Citation
The Kwajalein hourglass

Material Information

Title:
The Kwajalein hourglass
Uniform Title:
Kwajalein hourglass
Place of Publication:
Kwajalein Aroll, Marshall Islands
Publisher:
Commander, U.S. Army Garrison- Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA/KMR)
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases -- Periodicals -- Marshall Islands ( lcsh )
Military bases ( fast )
Marshall Islands ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
"U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
55731016 ( OCLC )
2004230394 ( LCCN )
ocm55731016

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

The Kwajalein Hourglass K w a j a l e i n H o s p i t a l p h a r m a c y t e c h n i c i a n J a s o n S a m s o n g a i n e d v a l u a b l e Kwajalein Hospital pharmacy technician Jason Samson gained valuable e x p e r i e n c e d u r i n g h i s s e r v i c e i n t h e U S A r m y F o r m o r e s e e P a g e 4 experience during his service in the U.S. Army. For more, see Page 4. ( P h o t o b y J J K l e i n ) (Photo by J.J. Klein) www.smdc.army.mil/KWAJ/Hourglass/hourglass.html

PAGE 2

Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006 The Kwajalein Hourglass The Kwajalein Hourglass is named for the insignia of the U.S. Army 7th Infantry Division, which liberated the island from the forces of Imperial Japan on Feb. 4, 1944. The Kwajalein Hourglass is an authorized publication for military personnel, federal employees, contractor workers and their families assigned to U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll. Contents of the Hourglass are not necessarily of cial views of, T h e K w a j a l e i n H o u r g l a s s The Kwajalein Hourglass or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, Department of the Army or USAKA. It is published Wednesdays and Saturdays in accordance with Army Regulation 360-1 and using a network printer by Kwajalein Range Services editorial staff. P.O. Box 23, APO AP 96555 Phone: Defense Switching Network 254-3539; local phone: 53539 Printed circulation: 2,000E-mail: hourglass@kls.usaka.smdc.army.milCommanding Of cer......Col. Stevenson Reed Public Affairs Of cer......................Sandy Miller Editor......................................Nell Drumheller Graphics Designer..........................Dan Adler Reporter............................................J.J. Klein Distribution..................................C.J. Kemem2 COMMENTARYSee CREDIBILITY, Page 12USAKA Person of the Week Joe Coleman To submit a letter to the editor: Keep letters to less than 300 words, and keep com ments to the issues. No personal attacks will be printed. Letters must be signed. However, names will be with held if requested. We will edit for Associated Press style, grammar and punctuation and if you exceed the word limit, space. Limit one letter every 30 days. Send your letter to: The Hour glass, P.O. Box 23, Local; or hourglass@kls.usaka.smdc.army.mil.What would our lives be like without credibility? Credibility. Think what your life would be like without it. What would your life be like if your employer, supervisor, co-workers and family members didn’t trust you, and everytime you said something, they wondered if you were telling the complete truth? What if you put a spin on everything? What if you always distorted the facts or omitted the facts? Or what if that was just the perception people had of you? Instilling con dence in people who think you are misrepresenting the facts, or that you are completely out for yourself and no one else, would be pretty much impossible. What would your life be like without credibility? On a vastly larger and much more important scale, I believe that’s the position our government nds itself in these days. To refresh your memory, here are a few things that have been going on in our government the past few years. • The corruption scandals involving lobbyist Jack Abramoff and the investigations of several government of cials on corruption charges. • The ‘no-bid’ contracts worth billions of dollars for rebuilding in Iraq and the billions of dollars ‘lost’ or ‘unaccounted’ for in that country. • The massive ‘pork barrel’ spending bills that included millions of dollars for a ‘bridge to nowhere,’ in Alaska as one example. • The Medicare prescription drug ‘bene t’ that has turned out to be not such a good deal for seniors but will cost taxpayers billions of dollars. This law forbids the U.S. government from negotiating with drug companies for lower prices. (Recently, Wal-Mart has announced a discount drug plan that is far less expensive for consumers than the government plan.) • The incredibly costly energy bill which does nothing to lower the cost or curtail the use of oil, provides no funds for research for an alternative fuel, but does provide massive tax cuts to the oil industry. • And, of course, that little deal of almost letting an Arab company buy some of our seaports. Remember that one? • How about the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans? Do you remember the very lucrative ‘nobid’ contracts that were given out by the government for rebuilding? Now get this. There’s a law on the books called The DavisBacon Act, passed by congress in 1931, that requires federal government contractors to pay locally prevailing wages in the area of the country in which the work is being done. The wages are usually set by pay scales in local union contracts. Well, after the ‘no-bid’ contracts were let out for Katrina, the government suspended that law so the contractor(s) could hire ‘lower wage’ workers to come in and work on the contracts. But, that wasn’t enough it seems. The government also suspended laws that require contractors to get proof of citizenship before hiring workers! Do you think maybe a few illegals or, as some say, ‘undocumented’ workers got hired for those jobs? It was only after the media found out about it and raised a stink that the government reinstated the law’s provisions and contractors had to start paying proper wages and getting proof of citizenship before hiring workers. But, until that law was reinstated, we had illegals taking work Joe Coleman of the Roi-Namur Police Department did an outstanding job assisting with lost luggage during the Chili Cook-off. Coleman’s calm demeanor in combination with his immediate action led to the rescue of the missing luggage. Coleman is a modern hero!

