Citation
The Rogers Post

Material Information

Title:
The Rogers Post
Creator:
Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.) -- Company 453
Place of Publication:
Sebring, FL
Publisher:
Civilian Conservation Corps
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
Vol. 2, No. 4, December 19, 1936
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 28 cm
Physical Location:
Box 2
Box 2: Publications of CCC camps by number 453-4451
Folder #453 Sebring

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began 1935.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
UF Special Collections
Rights Management:
The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. This item may be protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. §107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
034621656 ( ALEPH )
962067875 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
WRUUsCuDnty the anlast week. The objecr trip was to make a e "Protected area," land r protection from firen. tm and Mr. Sampson a check on the incomto be done in this area is sufficient to warp, there is a possibility amp will be set up and m Mulberry will do the

disturbed*a

M. A. Boudet, camp educational adviser, is recovering from a major operation for appendicitis and hernia, according to his physician, W. L Martin. He is in the Sebring General Hospital where he was taken Saturday evening, Novcmber 7. for the operation after he had undorgone observation by Dr. Martin that afternoon.

own and liked
*ny 453. He in the using !cted with The iasstant edi-

-akes on the trucks of the it of the Interior. There ,nce of 72 and six-tenths en the lines and unless a ble to stop within the giving at the capacity speed s per hour, it is placed in shop for, adjustment. ks are inspected daily to 'ehicles in proper running
Safety devices a r e D be sure that accidents caused by avoidable'cir-

october 29t1h, about 4 p.m. White reported to the infirmary and began having severe convulsions. The camp surgeon was immediately summoned and White was rushed to the Jackson Memorial Hospital here in Miami, but died upon arrival at 6 p.m. White was liked by all the boys and his death was a shock to the entire company." News of White's death was a painful shock to enrollees and officials of 453, who held him in high esteem and it'was with regret it was learned that a boy of such high standards and personality should depart from our midst. White was survived by a mother and father at Ft. Pierce, Fla.- He first enrolled in the CCC 'at Company 450, White Springs, Fla., on
- November 19, 1933, and was honorably discharged on December 28, 1934. On October 23, 193 5, @ereenrolled in this company and was transferred to 1421 at Miami on May 30th of this year.
The first national park established by congress was Yellowstone, in 1872.

moved, and road building will be some of the projects that will be put through if the camp is set up during the next period.
The Project Superintendent and District Forester, accompant~d by B. F. Harris, forest ranger of Highlands County, iited the (t1'lI hda Botanical Garden and- fds
Hiamod F riday. Major 'tteton was exceedingly pleased with t h e work that theCC is don and referring to the0 ursery, he MAtd, -'It certainly s a nice plAce.
Mr.. Simpson said that Mr. Harris appreciated the cooperation that had lbeoi given hit by officials in Charge -of the-park and t,6 CCO members.
LARGE COLLECTIONS
Of PLANTS DONATED,
BY PARK'S BALKERS
During the past few weeks the Florida Botanicall Garden has been the recipient of a number of rare and interesting plants. Due to thecontinued and growing interest of the Garden's many friends.
Mrs. Ola, Head of Avon Park gave three fine specimens of the leaning Vate palm, which have been planted out in the Palm Garden. They supplement some that previously were presented by Mrs. Swearington of the same city.
Mrs. Mary Fredrich presented the Garden with a collection of Crotons and several Hibiscus besides other vines and bulbs. Mr. Krieder gave some fine Parrot Tulip bulbs, which have been planted and their blooming is awaited with great interest ,nd anticipation. Mr. Lighthiser, who spent his vacation in the North recently returned, bringing with
(Continued on Page 4)

Iuiling at camp. He was Uderm Ln care of the doctor for several days, but managed to attend to his official duties.
Feeling consIderably Improved Mr. Boudet, supervised the construction of the eductional buildIng Saturday morning, afterward going to his home where he suddenly became ill. He wvutaken to the hospital where Dr. ?rtin made a thorough examination seveml times during the afternoon and performea the operation that evening around 1:30 o'clock.
Members of the company h a v e been greatly concerned over the condition of the Educati nal AdvisO, making frequent inqWries as to his condition. Due- to the nature of the operation and the condition of Mr. Boudet it has been impossible for anyone to see him. Pleased because the enrollees have been asking about his condition, M. Boudet said he hoped it wouldn't be long before he is back with the "gang."
During the absence of the Educational Adviser, the educational program is being supervised by Roy E. Barnes, assistant C. E. A.
Recruits Visit Park
The beauties of Highlands Hammock were taken in by many of the transfers and new recruits for the first time Sunday afternoon when they were conducted on a trip through the hammock by the Assistant Educational Adviser. The boys were impressed greatly by the way in which the famous aged oaks have been preserved for generations to come. Several pictures were taken on the vesper field.
Private individuals are not allowed to acquire land in the Panama Canal zone.




