Citation
The Kwajalein hourglass

Material Information

Title:
The Kwajalein hourglass
Uniform Title:
Kwajalein hourglass
Place of Publication:
Kwajalein Aroll, Marshall Islands
Publisher:
Commander, U.S. Army Garrison- Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA/KMR)
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases -- Periodicals -- Marshall Islands ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Marshall Islands ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
"U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
55731016 ( OCLC )
2004230394 ( LCCN )
ocm55731016

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Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

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y M i c h e l l e L e b j e L a n g i n b e l i k i n w h i t e s w e a t e r a n d C a t h y T h o m a s h o l d i n g p l a t e a t t e n d a Michelle Lebje-Langinbelik, in white sweater, and Cathy Thomas, holding plate, attend a b a r b e c u e l u n c h i n t h e b r e a k r o o m a t t h e K w a j a l e i n R a n g e S e r v i c e s f a c i l i t y i n H u n t s v i l l e barbecue lunch in the break room at the Kwajalein Range Services facility in Huntsville, A l a T h e y a r e a m o n g t h e M a r s h a l l e s e e m p l o y e e s r e l o c a t e d t o H u n t v i l l e i n J u n e a n d J u l y Ala. They are among the Marshallese employees relocated to Huntville in June and July. F o r m o r e o n t h e i r r e l o c a t i o n e x p e r i e n c e s e e P a g e 4 For more on their relocation experience, see Page 4. ( P h o t o c o u r t e s y o f A n n e t t e T h i b o d e a u ) (Photo courtesy of Annette Thibodeau) www.smdc.army.mil/KWAJ/Hourglass/hourglass.html

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Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2006 The Kwajalein Hourglass The Kwajalein Hourglass is named for the insignia of the U.S. Army 7th Infantry Division, which liberated the island from the forces of Imperial Japan on Feb. 4, 1944. The Kwajalein Hourglass is an authorized publication for military personnel, federal employees, contractor workers and their families assigned to U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll. Contents of the Hourglass are not necessarily of cial views of, T h e K w a j a l e i n H o u r g l a s s The Kwajalein Hourglass or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, Department of the Army or USAKA. It is published Wednesdays and Saturdays in accordance with Army Regulation 360-1 and using a network printer by Kwajalein Range Services editorial staff. P.O. Box 23, APO AP 96555 Phone: Defense Switching Network 254-3539; local phone: 53539 Printed circulation: 2,000E-mail: hourglass@kls.usaka.smdc.army.milCommanding Of cer......Col. Stevenson Reed Public Affairs Of cer......................Sandy Miller Editor......................................Nell Drumheller Graphics Designer..........................Dan Adler Reporter............................................J.J. Klein Distribution..................................C.J. Kemem2 COMMENTARYSee AIR TRAFFIC, Page 12 Correction: The letter to the editor in the Saturday issue titled Reader didn’t nd article offensive had name withheld by request. It should have read signed by Sandy Stevenson, RN, Kim Morris, RN, Nancy Grant, RN and Patty Galloway, RN. The Hourglass regrets the error. See EDUCATED, Page 5 L e t t e r t o t h e e d i t o r Letter to the editor Get educated about infant, pregnancy lossClassi ed ad deadlines are: For Wednedsay’s issue, noon Saturday; for Saturday’s issue, noon Thursday.By Sharee Moore1-327th Inf. Rgt.Grief snuck up behind me and put a knife in my back. It caught me off guard, spun me around and landed me at on my face. My baby was dead and there was nothing anyone could do or say to change the horrible truth. Initially, family and friends rushed to my aid. There were cards, e-mails, phone calls and hugs. Within two weeks, all the commotion slowed to a halt. In a month, friends and acquaintances acted as though nothing happened. My husband and I were alone in our grief. After three months, most people expected me to have moved on. By the end of the year, I believed I was crazy because I couldn’t conform to others’ grief schedules. www.MedicalNewsToday.com states that more than four million babies across the globe die each year. In the United States, annually, another 800,000 pregnancies end in miscarriage, states a transcript of Sound Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine’s radio broadcast. My brother, Bob Nast, after eight long years of trying, nally won a bag in the Kwaj Open. As chairperson of the event I have received numerous calls about the fact that his ight (Men’s A Flight) was not in the paper. Most people realize that this was not purposeful; however, one budding psychologist has suggested that I subconsciously omitted his ight because of repressed feelings of aggression from our formative years. I thought about that for about two seconds and went, “Nah...just a mistake!” If you could please publish the ve winners of the A Flight I would really appreciate it. I want to congratulate Bob Nast, Gerry Wolf, Lloyd Jordan, Bob Allard and Jimmy Feldpausch for your outstanding play in the tournament. Sorry guys and thanks for your understanding. — Nancy NastIt couldn’t be sibling rivalryAs U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll’s aviation of cer, I was intimately involved with the transition from the Federal Aviation Administration operated control tower and am also involved with the current U.S. Army operated tower. After reading the recent article on the transition in The Hourglass I nd it necessary to clarify a few issues that were discussed in this article as well as some rumors that have circulated among the community in regard to air traf c safety. The most prevalent, as well as the most inaccurate rumor that abounded was the one that implied that the lack of a manned control tower created an unsafe aviation environment. What many people do not realize is that the vast majority of air elds in the United States are operated without manned control towers, including those with from four to ve times the amount of air traf c that we experience. Federal aviation regulations delineate very speci c procedures for aircraft operating at air elds with no control towers. These procedures are understood Aviation of cer wishes toclarify air traf c article

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2006 Safety awareness stressed to minimize chance of accidents gpgpyg safety procedures is stressed to avoid injuries to stevedoring personnel and to other residents. (Photo by Nell Drumheller)Barge operations create many risks, hazards3 By Nell DrumhellerEditor M ore t h an 12,000 tons of car g o is transporte d to th e U.S. Army Kwa j a l ein Ato ll via waterways eac h year. The t wi ce -a-m o n th b ar g e arriva l s to t h e Kwa j a l ein d oc k b ring ab out a urry o f activity; two T-Rex Super Stackers and ve tractor traile r s r e m o v e co n t ain e r s f r o m the bo a t an d m o v e the product to the supp ly comp l ex to transport containers. “ It ta k es approximate ly 2 4-36 h ours to comp l ete th e s h i p o p erations, ” A l an Stone, Kwa j a l ein Range Services Supp l y an d T ransportation manage r s aid. Ship operations are norma lly f rom 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Between t h e h eav y equipment and the hustle-bustle of laborers the dock area becomes a high risk area. “The entire ship operation has many areas of risk,” Stone said. “The lifting of the containers off the ship creates an area where stevedoring personnel must avoid being under the suspended load.” He added that weather conditions can affect the hazards. “They [the stevedoring personnel] must also be attentive of the containers swinging in the wind. Personnel must stand clear of the containers as they are loaded onto the tractor trailers, and if they are not placed correctly they could tip off the trailer.” Safety concerns don’t end at the dock. The cranes on the ship load the containers onto tractor trailers which transport the containers to the cold storage, retail and GSK warehouses. “Once the container is delivered to the supply warehouse the T-Rex must lift it off the trailer and place it in the staging area. The T-Rex is a large piece of equipment with a limited view when moving containers. These containers must be moved very cautiously to avoid collisions with other equipment and to be vigilant for personnel in the area. Personnel driving or walking in front of, behind or under the suspended load of the T-Rex could be killed or severely injured,” Stone said. Other containers are staged next to Building 702 for distribution the following day to warehouse 993 and other locations on Kwajalein according to Stone. The hazard areas are marked with yellow tape. “The area around the supply and retail warehouse is cordoned off to keep all personnel and equipment not required to support the ship operations out of the area. This allows the T-Rex and tractor trailers to move freely through the area to transport containers. Allowing open access to this area would create a severe safety problem with large equipment operating in the same area with personnel walking and biking through,” Stone said. Stone added, “All island personnel must not enter the supply area during ship operations by foot or bicycle while the road closure signs and caution tape is in place. All vehicle traf c may only enter for work related purposes by using the supply road access behind Building 702. Vehicle access to this area is not to be used to pick up or drop off personnel at the dock security checkpoint. This includes during the lunch hour and at the end of the normal work day.” “The entire ship operation has many areas of risk. The lifting of the containers off the ship creates an area where stevedoring personnel must avoid being under the suspended load.” — Alan Stone, Kwajalein Range Services Supply and Transportation manager