PAGE 3

The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006Island enjoys continuous power after eight months of power lossesEbeye power plant generators repaired, back in service3 Bush condemns North Korea’s nuclear test By Steven Donald SmithAmerican Forces Press Service North Korea’s claim that it conducted its first-ever nuclear test today constitutes a threat to international peace and security, President Bush said this morning at the White House. “The United States condemns this provocative act,” he said. Bush said the U.S. is still working to con rm the North Korean claim.South Korea’s Yonhap news agency reported the apparent nuclear test was conducted in Hwaderi, North Korea. The U.S. Geological Survey said it had detected a tremor of 4.2 magnitude on the Korean Peninsula. “North Korea has de ed the will of the international community, and the international community will respond,” the president said.Bush said he talked to leaders of China, South Korea, Japan and Russia this morning. “We reaf rmed our commitment to a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula, and all of us agreed the proclaimed actions taken by North Korea are unacceptable and deserve immediate response by the United Nations Security Council,” he said. The U.N. Security Council held an emergency session in New York City this morning to discuss possible actions against North Korea. The Security Council has said such an act could lead to severe consequences, like economic sanctions. The North Korean regime is one of the world’s leading proliferators of missile technology, including transfers to Iran and Syria, Bush said. “The transfer of nuclear weapons or material by North Korea to state or non-state entities would be considered a grave threat to the United States, and we would hold North Korea fully accountable for the consequences of such action,” he said. The U.S. remains committed to diplomacy, the president said, but will meet the full range of its deterrent and security commitments. He said North Korean threats would not lead to a brighter future for North Korean people nor weaken the resolve of the United States and its allies. Today’s claim by North Korea serves only to raise tension, while depriving the North Korean people of the increased prosperity and better relations the world has offered. “The oppressed and impoverished people of North Korea deserve their brighter future,” he said. North Korea, of cially known as the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, is an isolated, repressive regime of 23 million people that has experienced wide-scale starvation under its current leader, Kim Jong-il. The communist country also drew international ire when it test red seven ballistic missiles in July. By J. J. KleinReporterEbeye residents have continuous power, ending eight months of rolling brown outs, after power plant generators were repaired and put back online. Power was restored to Ebeye on Sept. 29, when an engineer with the Cummings Engine Company of Brisbane, Australia arrived in the Republic of the Marshall Islands to connect the repaired generators and get them back online. An hour after arriving by plane, Nick Phillips of the Cummings Company was whisked off to the Ebeye power plant, taken to the generators and told, “Fix it.” By 8 p.m. the same day the island was back at full power. “The engines were rebuilt and they came over to Ebeye,” said Phillips. “I just needed to nish connecting up the electrical systems on them, check voltages, check the frequency and check that they were doing what they were supposed to before we put them online.” Phillips was assisted in making repairs by Daniel Tokeak, an electrician with the Kwajalein Atoll Joint Utility Resource. Two of the three Cummings generators were repaired and completely serviceable, the third generator is waiting for a part due to arrive this week according to Tokeak, and should be up and running within two weeks. A back-up Caterpillar generator is also functioning at 100 percent. Two Cummings generators were sent to Australia, stripped down and rebuilt then shipped back to Ebeye. While the generators are the same engines with new parts, the electronic controls, speci cally the automatic voltage regulators, were upgraded to the latest systems, said Phillips. A 12-month supply of all maintenance materials— air—water and oil lters—was purchased by KAJUR to ensure unimpeded operations. Phillips also spent most of the week training Tokeak, who will in turn train nine power plant operators to make any necessary future repairs to the engines. “They know for the next 12 months they have all the spares required,” said Phillips. “Daniel has my contact number in Australia…he can contact us direct at Cummings, and we can supply any spares required direct.” Gone, for now, are the four-hours-on, four-hours-off power shortage that made living on Ebeye a hardship for many residents. On the day Phillips checked out of the Kwaj Lodge, a maid, an Ebeye resident, came to Phillips to thank him for getting the power back on; she wasn’t the only one. “I’ve had a lot of people thanking me for getting the power back on,” said Phillips. “People seem to be sleeping a lot better because they’ve got the air conditioning running through the night again.”

PAGE 4

Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006 The Kwajalein Hourglass A World of experiences4 Kwajalein Hospital Pharmacy. (Photo by J.J. Klein) By J.J. KleinReporterAnyone who has picked up a prescription at the hospital pharmacy has probably crossed paths with Jason Samson. Behind the very professional and pleasant demeanor is the heart of an advenhis belt. Samson joined the Army right out of high school looking for a way to continue his education. “I didn’t actually plan to join the military, but towards the end of my schooling in high school I was looking for money to go to school and, you know, they advertise about the service and the GI bill and being able to take night courses,” said Samson. “So I looked at it and thought it would be an adventure to try it out, and went for the ASVAB [Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery] and the next thing I knew the recruiter was hunting me down.” A short time later, this young man from Ebeye was on his way to basic training at Ft. Knox, Ky. “Oh, yes,” reminisced Samson with a grin on his face. “I will never forget my rst day. I as soon as the bus took off that’s when all the screaming and yelling started. “They dropped us in the snow [to do] pushups. That was my rst time touching the snow. And it was miserable, terrible,” Samson continued, laughing. “I couldn’t feel my ngers, my toes. They were just numb.” At the end of basic training Samson was relieved, not to be leaving basic training, but to be heading to the warmer weather of Ft. Sam Houston, Texas, where he trained to become a medic. From there Samson was sent to work in the Emergency Room at Kenner Army Hospital, Ft. Lee, Va. As a high school teenager, Samson spent his summers helping out at the Ebeye hospital and was fascinated by the medical eld. It only seemed natural for him to train in the medical corp. “The rst call I went to really opened my eyes to the profession,” said Samson, “really gave me the desire to try and advance in the eld. “I got a call about a paratrooper who went through a tree and landed on a house trailer and he cracked his neck. I was running scenarios in my mind as we [my partner and I] were driving over there,” continued Samson. “We get there and [the paratrooper] says, ‘Yeah, I can walk, I just can’t “I got a call about a paratrooper who went through a tree and landed on a house trailer and he cracked his neck. I was running scenarios in my mind as we [my partner and I] were driving over there. We get there and [the paratrooper] says, ‘Yeah, I can walk, I just can’t move my head.’ Then all that training started owing out, you react without thinking. — Jason Samson See PHARMACY TECH,Page 5

