those who live past 16 will have a life span of 30 to 35 years. They will, in most cases, be hungry, tired and sick most of their lives. Moreover, only a small percentage of them will learn to read and write. Many will have to live in tents, mud huts or shacks. Thus, a good share of these children don't have much to look forward to by U. S. standards. These few facts make it clear that hunger, or a lack of food, is one of the biggest problems faced throughout the world. In my opinion, it's our biggest problem today. We don't think of it as such in the United States because most of us are concerned about "eating too much" rather than "not enough to eas." I am sure that many of the social upheavals and many of the world's problems trace to billions of hungry people desperate for food. 72 The Florida Cattleman

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Tilt lorid "W. lw A m wo l ow I

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GRAND CHAMPION stallion at the LADY LUCKY BAR was the grand Lutz show was Coffee Bar King, owned champion mare at the Lutz show. She is by A. R. Hill of Miami. owned by 0. T. Daniel of Winter Garden. GELDING champion at Lutz was Leo's Doubletime, owned by E. R. Crossman Farms of Plantation. Quarter Horse Events at Lutz and Tampa Highlight Activities During April Two QUARTER HORSE Shows were highlighted during the month of April at Lutz and Tampa, with excellent competition seen in all the classes. April 19 was the date for the Lutz show held at the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Posse Arena on the North Dale Mabry Highway. The show saw 250 registered entries and a total of 345 entries competing in the various events with Mike Rutherford of Houston, Texas, doing the judging. Coffee Bar King, owned by A. R. Hill of Miami, was named grand champion stallion winning out over Eight to the Bar, owned by Oddis Reeves of Tallahassee, who took the reserve stallion honor. The grand champion mare was Lady Lucky Bar, owned by 0. T. Daniel of Winter Garden, while Dottie Bar Bob, owned by Mrs. John Olinger, Lake Park, was named reserve champion mare. In the gelding competition, Leo's Doubletirne, owned by E. R. Crossman Farms, Plantation, was selected as grand champion, with Dyna Go Boy, owned by H. W. Curtis of Fort Lauderdale, taking the reserve champion ribbon. In the performance events, Deal's Favorite, ridden by Lee English and owned by Flying Dutchman Ranch, Lecanto, won the junior western pleasure class while Ben's Black Boy, ridden by Lee English and owned by Richard Horse Cover OUR COVER picture for this month shows riders putting their horses through their paces in the junior western pleasure class at the 1969 Florida State Fair Quarter Horse Show. Kaufman, took the senior event. Junior English pleasure was won by Senator's Pigeon, ridden by Linda Lyman and owned by Oscar Alvarez, with the senior event being won by Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Tommy Faircloth and owned by C. W. Bockelman, New Smyrna Beach. Taco Lee Ann, ridden by Jack Hennig and owned by Adrian Chapman, Wauchula, took first place in junior reining, while the senior event was won by Jay's Sugar Bars, ridden by Carol Harris and owned by Carol & Buck Harris, Reddick. The trial class saw Pine's Holly Boy, ridden by Danna Sawl and owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store, Davie, taking the first spot, and the open barrel race was won by Reese's Star, ridden and owned by Mary Ann Fortner, Odessa. Redigo Priest, ridden and owned by Marc De Champlain, Winter Garden, won the western riding event. First place in the open cutting competition went to Speck Daniel, ridden by Buck Daniel and owned by D. R. Daniel & Sons, Okeechobee. Top honors in senior cutting went to Josie Cody, ridden and owned by C. F. Fuller of Catasuagua, Pennsylvania, while Misty Romance won the junior cutting event for owner and rider Spencer Harden of Sanford. The youth all-around winner at the Lutz show was George Williams of West Palm Beach. At the Tampa show, held April 20, there were 200 entries and 58 youth entries. Sonny Minges of Fayetteville, North Carolina, judged all the classes and he picked Eagle Man, owned by Herschel Williams of Tampa as grand champion stallion and Eight to the Bar, owned by Oddis Reeves as the reserve champion. Grand champion mare was Miss Brown Bego, owned by Stephanie Kay Stephenson, Anderson, Indiana, while Hia Rosa Twist, a Jay's Feed & Western Store entry, was picked as reserve champion. Another Stephenson entry, Rusty Squirrel, was named grand champion gelding, with the reserve championship going to Red Mac Bee 3, owned by Shela K. Ellis of Pompano Beach. The performance classes saw Cash'em Roan, ridden by Faircloth and owned by Green, winning the junior western'pleasure event, with the senior event going to Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by FairBockelman. Marc De Champlain rode Redigo Priest to win the western riding event, while the trail class was won by Poco Penrose, ridden and owned by Tom Deserable of Lithia. The open barrel race winner was Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth and owned by Faircloth and owned by Bockelman. Junior western pleasure competition was won by Hia Rosa Twist, ridden by Danna Sawl and owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store, with Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth and owned by Bockelman, taking the senior event. Two entries from Jay's Feed & Western Store took both the junior reining and senior reining events. Sissy Pete was winner of the junior class while Cocoon took top honors in the senior competition. Both entries were ridden by Caponey. George Williams was the all-around youth champion at the Tampa show and Tenn Cody Noche, the C. W. Bockelman entry, was named the all-around champion horse for both shows. Complete results for the two shows to three places, with number of entries in parentheses, are as follows: Tampa 1918 stallions (13) -Talleyho Tom, Alfred Meeks, Belle Glade; Eternal Flicker, Carol & Buck Harris, Reddick; Poco Chobee, Gene Jackson Belle Glade: 1967 stallions 8)-Cutter Daniel, John Drenik Ranch, Okeechobee; Bar Eternal, F. E. Stanfield, Dade City; Wrangler Bonanza, Kellai Farm, Sparr; The Florida Cattleman

