Citation
The Kwajalein hourglass

Material Information

Title:
The Kwajalein hourglass
Uniform Title:
Kwajalein hourglass
Place of Publication:
Kwajalein Aroll, Marshall Islands
Publisher:
Commander, U.S. Army Garrison- Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA/KMR)
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases -- Periodicals -- Marshall Islands ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Marshall Islands ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

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General Note:
"U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
55731016 ( OCLC )
2004230394 ( LCCN )
ocm55731016

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Digital Military Collection

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 D C U n i t e d m i d e l d e r J u s t i n M o o s e s h o w s o f f s o m e m o v e s DC United mid elder Justin Moose shows off some moves a t a at a s o c c e r c l i n i c h e l d W e d n e s d a y e v e n i n g o n B r a n d o n F i e l d soccer clinic held Wednesday evening on Brandon Field. F o r m o r e s e e P a g e 6 For more, see Page 6. ( P h o t o b y N e l l D r u m h e l l e r ) (Photo by Nell Drumheller) www.smdc.army.mil/KWAJ/Hourglass/hourglass.html

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Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass 2 See GETTING BACK, Page 12 The Kwajalein Hourglass is named for the insignia of the U.S. Army 7th Infantry Division, which liberated the island from the forces of Imperial Japan on Feb. 4, 1944. The Kwajalein Hourglass is an authorized publication for military personnel, federal employees, contractor workers and their families assigned to U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll. Contents of The Hourglass are not necessarily T h e K w a j a l e i n H o u r g l a s s The Kwajalein Hourglass of cial views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, Department of the Army or USAKA. It is published Saturdays in accordance with Army Regulation 360-1 and using a network printer by Kwajalein Range Services editorial staff. P.O. Box 23, APO AP 96555 Phone: Defense Switching Network 254-3539; Local phone: 53539 Printed circulation:1,500 E-mail: hourglass@usaka.smdc.army.milCommanding Of cer......Col. Stevenson ReedPublic Affairs Of cer (acting)........Tamara WardEditor......................................Nell Drumheller Graphics Designer..........................Dan Adler Reporter..............................................JJ Klein commentarY Getting back something I lost L e t t e r t o t h e e d i t o r Letter to the editor Navy, Marine Corps personnel offer their apologies to ArmyOn behalf of all of the Navy and Marine Corps personnel on the atoll, whether retired, reservist, active duty or veteran, I would like to, once again, send out an almost sincere apology to all of the Army personnel on the atoll, whether retired, reservist, active duty or veteran, for the serious whooping the Midshipmen of the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis gave to the Cadets of the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, during their annual gridiron confrontation this year. Once again, better luck next year. God bless all of those who serve. Greg Howson —Go Navy!To all of the participants in the Community Choir, and the junior/senior high school band and choir for all of their hard work and two very enjoyable Holiday concerts last week.To the inconsiderate parents at the Dec. 6 concert, for not removing their disruptive children from the hall. The last 25 minutes of the concert would have been more enjoyable without the unnecessary distractions of running and squealing toddlers.Are you familiar with the movie, A Christmas Story? You know — the one where the young boy wants a BB gun more than anything in the world? Well, I’ve got a Christmas story too. When I was around seven or eight, I really don’t remember, I wanted an of cial St. Louis Cardinals jacket more than anything in the world. No cheap substitutes would do — I wanted the real thing. I badgered my father endlessly about getting one for Christmas. My father took me to see the local department store Santa and I told him I wanted one. Santa said, “sure, no problem.” As I got off his lap, I noticed my father was looking daggers right at Santa — like he wanted to do him great bodily harm. At eight years old, I was unconcerned that a Cardinals jacket was very expensive — way too expensive for my father to afford. All I knew is that I wanted one. Well, Christmas morning nally came. I rushed into our small living room and started rummaging through the gifts under the tree and came up with one that felt like it had a jacket inside. I tore it open and sure enough, I owned an of cial St. Louis Cardinals jacket, at last. I was as happy as a youngster could be. Santa Claus had come through. Hooray for Santa. The next day, I went to the schoolyard to hang out and show off my cool new jacket. There were four older boys there and they came over and said my jacket was neat and asked where I got it. I told them it was for Christmas and that Santa Claus had given it to me.They started laughing and saying bad things about Santa and how I was a nerd and stupid to think Santa had given me the jacket. But worst of all, they said Santa wasn’t real. I argued with them, but they just kept laughing and saying bad things about Santa that I took great offense at. Now, each of those guys was at least six inches taller than me and outweighed me by at least 30 pounds. But hey, they were messin’ with Santa. So, I took off my glasses, carefully put them in my brand new jacket pocket, drew back my right arm, made a st, said, “this is for you Santa,” and punched the biggest of

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 3See DINNER, Page 8 F a c i l i t y w i l l l o s e s t a f f a l t e r n a t i v e s a r e s o u g h t Facility will lose staff, alternatives are soughtBy Nell DrumhellerEditorThe Kwajalein community is undergoing a lot of changes as part of the transformation plan required by the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll. One of the latest is that beginning in January the Grace Sherwood library will be de-staffed. “The Grace Sherwood Library has been a much appreciated and wellloved part of the Kwaj community for years, but due to the current scal environment there is no longer funding to support the library,” explained Simone Smead, Community Activities manager for Kwajalein Range Services. “However, there is an opportunity to have a private club or organization, established or newly created, take over the library and run it as a club.” Staf ng depends on level of service and hours of operation, according to Smead. If volunteers can be G r a c e S h e r w o o d L i b r a r y c h a n g i n g Grace Sherwood Library changing found to staff the library that should ensure the doors don’t close permanently. An alternative is to have the library run on an honor system. KRS is looking at options to keep the doors from closing. The library is closed on Tuesdays and holidays, open 9 a.m.-noon and 1-8 p.m. on Wednesdays; 1-8 p.m. on Thursdays and 1-6:30 p.m. Saturdays through Mondays. The library has computers for public use, magazines, books, movies and audio books. The staff sponsors special reading challenges; preschool times and events; and monthly themes. “We are asking the community to think about this and if you are interested, please contact me at 53331,” Smead said. K w a j E b e y e w o m e n a t t e n d C h r i s t m a s e x c h a n g e d i n n e r Kwaj, Ebeye women attend Christmas exchange dinner Grace Sherwood Library has been a place of reading and learning for young and oid on Kwajalein for many years. The library will not be staffed beginning in January. Jabkol Harry, left and Lise Sheet enjoy the Christmas Exchange dinner. (Photo by JJ Klein)By Tamara WardU.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll“As a rst time attendee, I felt honored to share time with the Ebeye and Kwajalein Ladies. Such a great kindredship this gathering provides, as well as kindness,” Leslie Smith said. Dating back over 40 years, the Yokwe Yuk Women’s Club Christmas Exchange Dinner has been a fun lled event where women from Ebeye and Kwajalein get together, put aside their differences, and have good old-fashioned fun. This year’s special guests from Ebeye included Leroij Seagul Kabua-James, Senator Jeban Riklon’s wife Emma, and Ebeye High School Principal Kiorong Sam. This year YYWC President Jenny Norwood decided to put a different spin on things. Wanting to place more emphasis on service rather than gift giving, she asked all women to refrain from exchanging gifts and instead, recommended the women from Kwajalein donate to the “Eileen Account.” Funds from that will be distributed to the hospital on Ebeye. Norwood started the night’s event with a heartfelt presentation and welcome to the visiting Ebeye women. “You bring two very important things with you when you come,” Norwood stated, as she opened a decorative gift box, and pulled out two cards. “Friendship and fun.”