PAGE 5

The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006 5 move my head.’ Then all that training started owing out, you react without thinking.” At the beginning of his Army career, a bit of loneliness set in, normal for any new recruit far from home, but particularly resonant for someone who is experiencing a new culture and always the only Marshallese in the crowd. “It was really lonely. I didn’t see anyone from here; I couldn’t speak [my] native language. I just had to tough it out,” remembered Samson. One thing that could have chased the homesick blues away would have been some comfort food from home, in particular – sh. “If I could have eaten sh… that would have helped tremendously with the homesickness and loneliness. I tried every food that came my way,” said Samson, thinking back to those early days at basic training. Of course, Samson couldn’t afford to be choosy at the chow line with a drill sergeant over his shoulder. Following a tour in Korea, Samson was sent to Ft. Carson, Colo., where he did a rotational deployment to Egypt. Looking back, Ft. Carson was his favorite duty station and where he nally met up with four other Marshallese men. It was the rst time Samson, and for that matter the other men, had been stationed at the same post with fellow countrymen. Ask him if he spent any time with his compatriots and he is quick to reply, “Every weekend. “We just got to know each other and hung around all weekend, every weekend,” continued Samson, “that knocked off those loneliness feelings of all those years.” Samson has experienced a lot of “ rst” as an adult, thanks to the Army. “My biggest rst standing at the foot of the pyramids. They are huge. It’s just unbelievable how they could have built that so many years ago without all the technologies we have today. It’s amazing,” said Samson. “You just wonder, ‘How did they lift these humongous, thousand pound bricks up that high?’” Another ‘ rst’ for this young man, who grew up shuttling between the tropical islands of Majuro and Ebeye, was snowboarding. “I could barely walk the next day,” said Samson laughing, “but you get the hang of it after 100 falls.” With all these new experiences, why would Samson leave the Army? He left for the same reason he started with the Army, education. “I really wanted to do some schooling, but the units that I was with got deployed a lot and we never really had the time to participate in night classes,” said Samson, and “I just wanted to do more schooling.” A lot of people like to think that they embody the “I’ll try anything, once!” attitude. For Samson that really is a way of life. He brought that attitude with him when he enlisted in the military and lived it out as a young Soldier. Securing o u r our b o r d e r border U S Air Force airmen install a f ence along the U S .-Mexico border east of San Luis, Ariz., on Oct. 3 The G uardsmen are w orking in partnership w ith the U S Border Patrol as part of Operation J um p S tart. The airmen a re ass ig ned to the 188th Fighter Wing Arkansas Air National G uard. ( DoD photo by Staff S g t. Dan Heaton, U.S. Air Force ) PHARMACY TECH, from Page 4

PAGE 6

Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006 The Kwajalein Hourglass 6 Wounded warriors fighting another battleBy Gerry J. GilmoreAmerican Forces Press Service Two Army combat veterans who both lost something dear in the war against terrorism say they are determined to keep on battling, and proving it as they prepare to run the Army 10-Miler race tomorrow. In December 2005, Spc. James Stuck was wounded by an improvised explosive device blast in Kirkuk, Iraq. His right leg was later amputated at mid-shin. Spc. Joseph Keck, an Afghanistan veteran, lost his lower left arm just below his elbow after being injured in an IED explosion near Kandahar in July. Yet, Stuck and Keck are upbeat as they continue to recover from their wounds. They also will run in tomorrow’s Army 10-Miler race as members of the Missing Parts in Action team from Walter Reed Army Medical Center here. The two soldiers related their experiences today during an Army 10-Miler press conference yesterday at a local suburban hotel. “I went skiing ve weeks after I’d lost my leg,” Stuck, a 22-year-old from Pittsburgh, recalled. “So, it just shows what you can accomplish.” He has also taken up kayaking and snowboarding since he was injured. Noting he’s come a long way since being injured, Stuck said his goal at the 10-Miler “is to just nish the race.” Stuck attributed his rapid recovery to being able to come to terms with his condition and the adoption of a positive outlook. “Hey, I’m lucky to be alive,” Stuck said. “So, you accept it. There’s nothing you can do to go into the past to change it.” Keck, who hails from Rockford, Ill., said he has completed 12-mile runs during unit physical training sessions. The 22-year-old said he’s savoring the opportunity to compete in the 10-Miler. “It’s something I know I can do,” Keck said. “Just, now, I’m looking at how fast I can do it.” Besides competing at the 10-Miler, Keck said he also anticipates taking his motorcycle for a spin when he goes home for a visit in the spring. Keck said he is determined, like Stuck, to make a full recovery. He also accepts the loss of his arm, having realized soon after being wounded that he might lose it. “When they told me that they were going to amputate it, I already knew,” Keck recalled. His recovery has “been a little hill to climb,” he acknowledged. However, Keck today reiterated his determination “to carry on,” as he prepares for the 10-Miler. Army Capt. Matthew Scherer, an Iraq War veteran, accompanied Stuck and Keck at the Army 10-Miler press conference. Born in Joliet, Ill., Scherer, 35, is the chief of Walter Reed’s amputee physical therapy section. He’s also a supporting therapist and co-organizer of the MPIA team. The MPIA team rst competed at the Army 10-Miler in 2004, Scherer said. The 10-Miler “is a world-class race,” he said, where wounded warriors can come together in sports and work as a team. Scherer said the MPIA team is co-sponsored by the U.S. Armed Forces Amputee Patient Care Program. This year’s MPIA team has 14 wounded servicemembers representing all the military services and 18 physicaltherapist supporters, he said. One of the AFAPCP’s goals “is to help folks reach their maximum level of functional capability after they’ve lost a limb” or sustained other types of severe injuries, Scherer said. U.S. Army Spc. Jennie Baez provides security for fellow Soldiers during an operation in Al Anbar province of Iraq on Sept. 27. Baez is assigned to the 47th Force Support Battalion. (DoD photo by Lance Cpl. Clifton D. Sams, U.S. Marine Corps) She’s got their backs

