Citation
Seedling pine

Material Information

Title:
Seedling pine
Creator:
Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.) -- Company 1420
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Florida
Publisher:
CCC Company 1420
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
v.2, no.1, January 25, 1935
Physical Description:
volumes : illustrations ; 28 cm
Physical Location:
Box 2
Box: Publications of CCC camps by number 453-4451
Folder: C.C.C. #1420 and #1421

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began 1934.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
UF Special Collections
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
034612556 ( ALEPH )
961473295 ( OCLC )

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,PAVING TOWARD
OCALA CONTINUE

Le buI of energy expended now by ten of Co. 1420 is put on the task pletng the new road& Tho proposed .d is to pa-e a one. : on the e. eka Springs right of- with clayduig from. i SinitAO The wotk
06gressing nicely',Sd-a The line ofRoly beI lo and longer, It is
L'ed iat within a very few the ca wil. be esVuated LEpoC oy h:.Enway from .Co Salt Spig o1t
-!A certainly '701.l be" .0tosee tbo .ret faic from 4ps to and froa town in the n f. 9 knoigs ot the ac0 ri.enssry fo- a m *e m-.-ie*

DOUBLE SHIFT
IS INAUGATE
January 2k markedly a great change in the time vnet by therar ios crew. cn th.e job The two shift day mrnres it possible for .al of the rn ell using the system to work the
Jrequi7 r hvoure
ter Ly, d yet ha- ve halL b day on their

own time,
the morning shift'goes over 4 the -op at ,0 Ao:. and quits when %tho aro ro] l e by the ftezrroca (granard) sht, at 1o00 o'8:Lo..ke Phia sm relino-uih in 800 visinity of 7 ,00
EiITOR REeIGtS
It is with sincere regret that we
U 4.

i.n up 10' h ad Br t as Eitor of the Seed1lng
o4 wold ~,in to become 0Mctor of the Ad ,'E g 'h "r.sL

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S -R D TT NT S *

.*ritorlal page*

EDITORIAL ON
EDITORIALS

An editor is often JudRESEARCH EDITOR god by the quality of his
C*H. Neel editorials. So, too, is a
small newspaper entirely Jud ART EDITOR god frequently by its editW*Ve Faneier orial policy. An editor can
-e-*-.-.-.-a-a-a-o-a--a-e ruin the wholembackground of
his paper by his type of edTHIS PROBLEM OF SPACE
THIS PROBLE OF SPACE itorial. NO one cares to be
Leaving only 2 sq. ft. reminded, copy after copy, per man in the many for that he must always use the
per man in the company for beto eneu rta i
floor space in 'the Educat- best of manners, or that his ional Department, there w- future success depends on l ould be approximtely 400 taking advantage of every op
sq. feet needed..o-ur presen portunity. Iaterial of that room contains- about 280 sq. type 'i, very helpfull a is ft., about one third. of whi. no doubt of very great values oh is taken up by desks, tc but their place is not in tn' which leaves aboht 186-sq edditorial columns,
-- Real el-it rial irv"bft. altogether for our men. A real editorial .e"*}o
Consider also that almost ased .on the soi.d. foundation
every- es-tablished class mus of every day newag onthich. be taken ocxe of in this ou-the editor tates his opinby hole. -.ionc or his views of right
Cohsidering the Ilip*.a and-wrong, together with detie need for e liberal lve arguments. .The
tive need fr- s.&ieat- 8I- reultas, thin, not only lead paoe-v- Iggest the ergan o etimaton of
ization of a few oustie the tmation of the ;edand laboro to bew + urs itor, hie staff and their pand ]labor, to +b r stiA;0,t1,"
by the men in their leus olcies, but to an interest ythe s th er ay arousing interpretation oftime so that~w a may fmrt 1e- 1 -tie s ith we e ourrent affair'. There, also
iligas No is the ecos, is his desire to influence
ii:alti mOW i the Uora his readers to .retain oero ca:t:ime fo r aprogra tain opinions of their own. of on.-:? .ton, .

Evcen at the rate of I
1:vab. ~ J 10iuica day, th
0y.,.. of the Cupany Stte om ..e t.o Zong and < ti, be a .;'d:' iaprove I wa;to .id r- .hat d. ; awn &:4 flave'~r bed tat is bta p.rep.ter'. 0 the-:nbo"v of to poi, i d Lna C-l w).J b, a nioe 2 Aoking C; Area.