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1966 stallions (5)-Double Boomer, Olin Mott, Tampa; Golden Luck Tuno, Mildred Klink, Orlando; Starkey's Star, Fred Ditzian, Miami; Aged stallions (9)-Eagle Man (grand champion), Herschel Williams, Tampa; Eight to the Bar (reserve grand champion), Oddis Reeves, Tallahassee; Jimbo San, Buck Mann, Bartow; 1968 mares (8)-Eternal Luv, Carol & Buck Harris, Reddick; Lady Lee Hill, C. G. Parker, Gainesville; Dutchess Eagle, Flying Dutchman Ranch, Lecanto; 1967 mares (12)-Lady Lanora, Linetta DiPietro & Beverly Grubb, Pompano Beach; Renee's Luck, Meeks; Tyson's Beauty, Robert Freeman, Ocala; 1966 mares (10)-Wimpy Doodlum, Robyn Holbert, Coral Gables; Clarion's Joy, Niki Freeman, Ocala; Princess Boss, Bobbi Deserable, Lithia; Aged mares (17)-Miss Brown Bego (grand champion), Stephanie Kay Stephenson, Anderson, Indiana; Hia Rosa Twist (reserve grand champion), Jay's Feed & Western Store, Davie: Lady Lucky Bar, 0. T. Daniel, Winter Garden; 1968 geldings (1)-Unnamed William C. Clark, Hialeah Gardens; 1967 geldings (5)-Mr. Rust Bars, Charles R. Leonard, Hialeah Gardens; Hickory Bar Bert, James C. Thompson, Pompano Beach; War Boots, Robert Freeman, Ocala; 1966 geldings (6)-Red Mac Bee 3 (reserve grand champion), Shela K. Ellis, Pompano Beach; Leo's Doubletime, E. R. Crossman Farms, Plantation; Readmeador, Arnold F. Saraw, Tampa; Aged geldings (9)-Rusty Squirrel (grand champion), Stephanie Kay Stephenson; Dyna Go Boy, H. W. Curtis, Fort Lauderdale; Leo Tan, Robert Warren, Lexington, Kentucky; Junior western pleasure (27) -Cash'em Roan, ridden by Tommy Faircloth, owned by Jack D. Green, New Smyrna Beach; Lady Lanora, ridden by Beverly Grubb, owned by Linetta DiPietro & Beverly Grubb; His Rosa Twist, ridden by Jay Caponey, owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store, Davie; Senior western pleasure (21) -Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by C. W. Bockelman, New Smyrna Beach; Poco Penrose, ridden and owned by Tom Deserable, Lithia; Pampa's Leo, ridden by Roy Nolan, owned by C. M. Whitfield, Perry; Western riding (5)-Redigo Priest, ridden and owned by Marc De Champlain, Winter Garden; Golddust Gal, ridden and owned by Kathleen Stanfield, Dade City; Red Mac Bee 3, ridden by Donna Wright, owned by Shela K. Ellis, Pompano Beach; Trail class (10)-Poco Penrose, ridden and owned by Tom Desesable, Lithia; Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by Bockelman; Dapple Rey, ridden and owned by Jere Miller, Riverview; Barrel race (all ages) (2)-Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by Bockelman; Cocoon, ridden by Jay Caponey, owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store; Junior English pleasure (12)-Hia Rosa Twist, ridden by Danna Sawl, owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store; Deal's Favorite, ridden by Lee English, owned by Flying Dutchman Ranch; Senator's Pigeon, ridden by Linda Lyman, owned by Oscar Alvarez, Tampa; Senior English pleasure (10) -Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by Bockelman; Lady Senior, ridden by Martha Bennett, owned by E. R. Crossman Farms; Dyna Go Boy, ridden by Linda Curtis, owned by H. W. Curtis Junior reining (7)-Sissy Pete, ridden by Caponey, owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store; Taco Lee Ann, ridden by Jack Hennig, owned by Adrian Chapman, Wauchula; Breezing Cool, ridden by Joe Lott, owned by Doyle Conner, Jr., Tallahassee; Senior reining (3)-Cocoon, ridden by Caconey, owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store; Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by Bo elman; Dime Belle, ridden by Marc De Champlain. owned by Barbara Penney, Orlando; Youth showmanship at halter (14) -Little John Doe, George Williams, West Palm Beach; Sowega Sue, Mary Calire Kendall, Delray Beach; Sowega Sinda Bar, Sally Bruce, West Palm Beach: Youth western pleasure (23) -Kay Bell Bar, Michelle Meehan, West Palm Beach;Bob's Pick, Karen Pridemore, Pompano Beach; Rusty J Som, Bruce Nigels, Jacksonville; Youth Horsemanship (21)-Little John Doe, Williams Sowega Sue, Kendall; Foxi Shot, Buddyv M'orales, Jr., Tampa. Lutz 1968 stallions (17) -Eternal Flicker, Carol & Buck Harris, Reddick; Talley Ho Tom, Alfred Meeks, Belle Glade; Unnamed, Norma Corbett, Sebring; 1967 stallions (7) -Cutter Daniel, John Drenik Ranch, Okeechobee; Chapeppy Buck, E. R. Crossman Farms, Plantation; Wrangler Bonanza, Kelli Al Farm, Sparr; 196 stallions (8)-Double Boomer, Olin Mott, Tampa; Golden Luck Tuno, Mildred Klink, Orfor June, 1969 75 Sold only Through Authorized H Bar C Dealers The Quality Brand everybody knows HALPERN & CHRISTENFELD, INC. 101 W. 21st St., New York/Denver/Los Angeles Florida Cattleman Advertising Makes Dollars Breeding BeeFmaster Cattle in Florida For Florida Cattlemen Seven Lazy Eleven Ranch 7 Carl Glidden. Owner Madison J. McKay, Mgr. Telephone: AC 813/LY 7-3755 NAPLES, FLORIDA 33940 See these H-Bar-C Dealers: McLelland Shoe & Saddle Shop, Lake Worth Ranchland, Fort Pierce Quality Shops, Clearwater Gainesville Stockman Supply, Gainesville B. E. Purcell Co., Orlando The Fair Store, Okeechobee Hardee Livestock Mkt., Wauchula STETSON & BAILEY HATS RANCH & WESTERN WEAR LEVIS -WRANGLER'S e BOOTS GOOLWDS 26 Broadway Kissimmee, Fla. For the Well Dressed Westerner A NEW style Western Suit .the latest in fashion! Meticulously tailored for perfection of fit, in choice of Imported ultra fine iridescent worsteds, sharkskins and wool and silk blends.

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They'll S ou Our 16th Annual Quarter Horse Productin al Saturday, June 21-120 P. At Our Ranch They've Got The Nerve, and They've Got The Blood. Look at the lines of our stallions TENNESSEE, P-43,874-by Hot Rock, out of Little Breezy D TENNESSEE STUD, 171,187-by Tennessee, out of Carrie Notion B KENTUCKY, 195,378-by Roman Sword, TB, out of Cow Lady COWBOY TURP, P-146,218-by Poco Turp, out of Cow Lady EDDIE DEXTER, P-76,900-by Teddy Dexter, out of an Eddie mare Write for catalog-Please include your Zip Code P.O. Box 5z0 telephone tilI 642-5414 R. B. CAROTHERS -Chairman of the Board .CLIFFORD WYATT -In Charge of Horses MILKING SHORTHORNS Highest $ and Average Value International Carcass Contest 1966: High Cutability %-only 1/2" fat thickness of av. steers in Kansas Carcass Evaluation Center. MILK MAKES THE DIFFERENCE For substantiating facts and literature write: 313 S. Glenstone, Springfield, Mo. 65802 Milking Shorthorns (Durhams), For Cross-breeding RIDGECREST FARMS HERD SIRE: KA FANTASTIC ADAIR. Color-Roan; Weaning Wt.-745 lbs.; Wt. at 13 mo.-1190 lbs.; Present wt.-over 2000 lbs.; Gain tested-4 lbs. per day in official Kansas feed test. BULLS: Polled and Horned usually for sale-come & see. PAUL R. LEWIS & SONS Rt. 1, Box 233, Monticello-Ph. 997-1592 "TEST and WEIGH TO MAKE BEEF CATTLE PAY" Ask about Joining-Contact J. E. PACE F FBCIA Sec'y B.F McCarty Hall, U. of Fla. Gainesville, Florida Service Boars & Gilts For Sale "Export Orders Our Specialty" GATRELL DUROC FARM Phone (Fred) 591-1452, (Henry) 501-1709 FAIRFIELD, FLORIDA 32634 Iando;s, Sinsrkey's Star, F. M. Dilzian, Miami; Aasd 's lions (12)--Cofee Ber King (grand hmpiOn), As. R. 14111, Miami; Eight To The Bar (roesrv grand champion), Oddis Reeves, 'Taah-sse"; Eagle Man, Hershel Williams, I 19 mares (10) -Dottie Bar Bob (reserve grandsi champion), Mrs. John Olinger, Lake Park; Eternal Luv, Carol & Buck Harris; Doichoss Eagle, Flying Dutchman Ranch, Lecantm; 1967 mares (17)-Rene's Luck Meeks; Full Star. I. A. Lewis, West Palm Beach; Tyson's Bieantv, Mr. & Mrs. Robert Freeman, Ocala; 19G( mares (13)-Hickorv Bar Lady, Hickory hill Farm, Gainesville; Clarion's Jay, Mr. & M'rs. Robert Freeman; Wimpy Doodlum, Robyn Holtbcrt, Coral Gables; Aged mares (20)-Lady Lucky Bar (grand champion), 0. T. Daniel. Winter Garden; Present Me, Wayne Bell, Fort Worth, Texas; Katie's Dream, Gerald McKinney, Miami; 1968 geldings (1)-Unnamed, William Clark, lialeah Gardens; 1967 geldings (6)-War Boots, Mr. & Mrs. lRobert Freeman; Copper Jing Jing, Dr. Graydon Cloud, Lakeland; Rudy Lee's King, Jack Alvarez, Perry; 1966 geldings (6)-Leo's Doubletime (grand champion), E. R. Crossman Farms, Plantation; Readameador, Arnold Saraw, Tampa; Red Mac Bee 3, Shela Ellis, Pompano Beach; Aged geldings (8)-Dyna Go Boy (reserve grand champion), H. W. Curtis, Fort Lauderdale; Cocoon, Jay's Feed & Western Store, Davie; Lightning Lad, Linda Lou Dytes, Tampa; Junior western pleasure (31)-Deal's Favorite, ridden by Lee English, owned by Flying Dutchman Ranch; Cash'em Roan, ridden by Tommy Faircloth, owned by Jack Green, New Smyrna Beach; Starkey's Star, ridden and owned by Fred Ditzian. Miam: Senior western pleasure (20)-Ben's Black Boy, ridden by Lee English, owned by Richard Kaufman, Inverness; Poco Delleda, ridden by Carol Harris. owned by Carol & Buck Harris; Little John Doe, ridden and owned by George Williams, West Palm Beach; Junior English pleasure (8)-Senator's Pigeon, ridden by Linda Lyman, owned by Oscar Alvarez; King's Nite Out, ridden by Doran Zazueta, owned by A. Zazueta, Tampa; Deal's Favorite, ridden by Lee English, owned by Flying Dutchman Ranch: Senior english pleasure (10)-Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by Bockelman; Miss Swen 89. ridden and owned by Monika Treadway, Island Grove; Girl Freckle 130, ridden and owned by Jay Franke, Davie; Trail class (9)-Pine's Holly Boy, ridden by Danna Sawl, owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store; Wapala June, ridden and owned by Catherine Deaker, Lutz; Cocoon, ridden by Jay Caponey, owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store; ,Junior reining (12) 'Faco Lee Ann, ridden by Jack Hennig, owned by Adrian Chapman, Wauchula; Sissy Pete, ridden by Caponey owned by Jay's Feed & Western Store; Arrow Step, ridden by Salty Langford, owned by William P. Ball, Sanford; Senior reining (5)-Jay's Sugar Bars, ridden by Carol Harris, owned by Carol & Buck Harris; Miss Swen 89, ridden by Salty Langford, owned by Monika Treadway; Tenn Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by Bockelman; Barrel race (all ages) (3)-Reese's Star, ridden and owned by Mary Ann Fortner, Odessa; Term Cody Noche, ridden by Faircloth, owned by Bockelman; Cucaway, ridden and owned by David Mitchell, Plant City; Western riding (13)-Redigo Priest, ridden and owned by Marc De Champlain, Winter Garden; Red Mac Bee 3, ridden by Donna Wright, owned by Shela Ellis, Pompano Beach; Rusty J Som, ridden and owned by Bruce Nigels, Jacksonville; Open cutting (13)-Speck Daniel, ridden by Buck Daniel, owned by D. R. Daniel & Sons, Okeechobee; Amber's Jay Bay, ridden and' owned by Bill Cone, Ocala; Mas Chiquita, Luskey & McDonald, Clyde, Texas; Junior cutting (3)-Misty Romance, ridden andi owned by Spencer Harden, Sanford; John Daniel, ridden by Ben Gill, owned by Daniel & Sons; Kitty's Holly, ridden by Joe Lott, owned by White Construction Company, Chiefland; Senior cutting (11)-Josie Cody, ridden and owned by C. F. Fuller, Catasuaqua, Pennsylvania; I'll Dance, ridden and owned by Spencer Harden, Sanford; Plain Slates, ridden by Walter Mann, owned by Oscar Alvarez; Novice horse ($500 limit) (14)-Ponder's Ace, ridden by Walter Mann, owned by Oscar Alvarez; Cathy's Hollywood, ridden and owned by Salty Langford, Belleview; John Daniel, ridden by Ben Gill, owned by Daniel & Sons; Novice rider ($500 limit) (12)-Misty Melodv, ridden and owned by Don Beverly, West Palm Beach: Jim's Daisey, ridden and owned by Joe Yates, Vero Beach; Silver Margo, ridden by Eddie Young, owned by J. O. Phillips, Chrstmas; Youth all-round champion-George Williams. 76 The Florida Cattleman -~~

