Citation
The Kwajalein hourglass

Material Information

Title:
The Kwajalein hourglass
Uniform Title:
Kwajalein hourglass
Place of Publication:
Kwajalein Aroll, Marshall Islands
Publisher:
Commander, U.S. Army Garrison- Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA/KMR)
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases -- Periodicals -- Marshall Islands ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Marshall Islands ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
"U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
55731016 ( OCLC )
2004230394 ( LCCN )
ocm55731016

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Digital Military Collection

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The Kwajalein Hourglass J o s h S a u l s U S A K A R a i d e r s p i t c h e r t o o k h i s t e a m t o a s e a s o n c h a m p i o n s h i p Josh Sauls, USAKA Raiders pitcher, took his team to a season championship. F o r m o r e o n t h e s o f t b a l l t o u r n a m e n t s e e P a g e 6 For more on the softball tournament, see Page 6. ( P h o t o b y N e l l D r u m h e l l e r ) (Photo by Nell Drumheller) www.smdc.army.mil/KWAJ/Hourglass/hourglass.html

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Wednesday, March 21, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass The Kwajalein Hourglass is named for the insignia of the U.S. Army 7th Infantry Division, which liberated the island from the forces of Imperial Japan on Feb. 4, 1944. The Kwajalein Hourglass is an authorized publication for military personnel, federal employees, contractor workers and their families assigned to U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll. Contents of the Hourglass are not necessarily of cial views of, T h e K w a j a l e i n H o u r g l a s s The Kwajalein Hourglass or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, Department of the Army or USAKA. It is published Wednesdays and Saturdays in accordance with Army Regulation 360-1 and using a network printer by Kwajalein Range Services editorial staff. P.O. Box 23, APO AP 96555 Phone: Defense Switching Network 254-3539; local phone: 53539 Printed circulation: 2,000E-mail: hourglass@kls.usaka.smdc.army.milCommanding Of cer......Col. Stevenson Reed Public Affairs Of cer......................Sandy Miller Editor......................................Nell Drumheller Graphics Designer..........................Dan Adler Reporter ............................................JJ Klein Distribution..................................C.J. Kemem2 COMMENTARYRussell thanks Kwajalein friends for packages, letters L e t t e r t o t h e e d i t o r Letter to the editor Why are some people so eager to surrender western culture? See CULTURE, Page 12 Dear Hourglass Staff, First, my two Soldiers and I have returned home safely to Colorado after our tour at Camp Fallujah, Iraq. I am blessed to have only done a ‘short’ tour, and it is great to be home. Every Soldier I met supporting the war was motivated and doing the right thing for his / her country. Be proud of them all. Second, thank you for posting my address in the paper, and thank all my Kwajalein friends for sending me and my team care packages and letters. It makes the time spent away easier. — Maj. Mike RussellWho would have thought that the children’s story, The Three Little Pigs written 150 years ago, would create any kind of controversy. This fairy tale has been enjoyed by children the world over. I’m sure most of us read it as children and have read it to our children, and some of us have read it to our grandchildren. But, of course, these days it doesn’t take much to cause controversy and anyone can be ‘offended’ by anything it seems. Have you heard about the children’s music festival that was being organized in Yorkshire, England? There were 63 schools that were going to be involved in it. Apparently, one of the schools was going to stage a musical production of The Three Little Pigs but the organizers ordered the school to change the lyrics and name from The Three Little Pigs to The Three Little Puppies Why did they do that, you ask? Because the organizers were afraid that singing about pigs would be offensive to Muslim children and their parents. The Islamic religion forbids Muslims to eat pork. But singing about pigs? Well, after much consternation and protesting from non-Muslim parents and some city of cials, The Three Little Pigs original lyrics were reinstated. Funnily enough, even some of the local Muslims said they weren’t offended by singing about pigs. But what if they had been? Would there have been violent protests? Would The Three Little Pigs have ever seen the light of day at that music festival? If the organizers of the event felt so strongly about being sensitive to Muslims, they might have known that Muslims consider dogs to be ‘unclean’ and ‘offensive.’ So, ordering the lyrics to be changed to The Three Little Puppies was just as stupid as banning the original lyrics in the rst place. It’s amazing to me why some people in the western world are so eager to surrender their own cultural and religious beliefs in order to be ‘sensitive.’ This is only the latest in a string of asinine politically correct moves that have been made in many European countries in order to placate their immigrant populations (which they are scared to death of). What’s happened in Europe over the past few decades and what is happening in America right now shows that diversity is a wonderful thing up to a point. It’s great until you have so much diversity that you don’t have your country or your culture anymore. The Islamic immigrants that ooded European countries over the past years never had any intention of assimilating into the cultures or beliefs of the countries they immigrated to. That’s why so many second and third generations of those immigrants don’t consider themselves British or French or Dutch. They still cling to the culture, beliefs and religions of the countries they came from. In fact, far from wanting to assimilate, they want just the opposite. They want to impose their culture, religion and way of life on the citizens of the countries they live in. Can it happen in America? How many people have ooded across our border from Mexico and South America who can’t or won’t speak English? How many politically correct people in America are eager to surrender our common language and culture so as not to be ‘insensitive’ or ‘racist?’ The immigrants who came to America from Europe in the 1800s and 1900s were all looking for the same thing— freedom. But they realized that they all

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, March 21, 2007 3 A b r idg e i s rea d y t o b e t es t e d. See BRIDGES, Page 5 Science students compete in bridge-building project gyjjg up to see which one is strongest during the science competition Friday. (Photos by Nell Drumheller) By Nell DrumhellerEditorAll 140 students in science classes in grades 7-12 participated in the bridge construction project for this year’s science competition. The Davye Davis MultiPurpose Room was lled on Friday as students, parents and teachers milled around, waiting for the results of stress and strength tests on the balsa wood bridges. In the end, junior Rachel Stepchew, 17, built the strongest bridge. “The students had one week to build the bridges. Many of the students worked an extra hour before school and an hour after school every day of the week to complete their bridges on time,” Brian Brewster, science teacher, said. The goal was to build the strongest bridge by weight. “All of the materials were supplied, but the students had a limited a m ou n t o f w ood to w o r k Bridges of Kwajalein County with. Their designs had to use the limited materials as effectively as possible. Once they had used up their 18 pieces of wood, they did not get any more,” Brewster said. Stepchew attributed her success to hard work. “I r ea lly l i k e b ri dg es a n d arc h itecture, ” sh e sai d “ I spent l i k e 2 0 h ours m a k in g sure it w as per f ect. ” S h e add e d “ I use d a l ot o f woo d M y b ri dg e was one o f the he avi est ” Brewster desc ri bed the b ri d geb ui ld ing process: First the stude n ts d i d In te rn et rese ar ch le arni n g a b out struct ures, materia l s, a n d w h a t ma kes s trong b ri d ges as w ell a s the d i ff erent t y pes o f bridges. The students were tested on this information. After the research, “We built bridges out of drinking straws and hot glue to gain an understanding of the build process as well as to understand how to make bridges both strong and light,” Brewster said. “We used several computer programs to help test bridges and to re ne student designs. The computer program helped students see where the weak points on their structures were and then make modi cations to improve it. The last step was to draw a scale model of their bridge from the side and from the top views,” he added. “We built our balsa bridges directly on top of the scale designs by laying wax paper over the drawings and supporting the bridge on cardboard while the pieces dried in place.” Brewster said all of the designs had to be approved by the teacher before the students could begin building. “The students could use any design that they wanted, but it had to be a correct scale drawing to pass inspection,” he said.This is the third time, in the past seven years, bridge building has been the project for the science competition. “These bridges were vastly improved over previous years. Our average strength-to-weight ratio for all of the bridges this year was 324. Last time it was 187. This shows the students worked extremely hard on their designs, and that we are improving as teachers on the advice and direction that we are giving to students. We are still giving the students complete freedom in their designs, but the instructional time leading up to the building is helping to guide