EDITOR IN CHIEF
G*R. capes
ASSOCIATE EDITOR J.W* Greenleaf

LZE PINES EDITORIAL STAFF
we **

,

Believe it or not, but the following exerpts are from
the Foresery oords for the mcith of Novem1be1, 1934, This is a brief, educational resume' to give the rear some idea of the oost of transportation to and from the proJeete, for reoreational purposes, and work on otner odd
Jobs for eleven trucks.
1,125 gals. gas......$112.50 55 lbs. of grease... 5650 28 jl. of o'l. ... .... ;5
Tetal.......
The total numb,3 of miles traveled was 7,.99t fU. of rToh 1,8?? were for r-creatignl pu:p.pse,. If this was tho average monthly cost, the f-iqures f&.r a ar would show 1)4J940., not including of coure, the cost of mechanical repairs and tires and accessories.
Figures furished'by
SUPt# C He Rogers,
U.S. .Forestry serve,
Co. 14,20, co. 0
4 SoRT HISTORY EXAM.
r- ...., ,
h':29 Wen was the war of 1812 f6-Uht?
-What two nations fought the .Spanish-Amerioan warb go.tt made three trips
to the jortt pole. OnI one of
these trips he was killed. Which was it?
In what country is the .,Chginese wall?
If NapOleon fought in the
Civil 't ..x. nd Herbert Hoosvero' signed *he Declaration of -Independane. what has all think to L, with the price of eggs"
in S andiant'ia?
jye.t weok see our .@eography examiration,-




S E'EI. 1N P E

DRAMATICS
S The Drafatios class has been on a deoline, due to several reasons. captain Bridges finds it impossible to give us the required transportation, which would enable us to meet with Miss Holstein, our
teacher.
NOW that we are sure that conneotions are impossible, I believe that it would be better to continue the Club activities in
camp. I have had a little DFramatics training, and will be glad to'give instruction, With .the help of-books,
Let us meet regularly aid start a sea, son of plays and entertainments, for the enjament of our a3Up teliows. we also exte.d oaTr cordial invitation to new'members
W.V. Fancher, president
Dramatics class.
ENGLI SH CLASS
The Educational Department has arranged for the starting of a new class in english, under the direction of Kenneth
Bryant. Several of the boys in camp who have been here only for an enlistment per. iod-or so have expressed 4 desire to 9tudy English anew. So the Department of pduaw tion is acting t,o grant this desire.
The class will be for the benefit of those who earnestly want to better their speeGh and writing ability; and men of our
ages knw the necessity for true betterment
to wil be ,a glad to have anyone
who al.l %be* willing to study for his owyn good. ve do z'ot want to c'eate just a hazy idea of wht .s correct in uglish; we war.t to Gtrive for a thorough understanding of the rules of grammar and composition.
Kenneth Bryant,
Instructor.-

THREE GUSSES
We would appreciate the help of some brilliant Scintisto. yhat are those queer looking contraptions that have been seen on our clay rcads, puffing and groaning along with a heavy loud of -%.lay on their broad backs? They look rather strange and lonesome out-there in the woods, and they rush along trying to oatch up to one another, as though they were afraj4 to be alone in the big woods, It would interest us to kncw how far back they date, 4nd from what ancient ruins were they dog up. perhaps if we send into the mithbsontan Irnstitute or the chicago Field uiseum they might enlighten us as to *their' history.
some of us are inclined to believ&
that they are perhaps some of julius cesear famous wKitty -ars, while others contend that they are part of cristopher Columbae, weil-known fleet.
But there is one fellow who claims
that we are all day-dreaming, and that the
strange creatures are merely the new (?) hand dump trucks. But we don t believe him

COWERCAL ART
AnD DRAWING
To anyone interested in Commercial Ari .and Drawing, I wish to announce that Mr. pcarty has loaned me two of his personal books on the subject: namely wsketohing & Rendering in pencil* and *Anatomy and Drerings. The olass, at present, can hardly b" called organized. The roll is very small, leaving ample room for new members.
Sf you are interested in learning the. essentials of Drawing for your own amusement or fer a serious life-time study, it would be advisable to join this class. I am at your service in the Educational office.
I am also taking a course in commeroil al Illustration through the international correspondence school. Anyone interested il this may take advantage of the offer given by Mr.jgoCarty.
w7. V Fanrher,
A #

page

by Mr. McCarty.