work after hours and Saturdays. Construction on the buildings is nearing completion, roads and walks are rapidly going in, the area of the campsite has been cleared and plans are now being worked up for a concentrated' beautification program.
In order that these hours of labor and' excellent work will not have been done in vain, let us resolve to protect the accomplishment by cooperating with each other in refraining from practices or habits that will mar the appearance of the camp. Pride in the camp will result in praise from the public.
-CCC---- ..
WILL SUCCESS BE YOURS?
Daily we are thrown in contact with members of the CCC who have various ideas whether,. or not it pays to work hard and make progress or do what is required-just

o Late
Z o L QKassify
By RUSSELL KAYX
Secretary Florida Press Association,

It's a long jump from Pensacola to Key West, but you will never really know your state or appreciate its glory and granduer until you journey from its western gateway to its southernmost tip within a tenday period.
One would imagine that having created such a realm of enchantment as Florida's mainland, Mama Nature would have been content to sit back and call it a day, but apparently, intent on making this her unrivaled masterpiece, she couldn't quit until she-had .-adorned her glamorous creation with a string of glorious pearls and a jewel pendant. So she ran a chain of keys and islands along both coasts and far to the south, where the emerald and turquois waters of the Gulf and Atlantic met, who hung the jeweled pendant that we know as Key West.
By boat, by highway or by air, the journey from Miami to Key West is a thrilling and delightful adventure. You can have your Mediterranean, Hawaii or the Beach of Bali Bali, but when it comes to charm, tropical beauty and interest, Key West and the over seas highway are good enough for me.
Key West--a city rich in historic interest and enchanting with its tropical beauty, through no particular fault of her own, has been tak1P9 it on the chin for a long time,

but in spite of set-back and tough break after tough break, her people have not lost heart or faith or courage and to-day she. .-is making'r a: comeback that is remarkable. Isolated ina sense from the rest of the state, Key West has'always found transportation a problem. Nature while--favoring this section in many ways, strikes cruelly now and then, lest the self-satisfied populace assumes that they are possessed of an eternal heaven.
Few localities in the world have more to effer the tourist and winter visitors and its greatest need today is intelligent publicity and promotion that will acquaint the nation with what it has to offer.
Surrounded by the finest fishing waters in the world, Key West is a veritable angler's paradise. Almost every variety of game fish is found here and competent guides are prepared to show the sportsman a time he will never forget.
DEMPSEY LEASES HOTEL
MIAMI BEACH (FNS) Jack Dempsey heavy-weight champion, with several New York associates, announced this week the lease of the seven story Vanderbilt Hotel, which be operated under the management of Mr. Dempsey as the Dempsey-Vanderbilt.

PRESS ASSOCIATION
Continued from Page One
tions, had planned to attend the annual meeting of the Press Association, held at Pensacola, Florida, last Friday and Saturday, but due to the illness of M. A. Boudet, educational adviser, it was impossible for him to go.
PENSACOLA, Fla. (FNS)-Robert F. Siker, publisher of the Okaloosa News Journal and- representative from his county in the next legislature, was chosen by Florida news, papermen to head their organization for the coming year as president, succeeding George L. Burr, Jr., of Winter Haven.
The election of officers closed a two-day session attended by approximately 100 publishers.
Speakers on the annual banquet program were John Temple Graves, II, of Birmingham, Hon. C. 0. Andiews, U. S. Senator-elect; Millard V. Caldwell, congressman, and president-elect of the Florida State Senate D. Stuart Gillis.
Hollywood Beach was selected for the spring meeting and Tallahassee for the fall session with dates to be set bAhe, incoming president.
One of Georgia's rarest botanical specimens is a big sequoyah, or redwood, from California, which is growing in the city cemetery at Milledgeville.

R.F.

Hardwi
Spo

AVON PARK -FLORIDA
Congratulations
toGthe
"ROGERS. POST"

Kahn's Dept.
Sebring, Fla.

Dutton

Auto

uI'I,
will




Commenting on the fact that the Armistice of November 11 celebrate;d the end of a war to end wars, Mr. Frank pointed out that our nation is now engaged in a different sort of war, a war thai is killing from 35,000 to 37,000 people annually, a wag in which all can play a part. Automobile death accident toll in this country during the last 10 years amounted to more than 300,000 men, women and children, which is 45 per cent more than killed in all the wars in which America has been engaged, he showed. One million accidents, of which twenty percent re-

the Indian Key Massacre by Dr. Perrine's daughter, one of the survivors who escaped. Careless smokers caused 47,845 fires in the nation In 1935-23 per cent of all forest fires.
Lake Wales Laundry &
Cleaners
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It pays to look your best. Have your laundry and cleaning done the right

e Us For n Fresh eshments

Phone 150

C. C. COBB
our new line of, ts for young men Hle we have your

Continued from Page One
him many Interesting plants. among them, Hollyhocks, Rose of Sharon, Hardy Sweet Peas and others. Mr. A,C. Altvater has given the park several large clumps of the giant bamboo, which are now being set out along the protection ditch. While on a recent trip to Key West and the lower Florida Keys, Mrs. J. B. McFarlin obtained livIng plants, among them a large columnar cacti, the pelican flower, a vine which bears large flowers often twenty inches across with tails reaching three feet. This plant Is related to the Dutchman's Pipe vine, commonly grown In the North. The vine is a native of the West Indies and South America.
Miss Violet Knickerbocker g a v e two fine specimens of the Chinese Arborvitae which have been added to the general coniferous planting.
A large collection of seedling pants were received yesterday morning from the nursery of the fashionable Harder Hall hotel. Aftcr the plants are separated a n d classified they will be placed in the nursery for a short period of time and then moved to their permanent home out in the field.
Gratefull acknowledgment is given by the officials to all who have contributed to the Garden, for their gifts, encouragement and support of the Florida Botanical Garden.