PAGE 7

The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006ThursdayAll programming is subject to change without notice7 TimeChannel 13 AFN Sports Channel 14 AFN News Channel 17 AFN Prime/ Roller Channel 20 AFN Spectrum Channel 23 AFN Movies Channel 26 AFN Family Channel 35 AFN Direct to Sailors TimemidnightNFL ReplayToday Show The Late ShowLate Night withMovie: (cont.) Kim PossibleWithout A Tracemidnight 12:30 a.m.Game #1 Late Late Show Conan OÂ’Brien Patriot Games The Proud Family 12:30 a.m. 1 a.m. CNN Newsroom with Craig Ferguson The Dead ZoneMovie: <:07>Zack and CodyPaci c Report1 a.m. 1:30 a.m.NFL ReplayJudge Judy Indian Summer Naturally SadieTonight Show1:30 a.m. 2 a.m.Game #2 CNN NewsroomStargate SG-1 Criminal Minds Everwood W/ Jay Leno2 a.m. 2:30 a.m. Late Show with2:30 a.m. 3 a.m.SportsCenterMSNBC LiveOprah WinfreyThe West WingMovie:Even Stevens David Letterman3 a.m. 3:30 a.m.Love DonÂ’t Cost Home ImprovementLate Late Show3:30 a.m. 4 a.m.Baseball TonightDr. Phil ShowWill & Grace a Thing Moesha w/ Craig Ferguson4 a.m. 4:30 a.m.NFL LiveKing of Queens Movie: <:56>DegrassiJudge Judy4:30 a.m. 5 a.m.NFL Total AccessCBS Evening NewsCarol Duval ShowOne True Thing TeletubbiesWWE Raw!5 a.m. 5:30 a.m.ESPNewsBreathing SpaceBarney & Friends Family Reunion5:30 a.m. 6 a.m.The Sports ListFox News LiveTodayCaribbean Workout Sesame Street6 a.m. 6:30 a.m.ESPNews The Right Fit6:30 a.m. 7 a.m.The Hot ListStudio B withGood EatsThe EntertainersBear in the Big Blue7 a.m. 7:30 a.m.Outside the Lines Sheppard Smith UnwrappedBlueÂ’s Clues7:30 a.m. 8 a.m.NFL LiveThe Situation RoomSesame Street30 Minute MealsBehind the ScenesDora the ExplorerThe Final Score8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.Jim RomeFood 911E.T.Go, Diego, Go!Headline News8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.Around the HornThe Big StoryThe ViewRoseanneMovie: Connie the CowGood Morning9 a.m. 9:30 a.m.PTI w/ John Gibson Roseanne Gold Rush Miss Spider America9:30 a.m. 10 a.m.SportsCenterAround the ServicesDr. PhilAlly McBealFranklin10 a.m. 10:30 a.m.NBC Nightly NewsMovie: <:44>Reading Rainbow10:30 a.m. 11 a.m.ABC World NewsE.R.E! News Live/ Adventures of Miss SpiderOne Tree Hill11 a.m. 11:30 a.m.CBS Evening News Daily 10 Baron Munchausen Connie the Cow11:30 a.m. noonMLB PlayoffsCountdown withAccess HollywoodBlind DateGo, Diego, Go!Veronica Marsnoon 12:30 p.m.Teams TBD Keith Olbermann Judge JudyLiving SingleDora the Explorer12:30 p.m. 1 p.m.Hannity & ColmesGuiding LightMy Wife & KidsMovie:BlueÂ’s CluesThe Closer1 p.m. 1:30 p.m.Mad About You Rocket Bear in the Big Blue1:30 p.m. 2 p.m.Lou Dobbs TonightGeneral HospitalEmeril Live Gibraltar Sesame StreetE.R.2 p.m. 2:30 p.m. Movie: <:54>2:30 p.m. 3 p.m.SportsCenterNews Hour withPassionsKidspace The Fugitive Funniest VideosAccess Hollywood3 p.m. 3:30 p.m. Jim Lehrer ThatÂ’s Clever!Funniest AnimalsJudge Judy3:30 p.m. 4 p.m.Baseball TonightSpecial Report withOprah WinfreyThird WatchPokemonMy Wife & Kids4 p.m. 4:30 p.m.NFL Live Brit Hume Yu-Gi-Oh!Mad About You4:30 p.m. 5 p.m.SportsCenterYour World withWheel of FortuneC.S.I.True HollywoodSpongeBobNFL Total Access5 p.m. 5:30 p.m. Neil Cavuto Jeopardy Story Fairly Oddparents5:30 p.m. 6 p.m.SportsCenterWorld News NowHeadline NewsSeinfeldBackstage PassKim PossibleX-Play6 p.m. 6:30 p.m.ATS/Regional NewsThe SimpsonsE.T. The Proud FamilyCheat6:30 p.m. 7 p.m.MLB<:15> Paci c ReportEverybody Hates...One Tree HillMovie:UnfabulousThird Watch7 p.m. 7:30 p.m.Teams TBD Tavis SmileyGirlfriends The Matrix: Zoey 1017:30 p.m. 8 p.m.Business ReportHellÂ’s KitchenVeronica Mars Revolutions Gilmore Girls Wheel of Fortune8 p.m. 8:30 p.m.Nightline Jeopardy8:30 p.m. 9 p.m.Hardball withWithout a TraceThe CloserMovie: <:24>Even StevensThe Daily Show9 p.m. 9:30 p.m.Chris Matthews Gladiator Home ImprovementColbert Report9:30 p.m. 10 p.m.SportsCenterOÂ’Reilly FactorHeadline NewsWill & GraceMoesha The Of ce 10 p.m. 10:30 p.m.Tonight ShowKing of Queens Degrassi Old Christine 10:30 p.m. 11 p.m.Baseball TonightToday Show W/ Jay Leno The Daily Show7th HeavenBones11 p.m. 11:30 p.m.NFL LiveThe Late ShowColbert Report11:30 p.m.