SEEDLING P INE

***BELIEVE IT OR NOT*** (yould Better Not)

(Each week this column will run stories .P" about the ancient- history of company 1420 and the 'amp Area. It is up to you whether you be- 4
lieve them or not.These stories were- told- to
us by old Chief Woodpeoker-gitting-on-A-Fenoe- i
ith-His-fail-yeathers-Hanging-over, who lives X.
all alone in an unknown island .n the middle of .
lake Kerr and lives on Animal crackers and Split pea soup (canned) So here goes. This story I
tells how all these sink-holes, depressions, or V
lakes around here oame to be formed,.
.*** --so *e *-*** *** **+ *** -***
once apon a .time there were three Beert -Tese three Beers were Indian Chiefs, leading "
the tribe called the Ruffanpuffitts.-ghief Hi-Bru was the big Beer; Chief Hed TOP was the Mi "I die-sized Beer and 'chief Fall sitty was the litt ie Beer*.There.was little indian ~irl by the
name of KOga-K la, whom theycoalled *Dope for .
short,. Now a&l. three ;of these India.n Cheifts __were in love. with KokA&Kela, who lived In Ocala, .
which was then a town of fivev'1gwa ad a
post Office, KoKa.-Kola didn't know. which ;one-of
the Indian chiefs to marry, '6~0a~se nothose
days once you became a squaw., you sAumlwd all'
the rest of your life, as the Intians hadn't heard of divorces yet SO. Kok-Koa th "
ought.up a scheme* she"filled.a, hUg dih ful of peper and sprinkled a hand-full o. .andci to it. Then"s'he go9tchief Hi-Bru, "hire ed. Tp. Mnd chief Ftl Sitty together ad show them a pair of boxing-gloves.
'th w _7 ih ma
..ngwhoever pioks out every gain of pepper
from'this dlsh of sand will win the oontes and Iwill marry she said. SO Fall
Sitty, a greedy fellow, grabbed the dish, .put on the boxing gloves and started pickS__ ... .ing away. at, the pepper. But the pepper got
-,into his -ose, and eyes and radn .1 : sne-z L --" :so hard that it made & nle i.s ;.e ground
- --_ ......... . six miles lotg and three mles willeo Koka.
"AX61. 1 h / Kola picked herself up off the ,-PLn an
said,*Thatts enough 'Of U; -1 .
so.Chdef edl (p 'picked up the 64sh uni to. .b- e-bxing gloves. ad: werit ao.work, 3it t' '
pepper got into. his eyes and they watered so much that the tears filled up th hol'3 that Falls sitty had sneezed into. the ,- round a'hd made s "ake"out of it" ,eakCiU.no-, led it Lake Kerre and chased Red T.op,. away "hif i was r t.t
because of al?. the sneezing anc coughing that was gol:. ul9 I Uepepjex nI .ben' blown a,ay, leaving only the sand, So Hi-gru how ish to oka-koa a.nd ,atd,
*See, -r'v' picked out elL tvhe ppper. you cust marry .1 a mCeV u+ Keka-Kola took one
lock d: Oh;c~f PE-ZL, :.-Oeamed wNevers:- and j~aupad ix- Lke g'r.* az:d drowned.

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"ARCHIE' EXPEDITION

TE OLES 70520 PreERDS
From time t4 Mwpn thio column we eq* et to place po thAt will appeal to ou
readersl both nd new favorites by the
poets of the we,4. Wo also intend Uocaoiopa compositiong of our own We hope tht.this ea will meet with the app royal of the lt ti ang the readers.
We will eundavpur to locate ad usenny of the most widely loved works that 1e ean apprehend. To Anitiate this coltn we Use a pen composed' by Olyde Noel*.

The re aberies tmB e n Me d rrdfting, While I ait n Toa alon ; Of the shes tf. a winding river., Where steed- our 4ttle cabin h1oned

Itwas -built of tbe logs of the atWtpIy
pine,
And was surr a by oedar sad fir. The wee y blues and woodland flowers gooent the air, lke, ttg zot rT*e,
-,i
The rnghtingtl9 a song, .ISeweto And sung the whple alght through$ A seng of rapt se eablipie, of the thought, offties, Zia blue.
Ihere the golden sunset ias L .apleders As oter forest o4 ribjlet it set ; The- golon hae n a sky e, blue, Never else wherehave I the eql Me
A near iesonee as nomeries will, Of a h t haired mother there, By the o d ireplace just at twilit,
g -n the old roc)kng chair.
ThM o neorie lo bve a special place I'M the vry depth of my hoear) COor tha. ofthes I nurae and aigh, r-w. Vi t.1 than I Would nQot part.Memore!3 to me are very sweet won of the cabin or Mother so t rw, And to ne these memories oftinee oene ke hoeet mou ries oftShee deo. .

