Citation
Indianhead

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Title:
Indianhead
Place of Publication:
Camp Red Cloud, Republic of Korea
Publisher:
2nd Infantry Division Command
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Frequency:
monthly
regular
Language:
English

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Genre:
government publication ( marcgt )
serial ( sobekcm )

Notes

General Note:
"Serving the 2nd Infantry Division community since 1963"

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.

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Digital Military Collection

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THE INDIANHEAD 4 4 9/3#,6).$&)/:$(86$;<(8$=>?$)6@6336#$A$B/)(8$ =6@CD3,2$/&$E/)6'F.$D/)#6)$'"#$./G$#,..6"(H$ +C),"5$(8,.$@6),/#I$B/)(8$E/)6'$G'.$6.@62,'33*$ @6).,.(6"($G,(8$,(.$,"2C).,/".$,"(/$'33,'"26$ (6)),(/)*H$J3./$(86$J):*$/&&6)6#$9/3#,6).$/&$ (86$#,-,.,/"$'"$6')3*K/C($@)/-,.,/"$,"$(86,)$ 6"3,.(:6"($2/"()'2(.$(/$863@$:66($(86$#6:'"#.$ /&$J):*$)6(6"(,/"$'"#$5,-6$9/3#,6).$(86$ /@@/)(C",(*$(/$:/-6$/"$G,(8$'"/(86)$28'@(6)$ /&$(86,)$2')66).H JULY 9, 1979 4)6.,#6"($L,::*$>')(6)$-,.,(6#$(86$!"#$ %"&'"()*$+,-,.,/"$,"$(86$=6@CD3,2$/&$E/)6'$ '"#$G'.$,:@)6..6#$G,(8$G8'($86$.'GH$?86$ @)6.,#6"($,.$@,2(C)6#$)C"","5$G,(8$(86$()//@.$ '"#$5'-6$53/G,"5$)6-,6G.$/&$()//@$:/)'36$ '"#$)6'#,"6..H JULY 17, 1968 L EGACY PAGE

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THE INDIANHEAD 5 THE WAI T IS OVER: NE W P O LICY MAKES TUI T I ON A SSIS T A N CE R EADILY A VAILABLE TO SO LDIERS CAMP HUMPHREYS, Republic of Korea Soldiers will no longer have to wait one year a!er completing Advance Individual Training, Basic O"cer Leaders Course, or Warrant O cer Basic Course to receive tuition assistance. According to Army Directive 2018-09 (Army Tuition Assistance Policy) of June 6, beginning Aug. 5: TA will be available immediately to Soldiers of all components a!er AIT, BOLC, or WOBC assuming they meet existing eligibility requirements; are not under suspension of favorable personnel actions in ac cordance with Army Regulation 600-8-2; and have enough time le! in service to complete the courses they are signing up for. # is opens up more opportunities for Soldiers," said Teal Hart, Camp Casey Education Center counselor. # e old policy wasn't an equitable rule for all Sol diers because there are some Soldiers whose AIT is 2 months and others whose AIT is a year, so the new policy is a big bene $ t." Soldiers who wish to use TA in order to pursue a master's degree will no longer have to wait 10 years. Instead, Soldiers will have to keep up with their professional military education requirements. Soldiers who have graduated from Advance Leaders Course, Captains Career Course, or Warrant O"cer Advance Course will immediately be eligible to receive TA for graduate-level coursework. "If getting an education helps the Soldier advance in their profession on the military side, then the sooner they can get started, the sooner they can get their professional development on track and increase their opportunities in the Army," said Hart. Soldiers using tuition assistance will now fall into one of two tiers. Tier 1 Soldiers are either working on their $ rst bachelor's degree or have earned an undergraduate degree without TA and wish to pursue a master's degree. Tier 2 Soldiers have used TA for any part of their undergraduate degrees and are working toward a graduate certi $ cate or master's degree. Soldiers can't use TA to pursue a second bachelor's degree or any doctoral degree, nor can they double up and request TA while they are on orders in a fully funded degree program. Pvt. Morgan Channels, a Cleveland native, unit supply specialist in the 602nd Aviation Support Battalion, 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade, said she enjoys the military's educational bene$ts and the new TA policy makes it easier for her to begin college as early as August. Soldiers will still be limited to 16 semester hours each $scal year at a rate of $250 per semester hour and can only use TA to pursue one postsecondary degree or certi $ cate at a time. For more information at TA or enrolling in college, Soldiers should contact their installation education o ce. STORY AND PHOTO BY Spc. ShaTyra Reed 20th Public A! airs Detachment Spc. Roger Houghton, 20th Public Affairs Detachment, 2nd Infantry Division, visits the Go Army Ed website Jun. 26, on Camp Humphreys. The new Tuition Assistance policy goes into effect on Aug. 5 and TA will be available immediately to Soldiers of all components after Advance Individual Training, Basic Officer Leaders Course, or Warrant Officer Basic Course assuming they meet existing eligibility.