PAGE 8

Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006 The Kwajalein Hourglass 8FridayAll programming is subject to change without notice TimeChannel 13 AFN Sports Channel 14 AFN News Channel 17 AFN Prime/ Roller Channel 20 AFN Spectrum Channel 23 AFN Movies Channel 26 AFN Family Channel 35 AFN Direct to Sailors TimemidnightNFL ReplayToday ShowThe Late ShowLate Night withMovie: Kim PossibleC.S.I. Miamimidnight 12:30 a.m.Game #3 Late Late Show w/ Conan OÂ’Brien Batman & Robin The Proud Family12:30 a.m. 1 a.m. CNN Newsroom Craig Ferguson One Tree HillUnfabulousPaci c Report1 a.m. 1:30 a.m.NFL ReplayJudge JudyZoey 101Tonight Show1:30 a.m. 2 a.m.Game #4 CNN NewsroomStargate SG-1Ver onica MarsMovie: <:06> Gilmore Girls with Jay Leno2 a.m. 2:30 a.m. The Matrix: Late Show with2:30 a.m. 3 a.m.SportsCenterMSNBC LiveOprah WinfreyThe Closer Revolutions Even Stevens David Letterman3 a.m. 3:30 a.m.Home ImprovementLate Late Show w/3:30 a.m. 4 a.m.Baseball TonightDr. Phil ShowWill & GraceMoesha Craig Ferguson4 a.m. 4:30 a.m.NFL LiveKing of Queens Movie:DegrassiJudge Judy4:30 a.m. 5 a.m.MLB PlayoffsCBS Evening NewsCarol Duval ShowGladiator TeletubbiesThe Ultimate5 a.m. 5:30 a.m.Teams TBD ESPNewsBreathing SpaceBarney & Friends Fighter 35:30 a.m. 6 a.m.Fox News LiveTodayCaribbean WorkoutSesame Street6 a.m. 6:30 a.m. The Right Fit (season nale)6:30 a.m. 7 a.m.Studio B withGood EatsTrue HollywoodBear in the Big Blue7 a.m. 7:30 a.m.Sheppard Smith Unwrapped Story BlueÂ’s Clues7:30 a.m. 8 a.m.NFL LiveThe Situation RoomSesame Street30 Minute MealsBackstage PassDora the ExplorerThe Final Score8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.Jim RomeSemi HomemadeE.T.Go, Diego, Go!Headline News8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.Around the HornThe Big StoryThe ViewRoseanneMovie: The WigglesGood Morning9 a.m. 9:30 a.m.PTI w/ John Gibson Roseanne Mrs. Harris Higglytown Heroes America9:30 a.m. 10 a.m.SportsCenterAround the ServicesDr. Phil ShowAlly McBealFranklin10 a.m. 10:30 a.m.NBC Nightly NewsMovie: <:48>Reading Rainbow10:30 a.m. 11 a.m.ABC World NewsE.R.E! News Live/ From Here to Higglytown HeroesHow I Met Your Mom11 a.m. 11:30 a.m.ESPNewsCBS Evening News Daily 10 Eternity The WigglesHow I Met Your Mom11:30 a.m. noonMLB PlayoffsCountdown withAccess HollywoodBlind Date Go, Diego, Go!Next Top Modelnoon 12:30 p.m.Teams TBD Keith Olbermann Judge JudyLiving SingleDora the Explorer12:30 p.m. 1 p.m.Hannity & ColmesGuiding LightMy Wife & KidsMovie: BlueÂ’s CluesLaw & Order1 p.m. 1:30 p.m.Mad About You Innocent Man Bear in the Big Blue1:30 p.m. 2 p.m.Lou Dobbs TonightGeneral HospitalFood NetworkSesame StreetE.R.2 p.m. 2:30 p.m.Specials 2:30 p.m. 3 p.m.ESPNewsNews Hour withPassionsDesign on a DimeMovie: <:05>Funniest VideosAccess Hollywood3 p.m. 3:30 p.m.ESPNews Jim Lehrer Style Star Glengarry Glen Funniest AnimalsJudge Judy3:30 p.m. 4 p.m.Baseball TonightSpecial Report withOprah WinfreyThird Watch Ross PokemonMy Wife & Kids4 p.m. 4:30 p.m.NFL Live Brit Hume Yu-Gi-Oh!Mad About You4:30 p.m. 5 p.m.SportsCenterYour World withWheel of FortuneC.S.I.Biography:SpongeBobNFL Total Access5 p.m. 5:30 p.m.Neil Cavuto Jeopardy Kevin Bacon Fairly Oddparents5:30 p.m. 6 p.m.World News NowHeadline NewsSeinfeldEbert & RoeperKim PossibleX-Play6 p.m. 6:30 p.m.ATS/Regional NewsThe SimpsonsE.T.The Proud FamilyCheat6:30 p.m. 7 p.m.NCAA Football<:15> Paci c Report The Of ce/ (:25) Old Christine How I Met Your MomMovie:ThatÂ’s So RavenThird Watch7 p.m. 7:30 p.m.Virginia Tech Tavis Smiley Window on the Atoll(7:50pm) How I Met Your MomMen of Honor Phil of the Future7:30 p.m. 8 p.m.at Business ReportBones Next Top Model Veronica Mars Wheel of Fortune8 p.m. 8:30 p.m.B.C. Nightline Jeopardy8:30 p.m. 9 p.m. Hardball with C.S.I. Miami Law & OrderMovie: <:18>Even StevensThe Daily Show9 p.m. 9:30 p.m.Chris Matthews The Medallion Home ImprovementColbert Report9:30 p.m. 10 p.m.SportsCenterOÂ’Reilly FactorHeadline News Will & GraceMoeshaDeal or No Deal10 p.m. 10:30 p.m.Tonight ShowKing of QueensDegrassi10:30 p.m. 11 p.m.Inside the NFLToday Show W/ Jay Leno The Daily ShowMovie: 7th HeavenSurvivor:11 p.m. 11:30 p.m.The Late ShowColbert Report My Cousin Vinny Cook Islands11:30 p.m.