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ARM 17 A GREAT BIG .to Mar-K Ranch of High Springs for their generous contribution of $1 per head for every animal sold in their recent dispersal of domestic Charolais. Shown above is John Culbreath, Brooksville, manager of the sale presenting the check to Beef Council Chairman Cedrick Smith, Jr. Others in the picture are from left: FBC Area Chairmen John Alexander and Cary Carlton; Culbreath; FCA 1st Vice President R. D. Bennett; Smith; and 2nd Vice President Tommy Sloan. At left is Mar-K's French Charolais herd sire Alger. We also gratefully acknowledge Mr. Culbreath's volunteering to contribute $1 per head sold in all Florida sales which he manages in the future. This kind of enthusiastic help will get the word to even more Florida beef eaters. Our thanks to both of these concerns and all others whose contributions help us promote FLORIDA BEEF! A Committee of the Florida Cattlemen's Association P. 0. Box 656, Kissimmee, Florida (Published as a service to the industry by The Florida Cattleman magazine)

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I Good Using Horses .Our Specialty Registered Quarter Horses Santa Gertrudis Cattle For Sale at all times D. R. Daniel & Sons' R Bar Ranch PHONE; (813) ROdeo 3-2089 ROUTE 3, BOX 4005 OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA 33472 ILE (LEXOL is available at H Worth, Mildred Langford other LEXOL dealers nea N. J. 07006.) .and feel how soft and luxurious it can be. Clean and condition your saddle and harness, boots and bridles with LEXOL. See how the leather becomes stronger, softer, more comfortable for you and your mount. even after long exposure to drying sun, wind and salt air. Protects metal parts, too! Preserve all your tack with LEXOL, and let leather live. Insist on LEXOL at your nearest saddle & harness dealer. LEXI0 The LEXOL Corporation West Caldwell, N.J. 07006 erzbergs in Kissimmee, McLelland Shoe & Saddle in Lake 'in Hialeah and Draper's Western Stare in Sarasata. For ar you, write: THE LEXOL CORPORATION, West Caldwell, Reg. Quarter Horses-Halter & Performance WHITE FARMS L. M. white. owner. Home Ph: 493-4461 Barn & Office, Days, Ph: 493-4477 White Construction Co., Inc. Ph: 493-4400 CHIEFLAND FLORIDA For Registered BRAHMANS and QUARTER HORSES see HAW CREEK RANCH Raymon Tucker, Owner Phone (904) 437-3562 BUNNELL, FLORIDA 32010 A Vi" Orange Ave. at U.S. 1, FT. PIERCE Phone HO 1-5335 B. E. PURCELL CO. We clothe the family; we furnish the home. "Complete Western Department" 301-321 W. Church St., Orlando, Fla. Phone GArden 2-3261 The Florida Cattleman Two Florida Horses Named AQUA Champion Two FLORIDA horses were named AQHA champions recently by the American Quarter Horse Association. They are Nemo's Two Bits and No Dignity. Nemo's Two Bits is a sorrel mare owned by D. R. Daniel & Sons, Okeechobee. Sired by Quarter Pole and out of Nemo's Gal, by Bee Play, she was foaled in the spring of 1965 and was purchased by Daniel in the first annual White Farms production sale at Chiefland, as a two year old. Dianne Gill, Daniel trainer, trained and showed Nemo's Two Bits in halter and performance events. The mare earned 27 halter points and 131/4 performance points in one year to receive the coveted title. Eleven of the performance points earned were in western pleasure and 21/2 in western riding, the only performance events she was shown in. In 1968, Nemo's Two Bits was the Florida Quarter Horse Association reserve champion mare. She placed second during the same year in junior western pleasure and third in western riding. Nemo's Two Bits was purchased recently by T. L. Sloan of Fort Pierce. Sloan owns and operates the Cow Creek Ranch and plans to use the mare on the ranch and later place her in his carefully selected broodmare band. No Dignity is owned by Sandy & Dennis Smith of West Palm Beach. She is a six year old sorrel mare, sired by Clabber Bar by Three Bars, and her dam is Cinnamon Cub, by Cub Bear. No Dignity was trained and shown in western pleasure by Sandy Smith and in halter by Dennis Smith. The mare was bred by Norman B. Johnson of Days, Kansas and the Smith's purchased her from Joe Lindholm of Audubon, Iowa in March 1968. Five months later she made AQHA champion with nine wins in halter and eight wins in pleasure to give her 191/2 points in western pleasure and 25 halter points. She has earned two grand championships and three reserve championships during her show career. SOME EIGHT million acres of Florida forest land still need planting with seedling trees before full forest production can be reached. 78

