Citation
Seedling pine

Material Information

Title:
Seedling pine
Creator:
Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.) -- Company 1420
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Florida
Publisher:
CCC Company 1420
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
v.3, no.8, October 14, 1935
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 28 cm
Physical Location:
Box 2
Box: Publications of CCC camps by number 453-4451
Folder: C.C.C. #1420 and #1421

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began 1934.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
UF Special Collections
Rights Management:
The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. This item may be protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. §107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
034612556 ( ALEPH )
961473295 ( OCLC )

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COLD '.2::r.s TR:: s.
The icy le ;ions of Kin7 Winter made their first attack on the scrub led by Lieut. Jack Frost and were only repulsed when Cormany 1420 unlimbered its haavy artillery front the supply rcom, set them up in the barracks and lit the first fire of the season. The black banners of soot and smoke waved over the camp as they wil again in these frigid months to come.
Soon the mornings will come wheh you lie in bed for hours arg'aine, with the other fellows about whose turn it is to build a fire. Soon two blankets, an 0.D. shirt, jacket, sweater, and heavy underwear will be what the tell dressed CCC
boy will wear to town.
You'll have to work or freezelto
death. In the mornings at roll call the
names that are called out freeze before they hit the around and you can hqar them again as they break on the frozen clay. Believe it or not, the third barracks was nailed together with icicles from winter before last -which are still just as hard as they were on the day they were fro zen.
Zero Weather- Here We Come.

SUPPLY ROOT ENLARGED.
Supply Sergeant Cosby got into the
highist of gears the other day and annexed the whole of the fourth barracks as his supply room. Shoes, mattresses ect. etc. are to be stored in the back, double doors to which have been ut :hrougl the wall
The old store room next to the Quarantine Ward was cleaned out, the stoves distributed about camp and the other supplies placed in the back of the supply room. Reveille is sleeping in the old store room now.

RU3BE. AD HONEy
HOLD SPOTLT
I CATP 1oVI_ S
Believing rightly that a fellow dan learn a darn sight more when the subject he is learning about is presented right before his eyes, the Corp Area Education Adviser is putting a lot of faith in
L visual education".
Good proofs that his theory is correct are "The Romance .of Rubber" presented in camp on the 3rd and "The Realm of the Honey Bee" shown on the 10th. Books can-not present the necessary data
so interestingly, vitally, and thorouhly in so short a time. Especially in a camp like ours, where it would take months for the hook to get around to all the fellows the pictures reached in one evening.
Along with the aforementioned pictures were shown, respectivelly, "On the Trail of the Sourdough" a travelogue over the route followed by the men of the Gold Rush and "Errigatihg Field Crops" a very enlightening film depicting various methods of supplying your particular type of crop with water.
Heres for more and better educational movies. These cold winter nights they will be shown in the recreational hall.
..7
NOTE: -"The Seedling Pine" was mentioned in "Happy Days" in the paper criticism section. They gave full credit to Fanhher' s Art Work, stating that they would have reprinted it if it had been a little less intricate. Clyde Neels
editorial on the Canal was also mentioned as being an interesting piece of work.
The headlines, it was Mtated could be made more intresting.

9

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Cc tober 14-'k. 19Yn ,

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N E W S F L A S H E S1I!
Malcolm (W4CY) Wade writes that
.. he is rio-ht in the middle of death and destruction down on the Keys doing his duty as wireless operator.
\ The campaign for camp beautific ion has been going on uninteruptedly. New duck boards in the bath house, new barracl, steps etc. etc. have been constructed and installed. Plans are being laid out forinsulating the barracks against Winters icy breezes.

*. i+. A.A. A.

'II

The boys got the surprise of
their lives the other day when after having roll, call at reveille, they were "left-faced" and stirred into double.
time. Many thought we were just taking an early morning jog around camp like we use( to do, but the truth came out when we circld around the wood pile and were told to start policing up. Wonder of Wonders!! The whole company had been foxed into
running to work.
For the first time since Rhodes left, the pressure in the boiller got so high that the safety valve swung into action and a geyser of steam and water shot high into the air. Those who endeavored to take a shower were sur-,
prized to find that there w .s no Cold water. Something going to 1a;>rn?
\~\$ $ $$ $ $
Although fly-paper was originally made for flies it seems as though it is catchihg a lot of CCC boys. Practical jokesters gathered in the canteen spread a couple of sheets on the floor and then beckoned various and sundry innocent bystanders over to them; vith resultant sticky confusion and hilarious laughter. $ $ $ $ $ $