PAGE 9

The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006 9All programming is subject to change without noticeSaturday TimeChannel 13 AFN Sports Channel 14 AFN News Channel 17 AFN Prime/ Roller Channel 20 AFN Spectrum Channel 23 AFN Movies Channel 26 AFN Family Channel 35 AFN Direct to Sailors TimemidnightMLB PlayoffsToday ShowThe Late ShowLate Night withMovie: (cont.) Kim PossibleLast Comicmidnight 12:30 a.m.Teams TBD Late Late Show w/ Conan OÂ’Brien My Cousin Vinny The Proud Family Standing12:30 a.m. 1 a.m.CNN Newsroom Craig FergusonHow I Met Your MomMovie: <:13>ThatÂ’s So RavenPaci c Report1 a.m. 1:30 a.m.Judge JudyHow I Met Your MomEscape From Phil of the FutureTonight Show1:30 a.m. 2 a.m.CNN NewsroomStargate SG-1Next Top Model New York Veronica Mars with Jay Leno2 a.m. 2:30 a.m. Late Show with2:30 a.m. 3 a.m.SportsCenterMSNBC LiveOprah WinfreyLaw & OrderMovie:Even Stevens David Letterman3 a.m. 3:30 a.m. Men of Honor Home ImprovementLate Late Show w/3:30 a.m. 4 a.m.Baseball TonightDr. Phil ShowWill & Grace Moesha Craig Ferguson4 a.m. 4:30 a.m.NFL LiveKing of QueensDegrassiJudge Judy4:30 a.m. 5 a.m.Inside the NFLCBS Evening NewsCarol Duval ShowMovie: <:18>TeletubbiesWorld Series5 a.m. 5:30 a.m.ESPNewsBreathing Space The Medallion Barney and Friends of Poker5:30 a.m. 6 a.m.ESPNewsFox News LiveTodayCaribbean WorkoutSesame Street6 a.m. 6:30 a.m. The Right Fit6:30 a.m. 7 a.m.The Sports ListStudio B withGood EatsBiography:Bear in the Big BlueBest Damn Sports7 a.m. 7:30 a.m.Outside the Lines Sheppard Smith Unwrapped Kevin Bacon BlueÂ’s Clues Show Period7:30 a.m. 8 a.m.NFL LiveThe Situation RoomSesame Street30 Minute MealsEbert & RoeperDora the ExplorerGood Morning8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.Jim RomeEasy EntertainigE.T.Go, Diego, Go! America 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.Around the HornThe Big StoryThe ViewRoseanneMovie: The Wonder Pets9 a.m. 9:30 a.m.PTI w/ John Gibson Roseanne Vanished Without Little Einsteins9:30 a.m. 10 a.m.SportsCenterAround the ServicesDr. Phil ShowAlly McBeal a Trace Franklin Extreme Homes10 a.m. 10:30 a.m. NBC Nightly News Movie: <:43>Reading RainbowDesigned to Sell10:30 a.m. 11 a.m.ABC World NewsE.R.E! News Live/ The Hunt for Little EinsteinsGroundbreakers11 a.m. 11:30 a.m.ESPNewsCBS Evening News Daily 10 Red October The Wonder PetsWeekend Handyman11:30 a.m. noonMLB PlayoffsCountdown withWindow on the AtollBlind DateGo, Diego, Go!Sports TBDnoon 12:30 p.m.Teams TBD Keith Olbermann Judge JudyLiving SingleDora the Explorer12:30 p.m. 1 p.m.Hannity & ColmesGuiding LightMy Wife & KidsMovie: <:18>BlueÂ’s Clues1 p.m. 1:30 p.m.Mad About You The Real Bear in the Big Blue1:30 p.m. 2 p.m.Lou Dobbs TonightGeneral HospitalEmeril Live McCoy Sesame Street2 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 3 p.m.ESPNewsNews Hour withPassionsDecorating Cents Movie: <:11>Funniest VideosNavy/Marine Corps 3 p.m. 3:30 p.m.Gametime Jim Lehrer The Look for Less Animal House Funniest AnimalsMail Call3:30 p.m. 4 p.m.Baseball TonightSpecial Report withOprah WinfreyThird WatchPokemonNational4 p.m. 4:30 p.m.NFL Live Brit Hume Yu-Gi-Oh! Geographic 4:30 p.m. 5 p.m.SportsCenterYour World withWheel of FortuneC.S.I.FilmFakers:SpongeBobAccess Hollywood5 p.m. 5:30 p.m.Neil Cavuto Jeopardy Croc Park Fairly Oddparents Weekend5:30 p.m. 6 p.m.World News NowHeadline NewsSeinfeldCinema SecretsKim PossibleExtreme Makeover:6 p.m. 6:30 p.m.ATS/Regional NewsThe SimpsonsE.T.The Proud Family Home Edition6:30 p.m. 7 p.m.Sports TBDHeadline NewsDeal or No DealAmericaÂ’s MostMovie:Buzz on MaggieThe 44007 p.m. 7:30 p.m.Tavis Smiley Wanted Friday, the 13th Grim Adventures 7:30 p.m. 8 p.m.Business ReportSurvivor:Invasion The XÂ’sRockstar: INXS8 p.m. 8:30 p.m.Nightline Cook Islands Movie: <:49>Hannah Montana8:30 p.m. 9 p.m.Hardball with Last ComicMonk The Ring NedÂ’s Declassi edHeadline News9 p.m. 9:30 p.m.Chris MatthewsStandingWhat I Like About YouNavy/Marine Corps 9:30 p.m. 10 p.m.SportsCenterOÂ’Reilly FactorHeadline News Will & Grace Switched! Deal or No Deal10 p.m. 10:30 p.m.Tonight ShowDegrassi10:30 p.m. 11 p.m.Baseball TonightDateline NBC W/ Jay Leno The Daily ShowMovie:7th HeavenC.S.I. NY11 p.m. 11:30 p.m.NFL LiveThe Late ShowColbert Report Misery11:30 p.m.