Vhen in SEBRING, DO as Sebringites DO, VISIT the

SEBRING
R SAULS and RAMON IRALS BEER

CAFE
CANTO, Proprietors
SHORT ORDERS

_____________- I ~

care of accidents has to be paid for by public and community funds, stated, the safety director.
SOCIETY PUBLICIZING
FLORIDA'S COLORFUL
HISTORY TO CITIZENS
MIAMI (FNS)-The Florida Historical Society, in session at the University of Miami, resolved to enter its second year of aggressive effort to prove to citizens of the state the value of publicizing Florida four hundred years of colorful history.
Prof. A. J. Hanna of Rollins College told assembled members of the society that the organization is entering a new era of service under the leadership of Joshua C. Chase, well-known authority on state history. It is prepared for this work

Molter Drug
Company
PRESCRIPTIONS
EVERYTHING IN DRUGS

Phone 24

On the Circle

C. M. Hamrick

FRIGIDAIRE SALES
and
SERVICE

PHONE 218

Sebring, FI

Hinckley-Durrance Hardware Company
FURNITURE HARDWARE SPORTING GOODS AND FISHING TACKLE
102 CIRCLE Sebring, Florida PHONE 74
Lakeland Creamery Inc.
Ice Cream Sherberts Moonkist Novelties
Sebring, Fla. Tel. 100

[ I. G. A. ST(
I HOME OWNED
"WE APPRECIATE YOUR IOn the Circle, Sebring, Florida I

ORES
STORE it PATRONAGE" Thomas Whitehouse & Son

a I it -




Phone

Wolf's Economy
STORE
AVON PARK

Be Sure

and See Us

I I
Avon Park Cafe
RGW.O NX4wS
snorT Onemas Cho o IWr in Froste4 Mugs
*At YOUR
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Nett to 'W~btern Union
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Have Your Cleaning Done the Right Way by
iSebring Cleaners
"Quality Service"
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RANCHOMARGARITA
VISIT
The Patio
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Floridian
Refreshments
Next' Do Circle Theatre
bring, Florida

eGharles 44ughiton the London stage as in a Christmas revive Barrie's "Pvtor Pan." Lanchester, will play

Know Your Language
By C. L. Bushpll
School of Englis,
International Crseapindece
School
"ARTHER" and "further" are
often used indiscriminately, even by writers of recognized standing. There is, however, a distinction. "Farther" denotes a greater distance between two points, as "Seranton is farther from New York than Philadelphia is." "Further" is properly used in the sense of "more in advance" or "additional," aja "A further difficulty is certain to be encountered."
* *
In verbs with the prefix "re-" the prefix itelf signifies "gain," "back," "anew." To say, therefore, "He returned back to his originAl starting Ia." is what grammhiians cal a pleonasm-the use of more than the necessary number of words. The sentence should read sitiplyH "e r et me to his original. starting place."