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Saturday, October 12th wvs Colunbus day, the day, way back in 1492, Old han Columbus was supposed to have dis covered America. The poor devil didn't
realize what he ras .-etting us into.
$ $$ $ $$
Corwany Clerk Potter finally
tianaged to scram out in hijh gear on leav The last thirt: days kept him so busy tha it was beginning to impair his health? Greenleaf was scrammed out of the Edacatational De-ot. to pinch hit in Potters
place. Lets hope he don't smother under all that paper work he's going to do randthat he gets the recreational trucks out on tine.
$ $ $ $ $
The Fire Gong is being beaten
to death these days as Fire
Prevention Week brings on its precautionary influence. In a camp like this the
bucket line is the same as a high pressure hose in a metropolitan firedUpartment. It all depends on the bucket line, so the more practice we have at forming it quick
ly and efficiently the safer we and our belongings will be from Ogre Fire.
Frank Johnson finally got m ked duty and went home. He was discharged on Sept. 30th but was in Qrs. at the time and had to stay on until he zot well. Frank boasted that all he did during his eleven day stay here was to lis+ ten to the World Series -names and eat up a
\\\ Smitty (ex cook) is still in their hospital at Savannah, recovering from an appendix operation with a few complication which he took with him. He ought to be back here any day now for his discharge.
I$ $ $ $ $ $




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Cotober 14th, 1955.

THE

PI:E

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Jo Jo: "Do you mind if. I kiss you?1
No answer.
Jo Jo:"Would you care if I kissed you?" Girl: "Say, what. do you want me to do, promise not to bite?"
... - - - - - -
Angry Father: "Young man, how is it that I find you kissing ny daughter?" Bill Walker: "I don't know, unless it could:be those -ubber heels of yours.
- - - --
Greenleaf: "That funny." Osborne: "Wh at?"
Greenleaf: Oh, nothing, I was just thinirg.
Osborne: "That is funny.
Reveille: "You looklike a nice sensible girl, lets get married," Girl: "No, I'm just as nice and sensible as I look."
~ ~
Carroll, you quit a-pointing that thar gun at your little brother, hi it might go off and kill one of them little pigs he's playing with.
Sentell: "hat' s the idea, wearing my raincoat?"
Big Gun: Itt s raining aint t it. You wouldn't want your suit to get wet, would y you?"
I've never ,zee. na- rub-be-r c ,J I hope I never see one,
But judging from
This mes3 hall meat
I'm sure that there must be one.
Allen R.: "Yeah, gefore I joined the CCC I was pretty conceited, but now that they've'knotke& that out of me, I'm the bestiman they've got.-"

Parker: "Where were you baptized?" Greenleaf:"In that church across the tracks. "
Parker:'"You weren't baptized, you were drycleaned."
(DoA't the y all)
"Tree l
(Apologies to Joyce Kilmer)
I must confess that I c'ntt see ~-Why poets rave about a tree.
They call -the roots,its hungry mcuth I wish they'd try to dig them cut.
Those leafy ans that lift to pray, Itve chopped them -day by v3ery day.
Of course the' robins nest up there But who wants robins in their hair?
They live *in rain, but who has not Who sleeps upon an army cot?
Poems are made by -fools like re Bpt any nut can plant a tree.
Am I going to die, dctor?" My dear Mr. Smith, thats the lapt thitg you'll do.'1

Coman: t1i,e father and a man named Dooley ,have been fighting for twenty years, but now they've stopped." Froman: "Why?- Did they bury the hatchet? Coman: "No; the y buried Dooley.
Futc-h: "Well, wihat happened when you ar)k-.ed the boss for a raise?" rason: "Why he was like a lamb." Futch: "What did he say?" Eason: Baa.
- . - -




Ccober H4th i9 -T HE S E E L IG P IE PG I

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THz BILL OF FIGHTS
(The first ten amendments
to the Constitution)
ARTICLE 1.
Con-ress shall make no lawr respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or adridgina the freedom of speech, or of th( press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the I overnment for a redress of grievances. ARTICLE 2.
A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and hear .,arms, shall not be infringed. ARTICLE 3.
,o soldier shall, in time of beace b quartered in any house, without the 'consent of the owner, nor in time of war,
but in a manner to be prescribed by law. ARTICLE )4.
The rirht of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
ARTICLE 5.
Mo person shall be held to answer
for a capital, or otherwise infamous crim( unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arisin'- in the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense- to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal
case to be a witness against himself; nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use
without just compensation.

