Citation
Boggy bayou breeze

Material Information

Title:
Boggy bayou breeze
Creator:
Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.) -- Company 1402
Place of Publication:
Niceville, FL
Publisher:
Civilian Conservation Corps
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
Vol. 1, No. 2, February 19, 1935
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 28 cm
Physical Location:
Box 2
Box 2: Publications of CCC camps by number 453-4451
Folder #1402 or #1401

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Camps ( FAST )
Young men ( FAST )
Depressions ( FAST )
Forests and forestry ( FAST )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began 1935.
General Note:
The Civilian Conservations Corps (CCC) was an employment program for unmarried men during the Great Depression in the United States. It was launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933 as part of his New Deal, and continued until 1942, when many of the men had left for military service in World War II. The United States Army oversaw the operations of the camps, which were located at sites around the country, including several in Florida. The men signed up for a minimum of six months and were paid around thirty dollars a month, plus room and board. The men worked mainly in rural areas on projects such as forest renewal, state park development, and construction of service buildings and roads.
General Note:
In Florida, each camp was allowed to publish its own newsletter. Many of the newsletters were sent to other camps so their advisors could learn from each other. The camps were directed to send a copy of each newsletter to the University of Florida. These newsletters include serious topics such as safety precautions and camp news, but many also contain humorous anecdotes about camp life and stories about individuals who worked in the camps. Many of the newsletters also feature hand-drawn covers and other illustrations drawn by camp members.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
UF Special Collections
Rights Management:
The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. This item may be protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. §107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
034612535 ( ALEPH )
961473662 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
i,1 J Companyv 1402. 1Ticeville,~ lorida, Tuesdy Fe_ -,1

Forest and Army
Personnel and *<
Their Positibs
Lt. Leland L.Stokes,
------ Camp Commander. y Lt. Ellis F.Vaughan, .
------Mess Officer.
Lt. W.C. Hoffman,
-.----- Exchange Office
L. E .Andrews,
------Education Adv. t W.F. McGriff, MD
-4---- Contract Surgeo 4
-.----- 0 --------SForest Personnel
Frank A. Albert,
------ Supervisor of Choctawhatchee,0xceola, Ocala, Ap.! chieola J~ E ST esty, compi.i g 8 0RN- F E R UAM
in round numbers, abtout 1,000,000 acres
Mr Glendenning,
---- Staff Technician.
F.A.Collins,----- Camp Supt.
Roy McCray, -----Cult. Foreman
Col.Guy Wyman,---- T.T. Locate Bruce Thomas, ---- T.T. Foreman
Sill Ward, ---echanic
Jerry Reynolds, -- +.T. Foreman Henry Redick, ---- T.T. Foreman
S--------------- 0---------------Lieutenant L. N. Buck, 29th Infantry, U.S.A., Regular Army 0ffite stationed at Fort Benning, has been a visitor of Cogpany 1402 ,. Florida Camp 7- during the past gew days

A !lan Honored by all
The World And
Revered by U.S.
Those who are loyal, true Americans will nev er fail to recognize Washingtoh's Birthday as a day of commemoratiLnV the birth of Amerida's most beloved citizen.
It is natural that we who love America should respect and honor this towering soldier and statesman who made this great nation possible. Those words still ring true, "First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts

---- of his countrymen." In
Answer to the question, "What held the patroit forces together in the
dark hour of the Revolution?",
Albert J. Beueredge fittingly and aptly answered, "George Washington and he alone. Had he died or teeoon seriously disabled the Revolution would have ended-- Washington was the soul of the Revolution.".
It is not the purpose of this article to argue vAhthor or not the great Washington did or did not swear, gamble, drink or toll untruths; personally we prefer to r,think h, did not do many of the
things modern critics seem to
think requisite of a true, present day HE man. We do have it that Washington was a real gentleman, ..... (0on ouaft6=

h43S ,', '-*
7

L

r,4:Z




Lx V. ;

published weekly by a c -p s taff moli&osed of the following boys:
aude Wi. Crump ---------- Edito
;purgeon McDuffie---- Asso..Edi-tor ivian L. Wade -.-----Sc Editor ,h'rlie J. Bush------ Spts.Editor r inklin Walls -----Metts.Editor
o C. .. .... J %.. ty ihis Paper
Subscription Rates :