The Archeoloipal 01 lub, :compriein. 9 members, left .at S:45p.. Saturday evening to camp on Salt springs r ovornite and be ready for oxploration Sunday norning. The expedition, led by Mr. Potter, took along a boat with an outboard rotor, sufficient blankets, and provisions for three meals. Seven Indian burial grounds are on the program for location and explo ration.
-*-- -*_- -* ---- -- _Clyde Neel has boon issued an enerrency pass, so that he can be with his- brother in Orlando, who has become quite ill.
FLASH:- Work on Educational Clubhouse will start Monday morning, a group of men having volunteered to help with this const ruction.
--- -*.-.. -- -*Great. things are ahead for the "Seeding Pine' if the plans and hopes of the
Jounalism.0lass nature and come into being. An attempt willb e rade to put the paper onr an independent financial basis, 8o that it will, not be a continual drain on the Conpary funds. This will be done almost entirely by the selling of advertizing space. Plans. for the future also include a snall printin.- press of the hand operated type, which will also enable the Camp to start a class in Printing and Type-Setting. The Journalism Class and the Printing Class will then work hand in hand in publishing the Company paper.
Johnny Vanderhook, our foTr..cr Canteen Steward has loft us to continue his education at the University of Florida. We extend to him our very best wishes for his happiness and success.
Earl Arkhar has taken up the reins where Johnny left off and .o know that he will continue to faithfully discharge the
duties incurred as did Vanderhoek.

SUSPENSE GFOWS AS CONGFSS DLIBERATES ONY FATE OF C.C.C.

I I ES1 L t NO a- L I

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SELLING PINE

SPORTS EDITOR
TWO lOPE VITOPIES
Co. 1420 won their seventh straight game with the usual "plenty to spare". Our boys met the teamr of 1401 on Antony P11 a court. the opposing tean dri fi~t blood bj scoring in the first few sccoth oi0 the game. Co. 1420 soon hit their ~t.de and the score was 18-8 after the frat qf u tor. It was jplairnly evident that Co. 1420 nad by far the better team. Wont hold the po oition of center like a veoran, although it wac his fir-t g zo of match basket ball. He usu.ly, got the tip-off wh.ilc Burrougih and Luan. attended to the points.
~Lurar l high an,Burroughs trailig by only one point, When the final whistle blew the score stood 5~8-12 in our favor.
A return gamen was played on 14201e
hone court. 1401 found the Mta of their former eng~gennt till in good chape, and accepted another dofoat. It seemed, during the first quarter,that the onlookers were to see a well matched.gaao of basket ball the score tobeing. 3-2 and both teens playing hard, At the end of the first halfit wmse plainly evident that 1420 had the better tean, the score being 12-5,
The first tjan of Co. 1420 played the entire anrie with the oexcepootion of one s lb-, Hogan, for Went Co. 1401 -r.tered
ton hoopater~ o
-rrogh ~-eened to be in good shape, as he 1,rC., rdL-'ie p,0:_.b in the last half of th-,i go.rn Duncron vas again high man with N: rph'5e one point behind, The soore at the end of the geame went dowv;n as 1-10.
The scores for proviouo games show that Carle and have been doing splendid work ac uardo, as the highest number of points piled up by any opposing team has not exceeded seventeen.
HOYT Sv.ITH
COSBY SAYS: In order to become healthy, wekltby and wioe, one Must work like hell and advertise,

An extencive progn of intrenural ath letics is boinr strongly advocated for all neher3s of Co. 120 who have a desir for sports. Under this system a schedule of Fgane can be arranged ;hereby a serio of car.tooto will be held between chosen toarn,. After a fa ganoc some preliin arieon will be ho~d and by a proce of elination the champions of 0mp on soon be d.i..rd e
Intranural athletics for the Co. will,
nest likely, coniet of
Baskot ball
.Diondo barll
Volloy al
Touch~Q fotbl
BoxinF. .
Intranura'l are valuable not only fron the standpoint of physical dovelopqent, but also 'the fact thatthey help to teach coordination, cooperation, fair -play and help te fill in sparc time with something of complete valu. Then,also, they are a very absorbing and.ausing pastimno,
At this point e w ould like to suggest the feasibility of constructing a new, or rather, better base ball dia ond. As easily c an be seen the old one isnt of nuch value in the condition at preert Several loaded of clay on the infield after scraping and leveling would work wonders. The outfield should be lengthed much more *han it is. Porhaps even a few benches would help the appearance and usefulness and help to put the field in good condition for the Advancing base ball season. This work could he completed by working Saturday mornings.
The EDITOR
The fellow who Used to walk a mile for a Camel now gets a lift from the same brands