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Wednesday, March 21, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass W i e n ke an d h i s c o ll ea g ues use a d a t a b a se of m o r e th an 2,800 mixe d g as, d ecompres s i o n c a ses to stu d y d eepd iv e decompression issues. H o w d i d he e n d u p on Kwa j a l ei n t a lk ing to a grou p of wa te r e n thus i asts ? H e l a st v isite d Kwa j a l ei n ab out 20 year s a go, w h i l e serv i n g in the U.S N av y H e wa s c ontacte d by KS C mem b ers Cow b o y G a ll oway an d R ic k Zuraws k i, w ho a sked h im if he’d be in te rested in coming to the islands. Wienke jumped at the chance, he checked his schedule and was able to squeeze Kwaj into a space between two other engagements. He was leaving Kwajalein and heading to Colorado where he was scheduled to compete in a downhill skiing competition. Perhaps some of Wienke’s presentation was over the heads of some of the divers in the room, but the presenter’s enthusiasm wasn’t lost on the audience. Wienke, a diver with more than 45 years in the water, leads a life with nuances of the Indiana Jones character. He is not only an internationally-recognized dive expert, but also a member of the Los Alamos Nuclear Laboratory Nuclear Emergency Strategy Team, in exercises involving Special Operations with SEALS and Delta Force above and below the water. He is a windsur ng, tennis, mountain biking and snow skiing enthusiast. And if that’s not enough, he quarterbacked the ‘63 Northern Michigan Wildcats to an NCAA II championship at the Hickory Bowl. Wienke received a bachelor’s of science degree in physics and mathematics from Northern Michigan University, master’s in nuclear physics from Marquette University, and doctorate in particle physics from Northwestern University. But on Kwajalein, after he put away his PowerPoint presentation, Wienke was a diver. He spent two days in the water. On the second day he dove the Prinz Eugen. “I was excited to dive the wreck,” he said of the Prinz Eugen. “I didn’t realize it was out here,” he said, with a twinkle in his eye. So while Wienke brought a depth of knowledge to the divers of Kwajalein, perhaps the waters of Kwajalein offered him something to remember. 4 Diving expert Wienke gives presentation at annual safety meeting for Kwajalein Scuba Club members ypgp Dr. Bruce Wienke visited Kwajalein last week and gave a safety presentation to Kwajalein Scuba Club. (Photo by Mike Malone) By Nell DrumhellerEditorThe Kwajalein Scuba Club sponsored an internationally-respected scientist on island last week. Dr. Bruce Wienke, Ph.d., was the guest speaker at the club’s annual safety meeting. Wienke, a program manager in the Nuclear Weapons Technology/ Simulation and Computing Of ce at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico is also an expert on diving. “I like to visit military communities and I like to talk about diving,” Wienke said. Wienke developed the reduced gradient bubble model algorithm that is used in many modern dive computers. “This isn’t rocket science,” Wienke explained of the process. He said that in comparison to the other research he does, this is basic high school level work. His lab and eld work have revolutionized the understanding of bubbles and how they affect humans in deep water dives. Speci cally, he endorses deep safety stops, “This should have happened 50 years ago,” he said of the research and acceptance which has popularized safety stops in deep diving. Using deep water stops has increased safety in both technical and recreational diving, according to Wienke. But it wasn’t an easy change, “there’s been a lot of resistance,” Wienke said. In his presentation last week, Wienke said the deep stop theory began to surface in the diving world in the 60s and early 70s. He related that Australian deep-water divers went to depths of 300 feet, twice a day, six days a week, ten months a year with higher incidences of decompression sickness, but not as high as should have happened according to the standardized dive tables used commercially by the U.S. and British Royal Navy. Those tables were the generally accepted standards at the time. According to the tables, those divers should have been dead. But the Australian divers had learned by listening to their own bodies. They had evolved a decompression strategy that kept them alive. They were making deep stops. The standardized tables suggested they should be making a decompression stop at 50 feet. Instead, the Australians were making a deep stop at half their dive depth, or 150 feet. “It was heresy in the early days,” Wienke said of the deep stop theory. “In the eld, what works, works. What doesn’t gets thrown away.” These divers, both in Australia and some deep water shermen in Hawaii developed deep water decompression strategies that worked for them. The technical and medical communities took notice. “They gained acceptance among divers who were doing this everyday, but not with the Navies who held to the old tables,” Wienke said. The deep stops work. “You’re controlling bubble growth if you’re making deep stops,” Wienke explained. “Deep stops will hold the bubbles at a deeper pressure and prevent them from growing too rapidly. Then as you come to the surface, you are effectively eliminating bubbles instead of treating bubbles.”

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, March 21, 2007BRIDGES, from Page 3 5 students to better building techniques and improved designs,” Brewster said.“The students applied the scienti c method to a realworld problem. They used computers to help come up with the best design possible and then had to build it. In addition to learning about structures, students applied math and measuring skills to help draw their scale models. Students were forced to plan ahead to make sure they had the supplies needed for their designs and to make sure that they would nish on time,” Brewster said. “The hands-on building was also a challenge for many as they learned the best ways to piece their bridges together. It was great to see students working together on this project as they helped each other out even though they were competing against each other.” Once the bridges were built, there had to be a process to test them. Brewster said it would have been possible to purchase a testing device, but that would have cost thousands of dollars. Instead, the science teachers decided to see what they could come up with. “We used force sensors that the department already owned and connected them to a lever arm to multiply the force. This way we could use a force senor that is only designed to measure up to 50 Newtons [11 pounds] to test bridges that could hold close to 350 Newtons of force [80 pounds]. Last time we had the competition we poured sand into a bucket underneath each bridge until it broke. This was both inaccurate and slow. Our device this time allowed us to nish testing all of the bridges in 90 minutes,” Brewster said. The device works like a see-saw. “The student used the force sensor to pull up on one side and the other end pulled down on the bridge. The sensors were connected to computers that collected the data and allowed us to measure very accurately the exact sheer point [point of failure] of the bridges,” Brewster said. Stepchew’s bridge tested the teachers’ device almost to its maximum capacity. It held 77 pounds. “She came within three pounds of maxing out our testing device,” Brewster said. Another sh storyFishermen, left to right, Moses Moreno, Joe Barnes, Les Saulibio (boat captain) and Ken Cox brought in a 66.4 pound sail sh, caught oceanside off of Ebeye on Monday.(Photo courtesy of Ken Cox)