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Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2006 The Kwajalein Hourglass B B Facing new world of challengesSee CHALLENGES, Page 54Relocated Marshallese demonstrate courage, sense of adventureBy J.J. KleinReporterBy the time Michelle Lebje-Langinbelik landed at the airport in Huntsville, Ala. she had taken the necessary steps to get family passports, immunization records, birth certi cates in order and participated in a relocation information session on Kwajalein. But all that preparation wasn’t enough to erase her fear of the unknown about relocating to Huntsville. Along with Lebje-Langinbelik, ve other Marshallese Kwajalein Range Services employees made the thoughtful and dif cult decision to move from Kwajalein when their jobs were relocated to Huntsville last summer. “All six of the Marshallese employees who chose to relocate to Huntsville and the family members who are accompanying them…have demonstrated great courage and sense of adventure in agreeing to make this journey,” Dave Norwood, KRS vice president and deputy program manager said. Moving is always a stressful undertaking, factor in moving to a completely different country and the anxiety is ratcheted up quite a bit. The four Marshallese employees, interviewed, carefully considered and weighed their decisions to move with their jobs. “I remember before I moved here the hardest thing was leaving family members behind and it took me a lot of time to think about this transition,” said Milden Bejang, employed with KRS for two years on Kwajalein. “It took lots of pressure…I did ask God to guide me with this matter.” Bejang is glad he made the move with his wife and son, and now hopes to bring his mother. “I think she’ll like it over here as I do,” Bejang said. “It was [a] hard and tough decision to make,” said Sepe Shrew, a KRS employee since the company takeover, “because we don’t understand the change we’re going through, what situation may arise.” Before the Marshallese employees could begin to consider the enormity of moving stateside, Norwood met with them on two occasions to provide the necessary information needed to make well-informed decisions to transfer and answer questions they might have. “We covered a whole range of information that was focused on the impacts we could foresee,” said Norwood, “especially in terms of the types of living expenses that they would have to be ready to undertake. We provided information on things like the expected cost of housing, the cost to own and operate a vehicle, local health care system, taxes and compulsory education requirements. “I don’t think most of us can truly appreciate the extent of the culture shock that they have experienced, involving such impacts as the language differences, the volume of traf c, the vastness of the area, the differences in weather and climate, and even the proliferation of different types of bread in the grocery store,” continued Norwood. Regardless of any amount of preparation, there were surprises and dif culties inherent in a move to a new country, for everyone associated with this move. All the relocated Marshallese employees spoke of the dif culty in securing U.S. Social Security numbers. “Homeland Security issues made it harder than we expected to obtain Social Security cards, and that caused a delay in obtaining permanent lodging, driver’s licenses, and bank accounts,” said Norwood. “We think we are over that hump now. We have learned some lessons with this group of pioneers, and we will be better prepared for future relocations.” Some dif culties faced by these workers were directly related to cultural differences and experiences. Managing nances proved to be complicated for Shrew, “When I got here, it was dif cult to work out a viable budget.” She admitted, “When I rst arrived, everything surprised me. There were big stores teeming with people, “I remember before I moved here the hardest thing was leaving family members behind and it took me a lot of time to think about this transition. It took lots of pressure…I did ask God to guide me with this matter.” — Milden Bejang “The only thing that surprised me the most was the way the people in our of ce have been treating us. They’ve been so nice, helpful, supportive, and they even made donations for us and our families.” — Michelle Lebje-Langinbeli Relocated Herbie Abija, left, helps out at the grill at an August hail and farewell in Huntsville, Ala.