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S jWTJWEIIKIW 7 ^ EE j m WH i ^j r5 S —Z= PUBLISHED : *y WEEKLY JAM25;i935,AD r • PUBLIC ATICU .• • !• *' u < il 's>. M.,3 riJ EAVIN9 TOWARD QGALA continues The bulk of energybeing expended now by the men of Co. 1420 is being put on the task of completing the new clay road. The proposed plan is to pave a one track on the Eureka Salt Springs right, of .. Wf.j$ewith cl ay dug from., the vicinity* The wohk is progressing nicely Day by day r.be line of clay become.': longer ani longer. It is estimated that within a very few weeks, the cane will be situated .on on iii proved clay highway from OOala to Salt Springs* 3oy~o3iA boyJ it certainly will be a relief to Libu the dread fade from the trips to and from town in the evening? s and t non grot of the sacr If a. co r.oo ess&ry for a mere movie* -Kl -.•••/ yi V. ‘•.'tW 9 y / Jwm /ftttf-j;) d\\ If the Dicntio quint up lots had been oc.tn in the Uhl ^ go. under the lf 0 H.,A a four of tnom would havo been plowed unior* l DOUBLE SHIFT IS INAUGERATED January 23: marked a great change in the time spent by thovarious crew* cii the job* The two shift day m s ir e s i t p o s s ibl e for all of the men using the system to work the r e quir c-d & i ? hou r s day. and yet have half a day on their own time 0 3he morning shift 'goes over t the top at V c 00 AqM# ‘ and quits when they are r<0 ieved by the afternoon igravyard} shift, at loOQ c f flocke This Bp asm relink quiches in vicinity of 7 3 00 E tMLo eeitor resigns IA is with sincere regret that we puplish the resignatj.cn of Kenneth Bryant as Editor of the Seedling JdLr Ik* y ant has sacrificed his posit*. 1 4 iJ to become : ns tree tor of the i Engl s b / z = 3 or:

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AND INCIDENTLY R s; D T N CT E i-.r; PINES EDITORIAL STAFF #-j 41 *** •Editorial page* EDITOR IN CHIEF C.R. capes ASSOCIATE EDITOR j.W G r e6nlaaf RESEARCH EDITOR CH Nel ART EDITOR W*V* Fanoher -*-*-*-*-• -*-*-**-*--*-* THIS PROBLEM OF SPACE Leaving only 2 sq. ft. per nan in the company for floor space in the Educational ]>eparta6nt, there wouli b6 approximately l+OO sq* feet needed, our present roam containsabout 280 sq. ft* about one third of whl oh is taken up by desks, wtc which leaves about 186 sq.. ft. altogether for our men. Consider also that almost everyestablished class mue-q be taken cere of in this cub by hole. considering the imp or a tive need forsufficient spaoey'-'wosuggest the ergem-* 1 isation of a few hours'. tin* and labor a to bo instituted by the men in their lexauva j tine so that we may fumi v.b our to Ives with the neoesuoury buildings* n w ic the nose 1 pica! ;time for a program of expansion. EDITORIAL ON EDITORIALS An editor is often Judged by the quality of his editorials, so* too, is a small newspaper entirely Jud ged frequently by its editorial polioy. An editor can ruin the wholembackground of his paper by his type of editorial. n one cares to be reminded, copy after copy, that he must always use the best of manners, or that his gelieve it or not, but the following exerpts are from the Forestry d^oords for the ; mo hit h of N vy::i be;f 1934 s This is a brief, educational resume to give the reader some Idea of the costof transportation to and from the projects, for recreational purposes, and work on otner odd jobs for eleven trucks. 1*125 gals. gas. .... .$ 112.50 55 lbs. of grease..,. 5*5 281 gal. of oil Total TZ-TolS The total numb 01 Tutor, suoofi ss depends on M? traveled was 7 w ,„u taking advantage of every op. portunity. Material of tuat type is very ,belp.ful and is no doubt of very great value of miles of r^hlob 1,82? were for recreational pu'-posec. jf this was Vno -average monthly cost, tho figures for a year would show but their place is not in tiiu^-j^^, ^ n0 -t including of cou. ---. rse, the cost of mechanical repairs and tires and accessories. Figures furnished by Supt* cj* H* Roger* U.S. Forestry servioe, Co. l42o, c.O.G* editorial columns. A real editorial is b-. ased on the solid foundation of every day newa, onjtrhioh. the editor states his opia-iouc or his views of right andwrong, togexher with deliberative arguments. -The results,' then, not only lead to the estimation of the edit o,r, hi staff and their policies, but to an interest arousing interpretation of : ; current affairs. There, also "is his desire to influence his readers to retain certain opinions of their own. THE EDITOR UUU j gven at the rate of .1 hrv.civ load of clay x day th< via of the company street von v t take so long wi.il be o decided improve • 1 4 men to Add. xc chan the lawn nub f I over bet that is being prepared o.. /the nrho'-s of n<| pond, and Lne 2 enulx will be* a nice booking c“ m P Area. a 1 ; •*, nfi 1 hia 4 a *,a_j -f 1 — 1 1 *. • • | | ‘Vpy ‘ i > u.:;w it A SHORT HISTORY EXAM. %hen was the v/ ar 1812 fought? ’^h at two nations fought : the Bpanlsh-A 6r:i can W ar -. gc.ntt made three trips to the jjorth. pole, on* one of tnsse trips he was killed, tjhioh was it? jn what country is th ..^Chinese ^all? pf Napoleon fought in the Civil yea and Herbert goosror* signed xhe Declaration of independence what has all this to. do with tho price of eggs’ in scand.anu.via? ye s.t week see our Geography examination,-