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Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass 4 A l l H a n d s M e e t i n g C h r i s t m a s Christmas C h e e r Cheer Santa says hello to a not-so-sure-she-likes-this little girl.Ennubirr children try their skills at putting during the Children's Christmas Party Monday on Roi. (Photos by Nell Drumheller)Annual party brings Christmas to Ennubirr children on Roi-Namur By Nell DrumhellerEditorFor the nearly 400 youngsters, 12 and under, on Roi-Namur Monday, holiday wishes really did come true. Members of the Enniburr Children’s Christmas Fund work from season to season to raise money, buy gifts and make the annual Christmas party a reality. The Roi-Namur community has been ‘playing Santa’ to Enniburr children for many years, since 1992. “The Roi-Namur Police Detachment started a “Toys for Tots” campaign for approximately 75 children age 12 and under,” Joe Coleman, ECCF president, said. “As the Enniburr Island

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 5 Life is just a bunch of bubbles for this little girl. Presents make good pillows for a tired little boy.population began increasing at a fast pace, the police turned it over to the Roi-Namur Community in 1996.” This year’s turnout was estimated at more than 600 people for the half-day Christmas party. “We spent just over $10,000 on gifts for the kids and enough food to feed the families from Enniburr Island and the many volunteers at the ECCF Children’s Christmas party,” Coleman said. He said that the bulk of donations come in the form of money raised from the ECCF Chili Cook-Off, and the rest comes from money raised from the ECCF Coconut Cup Race and ECCF Bingo. The day combines games, food, meeting Santa, gift giving and a Marshallese music program. “The best part of the event is watching the kids laugh and have so much fun playing all of the games; also watching the Marshallese music program,” Coleman said. “I get a lot of satisfaction out of seeing how much fun the Enniburr kids have during this event.” He added, “The most challenging thing about the event is ensuring all of the gifts have been bought and received in time for the Christmas party. The games and gifts are purchased on-line and Lannie Carroll buys the Christmas gifts with ECCF funding each year when she goes home on vacation to the Philippines.” I would like to thank the residents of Enniburr, Roi-Namur and Kwajalein for all of their help and support without which the ECCF could not possibly put on the magnitude of the annual ECCF Chili Cook-Off and the ECCF Children’s Christmas Party,” Coleman said. “We would like to get the Marshallese community more involved by looking into having dual ECCF Committee officers,” Coleman said. He thinks having both Enniburr Island ECCF of cers and Roi-Namur Island of cers would improve next year’s event. “This would give us a closer working relationship as to the best way to spend the money for the children and allow the Marshallese to be a part of planning and helping with fund raisers.” For more information on the ECCF, contact Coleman at 56552.

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Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass 6 S c h o o l School o f of Visiting DC United players hold clinicsfor Kwaj residents DC United soccer player Justin Moose shows off some foot skills at the soccer clinic. (Photos by Nell Drumheller)By Nell DrumhellerEditorFour professional soccer players from the DC United team were on Kwajalein this week providing clinics to athletes young and old. The athletes are touring military installations as a part of the Armed Forces Entertainment program. Jeff Carroll, mid eld; Marc Burch, defense; Nick Addlery, forward and Justin Moose, mid eld conducted three clinics over a two day period. The rst clinic was held on Tuesday evening for approximately 30 players in the 7th – 12 grade range. “I think the most important thing that the participants got out of the clinics was the opportunity to learn the basics from professional soccer players,” said John Morgan, Kwajalein Range Services Community Activities adult athletic supervisor. “The clinics taught the participants how to dribble, pass, shoot, communicate, and how to work as a team while making the experience fun and memorable.” The clinics were conducted on the level appropriate for each age group. The professional players patiently helped children as young as kindergarten age understand the basics while adding fun touches to the clinics. The second clinic was held on Wednesday for kindergarten through

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 7 Third grader Jillian DeCoster practices kicks as Nick Addlery looks on. Fifth grader Bryce Smith gives the ball some air time off his knee. Justin Moose, left, Paul McGrew, Dustin Bonham and Jim Stepchew watch as Allison Hibberts displays newly learned talents. Students warm up for the soccer clinics held by DC United players.6th grade athletes. Approximately 60 children participated. This clinic was broken down into two groups, with kindergarten through third in one and fourth through sixth in the other. There were soccer balls everywhere with young people kicking, dribbling, and bumping into one another. Moose kept the attention of the fourth through sixth graders while he taught them a variety of foot skills that had many of the adult volunteers watching in awe. “It was absolutely amazing to work with professional soccer players. It’s not everyday you get the opportunity work with professional athletes and it truly was an amazing experience,” Morgan said. The nal clinic was Wednesday evening. It was for adults and had approximately 20 participants. “Being the Adult Athletic Supervisor, it was fun watching them work with the various age groups and realizing that they are just normal people helping teach the sport they love,” Morgan said. “I felt the players did an excellent job catering their clinics to t their desired age groups. They did a wonderful job of getting the K-6th grade students excited about their upcoming soccer season.” The DC United stop on Kwajalein was one four on their 14-day tour of the Paci c. The trip included bases in Hawaii, Guam and Japan.