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Wednesday, March 21, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass Women’s Game 1 Sweet Feet 10 Spartans I 9 Men’s A Game I Podunkers 11 Criminals 3 Men’s AI Game 1 USAKA Raiders 11 Mon-Kubok 5 Men’s B Game1 Paci c Flyers 14 Spartans II 2 Women’s Game 2 Sweet Feet 11 Ebeje 4 Tournament resultsMen’s A Game 2 Podunkers 12 Criminals 4 Men’s AI Game 2 USAKA Raiders 13 Mon-Kubok 6 Men’s B Game 2 Paci c Flyers 10 Spartans II 56 Sweet Feet take women’s softball title, USAKA Raiders win men’s AI slot gg,pS, run at her rst at bat for the tournament. Each time she came to the plate after that she was intentionally walked. Hourglass reportsThe 2007 Softball Season ended Saturday when Sweet Feet defeated Ebeje, in two games, to take the Women’s title and USAKA Raiders defeated MonKubok, in two games, capturing the Men’s B league championship. Two other titles were determined earlier in the week. Podunkers defeated Criminals in two games taking the Men’s A title, and the Men’s B crown went to Paci c Flyers after they defeated Spartans II in two games. The 29-teams covered four categories in this season’s play. There were eight teams in both the Men’s A and Men’s A1 categories; four teams in the Men’s B category and nine teams in the Women’s category. “There were a lot of highlights during the season, but it seemed like different players took the forefront at different times, offensively and defensively,” Billey Coley, Kwajalein Range Services Adult Athletics’ supervisor, said. This season differed from past play in the make-up of the Men’s Divsions. “Normally there are three divisions: A, B and C,” Coley explained. “This year, we did not have enough teams for a separate A division, so the teams signed up in A and B were combined into the A and A1 divisions.” He added, “This was a very competitive and enjoyable season. I would like to thank the workers, players and spectators who made the season such a success.” Meanwhile, over at the family pool, the Inner Tube Water Polo season is in full swing and basketball begins Tuesday.Mon-Kubok third baseman Robert Sam gets the ball a moment too late as Mike Saltzman, USAKA Raiders, beats the throw.(Photos by Nell Drumheller)

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, March 21, 2007Thursday7All programming is subject to change without notice TimeChannel 14 AFN News Channel 17 AFN Prime Channel 20 AFN Spectrum Channel 23 AFN Movies Channel 26 AFN Family Channel 29 AFN Sports Channel 35 AFN Direct to Sailors TimemidnightToday The Late ShowLate Night withMovie: (Continued)Kim PossibleInside the NBALaw & Ordermidnight 12:30 a.m.Late Late Show Conan OÂ’Brien Patton The Proud Family 12:30 a.m. 1 a.m.CNN Newsroom with Craig Ferguson C.S.I. Zack & CodySportsCenterPaci c Report1 a.m. 1:30 a.m.Judge Judy DarcyÂ’s Wild LifeTonight Show1:30 a.m. 2 a.m.CNN NewsroomThe DistrictThe Unit EverwoodPath to the Draft W/ Jay Leno2 a.m. 2:30 a.m.Movie: <:36>The Sports ListLate Show with2:30 a.m. 3 a.m.MSNBC LiveOprah Winfrey24 Black Hawk Down Even StevensSportsCenter David Letterman3 a.m. 3:30 a.m. Home Improvement Late Late Show3:30 a.m. 4 a.m.Dr. Phil Show8 simple Rules MoeshaCollege GameDay w/ Craig Ferguson4 a.m. 4:30 a.m.The King of Queens DegrassiNFL LiveJudge Judy4:30 a.m. 5 a.m.MSNBC LiveCBS Evening NewsBreathing Space Movie: <:19> TeletubbiesMLB Spring TrainingThe District5 a.m. 5:30 a.m.ESPNewsCaribbean Workout BreakinÂ’ All Barney & Friends Red Sox5:30 a.m. 6 a.m.Fox News LiveTodayCreative Juice the Rules Sesame Street vs. UFC Unleashed6 a.m. 6:30 a.m. DIY to the Rescue Pirates6:30 a.m. 7 a.m.Studio B withGood EatsThe EntertainersBear in the Big Blue The Black Carpet7 a.m. 7:30 a.m.Sheppard Smith UnwrappedBlueÂ’s CluesCribs7:30 a.m. 8 a.m.The Situation RoomSesame Street30 Minute MealsBehind the ScenesDora the ExplorerNFL LiveThe Final Score8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.Food 911E.T.Go, Diego, Go!Jim RomeHeadline News8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.The Situation RoomThe ViewThat 70Â’s ShowMovie: Connie the CowAround the HornGood Morning9 a.m. 9:30 a.m.That 70Â’s Show The Brooke Ellison Miss SpiderÂ’s...PTI America9:30 a.m. 10 a.m.Around the ServicesDr. PhilOne Tree Hill Story FranklinSportsCenter10 a.m. 10:30 a.m.NBC Nightly NewsMovie: <:46> Reading Rainbow 10:30 a.m. 11 a.m.ABC World NewsLaw & OrderE! News Live/ Batman & Robin Miss SpiderSportsCenterLate Night with11 a.m. 11:30 a.m.CBS Evening News Daily 10 Connie the Cow Fantasy Baseball Conan OÂ’Brien11:30 a.m. noonCountdown withAccess HollywoodBlind DateGo, Diego, Go!NBAAmerican Idolnoon 12:30 p.m.Keith Olbermann Judge JudyFriends Dora the Explorer Mavericks12:30 p.m. 1 p.m.Hannity & ColmesGuiding LightThe Cosby ShowMovie:BlueÂ’s Clues at 1 p.m. 1:30 p.m.Mad About You A Walk To Bear in the Big Blue Cavaliers1:30 p.m. 2 p.m.Lou Dobbs TonightGeneral HospitalEmeril Live Remember Sesame Street Law & Order2 p.m. 2:30 p.m. SportsCenter2:30 p.m. 3 p.m.News Hour withPassionsFantasy CampMovie: Funniest VideosAccess Hollywood3 p.m. 3:30 p.m.Jim Lehrer ThatÂ’s Clever Last of the Funniest Animals Judge Judy3:30 p.m. 4 p.m.Special Report withOprah WinfreyThe West Wing Mohicans PokemonNFL LiveThe Cosby Show4 p.m. 4:30 p.m.Brit Hume Yu-Gi-Oh!NBA FastbreakMad About You4:30 p.m. 5 p.m.Your World withWheel of FortuneHome ImprovementTrue HollywoodSpongeBobSportsCenterEmeril Live5 p.m. 5:30 p.m.Neil Cavuto JeopardyHome Improvement Story Fairly Oddparents5:30 p.m. 6 p.m.World News NowHeadline NewsSeinfeldCinema SecretsKim Possible X-Play6 p.m. 6:30 p.m.ATS/Regional NewsKing of the HillE.T. The Proud FamilyCheat6:30 p.m. 7 p.m.<:15> Paci c ReportAll of UsAmerican IdolMovie:UnfabulousNBAThe Big Ten7 p.m. 7:30 p.m.Tavis SmileyEve S.W.A.T. Zoey 101 Mavericks7:30 p.m. 8 p.m.Business Report1 vs. 100 Gilmore Girls at Wheel of Fortune8 p.m. 8:30 p.m.Nightline Cavaliers Jeopardy8:30 p.m. 9 p.m.Hardball with Law & OrderMen in TreesMovie: <:15>Even StevensSportsCenterThe Daily Show9 p.m. 9:30 p.m.Chris Matthews Austin Powers: Home ImprovementColbert Report9:30 p.m. 10 p.m.OÂ’Reilly FactorHeadline News8 Simple Rules International Man MoeshaNFL Live The Of ce 10 p.m. 10:30 p.m.Tonight ShowThe King of Queens of Mystery DegrassiNBA Fastbreak Two & a Half Men 10:30 p.m. 11 p.m.Today W/ Jay Leno The Daily ShowMovie: 7th HeavenNFL Football FolliesHouse11 p.m. 11:30 p.m.The Late ShowColbert Report Ali11:30 p.m.