PAGE 10

Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006 The Kwajalein Hourglass 10 HELP WANTED C o m m u n i t y B a n k Community Bank j o b o p p o r t u n i t i e s job opportunitiesWe are looking for candidates with great customer service skills. If you are interested in joining an awesome team of associates, contact us today. Community Bank, operated by Bank of America, recruits and hires quali ed candidates without regard to race, religion, color, sex, sexual orientation, age, national origin, ancestry, citizenship, veteran or disability status or any factor prohibited by law, and as such af rms in policy and practice to support and promote the concept of equal employment opportunity and af rmative action, in accordance with all applicable federal, state and municipal laws.Contact Bank of America, N.A. Community Bank, Attention: Allison Villarreal, Banking Center Manager, 1-805-355-2152 or www.careers.dodcommunitybank.com. Kwajalein Range Services has the following job openings. For contract hire positions, call Teresa Bell, 256-890-8705. For all others, call Jack Riordan, 55154. Full job descriptions and requirements for contract openings are located online at www.krsjv.com. Job descriptions for other openings are located at Human Resources, Building 700. For information on the process for submitting Requisitions, Authorizations to Hire, Personnel Action Notices, and Internal Job bids, visit the USAKA business web page, then choose Human Resources, and then choose the link to the HR Responsibility Matrix. NEED EXTRA money? KRS employment applications are continually accepted for the Community Activities and Food Services departments for casual and part-time positions. If you are interested in being a scorekeeper, sports of cial, recreation aide, recreation specialist, library aide, lifeguard, disc jockey, pizza delivery driver, catering/dining room worker or temporary of ce support, please submit your application to the HR department for consideration as positions become available. For more information, call the KRS HR Of ce at 54916. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT II, HR. Requires strong computer and communication skills to process large volumes of HR documents and spreadsheets. Strong previous administrative assistance experience required. Will interface with all levels of employees and management, HR Reqs. K031200. AUTO BODY TECHNICIAN, Automotive, HR Req. K031086. ELECTRICIAN, HR Req. K030983. ELECTRICIAN I, Generator Shop, HR Req. 031254. ELECTRICIAN I, Kwajalein Operations, full-time, HR Req. K031092. EXECUTIVE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, Deputy Program manager, Logistics, HR Req. K031221. Must be able to operate standard of ce equipment, familiar with MS Of ce, Outlook, PowerPoint, technical and business vocabulary. Minimum 5-7 years experience at executive level secretarial and administrative responsibilities. Associate degree or technical certi cate a plus. Government-contract experience highly desired. GENERAL MAINTENANCE, generator shop, HR Req. K031253. MECHANIC HEAVY EQUIPMENT I, HR Req. K031162. MECHANIC I, Kwajalein Automotive. Four positions, HR Reqs. K030332, K030641, K030331 and K031029. MECHANIC II, Automotive Services, HR Req. K031139. MECHANIC II, Kwajalein Power Plant. Full-time, HR Req. K031124. RECREATION AIDE I, Roi Community Actvities. Casual position. Enniburr residents should apply to Anthony Stephens. HR Req. K031286. RECREATION AIDE II, Roi Community Services. Full-time. HR Req. K031217. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST, Education Services, Casual position. HR Req. K031299. SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS, Education Department. HR. Req. K031285. TECHNICAL WRITER, Con guration and Data Management Department. Casual position. Must have Microsoft Of ce skills and previous technical writing experience. HR Req. K031298. TOOL ROOM ATTENDANT LEAD, HR Req. 031239. KRS CONTRACT POSITIONS BUYER II, HR. Req. 031539. CAPTAIN, Fire Department, HR Req. 031060. COMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIAN, HR Req. 031437. COMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIAN III, two positions, HR Req. 031029 and 031565. CONTRACTS PURCHASES SPECIALIST, HR Req. 031525. COORDINATOR REMOTE LAUNCH SITES, HR Req. 031583. DESIGNER/PLANNER IV, HR Req. 031100. DESKTOP ANALYST II, HR Req. 031759. DISPATCHER II, aircraft, HR Req. 030988. ELECTRICIAN II, HR Req. 031116. ELECTRICIAN III/MARINE ELECTRICIAN, HR Req. 030924. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN I, HR Req. 031563. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN II. Six positions, HR Reqs. 030817, 031495, 031601, 031603, 031605 and 031607. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 031561. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN III – ALTAIR, HR Req. 030669 (Roi-Namur). ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN II, Telemetry. HR Req. 031389. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 031527. EMERGENCY VEHICLE TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 031032. FIELD ENGINEER I, HR Req. 031189. FIELD ENGINEER II, ve positions, HR Reqs. 031315, 031157, 031373, 031511 and 031559. FIELD ENGINEER II, Roi-Namur, HR Req. 030741. FIELD ENGINEER II, TRADEX, HR Req. 031245 (Roi-Namur). FIREFIGHTER, Four positions, HR Reqs. 031054, 031056, 031082, and 031124. HARDWARE ENGINEER II, Roi-Namur, HR Req. 031179. HARDWARE ENGINEER III, HR Req. 031493. HAZMAT SPECIALIST II, HR Req. 031108. LIBRARIAN, HR Req. 031435. MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST, HR Req. 030871. MATERIAL HANDLER II, HR 031621. MECHANIC III. Three positions, HR Reqs. 030590, 031000 and 031102. MECHANIC IV, HR Req. 030966. MECHANIC HEAVY EQUIPMENT III, Four positions, HR Reqs. 030376, 030862, 030912 and 030506. NETWORK ENGINEER II–MO, HR Req. 031227. OPERATIONS TEST DIRECTOR, HR Req. 031485. OPTICS TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 031595. PRODUCTION CONTROL CLERK I, Automotive. Full -time, HR Req. K031250. PROGRAMMER, HR Req. 031067. PROJECT CONTROLS ENGINEER II, HR Req. 031591. RF SAFETY SPECIALIST/FIELD ENGINEER II, HR Req. 031147. SERVER ADMINISTRTOR II, HR. Req. 031557. SOFTWARE ENGINEER II. CONUS-Lexington, HR Req. 031175. SYSTEMS ENGINEER III. Two positions, HR Reqs. 031481 and 031483. SYSTEM ENGINEER IV, HR. Req. 031555.TELEPHONE TECHNICIAN III, HR Req. 030965. WAREHOUSEMAN II/SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK, CONUS-Richmond, HR Req. 030843. 3D RTS WEATHER STATION ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN. Training and experience in radar maintenance and repair is critical; work with weather radars is preferred. 3D maintenance technicians survey, install, maintain and repair a wide variety of scienti c instrumentation and communications systems. Background in telemetry, analog and digital circuitry, PC and LINUX/UNIX operating systems highly desired. 3D is an equal opportunity employer and offers a highly competitive salary and bene ts package. For more information, call 51508. WANTEDROUND CHARCOAL barbecue. Call David, 52283. FOR SALETWO SWING-type baby safety gates, wood, adjustable, 29 inches high, adjusts from 26 to 42 inches wide, includes all hardware, $25 each or $45 for both; baby ultra exersaucer, unisex with many bright, bold colors, in good condition, paid $100, will sell for $45. Call 52642. SPARETIME 24-foot 1986 Grady White shing/diving boat wih dual Honda 90-horsepower, four-stroke engines, includes new trailer, many extras, $50,000; with covered boat shack, $60,000; three International 80 STW reels with poles, $750 each and many shing lures. Call James, 51943. 100-SQUARE FOOT storage shed, good condition, double doors, air-conditioning, dehumidi er and shelving, perfect for boat shack, available in min-