or 1 year For 6 months For 3 months For 1 month single Copy

1.50
.90 .50
.20 5

--------------- ----------- ----
IDEALS
Sow, during the anniversary
dates of those tt, famous individu!. 1s George Washington and Honest
-:I Lincoln, who for their con,utive periods filled so well the
-ice of the president of this inion of ours,is a fine and very )copriate time to think of those c-',ngod ideals of their day and cs w;vhich were so near and dear to tl-; and how those same ideals shoul Lon the same to us and also to t-o:J2 who are to walk in our footprints after we re no more.
Even as Lincoln was so interest-, ed in thQ preservation of the govcrn-ment of our union which is ad:nittod by master intellects of the present to be one of the most perfact of the ruling bodies of the world if not the one most perfect. Also there are many dissatisfied with this same government and think. th'st they could, do bettor themselves Yet. there are educated people of the world who are not very f-miliar with the work of the, different officeos and in this case, how could they do botter?-Thoro- is no logical, reason for not supporting it.

The Value of a CCC Enroll, ment
When the Civilian Conservation Corps sent out its first call to the American boys they responddd wonderfully. There were many thouand who wished to got into the CCC that could nbt for one 'reason or another.
After th6. caf&mps Were established and evury things was put irito order the Educational Program was installed. This program gives to many the privilege of an educ,-.tion of which previously they had been deprived.
The value of a three to fifteen month 'hi.tch' in the CCC ,cannot be estimated. The very rapid, development of a boy's mind. and body during his camp life l(ave,s a great impression :upon his later..Life. The things tn.t he daily does.are impressed upon his mind-Lnd'thyobcr:..
come habits,, suc.h-as cleanliness of body and mind.
With the many -things. of interest as well as educational in the CCC camps a boy's time is takon up with so. ething of great value to him. In his daily contact with other
boys and with the knowledge gained by doing useful work he becomes a better citizen.
-Every one will have to acknowledge that the CCC -has been and will continue to be a very profitabliventure'. Probably .these-camps do not accomplish enough work to pay back-. dollar for dollar the money spent. for their maintenance but the value of the educational achievement and better understanding of. Life, that the boys receive, vwill amount to very much more than the money spent
------------------ 0 ---------------!'Forestry an Econ.,mic. Challenge"
In this book you see the Forests as
they really are, and tie, work -to be done to .save them. The need of &he Forests and their umliigited resources for the entire, nat.ion. ,It portrays in,
_'ivid words, the duty of the young
people to -make, th.c. Forests safe for tr future citizens of America.




In and At out tLe C n
ti
C' "i LKi""
Summer tine isr' v y ftr ayw: h do' t2t '3 ':1 q v::~ up) fr "Our Natica '1 Fo i
...4h-....Of l ; i" Lc :% '..-4
E- c h 4-1-- 4
the Etchn Ko Ofiu L ,e ble In this o ... a
to got somea at a baete pr10 1criptio '9. nol 7

than you could got from a :tore. Tennis shoes,too. He's a r .7T ood follow if you don't wako him j up too soon in the morning.
The fellows interested in boxing anid vrostling are getting a r:al start and are putting on bouts for the entertainment of the f ol' S in cOmrp ,nd it is hoped th-:t the quarantine will be lifted soon and those talented follos in this as well as the other fiel4- il i h'.vo the opportunity c.f dio;py ing their art before the citizens of the surrounding community.
---------------------------------One of the chief advancements in o um at the present time is th:t
-f th. Department of LMusic, headed
Vivi n L. Vado :ho is a real
p--roarin AIabamiL.n with pleInty Sspunk for doing things T-,s I :ntirman_-, furnish th i. on i truaionts: Lawson .wi" h i s vilJ.n, Pyals ,nd Korn;-Lv i h I ,. "- I" Ei-1i1
t .ir gui tars, Ellis vi rh his mouth
q1r(tn tcn m ko ,. quite ,. noisy crowd .,mus,".- .70#,5 ).,
9 t ihey ar 1 3. 'ed
iljlin'e to do all in t i~i po e r to1 fu.. tis u s with -p y. -'

t h t ~
o.f oltort-im t i. thes. wodcs ef qu'aro.ntirno. It ixs Sod that .t s one tim in the future mo1re will .take an active p:,rt in the prorm. and pr.: c t ice vac .1ly .'nd Vx'ith the no', pi, 2o that arriv d this ufte.a n __.