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2006 5and many roads and highways were crammed with cars.” “[What] surprised me the most was the cost of food in the store[s] was really cheaper than [in the Marshall Islands],” said Herbi Abija, who works in cataloging within the Supply department. “Sometimes I wear my Marshallese dresses to the stores and people would stare at me like there’s no tomorrow,” Lebje-Langinbelik said with a giggle. To support these employees transition through the culture shock and help them cope with their individual relocation needs, KRS established a formal sponsorship program. All six transfers were sponsored by various Huntsville employees, who welcomed them with warmth and generosity. “People here that I’m working with are very, very friendly. They made this transition seem pretty easy,” Bejang said. “They came and picked us up from the terminal and showed us around town, and I want it to thank the staff in Huntsville, Ala., you guys are awesome.” “Here you can feel free to visit people’s home, share their holidays and enjoy their family,” said Shrew. “They will enjoy welcoming you and be pleased if you accept their hospitality.” “The only thing that surprised me the most was the way the people in our of ce have been treating us,” Lebje-Langinbelik said “They’ve been so nice, helpful, supportive, and they even made donations for us and our families.” Before the Marshallese employees set foot in Alabama their new coworkers created a local donation program and put out a call for items which might help the new arrivals in their transition. “The response from the local community was overwhelming, as we received dozens of small household appliances and furnishings, several items of furniture, and literally hundreds of items of fall and winter clothing,” said Norwood. Looking back over the last few months, LebjeLanginbelik said the transition to her new environment, although not without challenges, went relatively well. “I’m just so glad that I felt so special and welcomed from the time I landed here at the Huntsville airport ‘til now.” “They may sing our praises,” said Norwood, “[but] it is the Marshallese who have done the heavy lifting, taken all the risks, and who deserve our admiration for what they’ve done.” EDUCATED, from Page 2 With such a widespread problem, infant and pregnancy loss awareness should be a top priority for our society and the medical community. To meet this need, in 1988, former President Ronald Reagan proclaimed the month of October Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness month. The following is a list of suggestions you can use today to increase sensitivity and make a difference in one hurting parent’s life this month and beyond: 10 tips for families and friends • Allow the bereaved parent to grieve in their own way and don’t forget that dads hurt, too. • Never advise a parent to “get over it,” “move on,” or “don’t cry.” • Never “empathize” by sharing a story about your dead pet, grandmother or Uncle Lester. It just isn’t the same. • Never say “If there is anything you need, call me.” He or she won’t be fully functional and will have zero energy to make or remember phone calls. • Offer your help by making strong, speci c suggestions like: Allow me to help with your laundry, cooking, planning of the memorial service, informing others of the family’s loss, paying the bills, providing or arranging childcare for surviving children, etc. • Use kind phrases like: “I’m so sorry,” “I can’t imagine your pain,” “my heart breaks for you,” “I don’t understand how you feel, but I’m willing to listen,” “I don’t know what to say,” “I love you.” For the most part, sit quietly and listen. • Know the signs and symptoms of suicide and depression; don’t hesitate to demand professional help. • Write down and acknowledge the baby’s name, birth and death dates. To forget is heartbreaking. • Expect your loved one to relapse during the weeks leading up to the expected delivery date, one year anniversary and rst birth date. Be supportive and know this relapse is normal now and in years to come. • Get informed about the grief process! Buy or borrow a book about infant and pregnancy loss. For medical professionals • “It,” “fetus,” “fetal demise,” “GBS baby,” “SIDS case,” “aborted fetus” and other medical jargon are unacceptable terminology in the parent’s presence. Instead use the baby’s name or terms like “baby boy,” “baby,” “little one” or similar. • Patient care involves the physical and mental. Don’t get so busy tending to the physical that you avoid taking the time to just be there and listen. • Talk to the patient about what they can expect to see, feel and hear before, during and after a miscarriage or stillbirth delivery. Describe how the baby will look and what the parent can expect from labor pain and the procedure for delivery. • Never just hand a stillborn baby to his mother without cleaning and swaddling the baby in a blanket. Offer to take pictures. The parents will value these pictures later. • Don’t take the baby away until the parents give permission. This is the last opportunity to parent their child. • At follow-up visits, acknowledge their loss and let them know you have not forgotten. • As a general practice physician, never try to give advice outside your area of expertise. It is insulting to your patient. • At routine appointments, never become so detached that you rattle off questions about the patient’s loss as if it were an everyday occurrence. • It’s okay to cry with or for your patient. Although thousands of grief support resources are available now more than ever before, don’t underestimate the impact one person can make. Get educated about infant and pregnancy loss, show compassion and reach out to the hurting. Making a difference starts with you and me. Editor’s note: Sharee Moore is the mother of three angels, a bereavement counselor and author of “Stolen Angels: 25 Stories of Hope after Pregnancy or Infant Loss.” CHALLENGES, from Page 4

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Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2006 The Kwajalein Hourglass 6Adopt-An-Area keeps Roi, Kwaj beautifulCleaning up By J.J. KleinReporter“When you see that stray cup or ying piece of candy wrapper, pick it up and put it where it belongs,” said Susannah Jones, Kwajalein Range Services Community Activities Operations supervisor. “I’m sure many of us remember the slogan, Give a Hoot, Don’t Pollute, well that’s what the AdoptAn-Area program is all about.” The Adopt-An-Area program allows residents and organizations to adopt a designated area on Kwajalein and Roi-Namur for a year and maintain that area by cleaning up man-made litter. To sign-up volunteers submit a registration form with the Community Activities Of ce, and then select an available area from the Adopt-An-Area map. Each individual or group then determines its own cleaning schedule. Kwajalein resident Tom Anderson chose Area 39, a grassy section next to Camp Hamilton, because he thought such a beautiful beach should remain clean and the Kwajalein Outrigger Club will be using the area for the outrigger canoes. Anderson tries to patrol his area twice a week picking up the trash that has drifted in from the lagoon. But Anderson is only one of a handful of community members who have signed up with the program. So far the all-volunteer program hasn’t had a huge response from the community. Out of 40 areas for adoption on Kwajalein only four organizations, two individuals and one family have adopted an area. Roi-Namur hasn’t fared any better, all 11 areas on the island are still available for adoption. Island residents can follow the example of children, specifically Girl Scout Troop 4, in adopting this project. Every Saturday after school, the girls in Troop 4 head over to the playground at Emon Beach to clean up their area. The year-long commitment begins March 1 through February 28, but Jones said anyone interested in signing up with the program before March can register now and then renew their commitment in February. The KRS Community Activities department is revitalizing the program to compliment U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll Commander Col. Stevenson Reed’s island beautification initiative. There are plans to remove all old signs and replace them with the names of the individuals or groups maintaining the area and the area number. “I hope to expand the program a bit to include an Adopt-an-Area recognition and renewal event once a year,” said Jones, “and possibly other community service opportunities to encourage the entire community to do their part to keep the island free of man-made litter.” Girl Scout Elizabeth Kautz, cleans the Emon Beach playground Saturday as part of the Adopt-An-Area program. (Photo by J.J. Klein) E N J O Y H A L L O W E E N a t 7 p m S a t u r d a y a t t h e ENJOY HALLOWEEN at 7 p.m., Saturday, at the V e t s ’ H a l l M u s i c b y Vets’ Hall. Music by T h e D u r t y R a s c a l s The Durty Rascals B a n d Band. C o s t u m e c o n t e s t d r i n k s p e c i a l s h o m e b r e w s Costume contest, drink specials, home brews a n d m o r e and more.