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Wednesday, March 21, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass 8FridayAll programming is subject to change without notice TimeChannel 14 AFN News Channel 17 AFN Prime Channel 20 AFN Spectrum Channel 23 AFN Movies Channel 26 AFN Family Channel 29 AFN Sports Channel 35 AFN Direct to Sailors TimemidnightTodayThe Late ShowLate Night withMovie: (Continued)Kim PossibleESPNewsC.S.I. midnight 12:30 a.m.Late Late Show w/ Conan OÂ’Brien Ali The Proud FamilyPath to the Draft12:30 a.m. 1 a.m.CNN Newsroom Craig Ferguson American IdolMovie: <:15>UnfabulousFriday Night FightsPaci c Report1 a.m. 1:30 a.m.Judge Judy The Specialist Zoey 101 Carbajal vs. Aiken Tonight Show1:30 a.m. 2 a.m.CNN NewsroomThe District Gilmore Girls with Jay Leno2 a.m. 2:30 a.m. Late Show with2:30 a.m. 3 a.m.MSNBC LiveOprah WinfreyMen in TreesMovie:Even StevensSportsCenter David Letterman3 a.m. 3:30 a.m. S.W.A.T. Home Improvement Late Late Show w/3:30 a.m. 4 a.m.Dr. Phil Show8 Simple Rules MoeshaNFL Live Craig Ferguson4 a.m. 4:30 a.m.The King of Queens DegrassiNBA FastbreakJudge Judy4:30 a.m. 5 a.m.MSNBC LiveCBS Evening NewsBreathing SpaceMovie: <:15>TeletubbiesMLB Spring TrainingThe District5 a.m. 5:30 a.m.ESPNewsCaribbean Workout Austin Powers: Barney & Friends Red Sox5:30 a.m. 6 a.m.Fox News LiveTodayCreative Juice International Man Sesame Street vs. PunkÂ’d6 a.m. 6:30 a.m. DIY to the Rescue of Mystery Phllies Pimp My Ride6:30 a.m. 7 a.m.Studio B withGood EatsTrue HollywoodBear in the Big Blue 8 Simple Rules7 a.m. 7:30 a.m.Sheppard Smith Unwrapped Story BlueÂ’s CluesKing of Queens7:30 a.m. 8 a.m.The Situation RoomSesame Street30 Minute MealsCinema SecretsDora the ExplorerNFL LiveThe Final Score8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.Tasty TravelsE.T.Go, Diego, Go!Jim RomeHeadline News8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.The Situation RoomThe ViewThat 70Â’s ShowMovie: The WigglesAround the HornGood Morning9 a.m. 9:30 a.m.That 70Â’s Show Lackawanna Blues Higglytown HeroesPTI America9:30 a.m. 10 a.m.Around the ServicesDr. Phil ShowOne Tree Hill FranklinSportsCenter10 a.m. 10:30 a.m.NBC Nightly NewsMovie: <:49> Reading Rainbow 10:30 a.m. 11 a.m.ABC World NewsLaw & OrderE! News Live/ Alien Higglytown HeroesCollege BasketballLate Night with11 a.m. 11:30 a.m.CBS Evening News Daily 10 The WigglesNCAA ChampionshipConan OÂ’Brien11:30 a.m. noonCountdown withAccess HollywoodBlind DateGo, Diego, Go! Sweet 16:American Idolnoon 12:30 p.m.Keith Olbermann Judge JudyFriends Dora the Explorer Southern Illinois My Name is Earl12:30 p.m. 1 p.m.Hannity & Colmes48 Hours MysteryThe Cosby ShowMovie: BlueÂ’s Clues vs. Kansas AmericaÂ’s Top Model1 p.m. 1:30 p.m.Mad About You To Die For Bear in the Big BlueCollege Basketball1:30 p.m. 2 p.m.Lou Dobbs TonightGeneral HospitalEmeril Live Sesame StreetNCAA ChampionshipLost2 p.m. 2:30 p.m.Movie: <:57> Sweet 16:2:30 p.m. 3 p.m.News Hour withPassionsDesign on a Dime My First Mister Funniest Videos Pittsburgh Access Hollywood3 p.m. 3:30 p.m.Jim Lehrer Style Star Funniest Animals vs. UCLA Judge Judy3:30 p.m. 4 p.m.Special Report withOprah WinfreyThe West Wing PokemonSportsCenterThe Cosby Show4 p.m. 4:30 p.m.Brit Hume Yu-Gi-Oh!Mad About You4:30 p.m. 5 p.m.Your World withWheel of FortuneHome ImprovementThe DirectorsSpongeBobCollege GameDayEmeril Live5 p.m. 5:30 p.m.Neil Cavuto JeopardyHome Improvement David Lynch Fairly Oddparents5:30 p.m. 6 p.m.World News NowHeadline NewsSeinfeldEbert & RoeperKim PossibleSportsCenterX-Play6 p.m. 6:30 p.m.ATS/Regional NewsKing of the HillE.T.The Proud FamilyCheat6:30 p.m. 7 p.m.<:15> Paci c ReportThe Of ce/ (:25) 2 & a Half Men American IdolMovie:ThatÂ’s So RavenCollege BasketballThe Big Ten7 p.m. 7:30 p.m.Tavis Smiley Window on the Atoll (7:50) My Name is EarlSpanglish Phil of the FutureNCAA Championship7:30 p.m. 8 p.m.Business ReportHouseAmericaÂ’s Next Veronica Mars Sweet 16: Wheel of Fortune8 p.m. 8:30 p.m.NightlineTop Model Texas A&M Jeopardy8:30 p.m. 9 p.m.Hardball with C.S.I. LostMovie: <:26>Even Stevens vs. Memphis The Daily Show9 p.m. 9:30 p.m.Chris Matthews Pleasantville Home ImprovementCollege BasketballColbert Report9:30 p.m. 10 p.m.OÂ’Reilly FactorHeadline News 8 Simple Rules MoeshaNCAA ChampionshipDeal or No Deal10 p.m. 10:30 p.m.Tonight ShowThe King of Queens Degrassi Sweet 16:10:30 p.m. 11 p.m.Today W/ Jay Leno The Daily ShowMovie: <11:37> 7th Heaven Tennessee Survivor: Fiji11 p.m. 11:30 p.m.The Late ShowColbert Report Jackie Brown vs. Ohio State11:30 p.m.