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Correction! In an article on the top 20 horses in the National Cutting Horse Association appearing in the May issue of THE CATTLEMAN, a rider for one of the Florida horses listed was in error. Swen Miss 16, owned by White Construction Company of Chiefland, was in seventeenth place among the nation's top cutters, and was ridden to that honor by Joe Lott of Lott's Training Stables, Williston. Lott has trained and shown both performance and halter horses for White Construction Company owner Luther White for a number of years. We sincerely apologize for the mistake. Bailey Horse Gains Points A FLoRMA cutting horse, Rooster Clegg, owned by C. W. "Mann" Bailey of Oxford, has moved from sixteenth to fourteenth place among the nation's top 20 cutters, according to figures recently released by the National Cutting Horse Association. The standings, as compiled by NCHA, show that Bailey's horse has won $1218.92 in seven shows. In first place in the top 20 list is Jose Uno, owned by John Bradford of Tucson, Arizona, and ridden by Roy Huffaker. The leader has earned a total of $8169.26 in 19 shows. Men Like To Use Cooking Skill MOST MEN (98 percent) gave their wives high marks on cooking, according to a recent survey, but 10 percent claimed that they could cook better than their wives. The National Live Stock and Meat Board says 85 percent of the men admitted they read articles on cooking. Two-thirds said they would like to know more about this culinary art. Men like to add creative touches of their own to strict recipes and straight prepared foods. They shy away from foods which are complicated or take too long to prepare. Foods which the male cook concentrates on include meats, eggs, barbecued foods and sandwiches. FARM REAL estate in Florida has increased 41 percent in value since 1960, according to the Florida State Chamber of Commerce. "THE BEST FOR LESS" Supporters of Fla. Cattlemen, Poultrymen, Pork and Dairy Producers WINN-DIXIE STORES, INC. General Offices: Jacksonville REGISTERED QUARTER HORSES AT STUD Lee's Rock 257812 Midnight Taylor 253832 We like our horses, come see if you do. Visitors Welcome Mr. & Mrs. J. J. Wynn & Sons Hwy. 27, Moore Haven, la. 33471 Phone: WH 6-3251 VK BONA ALLEN & SIMCO SADDLES PICK THE SADDLE OF YOUR CHOICE NO MONEY DOWN only $8.65 per mo. Don't Have The Cash? Use Our Easy Payment Plan MAKINSON SADDLE SHOP The Store With The Horse Out Front KISSIMMEE FLORIDA Complete Outfits for the Entire Family Featuring name brands only: LEVI -H BAR C -LASSO -JUSTIN -NOCONA -D. J. TEX-TAN -TONY LAMA -AMERICAN -BRADFORD -TREGO'S Circle D Ranch 2ND PRODUCTION SALE August 2nd, 1969 at 1:30 p.m. MARIANNA, FLORIDA Selling 40 Registered APPALOOSA'S IKE HAMILTON, Auctioneer For further information contact: MATT C. DRYDEN Rt. 2, Box 1000-Phone 904/352-4952 MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32446 Visitors Always Welcome COMPLETE WESTERN SHOP Also Complete Appaloosa Show August 3rd at Ranch 791 for June, 1969

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WE FEATURE P 6 FOR THOSE WANTING QUALITY RIDING EQUIPMENT Bona Allen Saddles Johnson Halters Plymouth Ropes-Lariats Blankets and Brushes North & Judd Saddle Hdw. Renalde-Crockett-Kel ly Bits-Spurs Write for the name of your nearest dealer. Post Office Box 70 KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA 32741 FOR SALE AT THE RANCH Young Registered Quarter Horses THUNDERCLOUD RANCH ARNOLD SARAW, Owner RAY TURNER, Mgr. Rt. 2, Box 95 Ph. Palmetto Bowlin Green 776-1510 Ranch located E. of Parrish on Hwy 62 Registered Quarter Horses McDAVID FARMS Fred McDavid, Owner Residence Phone: 485-2681 Business Phone: 485-2471 Box 36, Brooker, Florida Advertise! + Interested in QUARTER HORSES? The best horse for WORK, for PLEASURE, for quarter-mile RACING. Write FLORIDA QUARTER HORSE ASSOCIATION Route 1, Box 555 Chiefland, Florida 32626 Farming and Ranching Is Background of The Lees of Wildwood 0 -TAKE' The Circle Arrowhead L hasQuarter Horses and mixed Braford cows and Hereford bulls. The ranch makes Pangola and Alyce clover hay, and plants rye for winter pasture. 16 year old Wayne is a "regular hand" after school, on Saturdays and during the summer. He has been active in 4-H and Mrs. Lee has served as a leader. Wayne and Sherilyn attend Howey Academy-28 miles away. This is Wayne's second year there and Sherilyn's first. The children drive daily. A Doctor of Law influenced Wayne to take Latin by telling him the value of the dead language to one interested in studying other languages and in learning the meaning of words. Wayne could not get Latin in the Wildwood schools and so the decision For the CowBelles A bargain is a bargain if it is needed, will be used and costs less than the usual price. I found a slip in my size but in a "tall girl" length marked down to a dollar. It was good quality and I bought it and hemmed it up. I am wearing it. But had I not hemmed it up and put it to use it would not have been a bargain! Grandson Alex presented me with a lovely construction paper bouquet. Made of tall flowers (stems creased to stand) which stand in a circular pot sealed to a square of the same type of paper with staples. I was inspired to experiment with such paper. He and I had much fun! How long since you cut paper dolls? Snowflakes? Working with young children will teach you how smart they are! The birth of a colt on a horse farm may be an ordinary experiment but on our farm -not so! April is the mother of a lovely such animal. I never cease to be amazed at the length of a colt's legs. Truly this bay's are nearly as long as his mother's. We have named him Ike. The next time you are mentally tired try baking a cake or working in the yard. Or, if you are physically tired, try a mental exercise. Variety is not only the spice of life but it tends to rest us and allows for great productivity. (And who has enough time to accomplish all that he or she would?) Do you ever feel humble and blessed when you learn the trials of another? Today I met an aged woman who cared for her invalid daughter for 16 years and the son of that daughter who came to her as an infant. Only recently the daughter passed on. I learned no word of complaint ever crossed the mouth of the woman and today she is only grateful for the love and devotion of the grandson, who calls her blessed. There is a fascination about the spring. The new fresh beauty of the world truly sparkles as it tells us God is very much alive. I noticed a waitress in a restaurant sprinkling salt on a wet spot on the floor. The gritty substance is said to provide traction and help prevent slips. By ETHEL HALES STANCIL A. W. LEE, SR., now 80 years old, of Wildwood, is sorta retired, but he still operates his Arrowhead L Ranch. The A. W. Lee, Jr.'s also of Wildwood call their ranch the Circle Arrowhead L. Mrs. Lee (Jr.), Nellie, grew up in Sumterville, while her husband A. W., grew up in Wildwood. She too has a farm-and-ranch background. Mrs. Lee was an only child. Her mother, a widow, Mrs. Vera Traylor, still lives in Sumterville. The Lees have four children: Wayne (16), Sherilyn (13), Drennan (a son, 9) and Vernell (a daughter, 5). I was interested in the name Vernell and learned it to be a combination of Nell (Mrs. Lee's name) and Vera (the name of Mrs. Lee's mother). 80 The Florida Cattleman tXI IN 6