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2006ThursdayAll programming is subject to change without notice7 TimeChannel 13 AFN Sports Channel 14 AFN News Channel 17 AFN Prime/ Roller Channel 20 AFN Spectrum Channel 23 AFN Movies Channel 26 AFN Family Channel 35 AFN Direct to Sailors TimemidnightMLBToday Show The Late ShowLate Night withMovie: (cont.) Kim PossibleWithout A Tracemidnight 12:30 a.m.World Series Late Late Show Conan OÂ’Brien Movie: <:48>The Proud Family 12:30 a.m. 1 a.m.Game #3 CNN Newsroom with Craig Ferguson The Dead Zone Verticle Limit Zack and CodyPaci c Report1 a.m. 1:30 a.m.Judge JudyNaturally SadieTonight Show1:30 a.m. 2 a.m. CNN NewsroomStargate SG-1 Criminal Minds Everwood W/ Jay Leno2 a.m. 2:30 a.m.Late Show with2:30 a.m. 3 a.m.SportsCenterMSNBC LiveOprah WinfreyThe West WingMovie:Even Stevens David Letterman3 a.m. 3:30 a.m.MalibuÂ’s Most Home ImprovementLate Late Show3:30 a.m. 4 a.m.Baseball TonightDr. Phil ShowWill & Grace Wanted Moesha w/ Craig Ferguson4 a.m. 4:30 a.m.NFL LiveKing of Queens Movie: <:39>DegrassiJudge Judy4:30 a.m. 5 a.m.MLBCBS Evening NewsCarol Duval ShowWe Were TeletubbiesUFC Unleashed5 a.m. 5:30 a.m.World Series ESPNewsBreathing Space Soldiers Barney & Friends5:30 a.m. 6 a.m.Game #3 Fox News LiveTodayCaribbean WorkoutSesame StreetPunkÂ’d6 a.m. 6:30 a.m. The Right FitPimp My Ride6:30 a.m. 7 a.m. Studio B withGood EatsThe EntertainersBear in the Big BlueBest Damn Sports7 a.m. 7:30 a.m.Sheppard Smith UnwrappedBlueÂ’s Clues Show Period7:30 a.m. 8 a.m. The Hot ListThe Situation RoomSesame Street30 Minute MealsBehind the ScenesDora the ExplorerThe Final Score8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.The Hot ListFood 911E.T.Go, Diego, Go!Headline News8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.Around the HornThe Big StoryThe ViewRoseanneMovie: Connie the CowGood Morning9 a.m. 9:30 a.m.PTI w/ John Gibson Roseanne Danielle SteelÂ’s Miss Spider America9:30 a.m. 10 a.m.SportsCenterAround the ServicesDr. PhilAlly McBeal Heartbeat Franklin10 a.m. 10:30 a.m.NBC Nightly NewsMovie: <:46>Reading Rainbow10:30 a.m. 11 a.m.ABC World NewsE.R.E! News Live/ Little Women Miss SpiderOne Tree Hill11 a.m. 11:30 a.m.ESPN PreGAMECBS Evening News Daily 10 Connie the Cow11:30 a.m. noonMLBCountdown withAccess HollywoodBlind DateGo, Diego, Go!Veronica Marsnoon 12:30 p.m.World SeriesKeith Olbermann Judge JudyLiving SingleDora the Explorer12:30 p.m. 1 p.m.Game #4 Hannity & ColmesGuiding LightThe Cosby ShowMovie:BlueÂ’s CluesThe Closer1 p.m. 1:30 p.m.Mad About You A Walk in Bear in the Big Blue1:30 p.m. 2 p.m. Lou Dobbs TonightGeneral HospitalEmeril Live the Clouds Sesame StreetE.R.2 p.m. 2:30 p.m. Movie: <:57>2:30 p.m. 3 p.m.SportsCenterNews Hour withPassionsKidspace Cat on a Hot Funniest VideosAccess Hollywood3 p.m. 3:30 p.m.Game #4 Post Game Jim Lehrer ThatÂ’s Clever! Tin Roof Funniest AnimalsJudge Judy3:30 p.m. 4 p.m.Baseball TonightSpecial Report withOprah WinfreyThird WatchPokemonThe Cosby Show4 p.m. 4:30 p.m.NFL Live Brit Hume Yu-Gi-Oh!Mad About You4:30 p.m. 5 p.m.SportsCenterYour World withWheel of FortuneC.S.I.True HollywoodSpongeBobNFL Total Access5 p.m. 5:30 p.m.Neil Cavuto Jeopardy Story Fairly Oddparents5:30 p.m. 6 p.m.World News NowHeadline NewsSeinfeldBackstage PassKim PossibleX-Play6 p.m. 6:30 p.m.ESPNewsATS/Regional NewsThe SimpsonsE.T. The Proud FamilyCheat6:30 p.m. 7 p.m.NFL RePLAY<:15> Paci c ReportEverybody Hates...One Tree HillMovie:UnfabulousThird Watch7 p.m. 7:30 p.m.Game #1 Tavis SmileyGirlfriends Just Married Zoey 1017:30 p.m. 8 p.m.Business ReportHellÂ’s KitchenVer onica Mars Gilmore Girls Wheel of Fortune8 p.m. 8:30 p.m.NFL RePLAYNightline Movie: <:49>Jeopardy8:30 p.m. 9 p.m.Game #2 Hardball withWithout a TraceThe Closer Bourne Identity Even StevensThe Daily Show9 p.m. 9:30 p.m.Chris Matthews Home ImprovementColbert Report9:30 p.m. 10 p.m.SportsCenterOÂ’Reilly FactorHeadline NewsWill & GraceMoesha The Of ce 10 p.m. 10:30 p.m.Tonight ShowDegrassi Old Christine 10:30 p.m. 11 p.m.Baseball TonightToday Show W/ Jay Leno The Daily ShowMovie: <:07>7th HeavenBones11 p.m. 11:30 p.m.NFL LiveThe Late ShowColbert Report That Thing You Do11:30 p.m.