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Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass8DINNER, from Page 3 By Yael BealsContributorPreschoolers on Kwajalein participated in a Hanukkah celebration Wednesday. The class sang the dreidel song, lit the candles in the Menorah and ate traditional Hanukkah food. “My favorite part of Hanukkah is dreidels because I love the dreidel song,” said So a Beals, 3. A dreidel is a four-sided spinning top that children play with on Hanukkah. Hanukkah, also known as the festival of lights, takes place around the same time as Christmas, a celebration of the birth of Christ, and Kwanzaa, a holiday honoring the AfricanAmerican heritage. Hanukkah is observed for eight days and commemorates the reposessing of the second temple of Jerusalem. After the Jews recaptured the temple they lit an oil lamp. There was only enough oil in the lamp to burn for one night, but it burned for eight nights, which was considered a miracle. Hanukkah is observed by lighting the candles in a Menorah, a type of candelabrum. Karen Tyson’s preschool class at the Kwajalein Child Development Center made Hanukkah arts and crafts projects and cooked the traditional Hanukkah Latkes, or potato pancakes. “I like the potato pancakes because we put apple sauce on top,” said Festival of lights P r e s c h o o l e r s l e a r n H a n u k k a h t r a d i t i o n Preschoolers learn Hanukkah tradition So a Beals lights the Hanukah candles. ( Photo by Yael Beals) Over dinner women were able to get to know one another. Seating was arranged so that a YYWC club member, Kwajalein and Ebeye resident was at each table. One of the traditions of the dinner was to have the women from each island entertain each other, with the host island, Kwajalein, beginning the night’s festivities. After the presentation of gifts to the “Eileen Account”, Cheryl Shields enthusiastically taught all the ladies the “Cha Cha”. Comic relief was also provided by the Kwajalein women who sang, or made an attempt to sing “Santa Baby”. The women from Ebeye, including recognizable employees of Kwajalein and a Recruit Indoctrination candidate performed two songs and ve dances. The Ebeye women also brought along with them a band of three young Marshallese men who played a variety of dancing music for the women. Wherever you looked in the multi-purpose room that night, there were women laughing, dancing around the room, and hugging their new friends. One Kwajalein resident even made a future date to visit her new Ebeye friend and learn how to make rice coconut balls and jerk chicken. So did Norwood keep the women from exchanging gifts altogether? Nope. There were so many bags given by both sides, there was a table full of leftover treats. But by that time, the most meaningful gifts had already been exchanged. Kai Gregoire. Lynn Elkin brought the preschoolers a taste of Hanukkah, the traditional Sufganiyot, a sweet pastry similar to a jelly donut. Elkin read a story about Hanukkah and then lit the candles in the Menorah “There’s not a big mix of cultures in our preschool classroom, so we are talking about the winter holidays including Hanukkah, Christmas, and Kwanzaa,” said Tyson. As Hanukkah comes to an end, the class is looking forward to learning about Christmas and Kwanzaa.

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Saturday, Dec. 15, 20079 P a u p e r ’ s m a r a t h o n h e l d Pauper’s marathon held M o n d a y Monday By Bob SholarKwajalein Running ClubThe Kwajalein Running Club held its Pauper’s Marathon and Rely Monday. The event is held annually to coincide with the Honolulu Marathon in Hawaii. Congratulations Jon, Alex, Christi, John, Valerie, Julianne and Doug; also to the teams. I vaguely remember that unexpectedly pleasing combination of emotional high and acute muscle soreness felt the day after running a 26.2-mile marathon. Enjoy it, you earned it. If you nd yourself grinning as you hobble the stairs, don’t worry; that is completely normal. Between Kwaj and Honolulu, seven Kwaj runners covered the full 26.2 miles. That is the highest count since the early 1980s. All starters nished. Four of the ve local marathoners elected to start at 3 a.m. The Honolulu Marathon starts at 5 a.m. Hawaii time, so it was a concurrent start. The teams started at a more humane 6:30 a.m. The fth full local marathoner Jon Jahnke, did not want to get up that early, so he started by himself about 5:30 a.m. Locally we had ve individual marathon runners and 23 runners participating on the four teams. There are no rules to team size, except teams have to include between two and 10 members. There are 10-loops to Pauper’s Marathon. The rst is 2-1/4 miles and the last nine are 2-2/3 miles. They are carefully measured to be a total of 26-miles plus 385-yards, which is the of cial modern marathon distance. We’ve been getting one or two residents per year traveling to Hawaii to run the Honolulu Marathon in the past decade. The local runners are unable (or unwilling) to buy a plane ticket, hence: “Pauper’s Marathon”. Back in the early 1980s, an amazing total of twenty (yes 20) Kwajalein residents ew to Hawaii to run the Honolulu Marathon. All twenty nished. This year Doug Helpler and Julianne Kirchner ran in Hawaii. AnnElise Peterson arrived at the race location at 2:30 a.m. and spent the next eight hours doing the loop timing. This was the 26th Annual “Pauper’s Marathon and Relay”.Pauper's results:Jon Jahnke: 3:46:05 2nd marathon and personal best Alex McGlinn: 4:33:30 1st marathon Christi Davis: 4:40:01 1st marathon John Lafferty: 5:12:28 1st marathon shedding 80 pounds on the way Valerie Hill: 5:24:28 1st marathon Range Rats: 3:19:26 (formed by Johann Schleiss) Team Marine: 3:41:19 (formed by Jack Carey) Team Elias: 3:54:50 (Brent and Krystal Peterson husband and wife duo team) Kwaj Kids: 4:38:31 (Justin Hill’s team of 10 boys)Honolulu results:Julianne Kirchner: 4:03:35 — 2nd marathon and personal best Doug Hepler: 5:19 — 1st marathon shedding 50 pounds on the way Valerie Hill's sons, Sawyer, left, and Justin, join her as she nishes her tenth lap during the Kwajalein Running Club's Pauper's Marathon relay Monday. (Photo by Bob Sholar) P r e s c h o o l e r s l e a r n H a n u k k a h t r a d i t i o n