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FLORIDA COWBELLES ASSOCIATION 1033 Orange Ave., Ft. Pierce, Fla. President Mrs. Thomas L. Sloan, Fort Pierce First Vice President Mrs. Carey F. Carlton, Sebring Second Vice President Mrs. D. F. LeFils, Osteen Third Vice President Mrs. G. C. Perry, Jr., Belleview Secretary-Treasurer Mrs. Don H. Robertson, Fort Pierce Recording Secretary Mrs. Robert C. Hutches Myakka City to attend Howey was made-where of course he takes Latin! Sherilyn enjoys the challenge of math at the school, where schedules are patterned after those in colleges. Most classes are 11/2 hours long and are attended every other day. Wayne and Sherilyn leave home about 7:30 in the morning and return about 4:30 -which means their day is little longer than that of the usual high school student. Sherilyn has been very active in 4-H. She has had rabbit and hamster projects and those which involve cooking. Wayne fed out two steers. Drennan's daily chore is the feeding of the horses and cattle which are currently penned. He also assists with the other feeding and drives the tractor for hay to be picked up, etc. Vernell loves horses, as the others. Though just five she thinks she can do all that the others can (and nearly can!). She began school last September. Mrs. Lee likes to sew but finds little time for it. The family are active Baptists and Mrs. Lee currently is a Sunday School group leader. Active in the local CowBelles association, Mrs. Lee serves as secretary of that group. She is also active in the Wildwood Homemakers Club. With the handicap of being without a county homemaker's agent, the club recently won second place at the Webster show. Oven stew is a family favorite. Mrs. Lee makes it easily. One square of aluminum foil is used for each serving. Onto this she places bite size pieces of boneless stew, sliced onion and carrots, chopped celery and seasonings and about 1/5 or 1/6 of a can of tomatoes. These "individual stews" are sealed and baked for 1 hour. 4 Use 1 DARI-BEEF CATTLE DUST Gain extra pounds of milk or beef from your herd by combating harmful, annoying horn flies, stable flies and lice. Dr. Rogers' DARI-BEEF DUST combines several potent ingredients, kills flies normally resistant to single insecticides, yet is safe. Keep your cattle pest-free use in dust gun, rub on by hand, or sprinkle from can. In 1 lb. shaker cans and 4 lb. bags. REG. QUARTER HORSES At Stud DERBY ADAMS 318,113 BLACKBURN BUCK 100,571 Bar D Ranch ORLANDO, FLORIDA T. M. Deal, Owner W. E. Campbell, Mgr. Rt. 5, Box 586 PH: 277-1149 SADDLES TRAILERS Little Dude Western Store CHARLES & SHARON PETTY, OWNERS Phone 384-1210 902 South Edgewood Avenue Jacksonville, Florida WESTERN LEATHER WEAR GOODS GLASS TRUCKLE (TB) Fee for 1970; Sire-Fair Truckle $500 Dam-Glass Bars by Three Bars Sire of 2 AAAT, 6 AAA, and 9 AA, Sire of Glass Chirp AAAT. Booked full for 1969. CLAY NEEL Box 203 Ph: AC 904/482-2969 Greenwood, Fla. or 352-4495 FLING ~IMACH QUARTER HORSES Harvey Hobbs, Owner Lynn Brewer, Manager Ph. WY5-5914 after 6:00 P.M. 906 NARCISSUS, N. FT. MYERS, FLA. 33903 The SOUTH'S LARGEST WESTERN STORE Select all your Western needs from The Ranchers wide variety. For your convenience, The Rancher offers complete MAIL ORDER SERVICE. Write or phone for quick mail delivery. 7The Ran cA e I& Ac. 4281 N.W. 6th STREET GAINESVILLE. FLA. 32601 PHONE 376-4595 for June, 1969 81

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AUCTIONEERING LEARN AUCTIONEERING, term soon. Free Catalog. Reisch Auction College, Mason Cityv 13 Iowa. 253tf EMPLOYMENT BOOKKEEPER ...for quality 400 head registered Black Angus ranch in Florida. Must have experience in showing cattle to buyers and keeping complete records. Living quarters for husband and wife. Apply to Florida Cattleman, Box 1030-P, Kissimmee, Fla. 32741. REAL ESTATE WANTED-300-700 Acres anywhere in Florida. Also up to 600 head of Dairy or Beef cattle. Will also take equipment and machinery. Contact P. 0. Box 461, Altamonte Springs, Florida 669p LAND AUCTIONEERS Get Your Ranch-Farm-Dairy-Acreage SOLD You name the time and date, we do the rest by our proven nation wide advertising programs and contacts. Phone or write for free appraisal of your real estate. GRISSOM REALTY AUCTION CO. Inc. Silver Springs, Fla. 32688. Phone Ocala 904/236-2515. FOR SALE-Completely equipped cattle/horse ranch in operation. Corral, pens, scale, squeeze and loading chutes. All posts and timbers penta pressure treated. 50' x 200' sale and feed barn with office. Power and telephone. 16,000 GPM fully automatic Caterpillar two-way sub-irrigation and drainage system. 200 acres in clover-bahiapangola fenced and crossfenced; 160 acres virgin, 620 acres semi-improved (ditched, diked and stumped). Fronting half mile on Cross-State 60, 2 miles west of 1-95 $385 per acre. For information and appointment contact owner. Box 291-A Route 1 Vero Beach. 32960 5669c NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA 900 Acre Ranch Active cattle & hay operation crossed by Hiway 26, 1 mile frontage. Three homes, barns, shops, all facilities. Farm machinery and equipment included. $350,000 Principals only. For appointment call Gainesville 376-9020 or write to Dr. A. E. Salazar, Ash ford Medical Center, Santurce, P.R. 00907. LOOKING FOR A RANCH? -For the best, ask Bill Thach, Southern Colorado Land & Livestock Company, Bank Bldg., Walsenburg, Colorado. 158f. FOR FLORIDA Ranches, Groves or Homes, contact J. H. Holben, Realtor, Lake Wales, Fla. 453tf LOANS ALL TYPES $10,000 to $1 00,000,000 Anywhere in USA & Canada FISHER Real Estate-Mortgage Mortgage Brokers, Joy, 111. LET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SELL FOR YOU Rate 15g per word, minimum charge $3.00. Classified display $8.00 column inch. Deadline 5th of month. In circulation about 25th of month. Send copy and remittance to: THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN, BOX 1030, KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA MISCELLANEOUS I I OLIVER 1250 New diesel tractor, power steering live power differential lock, $3,080.00. Market Implement Company, 3112 East Lincoln Street, Canton, Ohio 44707. Phone 454-1522. 669ip NEW WATER SAVING DEVICE ECONO FLUSH REGULAR FLUSH Designed to reduce water usage thereby saving on water bills and adding to useful life of cesspools with less maintenance costs. Simple dual action handle automatically activates water saving mechanism for liquid waste etc. Manufacturer estimates approximate saving of 1/3 water usage by lifting handle. Depress handle for normal flush. Easy to install with screw driver and pliers, by homeowner. Fits all conventional waterclosets and is fully guaranteed. $9.95 post-paid. Water Save inc., Dept. FC, 3181 N.E. 3rd Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33308. FOR SALE-Lewis cattle foottrimming stocks by Kansas Exp. Sta. Semi-portable all steel frame of 4" std. pipe welded connections. Rear posts back out of the way of trimming the hind feet. Front windlass to pull animal forward into stanchion. Heavy wooded floor and trimming rails of treated lumber. Four heavy canvas belts hanging from two roller drums held by ratchets, as new, $500. 4" x 3" Berkley Centrifugal Pressure Pump 350 GPM 220/440 V GE $220. 10 used cattle back oilers $300. Contractors, Surveyor's level, Bosrom 4-IC57, tripod, leveling rods and case $50. 80 used V-crimp galv. roofing sheets $64. Electric fencer. Steel office furniture, checkprotector, typewriter, duplicator, printing calculator, Route 1, Box 291-A-Vero Beach 305-567-2927. RANCH EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES NEW EASY WAY-to treat Pink Eye. Guaranteed or money back. Details free. AMC, 404 Main, Box 888, Kerrville, Tex. 78028 669tf RANGE RIDERCTASLE -~PERMANENT NUMBERS UNBREAKABLE NYLON EAZY TO READ LOW PRICES FREE FOLDERSAMPLE 25# DEALERS WANTED WESTERN TAG CO. Bo 74Vt, Cl492083 FARROWING STALLS-Complete $26.75. Dealerships available. Free literature. Dolly Enterprises, 238 Main, Colchester, Ill. 62326. 569p PICK-UP TRUCK STOCK RACKS-All steel construction $109.50. Dealerships available. Free literature. Dolly Enterprises, 238 Main, Colchester, Ill. 62326. 569p CALF CREEP FEEDERS-30 Bushel capacity $92.50. Dealerships available. Free literature. Dolly Enterprises, 238 Main Colchester, Ill. 62326. 669p George's Scale Service Box 97, Pahokee, Florida Agent, Fairbanks Morse Scales Sales & Service on Livestock and Motor Truck Scales; also all types and makes of Industrial Scales. 24-hour phone: 305/924-7147 GEORGE GERAGHTY Aerial Dusting & Spraying-Pasture Seeding & Fertilizing-Grove & Vegetable Crop Care by Air-Land Clearing & Fence BuildirAMERICAN AIRCRAFT CORP. Ph. NE 9-1468 Punta Gorda; 675-1988 LaBelle; 983-9342 Clewiston VETERINARY SUPPLIES-at wholesale. Send card for complete catalogue. Eastern State Serpm Company, 1727 Harden Street, Columbia, South Carolina 29204. 568p DOGS LEOPARD COW DOGS-I have some good young dogs in training now and some three month old pups. Will train him to suit you if you can tell me about your country and type of cattle. I am a rancher and run Brahman type cattle. Bobby Yancey, Conroe, Texas Phone PL 6-0116 or PL 6-5013. 67669c TRAINED REGISTERED CATAHOULA-Leopard Cowhogdogs. Money back guarantee. 30 day trial. Pups. Charles Whitener, Route 1, Paris, Texas 75460, Phone 214-785-4724. 1168p ENGLISH SHEPHERDS-Border Collies, America's most useful dogs. Puppies all ages. Choice colors. Faithful workers. Satisfaction guaranteed. Free rabies vaccination, training instruction. Fairmount Farms, Cedar Falls, Iowa. 50613. 567869p LIVESTOCK FOR SALE-30 cattle. 3 registered others high grade. Fine bull $5,000. All-young. 488-1758. Clinton Williams, Rt. 1 Box 1026, Venice, Florida. 669p FOR INFORMATION-an Pure Bred Red Angus Cattle contact J. H. Holben, Florida's first purebred breeder. Lake Wales, Florida. 811tf REGULAR PREGNANCY TESTING ...will save you money and improve your herd. Let us help with pregnancy testing and custom artificial breeding. 15 years exp. in Fla. JOHN O'STEEN (904) 794-3575, Rt. 2, Box 63, Mayo, Fla. WISCONSIN DAIRY CATTLE FEATURING TRI-STATE ARTIFICIALLY SIRED HEIFERS FOR SALE ~Financing Available Phone (Tampa) 689-1249 689-5472 WILLIAM 0. CAREY 8 mi. E. of Tampa on Hwy. 60 BRANDON, FLORIDA