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Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2006 The Kwajalein Hourglass 8FridayAll programming is subject to change without notice TimeChannel 13 AFN Sports Channel 14 AFN News Channel 17 AFN Prime/ Roller Channel 20 AFN Spectrum Channel 23 AFN Movies Channel 26 AFN Family Channel 35 AFN Direct to Sailors TimemidnightMLBToday ShowThe Late ShowLate Night withMovie: (cont.)Kim PossibleC.S.I. Miamimidnight 12:30 a.m.World Series Late Late Show w/ Conan OÂ’Brien That Thing You Do The Proud Family12:30 a.m. 1 a.m.Game #4 CNN Newsroom Craig Ferguson One Tree HillMovie: <:03>UnfabulousPaci c Report1 a.m. 1:30 a.m.Judge Judy The French Zoey 101Tonight Show1:30 a.m. 2 a.m. CNN NewsroomStargate SG-1Veronica Mars Connection Gilmore Girls with Jay Leno2 a.m. 2:30 a.m. Late Show with2:30 a.m. 3 a.m.SportsCenterMSNBC LiveOprah WinfreyThe CloserMovie:Even Stevens David Letterman3 a.m. 3:30 a.m.Just Married Home ImprovementLate Late Show w/3:30 a.m. 4 a.m.Baseball TonightDr. Phil ShowWill & GraceMoesha Craig Ferguson4 a.m. 4:30 a.m.NFL Live Movie: <:49>DegrassiJudge Judy4:30 a.m. 5 a.m.MLBCBS Evening NewsCarol Duval ShowBourne Identity TeletubbiesThe Ultimate5 a.m. 5:30 a.m.World Series ESPNewsBreathing SpaceBarney & Friends Fighter 45:30 a.m. 6 a.m.Game #4 Fox News LiveTodayCaribbean WorkoutSesame StreetThe Real World: SD6 a.m. 6:30 a.m. The Right FitLaguna Beach6:30 a.m. 7 a.m. Studio B withGood EatsTrue HollywoodBear in the Big BlueBest Damn Sports7 a.m. 7:30 a.m.Sheppard Smith Unwrapped Story BlueÂ’s Clues Show Period7:30 a.m. 8 a.m.The Hot ListThe Situation RoomSesame Street30 Minute MealsBackstage PassDora the ExplorerThe Final Score8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.The Hot ListSemi HomemadeE.T.Go, Diego, Go!Headline News8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.Around the HornThe Big StoryThe ViewRoseanneMovie: The WigglesGood Morning9 a.m. 9:30 a.m.PTI w/ John Gibson Roseanne Abandoned Higglytown Heroes America9:30 a.m. 10 a.m.SportsCenterAround the ServicesDr. Phil ShowAlly McBeal & Deceived Franklin10 a.m. 10:30 a.m.NBC Nightly NewsMovie: <:39>Reading Rainbow10:30 a.m. 11 a.m.ABC World NewsE.R.E! News Live/ Alive Higglytown HeroesHow I Met Your Mom11 a.m. 11:30 a.m.ESPNewsCBS Evening News Daily 10 The WigglesHow I Met Your Mom11:30 a.m. noonMLBCountdown withAccess HollywoodBlind Date Go, Diego, Go!Next Top Modelnoon 12:30 p.m.World SeriesKeith Olbermann Judge JudyLiving SingleDora the Explorer12:30 p.m. 1 p.m.Game #5 Hannity & ColmesGuiding LightThe Cosby ShowMovie: BlueÂ’s CluesLaw & Order1 p.m. 1:30 p.m.(if necessary) Mad About You The Hours Bear in the Big Blue1:30 p.m. 2 p.m. Lou Dobbs TonightGeneral HospitalEmeril LiveSesame StreetE.R.2 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 3 p.m.News Hour withPassionsDesign on a DimeMovie: <:09>Funniest VideosAccess Hollywood3 p.m. 3:30 p.m.SportsCenter Jim Lehrer Style Star Basic Funniest AnimalsJudge Judy3:30 p.m. 4 p.m.Baseball TonightSpecial Report withOprah WinfreyThird WatchPokemonThe Cosby Show4 p.m. 4:30 p.m.NFL Live Brit Hume Yu-Gi-Oh!Mad About You4:30 p.m. 5 p.m.SportsCenterYour World withWheel of FortuneC.S.I.Biography:SpongeBobNFL Total Access5 p.m. 5:30 p.m.Neil Cavuto Jeopardy Antonio Banderas Fairly Oddparents5:30 p.m. 6 p.m.World News NowHeadline NewsSeinfeldEbert & RoeperKim PossibleX-Play6 p.m. 6:30 p.m.ATS/Regional NewsThe SimpsonsE.T.The Proud FamilyCheat6:30 p.m. 7 p.m.College Football<:15> Paci c Report The Of ce/ (:25) Old Christine How I Met Your MomMovie:ThatÂ’s So RavenThird Watch7 p.m. 7:30 p.m.Clemson Tavis Smiley Window on the Atoll(7:50pm) How I Met Your MomCarmen: Phil of the Future7:30 p.m. 8 p.m.at Business ReportBones Next Top Model A Hip Hopera Veronica Mars Wheel of Fortune8 p.m. 8:30 p.m.Virginia Tech Nightline Movie: <:43>Jeopardy8:30 p.m. 9 p.m.SportsCenterHardball with C.S.I. Miami Law & Order SomethingÂ’s Even StevensThe Daily Show9 p.m. 9:30 p.m.Chris Matthews Gotta Give Home ImprovementColbert Report9:30 p.m. 10 p.m.Baseball TonightOÂ’Reilly FactorHeadline News Will & GraceMoeshaDeal or No Deal10 p.m. 10:30 p.m.NFL LiveTonight ShowKing of QueensDegrassi10:30 p.m. 11 p.m.Inside the NFLToday Show W/ Jay Leno The Daily ShowMovie: 7th HeavenSurvivor:11 p.m. 11:30 p.m.The Late ShowColbert Report Planet of the Apes Cook Islands11:30 p.m.

PAGE 9

The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2006 9All programming is subject to change without noticeSaturday TimeChannel 13 AFN Sports Channel 14 AFN News Channel 17 AFN Prime/ Roller Channel 20 AFN Spectrum Channel 23 AFN Movies Channel 26 AFN Family Channel 35 AFN Direct to Sailors TimemidnightMLBToday ShowThe Late ShowLate Night withMovie: (cont.) Kim PossibleLast Comicmidnight 12:30 a.m.World Series Late Late Show w/ Conan OÂ’Brien Movie: <:48>The Proud Family Standing12:30 a.m. 1 a.m.Game #5 CNN Newsroom Craig FergusonHow I Met Your MomThe Beach ThatÂ’s So RavenPaci c Report1 a.m. 1:30 a.m.(if necessary) Judge JudyHow I Met Your MomPhil of the FutureTonight Show1:30 a.m. 2 a.m. CNN NewsroomStargate SG-1Next T op ModelVe ronica Mars with Jay Leno2 a.m. 2:30 a.m. Late Show with2:30 a.m. 3 a.m.SportsCenterMSNBC LiveOprah WinfreyLaw & OrderMovie:Even Stevens David Letterman3 a.m. 3:30 a.m. Carmen: Home ImprovementLate Late Show w/3:30 a.m. 4 a.m.Baseball TonightDr. Phil ShowWill & Grace A Hip Hopera Moesha Craig Ferguson4 a.m. 4:30 a.m.NFL LiveKing of QueensMovie: <:43>DegrassiJudge Judy4:30 a.m. 5 a.m.Inside the NFLCBS Evening NewsCarol Duval Show SomethingÂ’s TeletubbiesWorld Series5 a.m. 5:30 a.m.ESPNewsBreathing Space Gotta Give Barney and Friends of Poker5:30 a.m. 6 a.m.MLBFox News LiveTodayCaribbean WorkoutSesame Street6 a.m. 6:30 a.m.World Series The Right Fit6:30 a.m. 7 a.m.Game #5 Studio B withGood EatsBiography:Bear in the Big BlueBest Damn Sports7 a.m. 7:30 a.m.(if necessary) Sheppard Smith Unwrapped Antonio Banderas BlueÂ’s Clues Show Period7:30 a.m. 8 a.m. The Situation RoomSesame Street30 Minute MealsEbert & RoeperDora the ExplorerGood Morning8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.Easy EntertainigE.T.Go, Diego, Go! America 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.Around the HornThe Big StoryThe ViewRoseanneMovie: The Wonder Pets9 a.m. 9:30 a.m.PTI w/ John Gibson Roseanne Twelve Mile Road Little Einsteins9:30 a.m. 10 a.m.SportsCenterAround the ServicesDr. Phil ShowAlly McBealFranklinExtreme Homes10 a.m. 10:30 a.m. NBC Nightly News Movie: <:45>Reading RainbowDesigned to Sell10:30 a.m. 11 a.m.ABC World NewsE.R.E! News Live/ K-19: The Little EinsteinsGroundbreakers11 a.m. 11:30 a.m.NFL LiveCBS Evening News Daily 10 Widowmaker The Wonder PetsWeekend Handyman11:30 a.m. noonNBA PreseasonCountdown withWindow on the AtollBlind DateGo, Diego, Go!Sports TBDnoon 12:30 p.m.Mavs Keith Olbermann Judge JudyLiving SingleDora the Explorer12:30 p.m. 1 p.m.at Hannity & ColmesGuiding LightThe Cosby ShowMovie:BlueÂ’s Clues1 p.m. 1:30 p.m.Spurs Mad About You Raise Your Voice Bear in the Big Blue1:30 p.m. 2 p.m.Lou Dobbs TonightGeneral HospitalEmeril LiveSesame Street2 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 3 p.m.SportsCenterNews Hour withPassionsDecorating Cents Movie: <:02>Funniest VideosNavy/Marine Corps 3 p.m. 3:30 p.m.Jim Lehrer The Look for Less Bull Durham Funniest AnimalsMail Call3:30 p.m. 4 p.m.Baseball TonightSpecial Report withOprah WinfreyThird WatchPokemonNational4 p.m. 4:30 p.m.NBA Fastbreak Brit Hume Yu-Gi-Oh! Geographic 4:30 p.m. 5 p.m.SportsCenterYour World withWheel of FortuneC.S.I.FilmFakers:SpongeBobAccess Hollywood5 p.m. 5:30 p.m.Neil Cavuto Jeopardy The Mukashi Code Fairly Oddparents Weekend5:30 p.m. 6 p.m.World News NowHeadline NewsCinema SecretsKim PossibleExtreme Makeover:6 p.m. 6:30 p.m.ATS/Regional NewsThe SimpsonsE.T.The Proud Family Home Edition6:30 p.m. 7 p.m.Sports TBDHeadline NewsDeal or No DealAmericaÂ’s MostMovie:Buzz on MaggieThe 44007 p.m. 7:30 p.m.Tavis Smiley Wanted Lord of the Rings: Grim Adventures 7:30 p.m. 8 p.m.Business ReportSurvivor:Invasion The Two Towers The XÂ’sNavy/Marine Corps 8 p.m. 8:30 p.m.Nightline Cook Islands Hannah MontanaMail Call8:30 p.m. 9 p.m.Hardball with Last ComicMonkNedÂ’s Declassi edNational9 p.m. 9:30 p.m.Chris MatthewsStandingWhat I Like About YouGeographic 9:30 p.m. 10 p.m.SportsCenterOÂ’Reilly FactorHeadline News Will & Grace Movie: <:19> Switched! Access Hollywood10 p.m. 10:30 p.m.Tonight ShowKing of Queens Scary Movie 3 Degrassi Weekend10:30 p.m. 11 p.m.Baseball TonightDateline NBC W/ Jay Leno The Daily Show7th HeavenECW Wrestling11 p.m. 11:30 p.m.NFL LiveThe Late ShowColbert Report11:30 p.m.