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Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass 10 Five servicemembers die in Global War on TerrorBig plays marked flag football games Dec. 4 6 p m M o n d a y i n 6 p.m., Monday, in C o r l e t t R e c r e a t i o n Corlett Recreation C e n t e r G y m Center GymCHRISTMAS IN THE MARSHALL ISLANDS IS A PROGRAM OF TRADITIONAL MARSHALLESE HOLIDAY PERFORMANCES. THE COMMUNITY IS INVITED TO SHARE IN THE SPIRIT OF THE SEASON WITH OUR MARSHALLESE NEIGHBORS. SPONSORED BY THE MARSHALLESE CULTURAL SOCIETY. QUESTIONS? CALL CRIS, 52935 By Jason KettenhofenChild and Youth Services programThe 2007 youth ag football season has hit the midway point and all teams have shown improvement since they rst took the eld in mid November. The game on Dec. 4 between the Yellow Kwaj Dogz and Blue Warriors came down to big plays. Yellow Kwaj Dogz struck rst in the half with a Cody Wright catch and run touchdown from Annie Hepler. Preston Parker–Roop’s 15-yard catch set up a two-yard touchdown catch, Hepler to Wright. The Blue Warriors had a few potential scoring opportunities with Noah Gray passing to Sam Jahnke, but the Yellow Kwaj Dogz defense held firm and turned the Blue Warriors away on downs. Jun Jun Davis, Keith Brady and the rest of the Blue Warriors defense had some great plays on defense in the second half. The only score came late in the half when Wright took a pitch and busted through a hole for a 12-yard touchdown run. Both teams showed hustle and good gamesmanship. Spc. Randy W. Pickering 31, of Bovey, Minn., died Sunday in Baghdad, Iraq of injuries sustained in a non-combat related incident. He was assigned to the Regimental Support Squadron, 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment, Vilseck, Germany. Cpl. Tanner J. O’Leary 23, of Eagle Butte, S.D., died Sunday in Musa Qal’eh, Afghanistan of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C. Spc. Johnathan A. Lahmann 21, of Richmond, Ind., died Monday in Tikrit, Iraq of wounds suffered in Bayji, Iraq when a improvised explosive device struck his vehicle. He was assigned to the 59th Engineer Company, 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas. Staff Sgt. Gregory L. Elam 39, of Columbus, Ga., died Tuesday in Kandahar, Afghanistan as a result of a non-combat related illness. He was assigned to the 54th Quartermaster Company, 49th Quartermaster Group, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), located at Fort Lee, Va. Chief Petty Of cer Mark T. Carter 27, of Fallbrook, Calif., Tuesday, as a result of enemy action while conducting combat operations in Iraq. He was permanently assigned as an East Coast-based Navy SEAL.

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 11 Kwajalein Beaches Emon Beach................................................11 a.m.-3 p.m. All other beaches......................Buddy system at all times Bowling Center.......................................................Closed CRC/Raquetball Courts...........................7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Gear Locker............................................................Closed Golf Course............................................Sunrise to sunset Golf Pro Shop...........................................6:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Driving Range........................................................Closed Hobby Shop...................................................12:30-5 p.m. Ivey Gym .........................................................Cipher lock Kayak Shack .........................................................1-3 p.m. Library....................................................................1-5 p.m. Adult pool......................................................Buddy system Family pool....................................................11 a.m.-3 p.m Skate Park.................................Buddy system at all times Small Boat Marina.........................................8 a.m.-6 p.m. ARC...............................................................noon-10 p.m. Surfway...................................................................Closed Ten-Ten.......................................................10 a.m.-7 p.m.. GimbelÂ’s........................................................9 a.m.-1 p.m. MacyÂ’s and MacyÂ’s West...............................9 a.m.-1 p.m. Beauty/Barber.........................................................Closed DVD Depot....................................................Normal hours Laundry...................................................................Closed Sunrise Bakery................................................6 a.m.-noon Three Palms Snack Bar..............................10 a.m.-8 p.m. Pizza delivery..............................................11 a.m.-8 p.m. Dock Security Snack Bar.........................................Closed Ocean View Club.............................................4:30-11 p.m. Country Club.........................................6:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Post Of ce Kwaj...........................................10 a.m.-1 p.m. Community Bank.....................................................Closed ATM will be operational telephone and online banking will be available Roi-Namur Roi gym....................................................................normal Roi Hobby Shop.......................................................normal Roi Small Boat Marina....................................8 a.m.-6 p.m. Roi library.................................................................normal Roi golf course..........................................................normal Roi adult pool............................................................normal Roi gear locker..........................................................normalChristmas Eve hours of operationKwajalein Beaches Emon Beach................................................Buddy system All other beaches.........................................Buddy system Bowling Center.......................................................Closed CRC/Raquetball Courts..........................................Closed Gear Locker............................................................Closed Golf Course............................................Sunrise to sunset Golf Pro Shop.........................................................Closed Driving Range.........................................................Closed Hobby Shop............................................................Closed Ivey Gym .........................................................Cipher lock Kayak Shack ..........................................................Closed Library.....................................................................Closed Adult pool.....................................................Buddy system Family pool..............................................................Closed Skate Park.................................Buddy system at all times Small Boat Marina..................................................Closed ARC...............................................................noon-10 p.m. Surfway...................................................................Closed Ten-Ten...................................................................Closed GimbelÂ’s..................................................................Closed MacyÂ’s and MacyÂ’s West.........................................Closed Beauty/Barber.........................................................Closed DVD Depot....................................................Normal hours Laundry...................................................................Closed Sunrise Bakery........................................................Closed Three Palms Snack Bar..............................10 a.m.-4 p.m. Ocean View Club.................................................5-11 p.m. Country Club...........................................................Closed Dock Security Snack Bar.........................................Closed Post Of ce Kwaj......................................................Closed Community Bank.....................................................Closed ATM will be operational telephone and online banking will be available Roi-Namur Roi gym....................................................................Normal Roi Hobby Shop.......................................................Closed Roi Small Boat Marina..............................................Closed Roi library..................................................................Closed Roi golf course..........................................Sunrise to sunset Roi adult pool............................................................normal Roi gear locker..........................................................Closed Roi Post Of ce..........................................................ClosedChristmas Day hours of operation Potable water Pipes and spigots are color coded yellow. Suitable for drinking, bathing, cooking and washing clothes. Produced mainly from rainfall. Limited island supply. Filtered and disinfected with chlorine. Pipes and spigots are color coded red. Not suitable for drinking, wading pools, children's sprinkler toys or water toys. Suitable for watering plants, watering lawns, washing vehicles and washing of patios. Produced by waste water treatment plant. Filtered and disinfected with chlorine.Dren eo erreo Pipe im bojet ko rekolar jalo (yellow) Emon non idrak, tutu, kmat, kwalkol nuknuk im menko erlok wot. Ewor jonan kojerbale ilo juon alon. Emoj karreokiki kin jeraiko Walok elaptata jen woot. Pipe im bojet ko rekolar biroro (red) Ejjab emon non idrak, karreoki jikin tutu ko, kab kein ikkure dren ko nejin ajiri ro im menko erlok wot. Emon non utidrikdrikimenineddekko,kwaliimkarreoikiwako, etonaak, ko im menko erlok wot. Emoj karreoiki kin jerakoDren eo etoon im ejjab dren in idrak NothinÂ’ but netA local team of basketball allstars, in the white uniforms, took on the Harlem Ambassadors in a game Thursday night. The Harlem AmbassadorsÂ’ team was on Kwajalein to provide the community an entertaining show with a positive message about the need to exercise, a commitment to education, and the prevention of substance abuse. Half of the proceeds of the show went to the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll/Reagan Test Site Recruit Indoctrination Program, a private voluntary organization dedicated to providing opportunities to young Marshallese that want to join the U.S. military but need additional training, in order to buy books and instructional material.Tickets for the Annual Holiday Tour of Homes will be on sale, 10 a.m.-noon, Monday on MacyÂ’s porch. The Tour of Homes is scheduled for 6:30-9 p.m., Dec. 21. Transporation provided upon request.Non-potable water (Photo by Nell Drumheller)