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/ FLORIDA'S FA P. 0. Box 427 BUYERS' PHONES Al Kaplan-Lakeland 683-4836 Don Kaplan-Lakeland 688-3174 Tom McPhillips-Plant City 752-9237 L. C. Hendrick-Ft. Meade AT 5-9875 Clint Stokes-Lake Wales 638-1318 STEST GROWING MEAT PACKERS Bartow, Florida FEDERALLY INSPECTED PLANT PHONE Bartow 533-2108 I 11 r ANGUS & RED ANGUS BULLS 1 and 2 years old. BCIA tested. 90 to select from, reasonably priced. GEORGE W. GIBSON Rt. 5, Rome, Ga. 30161 PREGNANCY TESTING Sell your free boarders and increase your calving percentages, through annual pregnancy testing. Let us show you facts to prove we can help I 631460 A. G. LEWIS Rt.1 Box 1373-C, Cocoa, Fla. RED ANGUS REGISTERED-We're overloaded with fine Bulls. Cane Creek Farm, 307 E. 10th Street, Anniston, Alabama. Phone 205-237-1618 Daytime. 469p RED ANGUS PERFORMANCE TESTED BULLS AND THEIR SISTERS Most Leading Bloodlines NATIONAL RED ANGUS LISTING SERVICE GEORGE CHIGA, Manager Box 699 Guthrie, Oklahoma CUSTOM FREEZING BULL SEMEN SEMEN MOTILITY TESTING SOUTHEASTERN FROZEN Don Schlesier SEMEN SERVICE 904-765-8894 8 765-4085 JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 32218 P.O. Box 35 + Advertise! + 300 HEREFORD BULLS 100 head performance tested, 200 pasture developed. Ready to go to work, fertility tested and guaranteed breeders. Also 400 Bull Calves. Write or call for price list. CODDING CATTLE RESEARCH Foraker, Oklahoma 74638 Phone (918) 722-4277 BUY AND TRY Wye Plantation Aberdeen-Angus frozen semen from Advanced Register P. R. 1. sires officially gaining over four pounds per day or whose 365 day weights are above 1200 pounds. (Performance tested sires always for sale.) WY E PLANTATION Telephones:-301/827-7166, 827-7160 Queenstown, Maryland 21658 Advertise! READY-DAILY CASH MARKET Central Packing Co. Inc. P. 0. Box 138 CENTER HILL, FLORIDA Phone these buyers at home or office. Erwin Bryan, Jr., 793-4601 W. L. "Billy" Ward, 793-4771 EST J. L. Goff, 787-5716 (Leesburg) 96 Office Phones: 793-3671 or 793-4681 FEDERAL INSPECTION Means a Better Market For Your Florida Beef Contact FEDERAL PACKING CO., INC. (Formerly Max Bauer) P. 0. Box 704 Phones: 888-5231-32-33 HIALEAH, FLORIDA or phone these buyers at home Dick Helton JU 5-1589 Lantana, Florida Kurt Frank 444-4758 Miami, Florida MIAMI FT. LAUDERDALE 888-4575 922-2265 PROVISION CO., INC. MEAT PACKERS P. 0. Box 335, Miami Springs, Fla. CATTLE BOUGHT DIRECT CALL OUR BUYERS: DON STIENS ..MO 5-3902 RUDOLPH FISCHELMAYER CE 5-1302 L & G (LOEB & GOTTFRIED, INC.) Buys Direct PHONE OUR BUYERS, ROBERT W. LOEB AT MIAMI 238-2138 ED STETLER AT LAKELAND 646-1320 P. 0. Box 273, Phone TU 7-5588 HIALEAH, FLORIDA LYKES markets more meat than any other Florida packer. We buy direct from producers in truckload or larger lots. Contact LYKES BROS., INC. Phone 248-1121, Tampa, Florida 752-1102, Plant City, Florida Ask for: John McKay, L. L. Watson, E. G. Morgan or J. B. Hawkins I A$.~,. vr amais