ARTICLE 6.
In all criminal prosecutions, the
accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy
and $ublic trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, rhich district shall have been previously ascertained by
law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesse in his favor and to have the assistance o counsel for his defence. ARTI CLE 7.
In suits at common law, where the
value.in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall Sbe preserved, and no fact tried by a jury shall d otherwise re-examined in any court of the United States" than according to the rules of the common law. ARTICLE S.
Excessive bail shall not be required nor excessive fi2Les imposed nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. ARTICLE 9.
The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed, to deny or disparage others retained by the people.
ARTICLE 10.
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

WANTED A BUSINESS MANAGER.
"The Seedling Pine" is in need of
someone with executive ability who desire business experience; someone to take full and complete charge of the business end
of the paper. This is an important and responsible position. Anyone desiring this position should report to Greenleaf
at the earliest possible time.

b

PAGE FIVE




THE SEELL I I E A

2~1

/

iir. Vz. McCarty, C.E.A., Adviser.

EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief.... .J.am.Greenleaf.
Associates.!. -..-..J.0sborne.
Chas.Carroll.
Reporter.......... .V.M.Parker.
Published bi-monthly by the Journalisn C
WE, THE PECPLE.....'
Cn the opposite page is-printed in full the Bill of Rights-the first ten a.. amendments to the Constitition. In these amendments is hidden the reason for the long life of the Constitution; the vital' spark which preserved it throughout these one hundred and forty-six years of change and progress.The Constitution concerns itself
with the individual citizen; not with economic theories. It is a guarantee of the rights to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness of every man, woman and chil born within the United States, realizing that upon the well-being,-and happinoss of these people the foundations of this
country rest. As such it has vfithstood the ravages of time.
Its creators took care that it woulc be sufficiently elastic to allow for change and progress; but under the sudden
strain of the Industrial Revolution and subsequest leaps in the raalm of science,
industry and economics, it undoubtedly would have collapsed completely if it ha( not had for its primary reason for exis.. tence the definition and protection of th rights of its citizens, irregardleos of political hierarchy or economic structure
The two great political parties of today are very fond of including in thei presidential campaigns accusations that the other party was maliciously tamporin; with the Constitution. It is our belief that the Constitution was designed and drawn up with the realization that change was inevitable and necessary;that

OFF ICE PS:
Capt. G. R. Briggs, C. C.
1st Lt. L. R. Bennett.
C. H. Rogers, Project Superintendent. ass of Co. 1420, C ala,. Florica.
however, certain natural rights and privileges reserved for the individual must not be interfered with tider any circurstances.' If pressure from economic, scier tific, social or financial devetoprients. is such that a change is necessary, even a change in the Constitution, all very W01ll, so long as it does not interfere with these inalienable rights delegated to the people.
The question 'that now locms. largest before the people of the country is wheth er or not their rights, definitely delegated to them by the Constitution, are d being denied them. Have we really the right to free speech? Wqre the veterans allowed to petition the government for a redress of grievances, .or did Hoover have them forcibly ejected with tear gas and bayonets? Are our courts free frcm the
political influence that imperceptibly but undeniably tips the scales of "Justice." against the unfortunate defendant whose political alignments happen to offond the presiding Judge. It means nothing if the Constitution is perfectly preserved in fonn and content if petty, prejudiced popingays, strutting about in the cast-off clothes of justice,
deliberately misinterpret this fundamental law to suit their own despicable ends and are allowed to do so by a lethargic citizen ry.
The Preamble to the Constitution,
begins:"We, the People of the United Stat in order to........." Now, even more th then, WE arc the only ones who can see t it that our rights remain untoughed;: lot us immediately attend to our bounden duty.

1, r1 LA

October 14th, 1935.

rAGE SIV

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October 14th, 1935

-. .......