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Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass 12 the four in the nose. Even all these years later, I wish I had thought a little more before I did that, because it didn’t work out too well. You know — it’s really amazing how fast you can go into the fetal position when you’re getting the snot knocked out of you. As I cringed on the schoolyard pavement, those guys seemed real serious about getting their licks in. I don’t know how long the unpleasantness went on, but it seemed like about a week. Either they got bored or tired — I don’t know which — but eventually they left, still saying uncomplimentary things. Now, I don’t have any idea where Santa was that day, but I do know he wasn’t around while I was getting the stuf ng beat out of me. So there I was on the schoolyard playground — I had a broken nose, a badly split lip, a deep cut over my right eye, my glasses were busted and my brand new Cardinals jacket was torn and covered with blood from my nose. All things considered, it hadn’t been a good day so far. I got up, dragged myself home and walked into the kitchen. My father was sitting at the table eating a sandwich. He looked up at me and said, rather unkindly, “what the bleep happened to your JACKET? ” So I explained, “You see daddy (sniff sniff), there were these guys (blubber) on the playground and they (sniff) said bad things about how (blubber blubber) Santa wasn’t real and I (sniff sniff blubber) wasn’t going to let them say bad things (blubber) about Santa. So I fought them daddy. Nobody’s (sniff) going to say Santa’s not real to me (blubber).” My father looked down at the oor for a second or two and then looked up, put his hand on my shoulder and told me something about Santa I really didn’t want to hear right then. My reaction was calm. I screamed, “WHAT DO YOU MEAN?!!” I remember thinking that it would have been helpful if he had given me that information YESTERDAY! It cost my poor dad a fortune to take me to the doctor to get my nose, lip and eye taken care of, not to mention how much it cost to replace my glasses. My new Cardinals jacket was a total loss, torn and blood-stained. I cried and cried over it. Needless to say, my thinking about the white-bearded guy soured a little after that. I got pretty cynical about a lot of things at my tender age. That non-trusting view of the world stayed with me into my young adulthood. Then I met a wonderful girl. She bubbled over with the excitement of life. To her, every day was a new adventure to be savored and enjoyed. She almost never let trials and tribulations (of which she had many) get her down. She still remembered every fairy tale she’d ever heard and every little childhood song. My miserable, snarly, ‘life stinks’ view of the world couldn’t have been more different from hers. Somehow, thank God, she fell in love with me and became my wife. Even though she managed to mellow me out somewhat, I told her that her view of life wasn’t very realistic. I always told her to be careful about what she trusted in. She was the most excited when Christmas came around. She loved going to shopping malls just to hear the music and see the lights. She would drag me to Christmas tree lightings downtown and other various holiday-related activities. She said she wished she was still a little girl and could sit on Santa’s lap again. I just shook my head. Then, we found ourselves with a daughter, and Christmas, like everything else in our lives, was about her. When my daughter was old enough, my wife asked me to take her to see Santa at the big downtown department store. Well, that was the last thing I wanted to do, but my wife insisted, so off we went. We got to the store and the place was packed with children and their parents. Everyone was brimming with excitement, except me. I just wanted to get it over with and get out of there. But then, I saw the sparkle and excitement in my daughter’s eyes. She just couldn’t wait to see Santa. I looked up and down the long line and saw the same anticipation and joy in all of the other children and even in their parents. I heard the Christmas carols. I saw shoppers in the store actually smiling at each other and wishing each other Merry Christmas. And as I stood in that line with my daughter and the other children, something happened — I got back what I had lost so many years ago in that schoolyard. I believed again. I knew for sure then and there that Santa is real. He exists in every child’s sparkling eyes. He exists in every child’s laughter. He exists in every parent who brings their children to see him, and maybe, for just a few moments, becomes a child again with their own fond Christmas memories. Yeah, I got back a little of what I had lost. Maybe the world wasn’t as bad a place as I thought it was. I realized that Santa Claus lives and always will as long as there are children who believe, and adults who are young at heart.I guess what I’m saying is that no matter how old you are, no matter how much life has knocked you around, no matter how the world has tried to make you think there’s nothing good out there, it’s nice to believe in the idea of Santa and to let the spirit of giving and love he represents, into your heart.But, I would strongly recommend you never get into an argument about it with four guys bigger than you. GETTING BACK from Page 2