PAGE 10

Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2006 The Kwajalein Hourglass 10 HELP WANTED Kwajalein Range Services has the following job openings. For contract hire positions, call Teresa Bell, 256-890-8705. For all others, call Jack Riordan, 55154. Full job descriptions and requirements for contract openings are located online at www.krsjv.com. Job descriptions for other openings are located at Human Resources, Building 700. For information on the process for submitting Requisitions, Authorizations to Hire, Personnel Action Notices, and Internal Job bids, visit the USAKA business web page, then choose Human Resources, and then choose the link to the HR Responsibility Matrix. NEED EXTRA money? KRS employment applications are continually accepted for the Community Activities and Food Services departments for casual and part-time positions. If you are interested in being a scorekeeper, sports of cial, recreation aide, recreation specialist, library aide, lifeguard, disc jockey, pizza delivery driver, catering/dining room worker or temporary of ce support, please submit your application to the HR department for consideration as positions become available. For more information, call the KRS HR Of ce at 54916. AUTO BODY TECHNICIAN, Automotive, HR Req. K031086. CARPENTER, Marine Department, casual position, HR Req. K031325. ELECTRICIAN, HR Req. K030983. ELECTRICIAN I, Generator Shop, HR Req. 031254. ELECTRICIAN I, Kwajalein Operations, full-time, HR Req. K031092. EXECUTIVE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, deputy program manager, Logistics, HR Req. K031221. Must be able to operate standard of ce equipment, familiar with MS Of ce, Outlook, PowerPoint, technical and business vocabulary. Minimum 5-7 years experience at executive level secretarial and administrative responsibilities. Associate degree or technical certi cate a plus. Government-contract experience highly desired. GENERAL MAINTENANCE, generator shop, HR Req. K031253. MECHANIC I, Kwajalein Automotive. Four positions, HR Reqs. K030332, K030641, K030331 and K031029. MECHANIC II, Automotive Services, HR Req. K031139. MECHANIC II, Kwajalein Power Plant. Full-time, HR Req. K031124. MECHANIC HEAVY EQUIPMENT I, HR Req. K031162. PROGRAM LEAD, Youth Services, two casual positions, HR Reqs. K031323 and K031324. RECREATION AIDE I, Roi Community Actvities. Casual position. Enniburr residents should apply to Anthony Stephens. HR Req. K031286. RECREATION AIDE II, Roi Community Services. Fulltime. HR Req. K031217. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST, Education Services, Casual position. HR Req. K031299. SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS, Education Department. HR. Req. K031285. TOOL ROOM ATTENDANT LEAD, HR Req. 031239. KRS CONTRACT POSITIONS BUYER II, HR. Req. 031539. Richmond hire. CAPTAIN, Fire Department, HR Req. 031060. COMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIAN, HR Req. 031437. COMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIAN III, two positions, HR Req. 031029 and 031565. CONTRACTS PURCHASES SPECIALIST, HR Req. 031525. COORDINATOR REMOTE LAUNCH SITES, HR Req. 031583. DESIGNER/PLANNER IV, HR Req. 031100. DESKTOP ANALYST II, HR Req. 031759. DISPATCHER II, aircraft, HR Req. 030988. ELECTRICIAN II, HR Req. 031116. ELECTRICIAN III/MARINE ELECTRICIAN, HR Req. 030924. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN I, HR Req. 031563. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN II. Six positions, HR Reqs. 030817, 031495, 031601, 031603, 031605 and 031607. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 031561. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN III – ALTAIR, HR Req. 030669 (Roi-Namur). ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 031527. EMERGENCY VEHICLE TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 031032. FIELD ENGINEER I, HR Req. 031189. FIELD ENGINEER II, ve positions, HR Reqs. 031315, 031157, 031373, 031511 and 031559. FIELD ENGINEER II, Roi-Namur, HR Req. 030741. FIELD ENGINEER II, TRADEX, HR Req. 031245 (Roi-Namur). FIREFIGHTER, four positions, HR Reqs. 031054, 031056, 031082, and 031124. HARDWARE ENGINEER III, HR Req. 031493. HAZMAT SPECIALIST II, HR Req. 031108. LIBRARIAN, HR Req. 031435. MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST, HR Req. 030871. MATERIAL HANDLER II, HR 031621. MECHANIC III, two positions, HR Reqs. 031000 and 031102. MECHANIC IV, HR Req. 030966. MECHANIC HEAVY EQUIPMENT III, four positions, HR Reqs. 030376, 030862, 030912 and 030506. NETWORK ENGINEER II–MO, HR Req. 031227. OPERATIONS TEST DIRECTOR, HR Req. 031485. OPTICS TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 031595. PLANT TECHNICIAN II, HR Req. 031645. PLANT TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 031643. PRODUCTION CONTROL CLERK I, Automotive. Full -time, HR Req. K031250. PROGRAMMER, HR Req. 031067. PROJECT CONTROLS ENGINEER II, HR Req. 031591. REGISTERED NURSE, three positions, HR Reqs. 031635, 031637 and 031597. RF SAFETY SPECIALIST/FIELD ENGINEER II, HR Req. 031147. SERVER ADMINISTRATOR I, HR Req. 031631. SERVER ADMINISTRATOR II, HR Req. 031557. SUPERVISOR SERVER ADMINISTRATOR, HR Req. 031629. SOFTWARE ENGINEER II. CONUS-Lexington, HR Req. 031175. SYSTEMS ENGINEER III. Two positions, HR Reqs. 031481 and 031483. SYSTEM ENGINEER IV, HR. Req. 031555. TELEPHONE TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 030965. WAREHOUSEMAN II/SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK, CONUS-Richmond, HR Req. 030843. WEB SOFTWARE DEVELOPER I, HR Req. 031639. AMERICAN LEGION POST 44 CLUB STEWARD, BAR STEWARD and BARTENDER. Job descriptions and applications may be obtained by calling 53436. LOSTE-WEAR Panasonic video/digital camera, in black case with clip. Call Chris, 54129, home or 53910, work or e-mail christopher.oglesby@us.army.mil SILVER I-POD, Sunday evening at the skate park. Call Jenni, 52867. FOUNDNECKLACE with two pendants, in Marine Department parking lot, Oct. 16. Call 55987. WANTEDREIKI MASTER practioner. Call 54632 and leave a message. GIVEAWAYMAC II ci computer, plus keyboard and monitor. Call 52379. PATIO SALETONIGHT through FRIDAY, 4:30-6 p.m., Quarters 496-B. PCS sale. FOR SALECHILD’S KWAJ-condition bike, $25; X-Box video games, NCAA Football Jurassic Park (Operation Genesis) and Greg Hasting’s Tournament Paint Ball $10 each. Call 53710, home or Susie, 53542. PCS SALE furniture for outdoors, bed, living, and dining rooms; underwater and lm camera gear; shing gear; dive gear; TVs; luggage; decks; hot tub and more. Call 52709, after 7 p.m. or leave a message. HOME COMPUTER/of ce center, expandable/ retractable, new, $400 or best offer; ve-foot bean bag couch; boogie board with ns and carry case; vacuum cleaner; patio table and chairs. Must sell by Nov. 1. Stop by Quarters 496-B, next to Tropics and Coral Bachelor Quarters. Call 51599, home, or 52710, work. SUNGLASSES, Coyote Northshore, polarized, rose lenses, new, $60. Call 51314. WIDE OPTIC sh nder with transom mounting clamp, $85; Yamaha Silent Trumpet, $80; six patio chairs, $4 each; women’s New Balance shoes, size 8, $40 and various plants. Call 52609. PENN SENATOR reel and rod, excellent condition, $350; 300-foot gill net, good condition, $100 and Scubapro Air II, no time since rebuild, $50. Call 53634, after 5 p.m. PIANO, $600 or best offer; 1200-watt microwave, $40 or best offer and toaster oven, $20. Call 51081. LAPTOP 12.1-INCH Averatec 3300 series, Intel Pentium M processor, Windows XP, 3-in-1 media card reader, CD-RW +/burner, 1-inch thin, 4.6 pounds 512 MB DDR, 80 GB HDD, 802.11g wireless LAN, $500 and queen-size pillow top mattress and box spring, $300. Call Rick, 52273, work or 51132, home. 25-FOOT project boat with berglass double bottom, see at Lot 55, best offer. Call 52232. TWO 26 by 1.9 to 2.125 thorn-resistant/Schrader valve tubes, $10 and two 26 by 1.75 CST Enduro 5 mm/high protection tires, $40. Call 52328. 16-FOOT HOBIE CAT in hand launch area, blue hulls, new shrouds and trapeze wire set, $800 or best offer. Call Randy, 53643. LADIES’ SUN bike, single-speed, with large saddle baskets, less than one year old, $120. Call 54434. MICROWAVE CART with cutting board, towel rack and