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Y 1 •toJ-r* by Mr* McCarty. tf. v F an ber* S l' E I, c pin 2 page 3. DRAMATICS T^Q Dramatics class has been on a decline, due to several reasons, captain Bridges finds it impossible to give us the required transportation, which would enable us to meet with RdsiQin, our teacher. Nw that ve are sure that connections are impossible, 1 believe that it would be better to continue the club activities in camp, j have had a little Dramatics training. and will be glad to give instruction, tith .the help of books. I.et us meet regularly and start a sea, son of plays end entertainments, for the Qr *,1 ^ u ont of our camp feliows. v te also extend our cordial invitation to new members W v* Fancher, president. Dramatics class. ENGLISH CLASS The Ed uca tional Department has arranged for the starting of a new class in English, under the direction of Kenneth Bryant several of the boys in camp who have been here only for an enlistmeht period or so have expressed a desire to Study English anew. 30 the Department of Education is acting to grant this desire. The class will be for the benefit of those who earnestly want to better their speech and writing ability; and men of our ages kn'iw the necessity for true betterment, v ;e wUl be gz.br! glad to have anyone who vrtli be .viiiing to study for his own good, vie do rot %ant to Choate just a hazy idea of whr.t is correct in English; we war.it to strive for a thorough understanding of the rules of grammar and composition. Kenneth Bryant, instructor. • THREE G U ESSES We would appreciate the help of some brilliant scientisty;hat are those queer looking contraptions that have been seen on our clay reads, puffing and groaning along with a heavy load of -clay on their broad backs? They look ratoer strange and lonesome out there In the woods, ana they rush along trying to oatoh up to one another, as though they were afraid to be alone in the big woods, jt would interest us to icncw how far back they date, and from what ancient ruins were they dug ud. perhaps if wq send into the Smithsonian jnetitute or the Chicago Field pseuo they might enlighten us as to "their* history. gone of us are inclined to believe that they are perhaps some of julius ce sear famous "Killy cars" while others contend that they are part of c r i s lpher columbos* well-known fleet. But there is one fellow who claims that we are all day-dreaming, and that tho strange creatures are merely the new (?) hand dump trucks. But we don’t believe hio< A A. 4^ COMMERCIAL ART AND DRA7/ING ?o anyone interested in c mmer cial A r1 ^ and Drawing, 1 wish to announce that Mocarty has loaned me two of his personal books on the subject; namely "sketching & \ Rendering in pencil" and "anatomy and ing" phe class t at, present; can hardly be called organized, phe roll is very small, leaving ample room for new members. pf you are interested in learning the essentials of D ra ing for your own amusement or for a serious life-time study, it j would be advisable to join this class, j am at your servioe in the Educational of, flee. I X am also taking a course in c omDero i al illustration through the international Correspondence school. Anyone interested this may take advantage of th off ex given 1 hy Mr. Jpcarty. I T7. v F ar, eher,