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 13Religious Services Catholic Saturday Mass, 5:30 p.m., in the small chapel. Sunday Mass, 9:15 a.m., in the main chapel. Mass on Roi is at 12:30 p.m., in Roi chapel. Protestant Sunday 8 and 10:45 a.m., on Kwaj and Roi-Namur service at 4 p.m.Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. Latter-Day Saints 10 a.m., Sunday, in Corlett Recreation Center, Room 3. Baptist 9:40 a.m., Sunday, in elementary school music room. Church of Christ 10 a.m., Sunday, in Quarters 442-A. Monday Broiled pork chops Herb roast chicken Three-cheese quiche Grill: Brunch station openLunchTuesday Beef Stroganoff Chicken picatta Broccoli/rice casserole Grill: French dipThursday Swiss steak Chicken stir-fry Tuna casserole Grill: Sicilian hoagies Friday Kalua pork and cabbage Cheeseburger macaroni Baked nairagi Grill: Tostada barDec. 22 Pot roast Sicilian pizza Tofu stir-fry Grill: Corn dogsCaf Pacific DinnerSundayCantonese pork Tandouri chicken Eggplant ParmesanMondayHamburger steak Penne pasta a la cacciatore Turkey peapod stir-fryTuesdayKwaj fried chicken Honey lime ono Hawaiian chopped steakWednesdayFlank steak Barbecued chicken ChefÂ’s choiceFridayStir-fry to order Korean beef ribs Charsiu chickenThursdayHam steak Hawaiian Oven fried chicken Brunswick stewTonightMinute steak Marinated salmon Vegetarian beansSunday Carved round of beef Vegetable ragu Breaded chicken breast Grill: Brunch station openWednesday Szechuan pork Chicken katsu Thai shrimp pasta Grill: Teriyaki burger Caf Roi Monday Hawaiian chopped steak Grilled moon sh Spirals with chicken Grill: Brunch station openLunchTuesday Braised Swiss steak Chicken thigh fricassee Parmesan potatoesGrill: Pork sandwich Thursday Pork carnitas Beef/chicken tacos CowboyÂ’s fried squash Grill: Chicken quesadilla Friday Stuffed cabbage Chicken divan Chili mac Grill: French dipDec. 22 Pork chili rejo Monterey chicken Black beans/rice Grill: BurittosDinnerSundayTeriyaki beef steak Cantonese pork Sauted nairagiMondaySpaghetti Beef piccatta Eggplant/chicken AlfredoTuesdayBarbecued ribs Spiced ham loaf Fried chickenWednesdayGrilled sirloin steaks Chicken chausseuer Pasta primevaeraFridayRoast chicken Wild rice and beef Baked zitiThursdayChicken katsu Thai pork and rice Thai shrimp pastaTonightCorn beef and cabbage Cornish game hens ChefÂ’s choiceSunday Arroz con pollos Pot roast French toast casserole Grill: Brunch station openWednesday Penne pasta Beef ravioli Chicken Parmesan Grill: N/A HELP WANTED KRS has the following job openings. For contract hire positions, call Sheri Hendrix, 256-890-8710. For all others, call Carolyn Veirup, 51300. Full job descriptions and requirements for contract openings are located online at www.krsjv.com. Job descriptions for other openings are located at Human Resources, Building 700. NEED EXTRA money? KRS employment applications are continually accepted for all Community Services departments and the Human Resources temporary pool for casual positions. Some examples of these positions are: sport of cials, scorekeepers, delivery drivers, lifeguards, catering/dining room workers, medical of ce receptionists, temporary of ce support, etc. For more information, call the KRS HR Of ce at 54916. ON ISLAND HIRESAC&R TECHNICIANS I, full-time, Kwaj Ops., HR Reqs. K050009 and K050010 CARPENTER II, full-time, Kwaj Ops, HR Req. K050158 CARPENTER III, full-time, Kwaj Ops, HR Req. K050047 GENERAL MAINTENANCE I, full-time, Marine Department, HR Req. K050160 HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR II, full-time, Meck Operations, HR Req. K050150 HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR II, full-time, Kwaj Ops., HR Req. K050038 HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR IV, full-time, Solid Waste, HR Req. K050155 INCINERATOR OPERATOR III, full-time position, Solid Waste Mgmt., HR Req. K050112 INCINERATOR OPERATOR III, full-time position, Meck Operations, HR Req. K050144 MECHANIC II, full-time, Roi Power Plant, HR Req. K050183 PLUMBER/PIPEFITTER II, full-time, Utilities, HR Req. K050040 PETROLEUM, OIL and LUBE TECHNICIAN, full-time, Supply/Fuel Farm, HR Req. K050385. RAMP WORKER I, full-time position, Air eld Ops, HR Req. K050251 RETAIL ASSOCIATE III, GimbleÂ’s, full-time, HR Req. K050291 SHEETMETAL WORKER II, full-time, Kwaj Ops., HR Req. K050011 STYLIST, casual position, HR Req. K050275 SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS, casual positions, on-call TOOL ROOM ATTENDANT I, full-time position, Roi Operations, HR Req. K050137 TRAFFIC AGENT I, part-time, Air eld Ops, HR Req. K050181 TRAFFIC AGENT, full-time, Air eld Ops, HR Req. K050250WAREHOUSE RECEIVING AND RECORDS CLERK, full-time, Property Management, HR Req. K050153CONTRACT HIRES (A) accompanied (U) unaccompanied Even numbered requisitions=CMSI Odd numbered requisitions=KRSABLE SEAMAN, HR Req. 031482 U AC&R TECHNICIAN II and III, three positions, HR Reqs. 031378, 031454 and 031530 U AC & R TECHNICIAN IV, HR Req. 031522 U ACCOUNTANT II, HR Req. 032083 U ACCOUNTING CLERK III, HR Req. 032097 and 032099. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE LEAD, HR Req. 032095. ALCOR TRANSMITTER FIELD ENGINEER II, HR Req. 032063 U ALCOR/MMW LEAD RECEIVER ENGINEER, HR Req. 032069 A APPLIANCE REPAIR TECHNICIAN IV, HR Req. 031528. CALIBRATION REPAIR TECHNICIAN II and III, HR Reqs. 032057, 032021 and 032055 CARPENTER II, III, IV, HR. Reqs. 031348, 031346, 031524, 031350 and 031442 U CDC INSTRUCTOR, HR Req. 032019 U CERTIFIED TEACHER, HR Req. 032087 U CHIEF ENGINEER, HR Req. 032049 U CHILD YOUTH SERVICES DIRECTOR, HR Req. 032093.