S ~ L I T G F I E

F - -: .r
-.ATGIES AiJD ,,ATTRESSESWard, our promising young bantam weight, dropped his first decision in a return bout with Kid Plemmons, the Gaines ville Gorilla, '.!ard sustained a disloca,. tion of the thumb and wass unable. to go
on with the fistic classic.
The second bout between Murray & Hartley showed the most color of the evw niggs slug-f6t. Both proved they oauld give and take with. plaixt of speed and wallop. Kid Murray took a close decision
by his ability to slug. Whatta sluggeril.
"Red" Roberta and "Sad Story"
Rogers, those bruisers, who traded loving caresses in the third stanza of the "pug" program, remind us of two old maids at a tagging convention.
In the second round, 'the boys pu on another act. This round recalled to u the antics of a couple of Dusky Dancers at an Ethiopian break-down. From this
colorful gallop, they moved into waltz time, the "Virginia reel", and finally made the limit in a high lope.
The fourth and last boxing bout between Burroughs, the "Bruiser" and John Glenn provided r rout-. r.er;- ;lave: fignting. Burroughs, our boy, showed lot: of spe-d and power. The Bruiser has a nice laft, and jabs with speed and power. But as fast as Burroughs was, Johnny Gleni move; with greater speed.
Glenn, one of the more prominent young men in the fistic circles of Centra: Florida is considered almost as a criter'in the manly art, as far as our fightcrs are concerned. His ring experience spoke for itself Friday night
continuedd in next colin.)

Both boys
"What say about a

put on a nice exhibit. return match?"

A new sport introduced on the
evenings program was wrestling. Bush & Young went for two falls in a 30 minute limit. The falls were about a draw, because it was. hard to distinguish whose shoulders were nearest to being flat on the mat- Th~e. 1out had progressed some six minutes when the boys remembered the3 had a date to take their gra"dmethers to. the opera and decided to postpone the remainder of the bout until some future dat
Hope we will have more bouts and a larger crowd next week. Bouts will be announced at an early date.

:-T E N N I, S-:
Since the completion of the tennis court, we expect some keen competition between our chanips (?) Johnson & Carnes.
The court needs playing on and
rolling to complete the packing down necessary for a good court. These rains tho
we have been have for the last few days

n

hlave helped considerably. Anyone desiring instruction in tennis should report to the Educational Office and a class will be arranged.
::-TRACK MEET-::
Because of the late hour at which we get through work, ts nearness to supper-time and the early hour at which dark comes on, it has been difficult to arrange for a track meet between barracks.
However, some arrangement will be made in the near future, and a meet held.

Lime

"U.

, 7

C .

i




Reverend sheffer crave a vc'ry irter--EDUCATICAL BRIEFS-: Od eating talk on the 7th, abou' -, :itzr The 11atheriatics Class will no long- to which some beautiful slidoc gave Lidded Ier have to ride sixty miles to take the c ol or. c our se- Mr. Horst, the instructor, Will come out to Camp instead, probably on on th 7th ao S ARE d Thursdays & Fridays." Here is your chan- 'UEER CF CA!S II ORPS AREA Te BE -rEDUED

ce to put to good use your idle moment. This opportunity to educate yourself and increase your store of knowledge is laid before you.' Are you going to be fool enough to passit up?
.. .. -. --.Our travelling library was scrammed together, packed and shipped down to the Tampa Sub-Depot in accordance with orders that we received. But it seemed tha we were too quick for them or something, because they were .returned with orders to bring them back next Wednesday.
Hereafter, anyone found with a magazine bearing the Educ-ational .Office stamp, that has not been checked out, will
be brought before the Captain for a heai ing. To take a magazine out of the library end hide it under your pillow is cheating the other fellows- out of a lot of enjoyable reading. The time that thE magazine spends under your bunk could bc spent in interested reading by someone else. It is not plain stealing; it is petty cheating.

According to a letter of instruction received from Fourth Corps Area Head-quarters, the read justed program for the continuation of the CCC during the calendar, quarter, Cctober 1st to December 31st,1935 reduces the number of campaniee in this corps area by a total of sixty-one -(61). All enrollee personnel of these sixty-one Companies is to be absorbed by transfer ase replacements to the remaining companies. This readjustment will be completed not later than October 51st.

1' '.''' ''. ''0 '5.. .. .. a I.