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Buyer's Guide A A-Bar-B Ranch Agri-Guard ....-.. American Angus American Breeder Service American-Int. Charolais Am. Milk S'horn ...., Arcadia L. S. Mkt. Ayavalla Plantation. B Bair, Dr. Roy A. Bank of Pahokee Baldwin, Leroy Bar D Ranch. Barnett Angus. Barthle Bros. Bennet t, R. D. Big B Ranch Bingham Seed Co. Blackwater Farms Blount & Hyde .. Blue Cypress Lake Book Ad .._ .. Boyett, Lee ..... Brigg Ranches Brit, T. M. Brooks Hill Farm .32 .14 .17 72 .71 .76 52 .71 85 .27 ....25 48 ...645 .63 .20B ..23 .4 ..71 27 C C. F. Ranch .70 Cannafax Farm. .s 67 Caravelle Ranch ..58 Carey, William ..82 Cattlemen's L. S. Mkts. .52 Central Packing ...83 Chapman, E. H. .61 Chemagro Corp. 7 Chipley L. S. Mkt. 5 Chitty, H. M. ..31) Chutes-Heldenbrand 39 Circle D Ranch 9 Circle R Ranch .7 Circle T Ranch 67 Circie Y Ranch .72 Circle Z tisich ..66 Clark Seed Co. .11 Codding Cattle Research 82 Columbia Market ..52 Conibear Equip. Co. ..36 Corrigan Ranch .66 Cosby-Hodges .1 Cutter Lab .16 D Daniel, Russell. Deep River Ranch Deere Acres Deriso Angus .._ Dewey Polly Realty Dexter Farms Dolomite Products Duda, A. & Sons .78 .10 25,82 .46 ..70 E E. Charolais & Charbray .71 Eatmon, K. D. ..4. .44,45 El Maximo Ranch ...71 El Rancho Grande (SG) ..63 Enresco ......18 Everglades Farm Supply 40 F F & W Enterprises .12 Fairmeadows ..25 Fair Store ..79 Falcon Irrigation .18 FASCO .13 Federal Packing .8. &3 Fisher Real Estate .82 Flint River Mills .70 Fla. Angus Ass'n.f, Fla. Ass' L. S. Mkis 02 F. B. C. L A. .76 Florida Beef Council 77 Florida Brahman .69 Fla. Favorite Fertilizcr .20 Florida Fence Post .8, Florida Hereford Ass'n 67 Fla. Qtr. Horse Ass'n ..80 Florida Ranch Enter .69 Fla. Santa Gertrudis .62 Fla. Shorthorn ...70 Flying H Ranch ..81 Fulton-Cole Seed ..86 G Gadsden L. S. Mkt. .52 Gainesville L. S. Mkt. _52 Garber, Arthur S. ...66 Gatrell's Duroc Farm .71 Gator Feed .56 Georgia Angus .27 George's Scale Service ...82 Glades Chemical .._ Glades Equipment .. Glades Feed & Supply Glades Market. Goolds Gotham Provision Graham Angus Farm Griffith Ranch. Grissom Realty Grovelane Farm. Gulfstrearn Farm. H Hardee Market .. Harvell, H. L. Haw Creek Ranch H-Bar-C Cooperative H-Bar-C Inc. Hear. Bar Ranch. Hector Feed Mills. Heldenbrand & Sons Hendry Tractor ... Herlong Ranches. Herzberg's, Inc. High Springs Milling Hulben, J. H. Houston Herefords Hughes Angus Ranch Hughes Feed & Grain I Interstate Market J J. C. Western Store Jay L. S. Auction. Jones, R. W., Jr. Farm Joseph Co., .S .. Jo-Su-Li Farms K Kaiser Chemical. K Bar Ranch .. Keene, R. D .. Kirclunan Co. ... Kissimmee Market L L Bar Ranch 1, H B ar .. Land, C. C .. Larkin, W. M. Lazy W l{anch. Lazv X Ranch. Lenholt, Dr. E. 1-1. Lessen, J. W .. Lewis, A. G. Lewis, Paul R. Lexol .. Lion Country ._ ... Little Everglades Live Oak Plantation Loe & Gottfried. Lykes Bros., Inc. M M & M Supply Co. Madison Stockyards Makinson Hardware Malloy, Dallas Manning, L. T. Mar-K Ranch Maxcy Corp., Tie Latt McDavid, Fred .. M eicke .. Mid-State Pucke rs Mid-l'ioira vlar-ket Mercury Angius laitas MiJo Fains. Millarden Farms Mills Market Mixon Milling Co. Monarch Ranch Monticello Market Montura Ranch N NACO .. National Red Angus Neel. Clay NOBA Norris Cattle Co. Nutrena. 0 Odom, J. D. .. Okeechobee Market O'Steen, John 23 65 .25 27 52 .65 .75 .75 69 .37 0. _54 Palmetto Hereford Ranch 66 Partin, Henry 0. .69 Paxton, L. S. Co-Op ....52 Petty, Charles ..81 Phillips Livest ek Hauling 18 Picnic Ranch ..G4 Pine Acres Ranch .67 Production Credit ..16 Purcell, B. E. .78 R Rafter L Ranch Ragans, Paul Ralston Purina ... Ramsey, Frank L. Rancher, The. Ranchland Remsberg Ranch Rico Ri James W. ck Hollow Farm dodgers, Bill. Royal Fert. Rush Bros. S ..25 .70 .27 .81 .78 .69 .57 ..65 27 .67 .46 .67 .61 Sanders, Phil ......23 23 Santa Fe River Ranch .67 40 Schearbrook Farms .49 S. G. B. I ..63 Sells, Sam & Sons .67 .52 Seminole Farms ..67 Seven Lazy 11 ....75 Shuman, R. W ...66 40 Silver Lake Estates .22 52 Silver Spurs Rodeo ...30 6' Singletary Farms ..67 165 Sleepy Hollow ..64 56 Smith Ranch. .65 Sooth Bay Equipment .42 S. E. Frozen Semen .._.82 19 Southeastern Shorthorn ..70 .71 Spinks, H. C. ...76 .63 Stage Coach Ranch .64 .56 Stalnaker Farm & Ranch 42 52 Stalvey Enterprises .20 Stuart, J. K ..69 Stuart, W. H. ..70 71 Stardust Ranch ....39 72 Stocker-Feeder Sales ...51 .71 Sugar Cane Gro. Co-Op. 54 6. Sumter County Market ..52 .71 Suni-Citrus Products ..85 29 Sun-Mar-C Ranch .25 25 Sunny Acres ..66 71 Superior Fertilizer .88 S2 Super-Mol .29 .76 Suwannee .Farms .27 78 Suwannee Valley Mkt. ..52 .50 Sykes Angus Ranch .36 65 69 T 83 Texas Pheno ...14,81,85,86 83 Thompson Bros ..27 Thornhill, John ....63 Thundercloud Ranch ..80 20 Timbrook Farms ...71 52 Tindel Livestock Mkt. .,52 79 Triangle Iron Works ..48 66 Triple Z Angus Ranch .23 G Tucker, Raymon .78 .7 Tyler, John H ..27 .71 .80 .21,46 3 23 25 52 25 701 .41 82 81 47 .39,69 .2 .20A .34,52 ..82 P PDQ .87 P X Ranch .71 P. Bch. Co. Ct'men Ass'n 35 P. Bch. Co. Com. ....43 U U. S. Sugar Crop .5 V V M S Corp. ..61 w Watson, Harley, Ranch ..65 Weaver, Otto .71 Wedgewort h's.42 Western Tag ....82 W. Fla. 1,. S. Mkt. .._ .52 White, William A ..82 White Farms .78 W ilson, Pat ..67 Wilson Pure Oil Co. .33 Windsweep Farms .67 Winnstead Plantation ...65 Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc. .79 Wisconsin Livestock .8 Wye Plantation ...82 Wynn, J. J. .79 Y Yazoo Valley Oil Y-Tex Corporation .., ..27 .66 z Zambito, Joe .23 Zellner, George A. ....66 The Florida Cattleman Vaccinate Now To Stop Anapi asmosis by D. E. COOPERRIDER, D.V.M. Florida Dept. of Agriculture THE DIAGNOSTIC laboratories again showed an increase in the number of cases handled during April. The total increase has been about 10 percent overall with the greatest in cattle accessions. The number of cattle autopsies doubled during this month. Clostridium infections in cattle continue to be diagnosed with red-water and malignant edema accounting for five cases. These were both cases of longstanding diarrhea but the ranchers did not think of this particular disease. Typical autopsy lesions indicated the disease and confirmation was not difficult. Pasteurellosis and salmonellosis were found in seven and eight cases respectively and calf diarrhea-pneumonia complex was seen in one animal. There are research reports that this disease is initiated by a specific virus invasion which "triggers" bacterial infection. Serology techniques showed the presence of bovine virus diarrhea antibodies in nine herds and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis antibodies in thirteen herds. This means the herds had some previous exposure and that new animals or unexposed animals added to the herd should be watched closely. Total cases involving parasites showed a great increase in the number of "flukey" animals found. Equine cases remained at about the same number and 16 animals were suspicious or positive for infectious anemia. One case of salmonellosis was seen and four cases of Streptococcus equi (strangles). This organism has been recovered recently from aborted foals and cervical cultures and should be considered when an abortion occurs. There were two confirmed cases of piroplasmosis from the general area where the disease is now apparently being confined. Porcine cases also showed a substantial increase because of the hog cholera outbreak in west Florida. A total of 25 were recorded with three still in the investigation stage. There were eight cases of swine erysipelas and two of pasteurellosis. Salt poisoning accounted for two more and there were fifteen cases of various types of parasites. With the onset of warmer temperatures and good pasture, there will be quite a bit of cattle movement and 84