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Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass 14 COMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIAN II, III, HR Reqs. 031941, 031803, 031999, 031967 and 031883 U COMPUTER OPERATOR II, HR Req. 031955 U COMSEC TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 031957 U CONTRACTS PURCHASES SPECIALIST, HR. Req. 031851 U CYS TECHNOLOGY LAB LEAD, HR Req. 031851 U DESIGNER/PLANNER IV, HR Req. 031308 U DISPATCHER, HR Req. 031540 U DRAFTER II, HR Req. 031486 U DRIVER II, HR Req. 031117 ELECTRICIAN II, III and IV LEAD, HR Reqs. 031224, 031210, 031332, 031408, 031412, 031570, 031504, 031304, 031380, 031414, 031578, 031580 and 031448 UELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN I, II, III, HR Reqs. 031719, 031825, 031869, 031743, 031959 and 031931 U ENGINEER, HR Req. 031436 U EQUIPMENT REPAIR TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 032101 AFIELD ENGINEER I and II, HR Reqs. 031867, 031753 and 032075 A FIRE INSPECTOR, HR Req. 031466 U FIRE LIEUTENANT, HR Req. 031546 U FIRE SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 031428 U FIREFIGHTER, HR Reqs. 031268, 031312, 031316, 031544, 031554, 031556, 031558, and 031534 U HARBOR CONTROLLER, HR Req. 031568 U HARDWARE ENGINEER I and II, HR Reqs. 032005, 031897, 031979 and 032065 A HEAVY EQUIPMENT MECHANIC III, HR Req. 0315 UHELP DESK TECHNICIAN II and III, HR Req. 032077 and 032109 U HOUSING INSPECT/EST/MAINT SPECIALIST, HR Req. 031390 U KWAJALEIN POWER PLANT, OPERATOR ELECTRIC, HR Req. 031494 U LEAD FIRE INSPECTOR, HR Req. 031424 U LEAD WELDER, HR 031198 U LICENSED MARINER I, HR Req. 031456 U MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST, MECK, HR Req. 031386 U MANAGER, INVENTORY CONTROL, HR Req. 031542 MANAGER, NETWORK OPERATIONS, HR Req. 032115 AMATE, 500T, HR Req. 031526 U MDN NETWORK ENGINEER, HR Req. 032029 U MECHANIC III, IV, HR Reqs. 031432, 031488, 031246 and 031474 U MECHANICAL ENGINEER III, HR Req. 031512 UMECK POWER PLANT MECHANIC III, HR Req. 031462 UMEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST, HR Req. 032015 U MMW OPERATIONS DIRECTOR, HR Req. 031945 U NETWORK ENGINEER III–MO, HR Req. 031855 A PAINTER III, HR Req. 031366 and 031472 U PHYSICIAN, SURGEON, HR Req. 031901 A PLANT TECHNICIAN II, III, HR Reqs. 031947 and 031643 U PLUMBER PIPEFITTER III and IV, HR Req. 031354 and 031548 U PROGRAMMER/ ANALYST-SUPPLY and MAINT, HR Req. 031841 A PROJECT PLANNER II, HR Req. 031296 A PROJECT PLANNER III, HR Req. 032091 A PUBLIC INTERNET SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR, HR Req. 031763 U PSYCHOLOGIST/EAP, HR 032119 U RADAR ENGINEER III, HR Req. 031961 A RADAR TECHNICIAN II and III, HR Reqs. 031943 and 031717 UROI POWER PLANT ELECTRICIAN, HR Req. 031220 USAFETY SPECIALIST III and IV, HR Reqs. 031893 and 032047 ASERVER ADMINISTRATOR III, HR Req. 032085 A SHEETMETAL WORKER III, HR Reqs. 031446 and 031422 USHIFT SUPERVISOR, CAFE ROI, HR Req. 032125 USOFTWARE COMPLIANCE SPECIALIST, HR Req. 032089 SOFTWARE ENGINEER II and IV, HR Reqs. 031975 and 031951 A SPACE SURVEILLANCE OPERATOR, HR Reqs. 031619, 031919 and 031915 U STEVEDORE CHIEF, HR Req. 031574 ASUPERVISOR, RANGE TELECOM, HR Req. 032067 ASUPERVISOR WAREHOUSING, HR Req. 031532 U SUPERVISOR CONFIGURATION AND DATA, HR Req. 031821 A SUPERVISOR LIGHT VEHICLE/SCOOTER, HR Req. 031196 A SYSTEMS ENGINEER I, III and IV, HR. Reqs. 031749, 031965, 031909, 031963 and 031011 A TECHNICAL ILLUSTRATOR, HR Req. 032123 U TELEMENTRY ENGINEER III, HR Req. 031723 A TRADEX RADAR FIELD ENGINEER-RECEIVERS, HR Req. 032061 UTRADEX TRANSMITTER ENGINEER, HR Req. 032081 A TRAFFIC AGENT I AND II, HR Reqs. 031560 and 031552 UWAREHOUSEMEN LEAD, HR Req. 031360 U WATER PLANT ELECTRICAL AND INSTRUMENT TECHNICIAN, HR Req. 031562 U WATER PLANT OPERATOR III, HR Req. 030826 UWATER TREATMENT TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 030826 UWELDER IV, HR Reqs. 031444 and 030834 UU.S. Army Kwajalein AtollOFFICE AUTOMATION ASSISTANTS, GS-03266. Temporary position not to exceed two years. The employee provides clerical support to ensure ef cient of ce operations. The employee accomplishes various duties to provide essentialof ce automation support and production. The employee performs a variety of assignments using the advanced functions of various database software packages. The employee prepares varied documents with complex formats using the advanced functions of word processing, desktop publishing, and other software types. The employee performs systems maintenance functions for electronic mail systems. The employee performs a variety of assignments using the advanced functions of one or more spreadsheet software packages. Performs a variety of secretarial and other clerical and administrative functions, using judgment to answer recurring questions and resolve problems. Apply at
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The Kwajalein Hourglass Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 15 Sands. Call 50165. EARRING ON Lagoon Road between VetsÂ’ Hall and 9th Street, on grass. Call 58060 or 54261. WANTEDSEWING MACHINE to buy. Call Ivy, 54814, home, or 52224, work. POTTED PALM TREE, to buy or borrow. Call Ingrid, 53140. INVERSION TABLE, to borrow or buy. Call Monte, 52834. PATIO SALESMONDAY, 7 a.m.-1 p.m., Quarters 213-B (in back). Full room of boysÂ’ toys, Christmas items, teen girl items, bikes, videos, books, clothes and electric piano. MONDAY, 7-10 a.m., Quarters 129-F. ChildrenÂ’s bikes, like new, baby clothes, baby items, computer speakers with sub-woofers, womenÂ’s dresses, glassware and Misty Anne boat. FOR SALEWHITE BASSINET that converts to a toy box with sheets, $40 and infant exersaucer, $20. Call 58565. CHEST FREEZER for boathouse, Whirlpool 21.7cubic feet, some rust, works great, $50. call Ben, 51990. GEORGE FOREMAN grill, $20 and ab machine, $30. E-mail for list of items: teesecake@hotmail.com. SUN THREE-SPEED bike, one year old, $125 and Sun three-wheel bike, six months old, $230. Call 53585. REFRIGERATOR, 3-CUBIC FEET, $150; upright freezer, 3-cubic feet, $200; metric tap and die set, large, $100; microwave with turntable, $25; teak boat cockpit table, new in box, $90; massaging chair liner with heat, almost new, $60; sit-on-top kayak with back rests, paddles and lifejackets, $350; entertainment center, large, $50 and book shelves, two, $40. Call 56671 and leave a message. FULL-SIZE BED with box spring, headboard and frame, $100. Call 54216. SONY PLAY STATION, portable, with 12 games and six movies, $225. Call 52564. PCS SALE. Sony TV, 55-inch, TV stand, Sony surround sound with speakers, subwoofer, DVD player, 51-CD stereo, kitchen roller counter, new Saunders of ce desk, oor lamp, Dell computer with at screen monitor and printer, rugs, crock-pot, large and small, and plants. Call Annette, 51393. ART STUDIO, 33-piece, includes easel, oil and acrylic paint, brushes, palette and canvas, $40; two rash guards with tags, womanÂ’s size medium, manÂ’s small and womanÂ’s medium body gloves, $15 each. Call 52567. KAI CUSTOM chopper bicycle, $500; Sony rear projection TV, 62-inch, $1,000; Sanyo TV, 32-inch, $250; Sony Play Station 2 with three memory cards, $100; Play Station 2 games, $10-15 each; Dell desktop PC with monitor and printer, $350; Peavey Envoy 110 guitar amp, $150; bicycle work stand and truing wheel, $50; road bike parts and tools. Call Toby, 55590. PORTABLE WOODEN bar with two stools, ip-up table top and two drawers, $50. Call 55945. STEREO SYSTEM, receiver with five speakers, in box, new, never opened, $200; tools, some very used, various prices; sewing machine, all metal gears, $350; off shore sailing harnesses, $40; white rustoleum and varnish, $15; plastic shelves, $20 and 50-foot long low-pressure hose, great for cleaning the bottom of a boat, $60. Call 56671 or leave a message. PCS SALE. Rubbermaid six-foot outdoor storage cabinet, $100; Hitachi 32-inch TV (available Dec. 24), $100; large Panasonic microwave, $40; two dark green rugs with pads, $80 each; silver rug, 6-foot by 9-foot, $25; 12 glasses, $15, dishes, $10; vacuum, $90 and ironing board, $15. Call 52771. METAL AND GLASS computer desk, $50 or best offer; 10 yards of 60-inch wide upholstery/curtain fabric with palm tree design, $50 and tropical design quuen-size bedspread, curtains, bedskirt and shower curtain, $30. Call 51444. 1990 23-FOOT BAYLINER trophy, new Yamaha 115s with 80 hours, new steering, bateries, electrical bait tank, sh boxes, 140-gallon fuel tank, stereo/CD, VHF radio, cabin with lots of storage space, located on Lot 17, $55,000 or best offer. Call Steve, 52864 or e-mail steve.fuchs@spacex.com TWO 1993 100-horsepower Mercury Mariner engines, run great, lots of extra parts and accessories, $4,000. Call 55987, and leave a message. COMMUNITY NOTICESSAY GOODBYE to the Wright family at 6 p.m., tonight, at Emon Beach main pavilion. Bring a dish to share. THE DCCB will be holding a special sealed bid sale for boats and boat trailers. Viewing and bidding begins on Tuesday and ends at close of business Dec 28. Hours for viewing are 8-11 a.m. and 1-3 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Catalogs will be available on the counter at the property of ce and at the DCCB. Questions? call 51770. Christmas RMI Shopping Day is 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Dec. 22, at Macys, Macys West and Gimbels. Must be 18 to enter, bring photo Iidenti cation. Retail Welcomes our RMI neighbors from Ebeye and Enniburr. MACYÂ’S SALE Tuesday through Dec. 31. Holiday decor and ornaments, 40 percent off; cards and party supplies, 50 percent off; framed paintings and pictures, 30 percent off; china and crystal, 40 percent off; selected toys, 50 percent off; all other toys, $40 percent off; all shirts (no logo), 40 percent off; Roi Rat shirts, 50 percent off; fragrances, 10 percent off and Olympia chains and charms, 30 percent off. MACYÂ’S DAILY SPECIALS. Monday: toys, 40 percent off; Tuesday: luggage and packs, 25 percent off; Wednesday: gold jewelry, 40 percent off and Thursday: furniture, 15 percent off. STARTING JAN. 1, tents, table, chair, grill and beach pavilion reservations will be taken at the Community Activities of ce, 53331. Corlett Recreation Center reservations will continue to be taken at 52491.