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july 2018 7 STORY BY Sta! Sgt. Quanesha Barnett 1ABCT Public A! airs CAMP CASEY, Republic of Korea #e United States Army Garrison Camp Casey invited approximately 40 Korean students from Dongducheon to Camp Casey for a one-day English camp on June 6. Aimed at immersing students in an English environment, the camp is a good neigh bor program that allows close coordination for Soldiers and Dongducheon citizens as they continue to strengthen their relationship. Soldiers and KATUSAs from 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division facilitated this year's English camp. #e Soldiers showed the students their M1A2 Abrams main battle tanks and M2 Bradley Fighting Vehicles. Communicating in English, the KATUSAs and Soldiers explained how they operated each piece of equipment, and how to conduct preventive maintenance checks and services before operating military equipment. #e students climbed into the tanks and Bradleys to get an understanding on how it feels to sit while driving a military vehicle. "I am glad we got the opportunity to invite our neighbors to Camp Casey and show the community how we work as a team in Korea," said Capt. Ronald Feher, com mander of 3-69 AR Headquarters and Headquarters Company. "#e excitement that I saw from the students, Soldiers and KATUSAs lets me know that we will continue to build a stronger relationship with our community and continue to help support the English camp. A!er leaving the motor pool, the students received a tour of Camp Casey before entering Casey Gym. #ere, the students, Soldiers and KATUSAs played basketball and took time to get to know each other and ask questions. Before concluding the camp, Lt. Col. William Coryell, the 3-69 AR commander, spoke with each individual student at Casey #eater and asked him or her questions about the camp before presenting them with a Certi$cate of Attendance. Soldiers from the 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, talk with local Korean students about the M2/M3 Bradley Camp Casey during the English camp visit on June 6. (Photo by Cpl. Seong Joon Kim, 1ABCT Public A! airs) C AMP CASEY PARTNERS UP WITH LOCAL SCHOOL "I am glad my battalion got the opportunity to show you how we operate equipment on the Peninsula," said Lt. Col. William Coryell, commander of 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment. "We're thankful to host the English camp students, and we really appreciate being a part of the community." Soldiers from 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team and volunteers took a group photo to commemorate their time with Korean students at the Camp Casey Theater during the English camp visit on June 6. (Photo by Cpl. Seong Joon Kim, 1ABCT Public Affairs)

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THE INDIANHEAD 8 CAMP RED CLOUD, Republic of Korea Leaders walked across the stage armed with tools to level the playing $ eld in intricate operations. Sixteen 2nd Infantry Division/ROK-U.S. Combined Division NCOs received certi$ cates of completion for Battle Sta% Noncommissioned O" cer Course 16-18 at a commencement ceremony held at the installation theater June 28. #e ceremony marked the completion of the $ rst-ever 2ID/RUCD Battle Sta% NCO Course, which resulted from the desire of Division Command Sgt. Maj. Phil K. Barretto for NCOs to apply strategic thought and maintain relevancy. Sgt. Maj. Tommie L. Jones, logistics sergeant major, spearheaded the establish ment of Warrior BSNCOC from the ground up. Jones said the signi$ cance of equipping NCOs with the knowledge required to plan complex operations is vital to mission success. FIRST-EVER 2ID/RUCD BATTLE STAFF COURSE 2ID/RUCD hosted the Battle Sta! Noncommissioned O" cer Course 16-18. Graduates and assistant instructors pose for a photo with Command Sgt. Maj. Phil K. Barretto, 2ID/RUCD command sergeant major (right) prior to a commencement ceremony at the installation theater June 28. "In examining our sta%, commissioned o" cers arrive trained while noncom missioned o" cers are forced to learn on their own," said Jones. By bringing the Battle Sta% Course here, we are leveling the playing $ eld. Now the noncommis sioned o" cers on our sta% can provide more relevant input and become more e %ective partners. #e graduates took the 22-day, reverse-cycle (11 p.m. to 8:30 a.m.) course through a combination of video teletraining and practical exercises administered by the Noncommissioned O" cer Leadership Center of Excellence at Fort Bliss, Texas, and instructors here. Guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Gabriel Camacho, surgeon sergeant major, commended the group for academic success and challenged graduates to maintain the signi$ cance of their training. "Our division has a complex, continuous operating environment," said Cama cho. "When we talk about the Military Decision-Making Process,' we emphasize how we support commanders and sta% to make the right decisions to exercise proper mission command. Honor graduate, Sta% Sgt. David K. Arnold, an operations NCO, earned the highest-grade-point average of 98.1 percent. 2nd Infantry Division/ROK-U.S. Combined Division Soldiers observe the Battle Sta! Noncommissioned O" cer Course 16-18 commencement ceremony held at the installation theater June 28. STORY BY Sgt. Raquel Villalona 2ID/RUCD Public A! airs PHOTOS BY Pvt. Park, Seung Ho 2ID/RUCD Public A! airs Guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Gabriel Camacho, 2nd Infantry Division/ROK-U.S. Combined Division surgeon sergeant major addresses the graduates of Bat tle Sta! Noncommissioned O" cer Course 16-18 during the commencement ceremony held at the installation theater June 28.