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, March 21, 2007 9All programming is subject to change without noticeSaturday TimeChannel 14 AFN News Channel 17 AFN Prime Channel 20 AFN Spectrum Channel 23 AFN Movies Channel 26 AFN Family Channel 29 AFN Sports Channel 35 AFN Direct to Sailors TimemidnightTodayThe Late ShowLate Night withMovie: (Continued)Kim PossibleCollege GameDayThe Biggest Losermidnight 12:30 a.m.Late Late Show w/ Conan OÂ’Brien Jackie Brown The Proud Family12:30 a.m. 1 a.m.CNN Newsroom Craig FergusonAmerican Idol ThatÂ’s So RavenSportsCenterPaci c Report1 a.m. 1:30 a.m.Judge JudyMy Name is Earl Phil of the FutureTonight Show1:30 a.m. 2 a.m.CNN NewsroomThe DistrictAmericaÂ’s NextMovie: <:23>Ver onica Mars Costas Now with Jay Leno2 a.m. 2:30 a.m.Top ModelSpanglish Late Show with2:30 a.m. 3 a.m.MSNBC LiveOprah WinfreyLost Even StevensCollege GameDay David Letterman3 a.m. 3:30 a.m. Home ImprovementLate Late Show w/3:30 a.m. 4 a.m.Dr. Phil Show8 Simple Rules MoeshaSportsCenter Craig Ferguson4 a.m. 4:30 a.m.The King of Queens DegrassiJudge Judy4:30 a.m. 5 a.m.MSNBC LiveCBS Evening NewsBreathing SpaceMovie: <:49>TeletubbiesMLB Spring TrainingThe District5 a.m. 5:30 a.m.ESPNewsCaribben Workout Pleasantville Barney & Friends Braves5:30 a.m. 6 a.m.Fox News LiveTodayCreative Juice Sesame Street vs. World Series of 6 a.m. 6:30 a.m. DIY to the Rescue Phllies Poker6:30 a.m. 7 a.m.Studio B withGood EatsThe DirectorsBear in the Big Blue World Series of 7 a.m. 7:30 a.m.Sheppard Smith Unwrapped David Lynch BlueÂ’s Clues Poker7:30 a.m. 8 a.m.The Situation RoomSesame Street30 Minute MealsEbert & RoeperDora the ExplorerNFL LiveGood Morning8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.Easy EntertainigE.T.Go, Diego, Go!Jim Rome America 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.The Situation RoomThe ViewThat 70Â’s ShowMovie: The Wonder PetsAround the Horn9 a.m. 9:30 a.m.That 70Â’s Show Guilty As Sin Little Einsteins PTI9:30 a.m. 10 a.m.Around the ServicesDr. Phil ShowOne Tree Hill FranklinCostas NowExtreme Homes10 a.m. 10:30 a.m.NBC Nightly News Reading Rainbow Designed to Sell10:30 a.m. 11 a.m.ABC World NewsLaw & OrderE! News Live/ Movie: <:01> Little EinsteinsCollege BasketballGround Breakers11 a.m. 11:30 a.m.CBS Evening News Daily 10 Field of Dreams The Wonder PetsNCAA ChampionshipBorn American11:30 a.m. noonCountdown withWindow on the AtollBlind DateGo, Diego, Go! Sweet 16: Navy/Marine Corpsnoon 12:30 p.m.Keith Olbermann Judge JudyFriends Dora the Explorer Vanderbilt Mail Call12:30 p.m. 1 p.m.Hannity & Colmes48 Hours MysteryThe Cosby ShowMovie:BlueÂ’s Clues vs. Georgetown American Chopper1 p.m. 1:30 p.m.Mad About You Something To Bear in the Big BlueCollege Basketball1:30 p.m. 2 p.m.Lou Dobbs TonightGeneral HospitalEmeril Live Talk About Sesame StreetNCAA ChampionshipNHL2 p.m. 2:30 p.m. Movie: <:56> Sweet 16: Stars2:30 p.m. 3 p.m.News Hour withPassionsDecorating Cents Rat Race Funniest Videos USC vs. at3 p.m. 3:30 p.m.Jim Lehrer The Look for Less Funniest Animals North Carolina Ducks3:30 p.m. 4 p.m.Special Report withOprah WinfreyThe West WingPokemonSportsCenter 4 p.m. 4:30 p.m.Brit Hume Yu-Gi-Oh! The Sports List 4:30 p.m. 5 p.m.Your World withWheel of FortuneHome ImprovementInside the ActorÂ’s...SpongeBobCollege GameDayAccess Hollywood5 p.m. 5:30 p.m.Neil Cavuto JeopardyHome Improvement Tim Allen Fairly Oddparents Weekend5:30 p.m. 6 p.m.World News NowHeadline NewsSeinfeldMovies 101Kim PossibleSportsCenterNanny 9116 p.m. 6:30 p.m.ATS/Regional NewsKing of the HillE.T.The Proud Family 6:30 p.m. 7 p.m.<:15> Paci c ReportDeal or No DealDancing With Movie:Fairly OddparentsCollege BasketballThe 44007 p.m. 7:30 p.m.Tavis Smiley The Stars Bruce AlmightyGrowing Up CreepieNCAA Championship7:30 p.m. 8 p.m.Business ReportSurvivor: Fiji ArchieÂ’s Mysteries Sweet 16: Rockstar: INXS8 p.m. 8:30 p.m.Nightline Movie: <:43>NedÂ’s Declassi ed Butler The Simpsons8:30 p.m. 9 p.m.Hardball with The Biggest LoserGreyÂ’s Anatomy What Women Want Drake & Josh vs. Florida Headline News9 p.m. 9:30 p.m.Chris Matthews TainaCollege BasketballNavy/Marine Corps 9:30 p.m. 10 p.m.OÂ’Reilly FactorHeadline News 8 Simple Rules Made!NCAA ChampionshipMonk10 p.m. 10:30 p.m.Tonight ShowThe King of Queens Sweet 16: 10:30 p.m. 11 p.m.Fox & Friends W/ Jay Leno The Daily Show Movie: 7th Heaven UNLV vs.Oregon C.S.Y. NY11 p.m. 11:30 p.m.Weekend The Late ShowColbert Report Basic 11:30 p.m.