Full Text

PAGE 1

VOLUME 2 SEEKING, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1936 Number 4 COMPANY PAPER JOINS FLORIDA P R E ASS’N. Also Becomes Unit Of Florida News Service Another achievement and step forward has been recorded in the journalistic history of The Rogers-Post. The paper recently became a member of the Florida Press Association and the Florida News Service. Members of the statf consider it a privilege and honor to have the singular honor of being the only CCC paper belonging to an organization composed of newspapers whose purpose consists of promoting the better things in the journalistic field. The Florida Press Association membership includes leading dailies and weeklies throughout the state. Beside the many splendid means in which they acquaint the public with their objectives, a keen competition is carried on by the various papers. Each one strives to make the current issue better than the previous, in an effort to become the best newspaper from the standpoint of front page and general makeup, editorial matter, coverage and many other features. The papers are divided into divisions according to their size an period of publication. Prizes are awarded annually to the ones considered the best. The Rogers-Post, by its membership, will be able to receive criticism and comment from reputable editors who have been in the newspaper game for a long time. The Florida News Service is a service conducted hy Russell Kay, secretary of the press, association. Newspapers all over the state send a copy of each issue to the News Service, where they are gone through for interesting news articles. Prepared bulletins are released at regular intervals, giving the news of most interest. Editor Barnes, the one responsible for the paper joining the organiza(Continued on Page 2) Brakes Must Hold Says Project Head Project Superintendent A. C. Altvater has had two lines painted on the pavement near the property of the Florida Botanical Garden and Arboretum for the purpose of testing the brakes on the trucks of the Department of the Interior. There is a distance of 72 and six-tenths feet between the lines and unless a truck is able to stop within the given area going at the capacity speed of 30 miles per hour, it is placed in the repair shop for adjustment. All trucks are inspected daily to keep the vehicles in proper running condition. Safety devices are checked to be sure that accidents will not be caused by avoidable circumstances. News of Camp Progress At a Glance Camp site has been cleared of the. palmettoes and other heavy growth. Construction on the principal buildings (five) is rapidly being finished. Work on the educational building in which the library and reading room will be lodged has been started. Roads and walks are ’ being built on the property. Beautification plans are in the process of consideration by the army officials and ECW heads. It is estimated that it will take several months to complete the extensive planting of shrubbery. Praise has been voiced by many of the citizens and tourists as to the manner in which the work is progressing. ENROLLEE WHITE DIES AT MIAMI FROM INFECTION Thirty was written to the career of L. A. White, enrollee of company 1421, CCC, Miami, Fla., and former member of this company on October 29th. He died at the Jackson Memorial Hospital from an infected ear. White was well known and liked by members of Company 453. He held responsible jobs in the using service and was connected with The Rogers-Post serving as assistant editor prior to transferring to Miami. Information ftom Edwin Britton, assistant educational adviser at the Miami Camp, supplied The RogersPost with the following information on~White’s death. “The ear infection which seemed to be a mere cronic infection changed to an acute severe stage. On October 29th, about 4 p.m. White reported to the infirmary and began having severe convulsions. The camp surgeon was immediately summoned and White was rushed to the Jackson Memorial Hospital here in Miami, but died upon arrival at 6 p.m. White was liked by all the boys and his death was a shock to the entire company.” News of White’s death was a painful shock to enrollees and officials of 453, who held him in high esteem and it was with regret it was learned that a boy of such high standards and personality should depart from our midst. White was survived by a mother and father at Ft. Pierce, Fla. He first enrolled in the CCC at Company 450, White Springs, Fla., on November 19, 1933, and was honorably discharged on December 28, 1934. On October 23, 1935, ^e reenrolled in