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july 2018 9 Arnold describes his experience in BSNCOC as challenging but rewarding. "As a younger NCO, you are not normally exposed to the larger picture of how sections all work together; how one action can a%ect everyone else," said Arnold. "BSNCOC a%ords you the opportunity to see how it all comes together." Other notable achievements included Master Sgt. Jermon V. Brown, an operations NCO, who earned a grade point average of 96.2 percent and Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Meckel, a signal opera tions NCO who was recognized as the best assistant instructor during the ceremony. Due to the success of the $ rst 2ID/RUCD BSNCOC, future courses are in the planning stages to facilitate training more battalion and higher echelon sta% NCOs to serve as integral members of sta% and manage daily operations. #e BSNCOC 16-18 graduates: Sta% Sgt. David K. Arnold, Sgt. 1st Class Kenny M. Bailargeon, Sgt. 1st Class Marie Y. Boyd, Master Sgt. Jermon V. Brown, Sta% Sgt. Michael E. Carroll, Sgt. Joshua D. Coston, Sta% Sgt. Michael B. Davis, Sgt. 1st Class Joshua D. Elder, Sgt 1st Class Cavelle L. Horn, Sta% Sgt. Kyi A. Johnson, Sta% Sgt. John M. Majerus, Sta% Sgt. Manuel R. Olivoalvarez, Sgt. 1st Class Wilburn S. Rose, Sgt. 1st Class Adrian Silva, Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy D. Whisler, Master Sgt. Je%rey M. Williams. (Left) Honor graduate Staff Sgt. David K. Arnold, an operations noncom missioned officer presents a Certificate of Appreciation on behalf on the graduating class to guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Gabriel Camacho, surgeon sergeant major, for his words of wisdom. The commencement ceremony marked the completion of the first-ever 2ID/RUCD Battle Staff NCO Course. (Bottom) Guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Gabriel Camacho, surgeon sergeant major, addresses the graduates of the 2ID/RUCD Battle Sta! Noncommissioned Of # cer Course 16-18 during the commencement ceremony held at the installa tion theater June 28. (Right) Command Sgt. Maj. Phil K. Barretto, 2nd Infan try Division/ROK-U.S. Combined Division command sergeant major shakes hand with Battle Staff Noncom missioned Officer graduates after a commencement ceremony at the installation theater June 28. The ceremony marked the completion of the first-ever 2ID/ RUCD Battle Staff NCO course.

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THE INDIANHEAD 10 Col. Kenneth K. Williams, 2nd Infantry Division Sustainment Brigade commander, relinquishes command as he passes the colors to Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, commanding general, 2nd Infantry Division/ROK-U.S. Combined Division June 25. (U.S. Army photo by Cpl. E Chun Yoo, 2ID/SBDE accomplished their training goals, further enhancing their level of surgical expertise' in logistics and honoring their outgoing commander's legacy. Williams relinquished command to Col. Rogers S. Giraud during a change of command ceremony held on the new 2ID/RUCD parade $eld June 25. Giraud approached the logistician seat with optimism, saying he is committed to ensuring the Champion Brigade will make it happen and "Fight Tonight." "I have tasked each Champion to lead, care, train, and sustain," said Giraud. "In executing these four key tasks, the Champion Brigade will remain the premier sustainment brigade; a highly disciplined team of teams; operationally focused; pro$cient; and masters in providing sustainment support that is Second to None." = ; (! B #) <%B ) %<>< $ ;B )(')$ % STORY BY Maj. Charles G. Fyffe and Sgt. Tanisha Karn 2nd Infantry Division Sustainment Brigade Soldiers of the 2nd Infantry Division Sustainment Brigade stand in formation on Warrior Field as outgoing commander, Col. Kenneth K. Williams and incoming commander, Col. Roger S. Giraud prepare to exchange the brigade colors with Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean on Warrior Field June 25. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Terysa King, 2ID/SBDE Public Affairs)