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page 4. S REPLUG PIEE *?’( !:' '/ -. tltcdi 3 FLIEVg IT OR NOT *** r (you'd getter Not) (gach week this column will run stories about the ancienthistory of coapany 14-20 and the c am F A r a. jt is up to you whether you believe them or not. -These stories were told to us by old c^ief woodpecker-gitting-on-A-F ence t7ith-His-T a ii-F eat hers-Hanging-over who lives all alone in an unknown island in the middle of lake K err and lives on Animal crackers and split pea soup (canned) so here goes, phis story 1 6 11 s how all these sink-holes, depressions, or lakes around here came to be formed,). 1 *** *** '•*** *** *# '***> Once apon a time there were three gears-, These’ three gears were Indian chiefs, leading the tribe called the guf fanpuff itts. chief gigru was the big geer; chief Red xop sas the Middle-sized geer and chief Fall sitty was the little geer. There was a'little Indian girl by the name of KK a **K. Q l a i whom they called "pope* for short. n w a 'l’l three of these Indian cheifs were in love with Kka-gola, who lived in oaala, which was -then a town of five wigwams arid a post offi e KOK a “Kl a didn't know, which one 'of the Indian chiefs to marry, S^oa-use jin -those days once you became a squaw,_ you squiwwed all" the rest of your life, as the inflians hadn't heard of divorces yet* go .Kha-Kola th"• bought up a scheme, she filled a huge dish full of" pepper and sprinkled a hand-full j 'of aand itfto it. Then; she got chief Hi~B ru t • j chief Red top and chief Fill siiiy together and showed them a pair of boxing-gloves. "Whoever picks out every grain of pepper from this dish of sand will win the oontes' and 1 will marry him", she said. s F a H Sitty, a greedy fellow, grabbed the dish, put on the boxing gloves and started picking away at. the pepper, gut the pepper got •into his hose, and eyes and made h: 1 m sneeze so hard that it made a nola iu ;he ground six miles loijg and throe mixes. wj.deo {<;okaKola picked herself up off + be g'^-cnd and • said, "That s enough of //.u--: e din.fl 30: chief R-e-di T6p picked up iHe di .-h .and tJ?x boxing gloves and went <0 workgut the pepper got into, his eyes and they watered so much that the + eire filled up th: that galls sitty had sneezed into the ground and made a'j.ake out of it,.' p led it gake K er r 0 and chased Red TOP-away.' chief was rer ...but bv tnat "cmo, because cf alb the sneezing and, coughing that was gox.'g on* alJ the ..pepper ca’ blown avay leaving only the sand, so showed the uish to goka -ko^a and he.xci., • see, -f ive picked out elL the popper.’ you must marry me ncw. jdu H lock at ch.'.ef giscreamed *Neveri : and jumped. i..Eo gai.e r.er.v hol-s go no.— h. Cl a cal' L f b' j en i&XCi., ,+ Roka-Kola took one and drowned.