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Saturday, Dec. 15, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass 16 Sunday 6:59 a.m./6:36 p.m. 4:35 p.m./4:36 a.m. 8:15 a.m., 2.8’ 2:11 a.m., 0.3’ 8:24 p.m., 3.6’ 1:58 p.m., 0.8’ Monday 7:01 a.m./6:37 p.m. 5:39 p.m./5:43 a.m. 9:22 a.m., 2.8’ 3:07 a.m., 0.4’ 9:29 p.m., 3.3’ 3:10 p.m., 1.0’ Tuesday 7:01 a.m./6:38 p.m. 6:45 p.m./6:50 p.m. 10:44 a.m., 2.9’ 4:13 a.m., 0.5’ 10:52 p.m., 3.0’ 4:46 p.m., 1.1’ Wednesday 7:01 a.m./6:39 p.m. 7:50 p.m./7:53 a.m. 12:05 a.m., 3.3’ 5:26 a.m., 0.5’ 6:23 p.m., 0.9’ Thursday 7:02 a.m./6:39 p.m. 8:51 p.m./8:51 a.m. 12:20 a.m., 3.0’ 6:34 a.m., 0.4’ 1:12 p.m., 3.7’ 7:40 p.m., 0.5’ Friday 7:02 a.m./6:39 p.m. 9:47 p.m./9:42 a.m. 1:34 a.m., 3.0’ 7:34 a.m., 0.2’ 2:08 p.m., 4.2’ 8:41 p.m., 0.0’ Dec. 22 7:02 a.m./6:40 p.m. 10:37 p.m. /10:28 a.m. 2:35 a.m., 3.2’ 8:27 a.m., 0.1’ 2:58 p.m., 4.6’ 9:32 p.m., 0.4’ Weather courtesy of RTS WeatherSunday: Mostly cloudy, 60 percent showers. Winds: ENE at 16-22 knots. Monday: Mostly cloudy, 40 percent showers. Winds: ENE at 14-18 knots. Tuesday: Partly sunny, 20 percent showers. Winds: ENE at 15-20 knots. Wednesday: Mostly sunny, 20 percent showers. Winds: ENE at 15-20 knots. Thursday: Mostly sunny, 20 percent showers. Winds: ENE at 15-20 knots. Friday: Mostly sunny, 20 percent showers. Winds: ENE at 15-20 knots. Dec. 22: Mostly sunny, 20 percent showers. Winds: ENE at 15-20 knots. Annual total: 84.64 inches Annual deviation: -11.41) inchesCall 54700 for updated forecasts or visit www.rts-wx.com. Sun rise/set Moon rise/set High Tide Low TideSun  Moon  Tides Prime rib of beef Roast rack of lamb Roast turkey Steamed crab legs Scallops Alfredo Smoked ham Jumbo shrimp Mussels on the half-shell Smoked salmon International cheese bar Assorted salads Fresh fruit A variety of delicious desserts Wine and beer will be for sale Take out meals must be requested in advanceUnaccompanied personnel, 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m. All other residents, 1-6:30 p.m. Let the holiday post of ce shuttle offered by Automotive Services give you a hand with your packages. The service is available until 6 p.m., Jan. 5. Shuttle service hours are: 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 3-6 p.m., Tuesday thru Saturday. Call 53341 or 58294 for service. Customers must travel with their packages to their quarters.Do the holidays have you in a tizzy and you don’t know if you’re coming or going ? An Explosives and Ordnance Disposal robot checks a suspicious bag left in front of Three Palms Snack Bar Dec. 6. It turned out to be nothing harmful. EOD, Kwajalein Police and the Fire Department responded to the scene. (Photo by Mike Zeitzmann)