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THE INDIANHEAD 14 CAMP HUMPHREYS, Republic of Korea 2nd Infantry Division ROKU.S. Combined Division held the Deputy Commanding General Patch Ceremony to commemorate three departing and three arriving DCGs on the new 2nd Infantry Division Parade Field June 15. Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, commanding general, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. Combined Division, and Command Sgt. Maj. Phil K. Barretto, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. Combined Division bid farewell to Brig. Gen. Jonathan E. Howerton, deputy commanding general-maneuver and Brig. Gen. Thomas R. Drew, deputy commanding general-support, at the patch ceremony. Brig. Gen. Kim, Tae Up, deputy commanding generalROK, was acknowledged but not in attendance due to temporary duty assignment in Canada. "It's important that we recognize his over two years of service with the 2ID/ROK-U.S. Combined Division," said McKean in reference to outgoing DCG-R, Brig. Gen. Kim. "A great tribute to his talent and ability to make the ROK-U.S. alliance even stronger." The Warrior Division formally welcomed Brig. Gen. Kim, Yong Chul the incoming deputy commanding general-ROK, Brig. Gen. Stephen J. Maranian, deputy commanding general-maneuver, and Col. Michael C. McCurry, deputy commanding officer-support. 2ID HOLDS D EPUTY C OMMANDING G ENERAL P ATCH C EREMONY AT NEW HEAD Q UARTERS The 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. alliance originally formed in 2015 as the first ever combined division with fully integrated ROK Army Soldiers serving alongside U.S. Soldiers, making both the partnership and the patch ceremony unique to the division. During the ceremony, McKean removed the combined division tabs from outgoing deputy commanding generals and placed them on the incoming deputy commanding generals; honoring those that served in the past and welcoming the new warriors to the team. Brig. Gen. Thomas R. Drew, outgoing deputy commanding generalsupport described the combined division as maintaining a mission-first at mosphere. "I've witnessed the we-serve' motto every day of this tour," said Drew. "It's such a great place to be a Soldier; being part of the 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. Combined Division has truly been an honor," he said. McKean spoke on the exemplary performance of his departing brigadier generals. "Both are truly selfless servants who took every opportunity to coach, teach and mentor leaders across the division." The patch ceremony is the first of its kind at Camp Humphreys, soon to be the Warrior Division's new home. The sprawling base is located nearly two hours south of Uijeongbu, the division's current location. As he thanked the outgoing DCGs for a job well done and welcomed the three new senior leaders, McKean noted that the combined division is mov ing forward with a demanding year ahead. "The division will continue to be served by great DCGs," said McKean. "I'm sure this year will be just as eventful as the last." "Get ready because it's a fast-moving machine." Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, commanding general, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S Combined Division places the combined division patch on Brig. Gen. Kim, Yong Chul, the incoming deputy commanding general for ROK at the Deputy Commanding General Patch Ceremony on the 2nd Infantry Division Parade Field June 15. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs) STORY BY Sgt. Raquel Villalona 2ID/RUCD Public A! airs

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july 2018 15 2ID HOLDS D EPUTY C OMMANDING G ENERAL P ATCH C EREMONY AT NEW HEAD Q UARTERS Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, commanding general, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S Combined Division stands with outgoing (left) Brig. Gen. Jonathan E. Howerton, deputy commanding general for maneuver; Brig. Gen. Thomas R. Drew, deputy commanding general for support and incoming (right) Brig. Gen. Kim, Yong Chul, the incoming deputy commanding general for ROK, Brig. Gen. Stephen J. Maranian, deputy commanding general for maneuver, and Col. Michael C. McCurry, deputy commanding officer for support during the Deputy Commanding General Patch Ceremony on the 2nd Infantry Division Parade Field June 15. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs) Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, commanding general, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S Combined Division stands with outgoing (left) Brig. Gen. Jonathan E. Howerton, deputy commanding general for maneuver; Brig. Gen. Thomas R. Drew, deputy commanding general for support and incoming (right) Brig. Gen. Kim, Yong Chul, the incoming deputy commanding general for ROK, Brig. Gen. Stephen J. Maranian, deputy commanding general for maneuver, and Col. Michael C. McCurry, deputy commanding officer for support during the Deputy Commanding General Patch Ceremony on the 2nd Infantry Division Parade Field June 15. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs)

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