this company and was transferred to 1421 at Miami on May 30th of this year. The first national park established by congress was Yellowstone, in 1872. OFFICIALS CONDUCT SURVEY OF STATEPROTECTED AREA Major Head Littleton, project superintendent of P-66. Mulberry, Fla., and R. H. Sampson, district forester, were in Highlands County the latter part of last week. The objective of their trip was to make a survey of the “protected area,” land that is under protection from fires. Major Littleton and Mr. Sampson are making a check on the incompleted work to be done in this area and if there is sufficient to warrant a camp, there is a possibility that a side camp will be set up and the men from Mulberry will do the work. The Mulberry company is a for| estry camp supervised by the Department of Agriculture. Extensive fire lanes, telephone and power lines constructed, fire hazards removed, and road building will be some of the projects that will be put through if the camp is set up during the next period. The Project Superintendent and District Forester, accompanied by B. F. Harris, forest ranger of Highlands County, visited the 'Flpflda Botanical Garden and "Highlarids Hammock Friday. Major Littleton was exceedingly pleased with the work that the CCC is doing and referring to the nursery, he stated, ‘‘It certainly is a nice place.” Mr. Sampson said that Mr. Karris appreciated the cooperation that had been given him by officials in charge of the park and the CCC members. LARGE COLLECTIONS OF PLANTS DONATED OY PARK’S BACKERS During the past few weeks the Florida Botanicall Garden has been the recipient of a number of rare and interesting plants. Due to the continued and growing interest of the Garden’s many friends. Mrs. Ola Head of Avon Park gave three fine specimens of the leaning date palm, which have been planted out in the Palm Garden. They supplement some that previously were presented by Mrs. Swearington of the same city. Mrs. Mary Fredrich presented the Garden with a collection of Crotons and several Hibiscus besides other vines and bulbs. Mr. ICrieder gave some fine Parrot Tulip bulbs, which have been planted and their blooming is awaited with great interest and anticipation. Mr. Lighthiser, who spent his vacation in the North recently returned, bringing with (Continued on Page 4) Underwent Operation — Barnes, Assistant, Takes Over Duties Mr. Boudet’s condition has improved so rapidly that he will be taken to his home some time today. Although he is being disnUssed from the hospital it will be necessary that he remain in bed and rest, being disturbed as little as possible. M. A. Boudet, camp educational adviser, is recovering from a major operation for appendicitis and hernia, according to his physician, W. L. Martin. He is in the Sebring General Hospital where he was taken Saturday evening, November 7, for the operation after he had undergone observation by Dr. Martin that afternoon. Several days prior to the operation Mr. Boudet sustained a severe strain from lifting a heavy timber while working on the educational building at camp. He was under the care of the doctor for several days, but managed to attend to his official duties. Feeling considerably improved Mr. Boudet, supervised the construction of the educational building Saturday morning, afterward going to his home where he suddenly became ill. He was taken to the hospital where Dr. Martin made a, thorough examination several times during the afternoon and performed the operation that evening around 7:30 o’clock. Members of the company have been greatly concerned over the condition of the Educational Advised, 'making frequent inquiries as to his condition. Due to the nature of the operation and the condition of Mr. Boudet it has been impossible for anyone to see him. Pleased because the enrollees have been asking about his condition, Mr. Boudet said he hoped it wouldn’t be long before he is back with the “gang.” During the absence of the Educational Adviser, the educational program is being supervised by Roy E. Barnes, assistant C. E. A. Recruits Visit Park Tlie beauties of Highlands Hammock were taken in by many of the transfers and new recruits for the first time Sunday afternoon when they were conducted on a trip through the hammock by the Assistant Educational Adviser. The boys were impressed greatly by the way in which the famous aged oaks have been preserved for generations to come. Several pictures were taken on the vesper field. Private individuals are not allowed to acquire land in the Panama Canal zone. CONDITION OF ADVISER DOUDET IMPROVED, PHYSICIAN REPORTS