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handling. This will stress the animal and make it more susceptible to bacterial infections. Close watch should be kept for signs of pneumonia (pasturellosis). Anaplasmosis season is almost at hand and if vaccination is contemplated, now is the time to vaccinate since two injections are needed to produce immunity. Short Course (Continued from page 69) ence the results of irrigation studies conducted at the Beef Research Unit. He said that sprinkler irrigation cannot be generally recommended as an economical practice for cow-calf beef production operations. Seepage irrigation is usually a profitable practice, he said, where all physical requirements can be met, because of the relatively low initial cost and labor requirement. Recommendations on the economics of beef production was the next topic discussed by R. E. L. Greene, agricultural economist at the University. Greene gave the audience the investments and returns on three different programs for beef production at the research unit. The results varied considerably on the cost to produce a pound of beef and the return per pound of beef 'produced. Feed Vital. .. Koger appeared as the final speaker on the 1969 Short Course program with some recommendations on breeding and management. He said that problems experienced in a cow-calf operation could usually be solved by one word, "feed." Koger said that since the Beef Research Unit had solved its winter feeding problem that virtually all their problems had disappeared. The unit now winters cows on corn silage. He urged cattlemen to study the possibilities of growing some sort of winter feed for their operation. Sarasota Elects MEMBERS OF the Sarasota County Livestock Association met recently to elect officers for the new year. Named to head the group was Mabry Carlton, Jr., with Russell Lauch assuming the vice presidency. Reelected secretary was Ken Clark while Marion Southern was elected treasurer. State director is L. H. "Buck" Hawkins and alternate is B. T. Longino, Jr. Named as director of the Sarasota County Fair was Max Carr. L For Fw nTIT Lost. Use Posts hat Last! PrM&ww AWer ftrAof Fm PoAt Solid to the core Bugs and rot resistant Double trimmed 0 Complete penetration Uniform size Field tested for long life ALSO AVAILABLE -Barn poles, Piling, Lumber, Structural timbers, Lowest prices on Condor Brand Foreign wire. Check_ with us for wholesale prices. FLORIDA FENCE POST CC PLANT and SALES OFFICE IF NO A P. 0. Box 5645-Ph. RE 5-1361 P. 0. Box 3 ONA, FLORIDA 33865 WAUCHULA, Sa "dit8 MOLASSES. Both plain and protein fortified. Best quality. New supplies will be available at beginning of season. A O., INC. NSWER-CALL 8-Ph. PR 3-6858 FLORIDA 33873 Advertise in The Florida Cattleman! Easy-to-use BLUE-DEATH FLY KILLER Dr. Roy A. Bair, Ph. D. AGRICULTURAL CONSULTANT Posture problems Ensilage, Haylage, Hay Production Ranch Capabilities o Soil Fertility e Forage Quality 9 Research WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 256 Alhambra Place, Ph: JUstice 2-2933 for June, 1969 85

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BLUELOTION .BOM B Use BlueLotion Bomb to dry superficial wounds, cuts, Cowpox sores, and BLUE LOTION BOMB abrasions on all livestock. Antiseptic action promotes faster healing, reduces possibility of superficial infection. Pressurized one pound can permits easy treatment. Ask your dealer for TPC Blue-Lotion Bomb tomorrow. -.ao -s ATR IIIN TALAHASEE FL-RD 3204 Cover Crops Pasture Grass rULTON-COLE SEED CO. ALTURAS, FLORIDA LEADS IN SEEDS Qua/itq ieed4 \d ;?a -cw SEED COMPANY Phone 539-1331 ALTURAS, FLA. COMPLETE HARVESTING SERVICE Cunha and Company Broke Every Record EVERY CATTLEMAN in Florida could have learned something specific that would pay off in profit almost immediately at the 18th Annual Beef Cattle Short Course sponsored by the University of Florida and the Florida Agricultural Extension Service. Dr. T. J. Cunha and the entire staff of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and the extension service put together the most varied, most practical and best attended short course in the 18 years it has been conducted. More than 900 cattlemen and ladies sat through the various sessions which began at 9:00 a.m. each morning and ended after 9:00 p.m. each night, and still braved the rain for a tour and questions on the beef research unit Saturday morning. Especially noteworthy is the changing attitude we see in research men at the University toward being very specific and very practical in their recommendations. Research scientists often live with so many variables that it is difficult for them to make precise recommendations until proven several times over, but cattlemen aren't above taking a chance on trying something that is less than 100 percent proved for them. Many comments were heard to the effect that, "That sounds like I might make it work. I'm going to try it." Given the facts as they are known ("It seems to be working at the research farm."), cattlemen are prone to do a little of their own experimenting. This short course certainly gave them plenty to get their teeth into. The only question now is what can Cunha and company produce for an encore. (Several cattlemen on the slight side suggested next year's program might start with more comfortable chairs. Another $5 added to the registration fee for better chairs might make more of the sessions a little more educational. Or would some cattle group be interested in expanding the permanent seating at the pavilion?) Paln Beach County Beckons! ONE OF the largest (in area and income) agricultural counties in the United States is the site of the annual Florida Cattlemen's Association convention. Palm Beach County has lots of everything. Cattlemen probably think first of the rich Glades muckland with it high carrying capacity for cows. Or they may think of the sugar cane that is so evident from every highway in the Belle Glade and Pahokee areas. Not as often seen because they're off the highway or covered by windbreaks are the salad vegetables inland, and the green beans, corn, tomatoes and other truck crops running parallel to the coast line. To others more urbanized, Palm Beach County means Palm Beach, the playground of super-millionaires, or West Palm Beach, a substantial city made up of all stratas of citizens. The Palm Beach County Cattlemen's Association is going to offer you the whole load-take your pick. Come to the convention with the family and plan to spend the weekend following the meetings enjoying whatever strikes your fancy. It's all there! Important business is to be conducted at this now 'once a year' meeting. Every member of FCA is needed with his ideas, opinions and effort, to make sure that his association goes in the direction most satisfactory to him. Election of officers, legislative matters, state and national, and other areas will be covered. Participate in the committees to which you've been appointed, and make yourself heard when questions are opened for discussion. 86 The Florida C-attleman

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For the Future of Your HERD? HEIFERS BORN on your ranch this spring are your future cows. Insure your future by giving them the chance to develop in size and soundness of bone for your future production at a profit. HAVE P. D. Q. SUPPLEMENTS available for them in feeders placed low enough for them to start eating at an early age, which also insures an early breedback of your cows. STEER CALVES fed P. D. Q. will weigh more at weaning time. (Ask your neighbor, he knows.) Remember, P. D. Q. Company was the first to start balancing pasture grasses in Florida. Keep it Out-They'll Eat Less! See Your Local Dealer or Phone MU 2-6144, P. 0. Box 116 PROMNI, 20% PROTEIN loi PooR PASW S '-2'~ N N Q ~4 V Orn

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the grass Is aas always KI~T .on Superior Sam's side of the fence. Superior Extra Value Fertilizers make pastures lusher and greener. You can always count on higher quality SUPERIOR S to help you upgrade stock for more profits -or help FERTILIZE IMMEDI of improved grass past you increase milk production and butterfat content. DO NOT FERTILIZE will be overseeded to cl Call your Superior Pasture Representative to make a with your Superior Rep detailed study of your fertilizer and grazing rotation AVOID SMOTHERID summer. Do not let gr needs. Fertilizers will be custom-blended for you and inches tall. Mow if nece delivered bagged or in bulk when and where you want them. TO INSURE YOUR LIVESTOCK PROFITS CALL THE FOLKS WITH KNOW-HOVW CLEARWATER Sam McMurray-ph. 446-9650 OKEECHOBEE Ben Dixon-Ph. RO 3-3257 DELRAY BEACH Cecil Welch-Ph. 278-1605 ORLANDO Fred Donaldson-Ph. 851-134z EAGLE LAKE Walter Stoltz-Ph. 293-7476 SARASOTA LeRoy Fortner-Ph. 958-5614 FT. MYERS Turnley Rucker-Ph. ED 4-6631 SEBRING John Fennell-Ph. 385-5248 FT. PIERCE Sherwood Johnson-Ph. 464-3320 TAMPA Charlie Little-Ph. 920-2922 Wally Long-Ph. 461-0636 Ed Green-Ph. 689-6018 Clyde Norton-Ph. 461-7099 Paul Bearss-Ph. 935-0236 Bob Wfillams-Ph. 461.1392 VERO BEACH Dorman Sellers-Ph. 567-5139 LAKE ALFRED Wade Wiggins-Ph 372-1433 W. PALM BEACH R. H. Howell-Ph. TE 2-858 LEESBURG Charles Ramsey-Ph. 787-3857 WINTER GARDEN Pete Stearns-Ph. 876-! PLANTS: Ta'mpa-813 -248-4131 Fort Pierce-305 -461-2230 FERTILIZERS DIVISION No. 7 NAME IN FERTILIZERS AND CHEMICALS SINCE 1936 AM SAYS: ATELY thin stands res and "rest." grass pastures that over this fall. Check resentative. NG CLOVER this ass grow over 8-10 ssary. 1W