~' ,~ 3'
~
C ~ I
'I' '~ j
~ I
-3- *,..djI*' f
I-I ~ )
K9 (
~ $ I

t3, ,k of the fi : :t perso r_.' ,
-.- .-:
ct. OCor.. o' ..... .,
c L1, "3
..D --. n V as a 'V= ..c r- '
3n. a S a
"Greot
In this ittlo book y u 1t )1 nein te OUs at~I;nQ-J no u C
onbo .-o. th Ameuiful ic'ne ou mlor 11 uti ful pctu 1 C
A"i ennhanted land

"?G.on.his Kharn

From the p ges of this b k you ..n .in th .. kn ... e of tho . l f the one time
st o"n-e the world has evor r r.i Y. t a rood descriptin
t. o 1 "" ,eo~e as it :was

n... .~
A.'' I
,'-.'
- C

* (

', ~,'
4

g ri7L <\

Tis is an int.. e rn ti b t-o S nov:lisry Roberts
RHi ne hart, thr ous.:
tifatthe f us tati
:11 Forest of the est. She v:as ac companied by her Friend, Howrd Eaton. She doic i- her spectacul
7ay the. wondrous tiesis of this
. s pork, -

"Thr ur C lo.di or Park "




_._ .BOGGY B.AU EEEZE

Social Events around Camp
Mr. Davis, the District Educational Advisor, goes in for the varieties of tennis: Ping Pong, etc. Ask Barber. H'Is an oild
i;illard drinker, too Shoots a mean game of peek. MIissed a lot of good meals, the,.o Or did ha?
----------------------------------

Last Sunday there wver t:e Max:ll Field, Ala. plonos at theo Airport: Major __ __ __ __ __
.Ryan flow
down in a P-12B Pursuit ship
and Licut Pratt and his Photo
Sgt. Powe-1.- flew "
an O-19B .
O bserva- i
ti.n ship
Enth ship, i
.nd their:
spont Sun d'.y .ftern'>n in *the, vioinity,
Lieut ,
Pr tt ad l
elr h v- V
ing lunch at the
C"mp.
How wo;,.uld y.-u like t. have more lessons in Citizenship? N:r-w the v.thor so-ms to bto clearing up, ch.ncos arc thurc will be more f them.
t hom, .
---- --- --- --------------------N ext timc this thing gets out y u tell 'em y'u kn *,,, n-thing abut it, Knd wouldn't if y-u did, r havee u, aint it?

"Boncy" says that every time he gets some long-winded report out,
hero comes another letter asking for something else. It's a good thing, '"mebbo", tha t there is a quarantine, else he never viu1d gct his work done,
1----------- - - - - -
Mr. Andrevs lost.a pip-e not' lChg
agoand"l had to buy a nov, no; except that the one he bought belonged to so-meone elso, it was a good pipe.
...... ..It E gave
T it back,
'by the
way; and
Small was
f org ivcn
for the
Atimc bcjing. Por-. haps ho'
try agair
a&.
,/, ii Vie a.ro
glad to
Lhave t.
- rk
-. izor
with us
Iat any
t imo.
He is
Asst.
ADistrict
- -_Inspectol___ Hc spont
a for:
days
, w vith us this ewoo
----..... He says
his grLato st losses during his stay resulted from his erring after-supper gusses,
... ---- ---1--------------------Woe are wondoring 'if persistent
rum nrs rolativo to.Lt.. Hffman are fact 'mr fiction. Watch y:,ur st~p, Li6ut on ht, o'vc heard C upids darts cro. v.ry -offective. Hovovcr there s ai:ays focm f r nc mere

O0




Recreation Club Put,. on Proram

The weekly program of
ation Club ws rc .,-,.
.L'd I~ S" r, 1 _

day eve .nd a so
_ ". 'S
t at me '
tI% .T .. ": i, ],:" .: i Ixco Lt f I]t. ; 7 i9. L t th0o' -Lu.: -u -*b .l :<. hone ti t3 \' t : cia to as ., in pit h.d in ahnd L- ne we o th~iat they will c

to '

Scarry on this

-I. .4-

Rc reF 1-

i-h
r r.
N~i .I
:.
o o~ I club of

gone: fllowship in our camp.
Announcement
Theoro is a 'nor' lottery out concorning the giving and tak ng or gifts. No- one in this C. IL -b dllowed to make collection, or donate to a collection, f the purposn of giving someone a gift. Wich renrs that you must not give 7n ohy to someone who might ask you -to donate for a gift tc someone ,uo is leaving. If you do you' cre liable to get in trouble over it. Oh it's a very nice thing to think c.:. uh of someone to w ent to give hin C parting gift--- but the rules of' this game forbid it; so be care-