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Wednesday, March 21, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass 10 HELP WANTED KRS has the following job openings. For contract hire positions, call Dennis Lovin, 256-890-8710. For all others, call Jack Riordan, 55154. Full job descriptions and requirements for contract openings are located online at www.krsjv.com. Job descriptions for other openings are located at Human Resources, Building 700. NEED EXTRA money? KRS employment applications are continually accepted for the Community Activities and Food Services departments for casual and part-time positions. If you are interested in being a scorekeeper, sports of cial, recreation aide, recreation specialist, library aide, lifeguard, disc jockey, pizza delivery driver, catering/dining room worker or temporary of ce support, please submit your application to the HR department for consideration as positions become available. For more information, call the KRS HR Of ce at 54916. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, air eld operations, HR Req. K050008. BEAUTICIAN, casual position, HR Req. K031351. BINGO CALLER, two casual positions, HR Reqs. K031423 and K031424. ELECTRICIAN I, Kwajalein Operations, full-time, HR Req. K031092. PAINTER II, Roi Paint Shop, full time, HR Req. K031390. Enniburr residents apply to Floyd Corder. STOCK CLERK, Gimbel’s, casual, HR Req. K031339. Enniburr residents apply to Annemarie Jones, Gimbel’s manager. SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS, Education Department, HR. Req. K031285. TECHNICAL LIBRARIAN, Engineering and Planning Department, Strong administrative assistant and librarian experience required, HR Req. K031385. KRS CONTRACT POSITIONS (A) accompanied (U) unaccompanied ACCOUNTANT I, HR. Req. 031276. ACCOUNTANT II, HR Req. 031254. AIR-CONDITIONING TECHNICIAN III, two positions, HR Reqs. 031162. AIR-CONDITIONING TECNICIAN III, (U) HR Req. 031114. AIR-CONDITIONING LEAD TECHNICIAN, (U) HR Req. 031192. AIR-CONDITIONING TECHNICIAN IV, HR Req. 031154. ASSISTANT FIRE CHIEF, HR Req. 031184. AUTO BODY SHOP LEAD, (U) HR. Req. 030604. CALIBRATION TECHNICIAN II, HR Req. 031653. CAPTAIN, Fire Department, HR Req. 031060. CAPTAIN 100T, (U) HR Reg. 031126. CAPTAIN, 1,600T, (A) HR Req. 031280. CARPENTER LEAD, HR Req. 031214. COMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIAN, HR Req. 031437. COMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIAN II, HR Req. 031683. COMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIAN III, three positions, HR Reqs. 031029, 031565 and 031803. COMPUTER TECHNICIAN II, HR Req. 031617. CONTRACTS MANAGER, HR Req. 031164. CONTRACTS PURCHASES SPECIALIST, Richmond hire, HR Req. 031759. DESIGNER/PLANNER III, (U) HR Req. 031256. DESIGNER/PLANNER IV, two positions, (U) HR Req. 031170 and 031170. DESKTOP ANALYST II, two positions, HR Reqs. 031759 and 031769. ELECTRICIAN II, two positions, (U) HR Reqs. 031116 and 031224. ELECTRICIAN II, Kwaj Power Plant, (U) HR Req. 030876. ELECTRICIAN II, Roi Power Plant, (U) HR Req. 031224. ELECTRICIAN III, HR Req. 031210. ELECTRICIAN III, Roi Power Plant, two positions, HR Reqs. 031104 and 031210. ELECTRICIAN IV, generators, (U) HR Req. 031152. ELECTRICAN IV, (U) HR Req. 031248. ELECTRICIAN LEAD, Meck Island, (U) HR Req. 031040. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN I, two positions, HR Reqs. 031563 and 031719. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN II, four positions, HR Reqs. 030817, 031495, 031605 and 031607. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN III, three positions, HR Reqs. 031561, 031527 and 031689. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN III – ALTAIR, HR Req. 030669 (Roi-Namur). EMERGENCY VEHICLE TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 031032. FACILITIES ENGINEER IV, master scheduler, (U) HR Req. 031240. FIELD ENGINEER I, two positions, HR Reqs. 031189 and 031729. FIELD ENGINEER II, eight positions, HR Reqs. 031315, 031157, 031373, 031511, 031559, 031148, 031725 and 031753. FIELD ENGINEER II, Roi-Namur, HR Req. 030741. FIELD ENGINEER II, TRADEX, HR Req. 031245 (Roi-Namur). FIRE CHIEF, (A) HR Req. 031184. FIRE INSPECTOR, (U) HR Req. 031188. FIRE SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN III, two positions, (U) HR Reqs. 030972 and 031182. FIREFIGHTER, six positions, HR Reqs. 031054, 031056, 031124, 031142, 031096 and 031270. FIREFIGHTER/EMT, two positions, (U) HR Reqs. 031138 and 031140. FIREFIGHTER/EMT, Roi-Namur, (U) HR Req. 031278. HARDWARE ENGINEER, HR Req. 031687. HARDWARE ENGINEER III, three positions, HR Reqs. 031493, 031665 and 031723. HAZMAT SPECIALIST II, HR Req. 031108. HEAVY EQUIPMENT MECHANIC III, two positions, (U) HR Reqs. 030376 and 030912. INVENTORY CONTROL SPECIALIST, Huntsville, HR Req. 031264. LEAD WELDER, Metal Shop, (U) HR Req. 031198. LIQUID SYSTEMS MECHANIC I, (U) HR Req. 030430. LIQUID SYSTEMS MECHANIC III, (U) HR 031000. MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST, two positions, (U) HR Req. 030871 and 031250. MANAGER, ENGINEERING AND PLANNING, (A) HR Req. 031262. MATE, 1,600T, (U) HR 031066. MATERIAL HANDLER II, HR 031621. MECHANIC III, ve positions, HR Reqs. 031000, 031102, 031238, 031286 and 031228. MECHANIC III, generators, (U), HR Req. 031102. MECHANIC III, Kwaj Power Plant, (U) HR Req. 031260. MECHANIC III, Meck Power Plant, (U) HR Req. 031289. MECHANIC IV, HR Req. 030966. MECHANIC IV, Metal Shop, (U) HR Req. 031246. MECHANIC IV, Roi Power Plant, (U) HR Req. 030966. MECHANIC HEAVY EQUIPMENT III, four positions, HR Reqs. 030376, 030862, 030912 and 030506. MEDICAL BILLING SPECIALIST, HR Req. 031775. MISSION SUPPORT COORDINATOR, HR Req. 031232. NETWORK ENGINEER II–MO, HR Req. 031227. OPERATIONS TEST DIRECTOR, HR Req. 031485. OPTICS TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 031595. PIPEFITTER/WELDER, Marine Department, (U) HR Req. 030986. PLUMBER/PIPEFITTER IV, HR Req. 031168. PORT ENGINEER, (A) HR Req. 031244. POWER PLANT ELECTRICIAN II, Roi power plant, HR Req. 031220. PORT AGENT, HR Req. 031234. PROGRAMMER, HR Req. 031067. PROJECT CONTROLS ENGINEER III, HR Req. 031252. PROJECT CONTROLS ENGINEER IV, two positions, HR Reqs. 031781 and 031783. QUALITY ASSURANCE SPECIALIST II, HR Req. 031230. RECREATION SPECIALIST, HR Req. 031773. REGISTERED NURSE, three positions, HR Reqs. 031635, 031637 and 031597. REPORTER, Kwajalein Hourglass HR Req. 031791. RF SAFETY SPECIALIST/FIELD ENGINEER II, HR Req. 031147. SERVER ADMINISTRATOR I, HR Req. 031631. SERVER ADMINISTRATOR II, HR Req. 031557. SMALL BOAT MARINA LEAD, HR Req. 031801. SHEETMETAL WORKER, Roi, (U) HR Req. 031064. SHEETMETAL WORKER, Metal Shop, (U) two positions, HR Reqs. 031202 and 030322. SHIPWRIGHT LEAD, (U) HR Req. 031214. SUPERVISOR BODY SHOP/LIGHT VEHICLE MAINTENANCE, (A) HR Req. 031196. SUPERVISOR KWAJALEIN HOUSING SUPPORT, HR Req. 031266. SUPERVISOR PROJECT CONTROLS ENGINEER II, HR Req. 031785.