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The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2006 11 F r i d a y S h a v i n g C r e a m S o c i a l Friday, Shaving Cream Social Jelisa Castrodale 4:30-4:40 p.m., three to four years • 4:30-4:40 p.m., three to four years • 4:30-4:40 pm three to four year 4:30-4:40 p.m., three to four year • 4:30-4:40 pm three to four year • 4:304:40 p th t f a ( m u s t b e a c c o m p a n i e d b y p a r e n t ) (must be accompanied by parent) • 4 : 4 0 5 p m G r a d e s K 2 • 4:40-5 p.m., Grades K-2 • 5 : 1 0 5 : 3 0 p m G r a d e s 3 6 • 5:10-5:30 p.m., Grades 3-6 S a t u r d a y C h i l d r e n ’ s Saturday,Children’s C o s t u m e C a r n i v a l Costume Carnival • 5 7 p m C o r l e t t R e c r e a t i o n G y m i n f a n t t o G r a d e 6 • 5-7 p.m., Corlett Recreation Gym, infant to Grade 6 • A d u l t c o s t u m e p a r t y 9 p m S u n d a y a t • Adult costume party, 9 p.m., Sunday, at t h e Y u k C l u b T h e o r i g i n a l Z o o k s w i l l p l a y the Yuk Club. The original Zooks will play a t 9 : 3 0 p m C o s t u m e c o n t e s t a l l at 9:30 p.m. Costume contest all n i g h t w i t h a $ 2 0 0 g r a n d p r i z e night with a $200 grand prize. • • T r i c k o r T r e a t i n g Trick or Treating , 6 8 : 3 0 p m T u e s d a y 6-8:30 p.m., Tuesday, i n a l l o f t h e f a m i l y h o u s i n g a r e a in all of the family housing area S a t u r d a y S c a r y H a i r B a l l Saturday, Scary Hair Ball, • 8 1 0 : 3 0 p m C o r l e t t R e c r e a t i o n C e n t e r R o o m 6 • 8-10:30 p.m., Corlett Recreation Center Room 6. G r a d e s 7 1 2 P r i z e f o r t h e b e s t c o s t u m e Grades 7-12. Prize for the best costume. knife block, $50. Call 55006. JETSKI, 2003 Sea-Doo XP-DI with BigFoot aluminum trailer, also comes with tools, large plastic tool shed, oil and to many other things to list, Blue Book value on jetski alone is $5,800, asking $6,000 for everything, test drives can be arranged. Call 54602, extension 488, and leave a message. SPARETIME 24-foot 1986 Grady White shing/dive boat with dual Honda 90 horsepower, four-stroke engines, new trailer, many extras, $50,000, with covered boat shack $60,000 and three international 80 STW reels with poles, $750 each. Call James, 51943. COMMUNITY NOTICESHAPPY 50th BIRTHDAY to Marty Bazar. KWAJALEIN ATOLL International Sportfishing Club monthly meeting will be held at 7 p.m., tonight, at the Paci c Club. Pizza & beverages will be served. THE NEXT George Seitz Elementary School Parent/ Teacher organization meeting is at 6 p.m.,tonight, in the elementary school music room. DURING VESSEL operations, tentatively scheduled for Thursday, the Supply and Marine Department areas, between 6th and 8th Streets and Supply and Marine Roads, are off limits to pedestrian, bicycle and vehicle/equipment traf c. Only Supply and Marine Department personnel will be allowed access into these areas. Barricades/caution tapes will be erected at all of these points. Questions? Call 52180. THE NEXT George Seitz Elementary School Parent/ Teacher organization meeting is at 6 p.m.,tonight, in the elementary school music room. KWAJALEIN POLICE Department will hold a bike auction at 4:30 p.m., Thursday, at the police station. KWAJ BINGO will be Thursday, at the Yokwe Yuk Club. Card sales begin at 5:30 p.m., Bingo play begins at 6: 30 p.m. Blackout at 53 numbers with a $700 jackpot prize. Bring identi cation to play. Must be 21 to enter and play. MILLICAN FAMILY POOL will be closed Friday due to the Shaving Cream Social. ENJOY the music of the Stone sh at 9:30 p.m.,Saturday, at the Yuk Club, celebrating a birthday bash for Michelle Poitras. Drink specials will be available. Questions? Call 53419. KEVIN HARTNETT is PCSing! Come to Quarters, 405-D, at 4 p.m., Sunday, and wish him a fond farewell. Bring a pupu to share. Call Lynn, 51618, for more information. THE AMERICAN CANCER Society has graciously donated educational pamphlets in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Now through Tuesday, you can stop by the hospital’s radiology department to obtain your information on Cancer Facts for Women ABC’s of Breast Health and The Older You Are The More You Need a Mammogram ANYONE WHO purchased a Relay for Life luminary and would like to keep it, may pick it up at Quarters 226-B (back deck) until Monday. THE UNOFFICIAL guest day sponsorship program has reached capacity for the Halloween activities on Tuesday. The Provost Marshal’s of ce will no longer be accepting guest requests for that day. Questions? Call Sarah Simpson, 52124. KOJELA nan aolep ro otemjej rej lomnak in sponsor tok armij nan ran in Halloween eo Oct. 31, bwe emoj an obrak, of ce eo an provost marshall emoj an bojraknan an approve requests ko nan ran in Halloween. Ne elong kajitok call ie tok Sarah Simpson, ilo 52124. THE SCHOLASTIC BOOK Fair will be held at 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Nov. 1 and 6-8 p.m., Nov. 2 (community night), in the elementary school music room. THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Parent/Teacher Organization will have a table at the Fall Craft Fair on Nov. 6. Stop by to see what great things we have to offer. THE COMMUNITY Education brochures for Winter A session are out. Check the gray boxes in front of the post of ce and Caf Paci c. Some classes have a limited number of openings, so sign-up soon.COLUMBUS DAY Weekend Fishing Tournament has been rescheduled for Nov. 12-13. B-boaters and residents from Ebeye and Ennibur welcome to participate! Special prize will be awarded for the most creative, catchy team name. Updated tournament rules available at Kwaj and Roi Small Boat Marinas or contact Trudy Butler on Kwaj or Tony Stephens on Roi-Namur. COMMUNITY BANK CAREERSYOU WORK FOR US AND WE’LL WORK FOR YOUCOMMUNITY BANK IS CURRENTLY HIRING FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS: BANKING CENTER MANAGER TELLERS COMMUNITY BANK IS ON THE LOOKOUT FOR MOTIVATED AND ENERGETIC ASSOCIATES WITH STRONG COMMUNICATION SKILLS. WE ARE ALSO LOOKING FOR A STRONG LEADER WITH MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE, STRONG CASH HANDLING AND PREFERABLY A BACKGROUND IN BANKING. IF YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO BE PART OF A WORLD CLASS ORGANIZATION, VISIT WWW.CAREERS.DODCOMMUNITYBANK.COM TO VIEW CURRENT POSITIONS AND APPLY ONLINE ALL CANDIDATES MUST POSSESS THE REQUIRED STATUS TO WORK ON KWAJALEIN. COMMUNITY BANK DOES NOT PROVIDE CONTRACT POSITIONS OR SPONSORSHIP. COMMUNITY BANK IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