Our Original and Present Forest
When white man c .me to Americu the first thing he had to do was cut trees and build himself a house. The trees grew, inabundancc over the e'.tire country as man knew it then.
Now if we desire to build a house or any other building of wood we have to send a long distance for the m'.terial and pay a nigh price for it.
We use 14,500,000,000 cubic feeoot of wood each 1-. i ... .,

d v 11-. o ..~
Pr : c ; v 2'y me:d ,[:_ :'.. .. e very Sunday 10:- = S. .. .... eo in ? 0 .. .
C CV .iais, Pastr.
cst Church
Preaching ov ry 4th S-+. ndG 2,11.-00 l
Sund:.y School ove.ry 1 EpwVorth L. uo .

Valparais e O r"' .;} -v Preaching ev.r I Sunday c c Sn

I..

-r ~ -I:
I .,,..t -.
i "" . ..4... '-"
it, ,- "",I "- : ""I ":.'-.';"
' 4- .' L : ""' '. 4 ../ 4
>- 7/,
I < 'gf "/ ". -' ..: <'4 .<-' "
Iji I. ..." -: ,.

Announcomont

Rev. Simpson, Pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Crestview, Florid rill l-e the re YlOr Wednesdcay ,.e-vn'n_;g, ad, d ass t ito,,d of Hov. ,.
- .. -'o., is vis tin in the ly
bLe,, the our 7:00 o' cllck S'L7"




-.,-~ .y.~;

Bits of Attempted Wit
One member of Mac's debating team-"It's going to be a rc:l battle of wits, I tell you".
Another mmbor---"How brave of you to go unarmed'.'
YMr. Andrewvs in one of his classes"'.n you toll me something about GO od Friday; "Slow Jack" "I-ow Jck" Yes Sir, he was the ftLlow that did the house-work for Rocinaon Crusoe.
Lieut. V-ughan-- "Now, Cureton, what are you doing, .learning something?"
Curaton--"No,air: I'm just listening tc you."
St. St~kos .-- "Did you enjoy your leave', 'Boney"
"Eoney"-- Yes, Sir, but their's
nothing like the feeling of a good desk umder Your feet again
Lt. Vaughan--- "Do you think
thsse cooking classes accomplish a Lt. Stokes-- I sure do. I have not seen a tramp around the place since they started."
----------- 0 -----------------Honors to Washington
wc Kecide by the fact he was tbustod Vwith the destiny of the infant motion, striving against the greatest power in the world; by the fact
1-L C hocoltc Pro

Metts Side Camp News
Rev. Carlton of the first Methodist Church of Milton, Fla., presented I the Metts Camp boys with an interesting sermon Monday Feb. 11,1935, which wqs enjoyed by all.
Captain lMcKee informed us during his visit hero that Vev. Carlton would deliver us a message each Monday evening at 6:00 o'clock.
The Metts Side Camp boys seem to
be greatg)ly puzzled about the thought of breaking up house keeping and
buliding a new camp here. That seems to be all youcan hear them talking about at this time.
We greatly appreciate the interest shown in the educational work six Mr. Andrews, the C.E.oAo, gave them a lecture on the importance of an education,
We can truthfully say that we havE 100% attendance at this time.Very muc
interest is being manifested by practicailY all the bo a in camp.
he was honored by that nation as its First President..He also was offered the presidency of the U.S.A. for life. This evidences unswerving trust in our beloved Washington.
It is without restraint,modification, or any fear of successful contridiction that ve go on record at this tie* as say i, ~Washington ws first in w-ar, first in peace, and is first in the hearts of his
Countrymen.