PAGE 11

The Kwajalein Hourglass Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006 11 November. $2,200 takes all. Call 55646. SOFA, $250; boyÂ’s oak bunk beds with dresser and desk, excellent condition, $300; ve-piece table set, $35; computer desk, $40 and womanÂ’s bike, $35. Call 54558. PLANTS, (not the orchids) see in back of Quarters 118-F; Univega tandem bike for two, $350; guardrail for childÂ’s bed, $5; GT womenÂ’s bike, aluminum frame and rims, smaller size, $25 and curtain rod for old housing. Call 52788, home or 50958, work. LANE NAVY BLUE sofa with recliners on each end; ladiesÂ’ complete golf club set with bag, $50. Call 54784. SURROUND NET, 300 feet long, excellent condition, $150; shing rod with Penn Senator reel, good condition, $450 and Scubapro mask, new in case, paid $60, will sell for $10. Call 53634, after 5 p.m. 21-FOOT boat with 225-horsepower Johnson plus backup eight-horsepower outboard, boat shack and boatlot 65, trailer and tools, seats ve to six, includes new VHF radio, GPS, DVD/CD and Stereo, $10,900; Bose 901 series speakers with Bose EQ, dark wood, includes Bose speaker stands,$399. Call Herb, 59662. 25-FOOT project boat, double -inch berglass bottom, includes 225-gallon welded aluminum fuel tank and trailer, best offer accepted. Call 52232 or 57130. BURLEY BIKE trailer, good condition, $175; Razor three-wheel scooter, excellent condition, $20 and a breadmaker, $10. Call 58222. PIANO, $600 and dishwasher, $150. Call 51081. PROSUMER DIGITAL camera, Olympus e10, 4 megapixel, with telephoto, all weather sealed, $500 or best offer. Call 53966 or 53396. 1500-WATT PORTABLE Yanmar diesel generator, great for charging batteries/remote power, 24VDC/ 115V AC output, $1,500. Call Randy, 53643. COMMUNITY NOTICESWHAT KIND of a parent are you? Are you a helicopter, a drill sergeant or a consultant? Find out at 5:30 p.m., tonight, in the elementary music room. To attend, call Amy, 53610. THE COMMUNITY CHORUS will rehearse tonight, due to the high school concert on Thursday. Singers still needed in all sections. Call Dick Shields, 51684. KWAJALEIN SCUBA ClubÂ’s monthly meeting will be at 7 p.m., tonight, in Corlett Recreation Center Room 1. KSC will show a 20-minute video prior to the meeting. It is the DiversÂ’ Alert Network production on avoiding marine mammal injuries. The video begins at 6:30 p.m. All island snokelers and divers are invited and encouraged to see this informative video. YOUTH SERVICES invites the community to view a slide show and video presentation on the Youth Leadership Forum on Roi at 7 p.m., Monday, at the Youth Center. All are welcome. Questions? Call 53796. REGISTRATION FOR the main volleyball season runs Oct. 6-20. Register your team at the Community Activities Of ce in Building 805. The registration fee is $150 per team. The managerÂ’s meeting is at 5:30 p.m., Oct. 20, in the library conference room. Quesions? Call Billy, 53331. REGISTER TO BE a volleyball official. Experience a plus, but not necessary. Attend the clinic at 6 p.m., Oct. 25, in Corlett Recreation Center gym, to learn the mechanics and rules of the game. Anyone interested must attend the clinic in order to be considered for the position. Questions? Call Billy, 53331.REGISTER TO BE a volleyball Scorekeeper. No experience necessary. Attend the clinic at 5:30 p.m., Oct. 25, in Corlett Recreation Center gym, to learn the basics of keeping the scorebook and scoreboard. Anyone interested must attend the clinic in order to be considered for the position. Questions? Call Billy, at 53331.WANT TO PLAY volleyball, but new to the game? Want to refresh some rusty game skills? Well, we have the thing for you. A beginnerÂ’s volleyball clinic will be held at 6 p.m., Oct. 26, in Corlett Recreation Center UMUC UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE TERM II 2006-2007BIOL 181 Life in the Oceans Instructor is Eric Nelson 6-9 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays.Register 1-5 p.m., Tuesdays through Saturdays, at the University of Maryland of ce in the Coral BachelorÂ’s Quarters or call 52800. Term II registration will be Tuesday Oct. 27. THE JUNIOR/SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL CHOIR AND BAND CONCERT WILL BE AT 7 P.M., THURSDAY, IN THE MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM. THE CONCERT WILL FEATURE THE CONCERT BAND, CHOIR AND STAGE BAND.gym. We will go over basic skills, rules, stretching and more. For more information, call Billy, 53331.WEREWOLF? Mermaid? Sponge Bob? What are you going to be for Halloween? Community Activities and Youth Services have a lot of fun things planned, so start working on your costume now. More information to come. MARK YOUR calendar for the Kwajalein Art GuildÂ’s Holiday Bazaar, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Nov. 6, in Corlett Recreation Center gym. ThereÂ’ll be more than 70 tables of arts, crafts and goodies from Kwajalein artisans and vendors.

PAGE 12

Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006 The Kwajalein Hourglass 12 Weather courtesy of Tonight: Partly clear with scattered showers. Winds: N-NE at 5-10 knots Thursday: Mostly sunny with with widely scattered showers. Winds: N-NE at 3-8 knots.Friday: Partly sunny with scattered showers. Winds: NE-E at 5-10 knots. Saturday: Mostly sunny with widely scattered showers. Winds: N-NE at 5-10 knots. Annual rain total: 70.77 inches Annual deviation: -3.19 inchesFor updated forecasts, call 54700 or visit www.rts-wx.com. Sun  Moon  Tides Sunrise/set Moonrise/set High tide Low tideThurs 6:38 a.m./6:43 p.m. 10:10 p.m./10:17 a.m. 6:50 a.m., 2.8’ 1:04 a.m., 0.1’ 7:11 p.m., 3.7’ 12:36 p.m., 0.3’ Fri 6:38 a.m./6:43 p.m. 11:09 p.m./11:18 a.m. 7:26 a.m., 2.2’ 1:51 a.m., 0.7’ 7:57 p.m., 3.1’ 1:01 p.m., 0.9’ Sat 6:38 a.m./6:43 p.m. 12:16 a.m. 8:36 a.m., 1.7’ 3:16 a.m., 1.2’ 9:42 p.m., 2.6’ 1:25 p.m., 1.4’ CREDIBILTY, from Page 2RTS WeatherCol. Stevenson Reed, U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll commander, discussed teen-related issues with Kwajalein Junior and Senior High School students at a Teen Town Hall meeting Friday. (Photo by Sandy Miller ) from people in New Orleans who had just lost everything and desperately needed jobs. Well heck, that sounds fair to me, how about you? I could go on, but I only have so much room on these pages. Credibility. It’s so hard to build it up and it’s so easy to lose and very, very hard to get back once it’s lost. In a democracy, any democracy, the government is built on the people’s trust. A government in a democracy has to have the citizens’ con dence that it’s doing what’s right and what’s in the best interests of the country and not operating in a perceived ‘culture of corruption.’ It’s a terrible shame that poll ratings for our government of cials are dismal. Those polls re ect that a majority of people don’t feel many of our elected of cials are doing what’s good for the country and not just special interests. For our nation, our way of life, and our government to survive in these turbulent times, trust and con dence have to be assured. We have to know that our government is a government for the people and not those with the most money and in uence. Don’t get me wrong. There are many hard-working people in government who do their best to watch out for us and the nation’s best interest and they deserve our thanks and our votes. Voting is how we reward those who do a good job for us. If we citizens don’t demand and insist upon good government and we don’t hold our elected of cials accountable for what they do by our votes, then guess what? We’ll never have the government we want. We’ll have the government we deserve. Credibility. What would our lives be like without it? Talking things over