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Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2006 The Kwajalein Hourglass 12 Weather courtesy of Tonight: Mostly clear with slight chance of showers. Winds: NE-E at 3-8 knots Thursday: Mostly sunny with scattered showers. Winds: E at 5-10 knots.Friday: Variably cloudy with showers likely. Winds: ENE-ESE at 7-12 knots. Saturday: Partly cloudy with scattered showers. Winds: ENE-ESE at 5-10 knots. Annual rain total: 79.72 inches Annual deviation: +0.59 inchesFor updated forecasts, call 54700 or visit www.rts-wx.com. Sun  Moon  Tides Sunrise/set Moonrise/set High tide Low tideThurs 6:37 a.m./6:29 p.m. 9:39 a.m./9:27 p.m. 5:45 a.m., 3.3' 11:36 a.m., 0.1' 5:59 p.m., 4.2' Fri 6:37 a.m./6:28 p.m. 10:36 a.m./10:23 p.m. 6:16 a.m., 2.9' 12:26 a.m., 0.0' 6:34 p.m., 3.9' 12:03 p.m., 0.2' Sat 6:36 a.m./6:26 p.m. 11:32 a.m./11:21 p.m. 6:55 a.m., 2.5' 1:09 a.m., 0.4' 7:20 p.m., 3.5' 12:37 p.m., 0.6'AIR TRAFFIC, from Page 2 RTS Weather To nominate an employee or family member for USAKA Person of the Week, send submissions to Sandy Miller, Public Affairs of cer, at sandra.miller @smdck.smdc.army.mil or call her at 51404. Check out Macy’s and Gimbel’s MONSTER electronics sale on selected electronic items, Saturday through Nov. 3 and followed by all rated pilots. Given the low density of traf c at Kwajalein, these procedures provided a completely safe aviation environment. During the transition from FAA to U. S. Army controllers, all aircraft transiting to and from Kwajalein were controlled by the FAA’s Oakland Center. Further, considering the high level of experience of pilots at Kwajalein, this is probably one of the safest air traf c environments in the world. I put my wife and kids on these planes frequently, and do not have to think twice about how safe they are. I want to ensure that the community understands the importance that all Department of the Army, FAA and host nation air traf c agencies place on ight safety, and that rules and regulations are strictly adhered to. Flight safety in the USAKA aviation environment has been, is, and will continue to be priority number one. — Chief Warrant Of cer Steven T. Simpson USAKA aviation of cer THE JOSH GOODE BAND WILL PERFORM AT 9:30 P.M., SATURDAY, AT THE ROI OUTRIGGER AND AT 6:30 P.M., SUNDAY, ON EMON BEACH. SPONSORED BY AMERICAN FORCES ENTERTAINMENT!