Full Text

PAGE 1

/ Forest and Army Personnel and • Their Po si tides Lt Leland L. stokes, Camp Commander. Lt Ellis F. Vaughan, Mess Officer. Lt. V/.C. Hoffman, Exchange Of f L E A ndr ew s Education Adv. V/.F. McGriff Contract 0 Forest Personnel Frank Albert Supervisor of Choctawha tehee Osceola, Ocala, A pc, 1 oh i b.o la Ferest^, compfidfng in round numbers, a•bout 1,000,000 acres Mr Glendenning Staff Technician. all ‘th S ur g e o 4 ..— Eroufi' B 0 R M F £ fi f? l/y\ R y£ 2 ~ ]r / 3 2 F.A .Collins Roy McCray, C o 1 Guy Wyna n Bruce Thomas, Sill Ward-, Jerry Reynolds, -Henry Redick, Camp Cult T.T. ^^\t. Supt Foreman Locatr:!' Foreman ^ f4echanic Foreman T.T. Foreman 0 A Man Honored by The World And Revered by U.S. Those who are loyal, true Americans will never ’fail to recognize y/ashingtoh’ s Birthday as a day of commemoratii 3 g the hi; of Amerida’s most beloved citizen. It is natural that we who love America should respect and honor this towering soldio: and statesman who made this great nation possible. Those words stilL ring true, "First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen." In answer to the q.^estion, "What held the patroit forces together in the dark hour of the Revolution?", Albert J. Beueredge fittingly and aptly ansv^ered,^ "George Washington and he alone. Had he died or been seriously disabled the Revolution would have ended Washington v/as the soul of the Revolution.", It is not the purpose of this article to argue vjhj^ ther or not the great Washington did or did not swear, gamble, drink or tell untruths ; per s one did not Lieutenant L. N. Buck, 29th Infantry, U.S. A., Regular Army Of ficser think h; stationed at Fort Banning, has been things modern a visitor of Coripany 1402 Florhda think Camp F-3, duripg the past 3?ew days day HE man. We V/ashingtoH was — — — — — — ( — 0 oit t Ily we prefer to do many of the critics seem to requisite of a true, present do have it that a real gentleman, on-pa

PAGE 2

'Utlisiied -weetcly by a camxj sxaf,’^ )o::r/oosed of ^he following "boys; ^^laude Y/. Crurap Edit on 3pnrgeon McDuffie Asso-. Editor "ivian Lcfwade So c. Ed it or Jlrirlie J Eush Spts, Editor Muni’vlin Walls Metts. Editor To T .'d fi U' C e j.p t J c.. 1 y thisPa pe r iubscription Rates : lor 1 year $ 1.50 lor 6 months .90 lor 3 months .50 For 1 month .SO Single' Copy 5d 0 IDEALS C i iI'j til ni n t o e pr ITow, during the anniversary datr;S of those t\n famous individu.^^h 4. ils George V/ashington and ” Honest T'jC’' Lincoln, who for their con.’-.ou+ivc periods filled so well the '^fiice of the president of this, anion of ours, is a fine and very pu-opriato time to think; of those ja changed ideals of their day and which were so near and dear to and hoYJ those same ideals should the same to us and also to '1 se who are to walk in our footnts after wc are no more-. Even as Lincoln. was so interested in thS preservation of the goverrmont of our union which is admitted hy master intellects of the present to ho one of the most perfect of the ruling bodies of the world if not tho one most perfect. klso there are many dissatisfied with this same government and think, that they could do hotter themsclvesf* Yet. there are educated people of the world who are not very f;. miliar with tho work; of tho different officG,s and in this case, how could they do hotter? There • is no logic; reason for not supporting it. j The Value of a CCC Enroll; ment When tho Civilian Conservation Cor.ics sent out its first call to the American hoys they responddd wonderfully. There v/ere many thous• and who wished to ^got into the CCC that could not Tor* one -reason or another. After the" .camps were ostahiishod and evory thing' was put' into ’order the Educational .Program was installed. This program gives to many the privilege of nn educe t ion of which previously they had been deprived. The value, of a Three to fifteen mionth ’hitch’ in the., CCC .cannot be estimated. a The very rapid.' development of a hoy's mind, and body during his camp life Ic'.aves.a great impression upon his later. ..life The things tlXi. t he daily does, are impressed upon his mind" '...fid Ythyy’''.:hCr.r;.a‘ come habits,, such as cleanl.i.ness of body and mind : V/ith the. ma.ny. .things... of Interest as well as educational in the CCC camps a boy’s time is taken up with SCe thing of great value to hipi. In his daily contact with other boys and with the knoiYledge gained by doing, useful work ho becomes a. better citizen,' Every one \ill have to acknowledge that the CCC has been and will continue to bo a. very prof itabloventure Probably these camps do not accomplish enough, work to pa;y back dollar for dollar the momoy spent. for their maintenance but tlie. value of the educational achievement and better under.1 stanaing of. Li,fe, that the boys receive, will ompunt to very much more than the money spent. 0 "Eo.r.estr.y an Economic. Challenge" In this book you see the Forests as they really are, and t|ie, work to be done to save them. The need pf ^he Forests and theirujilTiiiited resources for the entire nation. ^ It portrays in* yivid words, the duty 6f the young people to -makethe. Forest s safe for tli; future citizens of America.