PAGE 2

PAGE TWO THE ROGERS-POST THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1936 THE ROGERS-POST Semi-monthly publication of Co. 453, Fla. SP-3 CCC District “F,” Sebring, Fla. Sponsor and Adviser M. A. BOUDET Editor R. E. B.ARNES Sports Editor H. L. CHESHIRE Business Manager G. G. McRAE Advertising Manager Alton J. Travis Lieutenant D. I Larkin, 323rd Inf., Commanding A. C. Altvater, Project Superintendent EFFORTS BRING RESULTS Through the untiring efforts of the members, officers and ECW foremen, the campsite has been entirely changed within the past three weeks. Instead of the entire ground being covered with palmettoes, scrub oaks, scattered stumps and a dense undergrowth, there is to be found a place that shows the result of the hours that have been put in by the men in work after hours and Saturdays. Construction on the buildings is nearing completion, roads and walks are rapidly going in, the area of the campsite has been cleared and plans are now being worked up for a concentrated beautification program. In order that these hours of labor and excellent work will not have been done in vain, let us resolve to protect the accomplishment by cooperating with each other in refraining from practices or habits that will mar the appearance of the camp. Pride in the camp will result in praise from the public. CCC WILL SUCCESS BE YOURS? Daily we are thrown in contact with members of the CCC who have various ideas whether or not it pays to work hard and make progress or do what is required — ^just enough to get by and no more. Those that are ambitious and desirous of making advancement while in the organization as well as in future life, realize the fact that It takes determination to succeed and ambition to undertake any task that occurs while achieving the goal of success. The members that have made themselves believe that it doesn’t pay to do any more than is required and that they get along as well as those who lend every effort possible to go up the ladder of promotion, are found remaining at the bottom, destined to stay there, j A recent survey of all the camps show I that 13 per cent of the personnel of the CCC is made up of men who entered as members. Seventy-two members are now in the capacity of army officers. Within a few weeks 1 5,000 enrollees who took the civil service examination will be appointed to Junior Assistant positions in the various governmental agencies that make up the emergency conservation work program. President Roosevelt is very anxious that members of the CCC be promoted to the technical staffs. A year ago he expressed the desire that 25 per cent of the positions be filled from the organization. CCC The company has been greatly increased by the arrival of new recruits and men transferred from the abandoned camp at Reidsville, Georgia. They are among strangers, but ones that have the reputation of making a person feel at home and that he is really welcome. It is the pleasure of every old member of 453 to show the new boys the points of interest in the surrounding territory. Visits to other sections of the state more than likely will be arranged by the educational adviser. CCC If experience is a very expensive teacher, it does not follow that “^Uie other fellovy’s experience” cannot be taken advantage of at less cost. — Successful Business. 00 Ccite <^0 Classify By RUl^ELL KAY Secretary, Florida Pres* Association It’s a long jump from Pensacola to Key West, but you will never really know your state or appreciate its glory and grariduer until you journey from its western gateway to its southernmost tip within a tenday period. One would imagine that having created such a realm of enchantment as Florida’s mainland. Mama Nature would have been content to sit back and call it a day, but apparently, intent on making this her unrivaled masterpiece, she couldn’t quit until she had adorned her glamorous creation with a string of glorious pearls and a jewel pendant. So she ran a chain of keys and islands along both coasts and far to the south, where the emerald and turquois waters of the Gulf and Atlantic met, who hung the jeweled pendant that we know as Key West. By boat, by highway or by air, the journey from Miami to Key West is a thrilling and delightful adventure. You can have your Mediterranean, Hawaii or the Beach of Bali Bali, but when it comes to charm, tropical beauty and interest. Key West and the over seas highway are good enough for me. Key West— a city rich in historic interest and enchanting with its tropical beauty, through no particular fault of her own, has been taking it on the chin for a long time. but in spite of set-back and tough break after tough break, her people have not lost heart or faith or courage and to-day she is making a comeback that is remarkable. Isolated in a sense from the rest of the state, Key West has always found transportation a problem. Nature while favoring this section in many ways, strikes cruelly now and then, lest the self-satisfied populace assumes that they are possessed of an eternal heaven. Few localities in the world have more to effer the tourist and winter visitors and its greatest need today is intelligent publicity and promotion that will acquaint the nation with what it has to offer. Surrounded by the finest fishing waters in the world. Key West is a veritable angler’s paradise. Almost every variety of game fish is found here and competent guides are prepared to show the sportsman a time he will never forget. DEMPSEY LEASES HOTEL MIAMI BEACH (FNS) — Jack Dempsey heavy-weight champion, with several New York associates, I announced this week the lease of the seven story Vanderbilt Hotel, which be operated under the management of Mr. Dempsey as the Dempsey-Vanderbilt. COMPANY PAPER JOINS FLORIDA PRESS ASSOCIATION Continued from Page One tions, had planned to attend the annual meeting of the Press Association, held at Pensacola, Florida, last Friday and Saturday, but due to the illness of M. A. Boudet, educational adviser, it was impossible for him to go. PENSACOLA, Fla. (FNS)— Robert F. Siker, publisher of the Okaloosa News Journal and representative from his county in the next legislature, was chosen by Florida newspapermen to head their organization for the coming year as president, succeeding George L. Burr, Jr., of Winter Haven. The election of officers closed a tv'o-day session attended by approximately 100 publishers. Speakers on the annual banquet program were John Temple Graves, II, of Birmingham, Hon. C. O. Andiew’s, U. S. Senator-elect; Millard S. Caldwell, congressman, and president-elect of the Florida State Senate D, Stuart Gillis. Hollywood Beach was selected for the spring meeting and Tallahassee for the fall session with dates to be set b^he. incoming president. One of Georgia’s rarest botanical specimens is a big sequoyah, or redwood, from California, which is growing in the city cemetery at Milledgeville. SONG HIT OF THE WEEK YOU’RE GIVING ME A SONG AND A DANCE You’re giving ms a song and a dance, Telling me a tale of romance. But haven’t I heard those words before? You’re telling me you’re gonna be I true. But I shouldn’t listen to you. For hasn’t my heart been fooled before? Now you want me cause you haven’t got me. You’d even promise the moon. Right when you’d want me You’d be changing your tune. You’re giving me a song and dance. And I’m falling for your romance. But haven’t I heard those words before? Eli Witt Cigar Co. ABOVE THE AVERAGE Now Z for 5c Candies Novelties Cigars Cigarettes COMPLIMENT OF PARK Theatre Avon Park — Florida Virginia Gough, Mgr. R.F.SAPPINGTON Hardware Merchandise, Sporting Goods and Fishing Tackle AVON PARK — FLORIDA Congratulations to the "ROGERS. POST” a. Kahn’s Dept. Store Sebring, Fla. Dutton Motor Co. Auto Radio Refrigerator Sales Phone 214 Sebring, Fla. am c I L