AND OUT THEY GC.-.Glendon 'U. Raut had been here since July 12th, 1954, about 15 months and one day while out in the field working, he decided that that is about as long a.s a fellow should stay in the CCC. So he pulled up stakes and came into Camp, told them he was through and packed up. As the Captain was not in Camp that day, his discharge was held up. Many tried to persuade him to stay, but without success. on Cctober',

s. 9th he scammed out forever. Vie wrote away to find out if WO Cecil Clay and Royce Knight were two could get the same reduction we got las- more who decided to take out; but they year on foot-ball tickets, but the tic- went because they had better jobs Iaiting ket anagEr for them on the outside. We were sorry L ,refuses to loso them, bespecially Clay's rendition 6o 'atlow'the $.40Opricd on tickets that of "Southern Moon" on the guitar. we had last year. The price now is All these losses, however, were made $1.25. The next game is the Homecoming up by the enrollment of new Local Expergame with Maryland at Gainesville on thE ience Men. 23th. The game after that is with Georgia at Jacksonville. Whichever game you .- -.--- -------.. --------.---.
fellows want to go to most better be One Wisconsin Coo Camp has the right made known to us in plenty of time so idea. They haze a recreation hall for the that we can arrange for a ti-uck. We noisy and a recreation hall for the quiet ought to see a leabt one good game this games, like chess & checkers. What about season* this Company doing something like that?
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October l4th, 1955. THE SEED LI TO PINS PAGE QTE \ COLD EESATIIEH S THILLS. 1 RUBBER AND. HONEY • 1 The icy legions of King Winter made their first attack on the scrub led byLieut. Jack Frost and vrere only repulsed when Conpany 1^20 unlinbered its haavy artillery from the supply room, set them up in the barracks and lit the first fire of the season. The black banners of soot and smoke waved over the camp as they wii; again in ihese frigid months to come. Soon the mornings will come when you lie in bed for hours arguing with the other fellows about whose turn it is to build a fire. Soon two blankets, an O.D. shirt, jacket, sweater, and heavy underwear will be what the ^ell dressed CCC boy will wear to town, j You'll have to work or freezejto death. In the mornings at roll call the j names that Eire called out freeze before 1 they hit the ground and you can h^ar them again as they break on the frozen clay. Believe it or not, the third barracks was nailed together with icicles from winter before last -which are still just as hard as they were on the day they were frozen. Zbro WeatherHere We Come. HOLD SPOTLIGHT Ii: C.Ai.IP HOVIES Believing rightly that a fellow dan learn a darn sight more when the subject he is learning about is presented right before his eyes, the Corp Area Education Ad-viser is putting a lot of faith in ''visual education". Good proofs that his theory is correct are "The Romance .of Rubber" presented in camp on the 3rd and "The Realm of the Honey Bee" shown on the 10th. Books can-not present the necessary data so interestingly, vitally, and thoroughly in so short a time. Especially in a csmp like o-urs, where it would take months for the ^ook to get around to all the fellows the pictures reached in one evening. Along with the aforementioned pictures were shown, respectivelly, "On the Trail of the Sourdough" a travelogue over the route followed by the men of the Gold Rush and "Errigatiiig Field Crops" a very enlightening film depicting various methods of supplying your particular type of crop with water. Heres for more and better educational movies. These cold winter nights they will be shown in the recreational hall. SUPPLY ROOn ENLARGED. Supply 'Sergeant Cosby got into the highist of gears the other day and annexed the whole of the fourth barracks as his supply room. Shoes, mattresses ect. etc. are to be stored in the back, double doors to which have' been cut througl the wall The old store room next to the Quarantine Ward was cleaned out, the stoves distributed about can^) and the other supplies placed in the back of the supply room. Heveille is sleeping in the old store room now. 1 ^ •"TT •"i ••• • •• • • • • tiTI NOTE: -'The Seedling Pine" was mentioned in "Happy Days" in the paper criticism section. They gave full credit to Fanhher’ s Art Work, stating tha.t they would have reprinted it if it had been a little less intricate. Clyde Neels editorial on the Canal was also mentioned as being an intresting piece of work. The headlines, it was tetated could be made more intresting.