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, March 21, 2007 11 SUPERVISOR SERVER ADMINISTRATOR, HR Req. 031629. SOFTWARE ENGINEER II. CONUS-Lexington, HR Req. 031175. SOFTWARE ENGINEER IV, HR Req. 031751. SYSTEMS ENGINEER III, three positions, HR Reqs. 031481, 031483 and 031799. SYSTEMS ENGINEER IV, three positions, HR. Reqs. 031555, 031797 and 031749. TEACHER, (A) HR Req. 031813 TEACHER, (U) HR Req. 031811 TECHNICAL WRITER III, HR Req. 031805. TELEPHONE TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 030965. TIRE TECHNICIAN LEAD, (U) HR Req. 031126. TRAINING COORDINATOR II, HR 031663. WAREHOUSING MANAGER, HR Req. 031258. WAREHOUSE PROJECT SPECIALIST, HR Req. 031222. WAREHOUSEMAN II/SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK, CONUS-Richmond, HR Req. 030843. WATER PLANT OPERATOR III, HR Req. 031200. WELDER IV, Metal Shop, (U) HR Req. 030834. WANTEDTHREE-WHEEL bike, any condition, as soon as possible. Call 51925. DRUMMER for rock band. Call 50166 and leave message. FOUND PAPERBACK BOOK at high school. Call 52609. GIVEAWAYBEIGE CARPET, 9-foot by 12-foot, you remove it. Call 54421, days, or 59801, after 5 p.m. CHILDRENÂ’S plastic picnic table, has crack in seat; play sink and toy box. Call Kim, 54624. FOR SALEWEBER CHARCOAL grill with cover, $50; metal baby swing door and gate, $15; Ragazzi beechwood baby crib with mattress and natural color accessories, $400 and BlueAir puri er, best ofr mold bloom reduction, recommended by lung and asthma association, $400. Call 52654. NIKONOS-V 35mm underwater camera, complete with Ikelite substrobe 225 and charger, 18-inch arm and handle, 1:2.5 35 mm lens and padded 21-inch by 17-inch by 7-inch aluminnum attach case, $500 for all. Call 52681. YAMAHA 61-key electronic keyboard with A/C adapter, midi interface and stand, $90 and Montgomery Ward sewing machine, $40. Call 52379. PCS SALE. Toshiba 32-inch TV with component input and dual-tuner PIP, $250; two Sun bikes, $50 each; Rubbermaid storage shed, $75 and two Viewsonic Pro VP171b 17-inch LCD monitors, $80 each. Call Kevin, 53020. POLYCRAFT open boat, 4.1-meters/13-foot, seats four, comes with 30-horsepower electric starter, Yamaha outboard and 1.5-horsepower kicker motor, many extras including full canopy, $5,000. Call 51161. THREE-WHEEL bike, $200. Call 54490, after 6 p.m. HIGH CHAIR, $30; Christmas tree, $30; toaster, $5; electric can opener, $5; ice cream maker, $10; crock pot, $7; blender, $5; electric beaters, $2; George Foreman grill, $5; pancake griddle, $5 and wood room divider screens, holds pictures up to 8-inch by 10-inch, $25 for both or $15 each. Call Kim, 54624. MICROWAVE CART, $35; aluminum 100 scuba tank, $125; at screen JVC 37-inch TV, $1,800 or best offer and Panasonic surround-sound ve-disc system with remote rear speakers, $200. Call 58751. SAT/ACT books, new, never used, half price; ve romp/prom full-length formal dresses, excellent condition, various sizes, white, midnight velvet, pale green satin, purple taffeta, wine red and satin/taffeta. Call 53759, after 5 p.m. PANASONIC 27-inch at screen TV, with remote, model CT-27SL13, $225 or best offer. Call 52171. ELLIPTICAL MACHINE, $75 and treadmill, $125. Call 51035, after 2:30 p.m. WHITE HALOGEN oor lamp, $20; George Foreman grill, $15; blue rocker/recliner, $40; Sauder DVD/CD storage unit, holds up to 288 DVDs, $80; indoor/ outdoor doormats, $5; hand mixer, $10; CD holder, holds up to 120 CDs, $10 and picture frames, various sizes, $1-14. Call 54421, days, or 59801, after 5 p.m. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA, 2.1 megapixel with 10 by zoom, $100; 40-gallon sh tank with all supplies and sh, $120; Sony surround sound stereo system with DVD player, CD player and receiver, $200; aluminum six-speed Sun bike, $100; large wooden entertainment center, $120 and Epson R300 photo printer, $100. Call Mike, 55987. BLINDS FOR 400-series house, seafoam green and white, $100; vacuum cleaner, $75; various plants, $10 each and full-length mirror framed in oak, $30. Call 54877. PHILLIPS-MAGNAVOX 20-inch color TV, $60. Call 59121. WOOD STORAGE shelves from Pottery Barn, $10 each; changing table with shelves, $10; Graco packn-play crib, $15 and new stroller, still in the box. Call 55382 after 5 p.m. KETTLER TRICYCLE pink/purple with push handle $25; Fisher Price two-way cradle baby swing, $40; nice secure baby bath seat, $15; Ameda Purely Yours breast pump, used less than six times, with bottles and extras $50;nursing shirts and cloth diapers. Call 54520. HOBIE CAT, 16-foot, in launch area, blue hulls, new shrouds and trapeze wire set, $600 or best offer. Call Randy, 53643. TV, 27-INCH, $250; 20-inch TV, $200; surround sound DVD/VCR, $250; 6-foot by 9-foot oval tan rug, $15; PUR water lter system, $40; Honeywell HEPA lter with replacement lters, $175; Riffe spear gun, $600; luggage, $40; pottery wheel with stool, $600 and Dell computer with monitor, $400. Call 52843. all prices negotiable. COMMUNITY NOTICESCHILD and YOUTH Services is looking for baseball ans softball of cials and scorekeepers. Games will be played Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Come to the meeting at 5 p.m., tonight, on Brandon Field. AMERICAN LEGION Post 44 will meet at 6:30 p.m., tonight, at the VetsÂ’ Hall. Questions? Call Doug Hepler, 52681.THE SCHOOL ADVISORY Council will meet at 7 p.m., tonight, in the elementary music room. This will be the new superintendentÂ’s rst meeting. The public is invited. Questions? Call 53761. THE YOUTH CENTER will host cooking club Thursday. The menu this week is pizza. SCOREKEEPERS ARE needed for the basketball season. Anyone interested will need to attend the clinic on 5:30 p.m., Thursday, in Corlett Recreation Center gym. Questions? Call Billy at 53331. ITÂ’S GIRLÂ’S NIGHT at the Youth Center Friday. Bring workout clothes for yoga. A WOMENÂ’S HISTORY month luncheon will be held 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Friday, at the Yuk Club. Karen Pickler will be the guest speaker. Menu will include shrimp cocktail, grilled salmon, roasted red potatoes, steamed broccoli, peach cobbler and ice cream. Cost is $17 per person. Call Sarah Simpson, 52124.ENJOY AN evening of ballroom dancing, 7-9 p.m., Saturday, in the multi-purpose room. Free and open to the community. Adults and high school students welcome. Casual attire. Review class, 7-7:30 p.m. Bring your own non-alcoholic beverages. Questions? Call Dick or Cheryl, 51684. THE YOUTH Center will host the annual teen auction at 6 p.m., Sunday. KWAJALEIN GOLF ASSOCIATION presents a Backwards Fun Tournament with a 10 a.m. shotgun start on Monday. Registration begins at 9 a.m. Be at the golf course by 9:30 a.m. Format is 9-hole best ball with course played in reverse. Five-person teams. Call Larry Cavender, 52406 or e-mail larry.c avender@usaka.smdc.army.mil. THE MANDATORY ISLAND orientation will begin at 12:45 p.m., March 28, in Community Activities Center Room 6. It is required for all new island arrivals. The island orientation is not recommended for family members under 10. Questions? Call 51134.THE BOOK FAIR is coming soon. Shop for books for family and friends at the book fair community night, 6:30-8:30 p.m., March 29, in the elementary music room. Questions? Call JJ, 58672. SPRING BREAK is March 31-April 7. All students will return to school April 10. THE MOBILE KITCHEN presents Mahi Madness at 7 p.m., March 31, at the Paci c Club. Menu to include chicken, eggplant, red onion quesadillas, garden salad, dinner rolls, grilled mahi mahi with spicy papaya salsa, garlic mashed potatoes, stirfried vegetables and Black Forest tri e dessert. Seat $25, $20 for meal-card holders. Purchase tickets at Three Palms Snack Bar. THE 28TH ANNUAL Rustman is scheduled for April 30. The event consists of a 1K lagoon swim, a 42K bike course and 10K run. Kwajalein Running Club needs race day and race time volunteers. To volunteer, call Bob or Jane, 51815. Race entry forms will be available April 1.ATTENTION HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS planning to go on college or trade school should pick up a scholarship application at the Kwajalein Range Services Human Resources of ce in Building 700, or see your high school guidance counselor. This opportunity is for Kwajalein and Ebeye high school students whose parents are employed at Kwajalein or Roi-Namur. Deadline for applications is May 10. Call 55154.HIGH SCHOOL juniors, seniors and college students. Are you looking for a summer job? Kwajalein Range Services has a variety of summer employment opportunities in of ce and technical support and positions working with the Child Development Center. For more information, come to Human Resources in Building 700, or call 54916.Theology on Tap is back at 7 p.m., Friday, and March 30, at the VetsÂ’ Hall. The theme will be: WhatÂ’s the Point: A Religious View of the War in Iraq