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page.' three THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1936 THE ROGERS-POST \nd PLAY IS BEGUN BY INTRA-CAMP LEAGUE TEAMS Will <$> Chevrolet Motor Co. WEAVER 8i POER Have you driven the New Chevrolet? Come in. Pine & N. Ridgewood Dr. SEBRING, FLA. Sebring Pool Room CCC Members Always WELCOME Stop In While Waiting for the Trucks Learn to “shoot pool” Regular Team Be Selected Later Basket ball season for the camp got underway last week with the Intra-Camp League of four teams being organized and scheduled games begun. During the absence of M. A.' Boudet, educational adviser, who has previously coached the teams, and is incapacitated by a major operation, playing will be supervised by. Lieutenant Orlie Price. To date two of the slated games have been played with the players showing great form, considering the fact that they have not had any practice prior to the games. Below is the schedule that the various teams in the League will follow for several weeks. Practice for the regular company team will begin after all prospective players have had a chance to play. The dates of the games and the teams to play are listed according to the -team captains: Nov. 11 — Beatty vs. Padgett 13 — Hood vs. Britt 16 — Beatty vs. Hood 18 — Padgett vs. Britt 20 — Beatty vs. Britt 23 — Padgett vs. Hood. After these games have been played off the two teams winning the most games will play the two that have lost the greatest number. The two winners of these matches w'ill play for the championship. In the opening match of the season, in which the team managed by Beatty met Padgett’s team, the former emerged with a score of 21 to 14. Men on both teams played an excellent game, but due to three players of last season’s regular team being on Beatty’s outfit, it had an advantage over the other. Cheshire, playing for Beatty, was high score man with nine points to his credit. The teams managed by Captains Hood and Beatty played their slated game and Beatty’s quintet won a fast and close meet,. 22 to 21. Captain Beatty hung up 10 points in his favor. His score was the highest made. Hood’s team was leading up to the middle of the third quarter when the other team started scoring and was unable to be stopped. Atkinson, newcomer to camp and substituting on the Hood team, played a nice game and from all indications will give someone a tight race for a birth on the company team. LARGE COLLECTIONS OF PLANTS DONATED BY PARK’S DACKERS Continued from Page One him many interesting plants, among them. Hollyhocks, Rose of Sharon, Hardy Sweet Peas and others. Mr. A. C. Altvater has given the park several large clumps of the giant bamboo, which are now being set out along the protection ditch. While on a recent trip to Key West and the lower Florida Keys, Mrs. J. B. McFarlin obtained living plants, among them a large columnar cacti, the pelican flower, a vine which bears large flowers often twenty inches across with tails reaching three feet. This plant is related to the Dutchman’s Pipe vine, commonly grown in the North. The vine is a native of the West Indies and South America. Miss Violet Knickerbocker gave two fine specimens of the Chinese Arborvitae which have been added to the general coniferous planting. A large collection of seedling p’ants were received yesterday morning from the nursery of the fashionable Harder Hall hotel. After the plants are separated and classified they will be placed in the nursery for a short period of time and then moved to their permanent home out in the field. Gratefull acknowledgment is given by the officials to all who have contributed to the Garden, for their gifts, encouragement and support of the Florida Botanical Garden. When in SEBRING, DO as Sebringites DO, VISIT the SEBRING CAFE FISHER SAULS and RAMON CANTO, Proprietors REGULAR MEALS BEER SHORT ORDERS ARMISTICE DECLARED BY SAFETY DIRECTDR ON RECKLESS DRIVING TALLAHASSEE ( F N S ) — “I know of no better Armistice or no more humantarian activity than a concentrated drive on reckless, careless and discourteous drivers by your Post and every other Post in Florida, wrote Ashe Frank, Stat Safety Director, in his personal Ar* mistice day message sent to American Legion headquarters throughout the state. “Declare an armistice on the terrible daily slaughter of innocents on the streets and highways of our state through motor accidents,’’ he appealed. “Let us dedicate ourselves to end this slaughter. God, in giving you wisdom to drive an automobile, certainly did not intend that it should be used as an instrument of death.’’ Commenting on the fact that the Armistice of November 11 celebrate*d the end of a w'ar to end wars, Mr. Frank pointed out that our nation is now engaged in a different sort of war, a war that is killing from 35,000 to 37,000 people annually, a war in which all can play a part. Automobile death accident toll in this country during the last 10 years amounted to more than 300,000 men, women and children, which is 45 per cent more than killed in all the wars in which America has been engaged, he showed. One million accidents, of which twenty percent resulted in permanent injury, brought a hospitalization and property damage of $1,600,000,000 and 88 percent of the hospitalization and future care of accidents has to be paid for by public and commimity funds, stated, the safety director. SOCIETY PUBLICIZING FLORIDA’S COLORFUL HISTORY TO CITIZENS MIAMI (FNS)— ’The Florida Historical Society, in session at the University of Miami, resolved to enter its second year of aggressive effort to prove to citizens of the state the value of publicizing Florida four hundred years of colorful history. Prof. A. J. Hanna of Rollins College told assembled members of the society that the organization is entering a new era of service under the leadership of Joshua C. Chase, well-known authority on state history. It is prepared for this work of adding color to the state through its historical background by eighty years of research, study and historical preparation, he said. Professor Hanna told of the society’s collection which has been housed in a Jacksomille library and praised the magazine of the society which he declared “ranks well with the leading historical publications of the country.” An exhaustive study of de Leon’s discovery of Florida, articles about Florida's Spanish forts, biographical material about prominent Floridians, original plantation records, operations of early trading companies and reprints of numerous original documents were praised as publislted materials of the magazine. Perhaps the most important and colorful article ever published by the Florida Historical Society Quarterly, said Professor Hanna, is the acount of the Indian Key Massacre by Dr. Perrine’s daughter, one of the survivors who escaped. Careless smokers caused 47,845 fires in the nation in 1935 — 23 per cent of all forest fires. C. M. Hamrick FRIGIDAIRE SALES and SERVICE PHONE 218 Sebring, Fla. Hinckley-Durrance Hardware Company FURNITURE HARDWARE SPORTING GOODS AND FISHING TACKLE 102 CIRCLE Sebring, Florida PHONE 74 Lakeland Creamery Inc. Ice Cream Sherberts Sebring, Fla. Moonkist Tel. 100 Novelties 1. G. A. STORES HOME OWNED STORE “WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE” On the Circle, Sebring, Florida Thomas Whitehouse & Sons