PAGE 3

Cctober l^th, 19:)^ • T H K S ?. E I) 1. II o ~ c >lW.^ \ ^ "? > ''' S'W 5, It) b'^ '^ '''iJ V> • fi 'it''-U' |(i •' 4. ( ipt' > \ / N E W S \ F L A^H E SI 1 Malcolm (W^CY) Wade nrites that he is ri.'Tht in the middle of death and destruction dovm on the Keys doing his duty as Trireless operator, $ P ip ip *P ^ I I Sraitty (ex cook) is still in thej hospital at Savartnah, recovering from an j appendix operation with a few complication which he took with him. He ought to be back here any day now for his discliarge. $$$$$$

PAGE 5

Cctober l4th, 1955. THE SEEDLING PUCE PAGE FOim Jo Jo: "Do you mind if. I kiss you?*' No ansv/er. Jo Jo; "Would you care if I kissed you?" Girl: "Say, what, do you want me to do, promise not to bite?" Angry Father: "Young man, how is it that I find you kissing ny daughter?" Bill Walker: "I don't know, unless it could;be those 'Uubbe r heel s of yours."' Parker: "Where were you baptized?" Greenleaf : "In that church across the tracks. Parker: You weren't baptized, you were drycleaned, (Don't the y all) ( ‘'Trees" (Apologies to Joyce Kilmer) I must confess that I can't. .see “Why poets rave about a tree. Greenleaf; "Thats funny." Osborne: "What?" Greenleaf: "Ch, nothing, I was just thin^'^^^ call the roots, its hungry mouth j j they^rd try to dig them cut. • Osborne’; "That is funny." ^ Those leafy ams that lift to pray, I've chopped them 'day b/ weary day. Reveille: "You look' 1 ike a nice sensible girl, lets get •married, Girl: "No, I'm just as nice and sensible as I 1 ook. Carroll, you quit a-pointing that thar gun at your little brother, h'^it might go off arid kill one of them little pigs he' s playing with. Sentell: "What's the idea, wearing my raincoat?" Big Gun; It' sr raining ain't it. You wouldn't want your suit to get wet, would yja you?" I' ye never-seen'--&; •rubber* cow, I hope I never see one. But judging from This mess hall meat I'm sure that thei-e must be one. A1 1 e,n : R. ; Y e ah i ge f o re I joined the CCC I was pretty conceited, but now that they ve ‘knocked, that out of me, I'm the best: man they've got." Of course the' robins nest up there But who wants robins in their hair? They live ‘in 'rain, but who has not Who sleeps upon an array cot? Poems are made by '•fools like' me B^it any nut can plant a tree. Am I going’ to die, doctor?" My dear Mr. Smith, thats the lapt thihg you'll do." Caman; "Mefather and a man named Dooley jhave been fighting for twenty years, but 'now they've stopped." Froraan; "V/hy?-’ Did they bury the hatchet? Goman: "No; the ’ y buried Dooley." Futch; "Well, v;h at happened when you asjc•ed the boss for a raise?" Eason; "Why he was like a lai-ab. Futch; "What did he say?" Eason: "Baa.^'

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PAGE FIVE Cctobe_r l4th, 1955-T HE SEEDLING PINE I THE BILL OF RIGHTS (The first ten anendraents i to the Constitution) i ARTICLE 1 Con<=;ress shall maSe no law respecting an estahlishraent of religion, or proj hi biting the free exercise thereof; or !i abridging the greedom of speech, or' of tb; I press; or the right of the people peace) ably to assemble, and to petition the I government for a redress of grievances, ’ ARTICLE 2. A well regulated militia, being nec‘ essary to the security of a free state, : the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed. ; ARTICLE 3. No soldier shall, in time of |)eace be q-ioartered in any house, without the “consent of the ovTner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. ARTICLE 4 The ri^ht of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable ; cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the piace to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. ARTICLE 5. j No person shall be^ held to answer i for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime j| unless on a presentment or indictment of I a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the mil• itia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offenseto be twice put in jeopardy of lS.fe or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself; nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for ^jublic use without just compensation. ARTICLE 6. In all criminal pro.secutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been domraitted, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and Cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his_favor and to have the assistance 0 :' counsel for his defence. ARTICLE 7. In suits at common law, where the value, in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury s^ll (te otherwise re-examined in anjr court of the United States'i than according to the rules of the common law. ARTICLE g. Excessive bail shall not be required! nor excessive fi&es imposed nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. ARTICLE 9 I The enumeration in the Constmtution 1 of certain rights, shall not be construed, to deny or disoarage others retained by the people, ARTICLE 10. : The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. ... i i'* .% 4 1 • • # • • < .1 I I -I .1 II — Y/ANTED A BUSINESS MANAGER. “The Seedling pine" is in need of someone v/ith executive ability who desire 3 business experience; someone to take full and complete charge of the business end of the paper. This is an important arid responsible position. Anyone desiring this position should report to Greenleaf at the earliest possible time.