PAGE 3

In and At out the CamiD I nurarae.r tino isn’t very fa; Intv.rostij:;-, Books R>.ad in Tho Education Program av/ay; Vvaiy don’t you start saving up for tnat no a at--] Terming su.it no^-v? Mayto the Exchange Officer ut LI be 'a hie to got some at a bettor price than you could get from a store. Tonnis shoes, too. He’s a .pr.t-’-^’good fellov; if you don’t ivako him | up too soon in the morning. i I ” 0 ur National Forests” In this took you got a good de: ^c r i p t i on of ':iio Nu t i j no .1 Forests' I of this greho no.tlon and the gr^al task of the forest personnel. ’’Great tloo'.ants in. the le f e of George 'Washington”. Tho fellous interested in boxing j and vjr'ostling are getting a real start and are putting on. bouts for! the entertainment of the fclioi^’s in camp and it is hoped that the | quarantine v;ill be lifted soon | and these talented follows in this as v/ell as the other fields v;iLi have the opportunity of di.splay'^ ing their art before the citizens of the surrounding community. the chief advancements in One ; camp at the presc-nt time is that of the Department of Music., headed by Vivian L„ V/ado mho is a real r.lp--rcaring Alabamian with plenty 0 f s punk f or doing things. H i s on tor t.a .1 n'er'm’' f urni sh the: i ov/n 1 n s t r um 0 n t s : La w s o n. w i r h his vioi.in, Ryals ;;nd Hornnby v:ith their guitars, Ellis r vai th his mouth I organ etc,, im-ke | • quite a noiE3/crov/d and they are aid. t; 1 i 1 i ng to do all In ^ -hj 1 1? \ thuir pov'/er to f urn7 --ji ish U.S vrith plenty ? / V^' Mr >3 5 i fos In this book is tci.d tho lifo of V/cshi.ngton as a boy and j.atcr as a .rr'ra.u .fou get to knov.' him as a friend and later as your ideals ” Death Valley 'and the Facts" In this little book you got a : real knowledge of tho hottest spot o:a tno North American Continent. From its pages you can grasp in ‘ your m.emory a beautiful pic-'turc of this enchanted land, ^ "Gonghis Khan” I From, tho pages of this bock you j 0.0 n 'obtain tho knoulddge of the 5 King; and people of the one time i largest empire tho world has ever known. You get a good doscripticn of t.b.c life of people as it was r + .S o a B f.: ; -V f you •'* C'y y it. IS 4 ’‘Through 1 Glacier Park” I i 11 uUI i i-s of onto r iri i .rmi c ing these wook quarantino. It hoped that c.t some time in the future more will .toko an active p:..rt in the program and pro c t i co voc.'.vliy and with tho now piano that arrived this afterlie on. y S This is a'n interesting aca Gi/ *”' •£ ’ J"I 1 1 r*' r' £i W ( • • '? V > ; O'-f.---. "I:. > r.-,y /<., J', li • • -.yy • t''' rV.^ .O' V., I \ D<'/" I ^ 'F < count, ,b.y the f'UJL mous novol'i St, Mary Roberts Rinehart through the famous Nqtio al Forest of the V/ost. She v;as ac companied by her i friend, Howard I Eaton. She depic ] in her spectacul way the. wondrous J beautios of this 'orcou s p o rk