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PAGE FOUR THE ROGERS.POST THURSDAY. DECEMBER 19, 1936 Hunters Cautioned About Forest Fires With the opening of the hunting season almost here, R. H. Sampson, district forester of the Florida Forest Service, is making an appeal, not only to sportsmen but all other lovers of wild life and the forest to be careful with camp fires, matches and cigarettes, and other causes of accidental forest fires. The forests and fields are the natural home of game animals and birds. Woods fires destroy the hunting places and cover, leaving the game at a disadvantage in its fight against its natural enemies. The food supply is diminished and nesting places are burned, forcing migration to other localities. Often game is burned in its fright or in its feeble efforts to defend its young against one of its greatest enemies, fire. Electric Cleaners Laundry South Ridgew'ood Drive Phone 250 Sebring, Fla. 4* M Wolfes Economy STORE AVON — PARK Just received our new line of YOUNG MEN’S SUITS and Men’s Ready to Wear — PRICES REASONABLE — Be Sure and See Us Avon Park Cafe REGULAIS MEALS — SHORT ORDERS Choice Deer in Frosted Mugs MAKE IT YOUR HEADQUARTERS Next to Western Union Avon Park, Florida Have Your Cleaning Done the Right Way by iSebring Cleaners “Quality Service” Sebring, Florida RANCHO MARGARITA VISIT The Patio for Floridian Refreshments Next Door Circle Theatre Sebring. Florida WE HIE A lOr TO ^ THANKWt TOe. I'M Thankful THE ELfiCrrON IS BA5r IM1HANKWL ( wehav^anice/ V vWiPeOCEAH -E[rME£5lPE IM thankful I HAVE. A CEUOLAR. A6AIH Modern System For Preserving’ Specimens A plant drier for the purpose of drying out collected plant specimen to be placed in the herbarium at the Office and Record House building of the Florida Botanical Garden and Arboretum has been placed in operation. The drier is 40 inches long, 32 inches deep and 26 inches wide, made of wood with a rack constructed near the bottom on which the presses containing the samples rests upon. Underneath the rack is a two-burner electric heater. The heat from the' burners quickly and evenly dries the plants so they may be filed in the herbarium for future reference. Up to the time that the drier was placed in use, it was necessary to wait a considerable time for the specimens to thoroughly dry. The northwestern part of Alaska contains 400,000 square miles of treeless lands. COMPANY TO HAVE EXHIBIT AT FAIR To Give Seedlings For Reforestation R. H. Saiqpson, district forester, Thanksgiving Time 5(rv!Cc Plans are being made to have a booth, depicting activities in Company 453, at the Tampa Fair early in February. The minute details have not been worked out as yet, but the general idea is to portray the life of the CCC members and the work they do. The display will be carried out by the work and designs of the enrollees themselves. This will give the public an idea in a small way, what they are learning during their working and leisure hours. Two members will be placed at the booth to answer questions and represent the company at the fair. It is planned to have various articles, drawings and floral displays from the camp. DID YOU KNOW THAT— A battalion of fire fighters used parachutes in Russia recently to reach a remote area of the Urals, where it curbed a forest fire. By proclamation sent the federal government, the “Free and Independent State” of Dade, in northwest Georgia, withdrew from the United States before the rest of Georgia seceded. After the war no written diument^ ever announced the county’s return to the Union. fCharles Laughton is to return to the London stage as Captain Hook in a Christmas revival of Sir James Barrie’s “Ppter Fan.” His wife, Elsa Lanchester, will play Peter. Know Your Language By C. L. Bushnell School of English, International Correspondence Schools “PARTHER” and “further” are often used indiscriminately, even by writers of recognized standing. There is, however, a distinction. “Farther” denotes a greater distance between two points, as “Scranton is farther from New York than Philadelphia is.” “Further” is properly used in the sense of “more in advance” or “additional,” as “A further difficulty is certain to be encountered.” In verbs with the prefix “re-” the prefix itself signifies “again,” “back,” “anew.” To say, therefore, “He returned back to his original starting place” is what grammarians call a pleonasm — the use of more than the necessary number of words. The sentence should read simply, “He returned to his original staiiiiig place.” at Lakeland, advises all owners of idle, unproductive land and other interested parties that the season best suited for doing reforestation work is drawing near. ’The best season to plant is from December to February inclusive, and with favorable moisture conditions the soil should be in good shape to plant in December, after the seedlings have become dormant. The Florida Forest Service -nursery at Olustee has a supply of more than four million seedlings that will be ready for distribution in the near future. Last year the supply was not equal to the demand and many land owners, who wished to plant, were disappointed. Cyrus F. 'Wicker, of Miami, is making preparations to plant 100,000 slash pines on his property near Lake Placid in Highlands county. He has just recently finished cutting the original timber off of this land. Interested parties are urged to get in touch with the district office. Box 53, Lakeland, for further information. Requests for seedlings will be filled in the order received. Seedlings are furnished by the Florida Forest Service at the cost of production to those interested in reforesting their lands. IniCpector Visits Camp Captain John M. Tatum, Capt. Inf., 82nd Division, Headquarters, newly appointed Sub-District In^spector, visited camp Friday on an inspection tour. He has taken over the duties of Captain Hugh B. Dudley, who is in the Marine Hospital at Savannah recovering from an operation. Captain Tatum will have his office in Tampa. WHEN IN AVON PARK MAKE THE Jacaranda Drug Co. YOUR HEADQUARTERS Delicious Sandwiches — Drugs Drug Sundries Mandis Dairy Pure Jersey Milk “Best By Test ” 19 So. Ridgewood Drive Sebring, Fla. Compliments of CIRCLE THEATRE SEBRING, FLA. TED CASON, Manager .K-k'H-K-K-k-K-K-k-k-k-K-k-k-k-K-k-k-k-K-K-k-K-kt Smith Hardware Company BUILDING SUPPLIES PISHING TACKLE HARDWARE Avon Park, Florida Telephone 74 NEW MODELS ON DISPLAY “GET THAT V-8 FEELING” SUNSHINE MOTOR CO., Inc. SALES SERVICE