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October l4th, 1955. THE SEEDLING PINE PAGE SIX EDITORIAL STAFF : Editorin-Chief J.V/ra.C-reenl eaf Associate s N. J Osborne Chas. Carroll Reporter V. N. Parker 0. H. Rogers, Project Superintendent, Published bi-raonthly by the Journalism Glass of Co. l420, CCC, ;pcala,. Florida. Mr. V/n, McCarty, C.E.A., Adviser. OFFICERS : Capt. G. R. Briggs, C. 0. 1st Lt. L. R Bennett. WE, THE PEOPLE ....... Cn the opposite page is' printed in ifull the Bill of Rights-the first ten a.mendments to the Gonstittition.. In these amendments is hidden the reason for the long life of the Constitution; the vital' spark which preserved it throughout these one hundred and fortysix years of change and progress. The Constitution concerns itself with the individual citizen; not with econoraic theories. It is a guarantee of the rights to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness of every man, woman and chil^ bom within the' United States, realizing that upon the v;ellbeingand happiness of these people the foundations of this country rest. As such it has withstood the ravages of time. Its creators took care that it woulc be sufficiently elastic to allow for change and progress; but under the sudder strain of the Industrial Revolution and subsequest leaps in the raalra of science, industry and economics, it undoubtedly ViTould have collapsed completely if it hac not had for its primary reason for existence the definition and protection of th< rights of its citizens, irregardless of political hierarchy or economic structur(! The two greali political parties of today are very fond of including in thoi:* presidential campaigns accusations that the other party was maliciously tampering with the Constitution. It is our belief that the Constitution was designed and drawn up with the realization that change was inevitable and necessary ; that however, certain natural rights and privileges reserved for the individual must not be interfered with Under any circurastances. If pressure from economic, scier,fific, social or financial deveLopment s is such that a change is necessary, even a change in the Constitution, all very well, so long as it does not interfere w.ith these inalienable rights, delegated to the people. The question ‘that nov; locra's. largest before the people of the country is wheth.-^ er or not their rights, definitely delegated to them by the Constitution, are being denied them. Have we really the righjy to free speech? Wore the veterans allowed to petition the government for a redress of grievances, .or did Hoover have them forcibly ejected with tear gas and bayonets? Are our courts free from the political, influence that imperceptibly but undeniably tips the scales of "Justice," against the unfortunate defendant whose political aligniacnts happen to offend the pie siding Judge. It means nothing if the Constitution is perfectly preserved in fom and content if petty, pre judiced popingays, strutting about in the cast-off clothes of Justice, deliberately misinterpret this fundamental lav/ to suit their own despicable ends and are allowed to do so by a lethargic citizenry. The preamble to the Constitution, begins: "We, the people of the United Stats, in order to Now, even more tha'then, WE arc the only ones who can see t
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FACE SZ'-'IET F HI ^ October l4th, 1?55 F-I-G-K-T-S -JvlA.TCIISS /U-ID LIATTRESSESBoth boys put on a nice exhibit. "VvTiat say about a return match?" Ward, our promising young bantam weight, dropped his first decision in a return bout with Kid Pleramons, the Gaines vill Gorilla. Ward sustained a disloc action of the thumb and wass unable, to go on v;ith the' fistic classic. The second bout between Murray & Hartley showed the most colo-f of the niggs slug-:6§t. Both proved they otould give and take with of sp^ed and wallop. Kid Murray took a dose decision by his ability to slug,“whatta sluggerili "Red" Roberts and.'' "Sad Story" Rogers, those bruisers, who traded loving carssses in the third stanza of the "pug" program, remind us of two old maids at a tagging convention. In the second round, -the boys pu i on another act. This round recalled to U 3 the antics of a couple of Dusky Dancers' at an Ethiopian break-down. From this colorful gallop, they moved into waltz time, the "Virginia reel", and finally made the limit in a high lope. The fourth and last boxing bout between Burroughs, the "Bruiser" and John Glenn provided 'oiirt^o rounds •' very -ileve:* fignting. Burroughs, our boy, showed lots of speod and pov;eE. The Bruiser has a nice left, and jabs v/ith speed and power. But as fast as Burroughs was, Johnny Glerai moves with greater speed. Glenn, one of the more prominent yoimg men in the fistic circles of Oentral Florida is considered almost as a criter-| iL’ii in the manly art, as far as our figh-* bora are concerned. His ring experience spoke for itself Friday night (Continued in next column.) A new sport introduced on the evenings program was wrestling. Bush & Young went for two falls in a 50 minute limit. The falls were about a draw, because it was, hard to distinguish whose shoulders were nearest to being flat on .the matv The. bout hajd progressed some six minutes when the boys remembered thej’ had a 4ete t.o talce theirgr-admethers to-' theOpera and decided to postpone the remainder of the bout until some future dado. Hope v;e v/ill have more bouts and a larger crowd next week. Bouts will be announced at an early date. ;-T E N N 1 S-: Since the completion of the tennis court, v;e expect some keen competitiojn between our champs (?) Johnson & Carnesi The court needs playing on and rolling to complete the packing down necessary for a good court. These rains tha|t we have been have for the last few days hav^e helped considerably. Anyone desiring instruction in tennis should report to the Educational Office and a class will be arranged. t v t ~y ; -.-TRACK MEET; : Because of the late hour at which we get through work, its nearness to supper-time and the early hour at which dark comes on, it has been difficult to arrange for a track meet between barracks. However, some arrangement will be made in the near future, and a, meet held.