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SEES L I KS Pin YE OLDS POETIC FREINDS "archie" expe dition From tino t* .tinoln this column wo expo* ct to place poena that will appeal to ou r readers; both old and now favorites by the poot3 of the world* Wo aloo intend torun occ&aiop&l conpooitiono of our own • Wo hope that. this idea will noet with tho approval of the 15. to rati anon 7 the readers. We will ondovpur to locate and uaeany of tho nost widely loved works that wo oon apprehend* To initiate this colunn we use a posn composed by Clyde Neel*.* The Archeological Club, comprising 9 members, left .at 6:45 p.n. Saturday evening to camp on Salt Springs Hun c vomits and be ready for exploration Sunday norning. The expedition, led by Mr. Potter, took along a boat with an outboard notor, sufficient blankets-, and provisions for three neals. Seven Indian burial grounds are on the program for location and explo ration. — — — •tUSMO TIBS* Thers memories to me come drifting. While I sit and dran alono ; Of the shores of a winding river, Where steed cur little cabin hone# • r •It was built of the logs of tho st&tply pine. And was surrounded by cedar and fir* The woody bleseems and woodland flowers Scented the air like flagrant myrrh* The nightingale f b oong was sweet. And sung the whole night through; A aeng of rapture •• sublime Of the thoughts, offtines. I'm blue# Where the golden sunset was a a pi eider, As o 1 er forest and rivulet it sot; The golden haze in a sky se blue, Hover else where have I the eqiP-1 afct* A nenc rjreeones as memories will. Of a white haired mother there. By t be o 3d fireplace just at twilight. Sitting in the old rocking chair* } These memories have a special place In the ve ry depths of ny heart j C'cr thorn of times I nuao and sigh. But with them I would not part* Memories to me are vciy sweet When of the cabin or Mother so tree. And to me these memories of tines cone., its street moucries oftimos do'*** Clyde Neel has been issued an enerrency pass, so that he can be with hisb~ rother in Orlando, who has become quite ill FLASH:Work on Educational Clubhouse will start Monday morning, a group of men having volunteered to help with this construction. Great, things are ahead for the "Seeding Pine" if tho plans and hopes of the Jounalism Class mature and cone into being. An attempt will be made to put the paper on an independent financial basis, So that it will not be a continual drain on the Company funds. Thi3 will be done almost entirely by the selling of advertizing space. Plans for the future also include a small printin' press of the hand operated type, which will also enable the camp to start a class in Printing and Type-Setting. The Journalism ^lass and the Printing Class wil then work hand in hand in publishing the Company paper. Johnny Vanderhoek, our former canteen Steward has left U3 to continue his education at the University of Florida. We extend to him our very bent wishes for hi3 happiness and success. Earl f.frrkhar.i has taken up tho reins where Johnny left off and we know that he will continue to faithfully discharge the duties incurred as did Vand’-erhoek. SUSPENSE G TOWS AS CONGRESS DELIBERATES ON FATE OF C.C.C.

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5P0PTS EDITOR HOYT SMITH T7TO MOFE VICTOFIES Co* 1420 won their seventh straight g&re with the usual "plenty to spare". Our boys net the team of l4ci or. Antfeony Pi* s court* the opposing tean drew fist blood by scoring in the first few seconds of the game. Co. l42C soon hit their stride and the score wag 18-8 after the firsx quT-rtor. It was plainly evident that Cco lH 2C nad by far the tetter to&n* Wont held the position of center like a veteran, although it was his first gar.o of natch basket ball. Ho usually got the tip-off while Burroughs and Duncan attended to the points. Duncan war high nan, Burroughs trailing by only one point. When the final whistle blew the score Btood 5^-12 in our favor* A return gano wan played on 1-420*0 hone court. l4oi found the team of their fo me r engagement still in good chape, and accepted another defeat* It seemed, during the first quarter, that the onlookers w-e to see a well notched gano of basket ball, the score being. 5-2 and both tear.o playing hard. At the end of the first halfit was plainly evident that 1420 had the better tear:, the score being 12-5, The first tean of Go. 14-20 played tho entire gane with the exception of one cube, Hogan, fer YJentc Co* 1401 entered ton hoopoterso Burroughs seemed to be in good shape, as he sec red ru ne points in the last half of the gr.ne bureau was again high nan with Burt our he one point behind* The score at the end of the gane went down ao 51 10 The scores for previ&uo ganes show that Cagle and have been doing splendid work as uards, as the highest nur.be r of points piled up by any opposing tears has not exceeded seventeen* HOYT SMITH COSBY SAYS: In order to bocono healthy, wealthy and wise, ore must work like hell and advert INTI* MURAL ATHLETICS An extencivo program of intramural athletics is being strongly advocated for all ncnber3 of Co* 1420 who have a desire for oporto. Under thfiie cysten a ochedule of ganes car. be arranged whereby a series of contests will be held between chosen toons* After a few gar.es sone preliminaries will be. held and by a procoss of elination the chanpions of Canp can soon be disco. /e redo Intramural athletics for the Co. will, nost likoly ; consist of B^skot ball 3aso ball Diamond ball Vollo.y ball Touch' football Boxingi Intranurals are valuable not only fror. tho standpoint of physical devolopnent, but also the fact thatthey help to teach coordination, cooperation, fair play and help to fill in 3parc tine with oonothing of couplet o value. Then, also, they are a very absorbing and.anusing pastino. At this point we would like to suggest tho feasibility of constructing a new, or rather, better base ball diamond* As easily c an be seen the old one isn*t of nuoh value in the condition at present Several loads of clay or. the infield after scraping and leveling would work wonders. The outfield should be lengthod nuch noro jjhan it is. perhaps even a few benches would help the appearance and usefulness and help to put the field in good condition for tho advancing base ball season# This work could be completed by working Saturday mornings. The EDITOR The fellow who used to walk n. nil for a Carol now get a lift from the sane brand i