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B OC-C-Y BA YOU BREEZE Social Events around imp Davis 5 1 Advis, the District Educar, goes in for tlio )tiGs of tennis: Ping Pong, Ask Barter, Ho' an old Shoot s Mr t i on: varic etCo Dillard drinker ^ too. Shoots a mean game of peek. Missed a lot gc-d meals, the'. Or did he? ^Last Sunday there nore tv's Maxt;g 11 Field, Ala. planes at thC' Airport;: — — — ''Boncy” says that ev'^ry time he gets some long-v.'inded report out, hero comes another letter asking for something else. It's a good thing, "mebbe", that there is a quaranting, else he never v.'uld get hi S' \7ork done Ma j or Ryan flcv/ dovm in a P-12E Pursuit ship and Lieut Pratt and his Photo Sgt. Pow'eftlflovj an 0-1 9B Observation ship dov/n. Both ships '-nd their cr^ns spent Sunday after no 'on in the vicinity, Lieut Pratt andSrt. Pdvj-~ elT having lunch at the C Mr. Andr^us lost. a pipe not lb 'hg ag'O' "'and had 1 0 buy a nor; one; excep that the one he bought bel'nged to s ome one else, it nas a good pipe. ^ jKc gave T -M£ gOOT i^BD it /f/ i* % bv "X t> „s 6
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Recreation Club Puts, on Program V/ith the Churches The ?/eekly program of the Recreation Club v;as rendered lL-*st Ptiday evsniug an'd seer../':! to be vieil enjoyed ty all.irolsding toe offoeo’rs of the carrp;' together 77 ith fy-:o visit.’.iig of j icere "x appe.r;rod that many the enrth.lees found the program much m.cre ofuterta in ing than they nac anticipated and v/e hope that it will ba like that in the Put lire •F;r> •.-puc'"' •luu.'e'' ciate tne v/ay in wii;..-ch the .off j.c.ers pitched in and led r.no affair and v;e iiouo that they v/ilT continue to h.'f u us carry on this club of gonoro;[ fellowship in our camp. Announcement There is a ’new’ letter out concerning the giving and taking of gifts. Ro' one in this Compani/' v;ilibc allowed to make collections, or donate to a collection, for the pnrposG of giving someono a gift. Vfhich moans that you must not givo any money to someone v^ho might 'ask you' to, donate for a gift to someone who is leaving. I.f you do you’o? liatlc. to get in trouble over it. Oh, It’ S' a very nice thing to think Giiough of someone to want to give hlaji a parting gift but the rules of this game forbid it; so he careOur Original and Present Forest When vRiito man c..;me to America the first thing he had to do was cut trees and build himself a house. Tho trees grew in.
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' G Ly i_ -n JL. ,1' Bits of Attempted Wit Metts Side Camp News One member of Mac’s debating team — ”It’s going to bo a real battle erf ?/its, I tell you’J Another member ”How brave of you to go unarmed ’o' Mr, Andrews in one of his classes"Oan you toll me something about Good Friday, ”Slo7? Jack” Slo'W ^acky" Yes Sir, ho was the fellow that did the house-work for Rocinson Crusoe. Lieut, Vaughan — ’’Row, Cureton, what are you doing, Mearning something?” CurGton--”No ,Sir : I'm just listening ,tc you.” Lt. Stokes "Did you enjoy your leave', ’Bonoy^" "Boney” — Yes, Sir, but therms iiothing like the feeling of a good desk under your feet againl’ Rev. Carlton of the first Methodist Church of Milton, Fla „ presented the Metts Camp boys with an intere> sting sermon Monday Feb, 11,1935, which Yjqs enjoyed by all. Captain McKee informed us during his visit here that Rev, Carlton would deliver us a message each Monday evening at 6:00 o'clock. The Metts Side Camp boys seem to be groatgly puzzled about the though! of breaking up house keeping and buliding a new camp here. That seems to be all you c an hear them talking about at this time. We groatlly appreciate the interest shown in the educational work sii Mr. Andrews, the CoE.A,, gave them a lecture on the importance of an education. We can truthfully say that we have 100% attendance at this time. Very muc interest is being manifested by pracLt Vaughan "Do you think these cooking classes accomplish anything?” Lto Stokes — ” I sure do, I have not seen a tramp around the place since they started.” 0 Honors to V/ashington we decide by the fact he v/as trusted with the destiny of the infant motion, striving against the greatpower in the world; by the fact j _t i c a 1 1 y _a 1 1 thy ..b o^s i n_ c amp_. he V(/as honored by that nation as its First President He also v;as offered the presidency of the UeS-A. for life. This evidences unswerving trust in our beloved Washington. It is without restrain^ ^modif ication, or any fear of successful contr idiot ion that we go on record at this tine as saying, '-Washington v^os liLvis Ch^col^ic first in war is first Countrymen. f;i. in peace 5 ^ ^ jj inthe hearts of his Lnd 'Hq I A \\ '/-J£ INP^\ ia% mm W mm \ mm /