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Wednesday, March 21, 2007 The Kwajalein Hourglass 12 Weather courtesy of Tonight: Partly coudy with scattered showers. Winds: NE at 10-16 knots. Thursday: Sunny with isolated showers. Winds: NE at 10-16 knots.Friday: Mostly sunny with widely scattered showers. Winds: NE at 10-16 knots. Saturday: Variably sunny with isolated showers. Winds: NE at 10-16 knots. Annual rain total: 4.76 inches Annual deviation: -6.55 inchesFor updated forecasts, call 54700 or visit www.rts-wx.com. Sun  Moon  Tides Sunrise/set Moonrise/set High tide Low tideThurs 6:52 a.m./7 p.m. 9:06 a.m./10 p.m. 6:08 a.m., 4.9’ 12:22 a.m., 0.7’ 6:23 p.m., 4.1’ Fri 6:52 a.m./7 p.m. 10 a.m./11:02 p.m. 6:42 a.m., 4.6’ 12:24 a.m., 0.6’ 6:56 p.m., 3.4’ 1:02 p.m., 0.2’ Sat 6:52 a.m./7 p.m. 10:58 a.m. 7:19 a.m., 4.1’ 12:53 a.m., 0.1’ 7:31 p.m., 2.7’ 1:46 p.m., 0.3’RTS WeatherCULTURE, from Page 2 THE EASTER BUNNY SAYS JOIN CAF PACIFIC for Easter brunch on April 8. Its chefs will prepare slow-roasted steamship round of beef and herb-crusted rack of lamb, Peking roast duck, crabstuffed mushroom caps, strawberry crepes, Pacific island catch, tortellini with asiago cream sauce and charbroiled ham steaks. Also on the menu is a chilled seafood bar including jumbo peel-and-eat shrimp, mussels on the half shell and smoked salmon. Unaccompanied personnel are welcome from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m, families from noon to 2:30 p.m. Adults, 19.95, children under 12, $10.95. had to become one people with one common goal in order to stay free. They knew they weren’t Germans or Italians or Irish anymore. They were Americans. They were still proud of where they came from. They were proud of their heritages. But that was left behind when they set foot on America’s shores. They kept their religions because in America you were free to worship without fear. But, wherever they came from or whatever God they believed in, their allegiance was rst and foremost to the idea of a united, strong and free country. Their allegiance was to America. They learned the English language so as to become one people. Because by becoming as one, they would be strong and prosperous. People also came from Asia and other parts of the world. And everyone who came brought the desire to contribute to the country that took them in and gave them the freedom to follow their dreams and a sense of self worth. And again, while being proud of their heritage and the cultures of their old countries, they assimilated into the new culture and made it stronger. What has happened to that these days? Just recently, we’ve heard stories of immigrant Somalian Muslim cab drivers in Minnesota who refuse to pick up people who are carrying bottles of liquor because liquor is against their religion. We’ve heard stories of immigrants who work as cashiers in supermarkets and refuse to ring up customer’s purchases of pork because it’s against their religion. I ask these people who won’t learn English and who won’t assimilate into our culture of tolerance, religious and otherwise . why did you come to America? I can only surmise that life in places like Mexico, South America and Somalia isn’t too good. So if that’s the case, why do you try to replicate it here? Why do you refuse to speak the language? Why do you refuse to be tolerant of others while expecting them to be tolerant of you? We only ask that you become part of the fabric of our society and not try to rip it apart instead. We don’t tell you what religion you can practice. We don’t tell you to be ashamed of your heritage or where you came from. We allow people to join our new heritage while letting them honor their old ones. We only ask allegiance to our country in return. I can only say to those who don’t want to be part of our one people, who don’t share our common values and goals, who don’t feel any loyalty to our nation and who would force their religion, their culture and their way of life on the rest of us . it’s hard to welcome you. Yes, we celebrate diversity, but as it relates to making the whole stronger. What some well-meaning, politically correct people in the world don’t seem to realize is that the people they are being sensitive to and tolerant of, would not, if given the chance, be very tolerant or sensitive to them. Yes, diversity is a great thing. America was built on it. But let’s be careful not to diversify ourselves right out of our country.