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Octob er 1 4 th, 1 9^5 U t-EDUCATIWAL BRIEFS-: The Mathenatics Class v.'ill no longer have to ride sixty mile s to take the course. Mr. Horst, the instructor, will come out to Carap instead, probably on Thursdays & Fridays.' Here is your chance to put to good use your idle moments This opportunity to educate yourself and increase your store of knowledge is laid before youv. Are you going to be fol enough to pas sit up? Our travelling library was scrammed together, packed and shipped dov/n to the Tam^a Sub-Depot in accordance with orders that we received. But it seemed thatcorapanies is to be absorbed by transfer asj v/e were too quick for them or something, because they vvere .returned with orders to bring them back next V/ednesday. Hereafter, anyone found with a magazine bearing the Educ-ational Office stamp, that has not been checked out, wil! be brought before the Captain for a heai ing. To take a magazine out of the library and hide it under your pillow is cheating the other fellowsout of a lot of enjoyable reading. The time that the magazine spends under your bimk could be spent in interested reading by someone else. It is not plain steal ingj it is petty cheating. YJe vrrote away to find out if vje could get the same reduction we got las! year on football tickets, but the ticket manager t ''m .rJ c ,‘-n.o y, ^ refuses to allov/ the $40 pried' on tickets that we had last year. The price now is $1.25. The next game is the Homecoming game with Maryland at Gainesville on tho 26th. The game after that is with Georgia at Jacksonville. Whichever game you fellows want to go to most better be made knovm to us in plenty of time so that we can arrange for a ttuck. We ought to see a lea-bt one good game this season. Reverend Cheffer gave a very irteresting talk on the 7th, about S'-itzerl and,j to which some beautiful slides gave added c ol o r. I NUfiBER CF GAITS IH CORPS AREA TO BE REDUCED. According to a letter of instruction received from Fourth Corps Area Headquarters, the readjusted program for the continuation of the CCG during the calendar* quarter, October 1st to December 51 st, 1955 reduces the number of canpanieo in this corps area by a total of sixtyone '(61). All enrollee personnel of these sixty-one replacements to the remaining companies. This readjustment will be completed not later than October 5l3t. AND OUT THEY GC Glendon W. Raut had been here since July 12th, 1954, about 15 months and one day Y/hile out in the field working, he decided that that is' about as long a.s a fellow should stay in the CCC. So he pulled up stalces and came into Camp, told then he was through and packed, up. As'the Captain was not in Camp that day, his discharge v;as held up. Many tried to persuaxde him to stay, but without success. Cn October' 9th he scrammed out forever. Cecil Clay and Royce Knight v;ere two more who decided to take out; but they went because they had better jobsNvaiting for them on the outside. We were sorry to lose them, bespecially Clay’ s rendition of ’’Southern Moon" on the guitar. All these losses, howe-ver, were made up by the enrollment of new Local Experience Men. One Wisconsin CCC Camp has the right idea. Thoy have a recreation hall for the noisy and a recreation hall for the quiet games, like chess & checkers. V/hat about this Company doing something like that?

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