Citation
Undersea warfare

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Title:
Undersea warfare
Place of Publication:
Washington, DC
Publisher:
U.S. Submarine Force
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Frequency:
Quarterly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Submarine forces -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Submarine warfare -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Submarines (Ships) -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Submarine forces ( fast )
Submarine warfare ( fast )
Submarines (Ships) ( fast )
United States ( fast )
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Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

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Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (fall 1998)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some issues are published in combined form.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
40392679 ( OCLC )
2002207326 ( LCCN )
1554-0146 ( ISSN )
ocm40392679
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VA858 .U53 ( lcc )
359 ( ddc )

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Digital Military Collection

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WINTER 2018 UPDATED FORCE MAP FOLDOUT INSERT INSIDEHeres why no U S diesel subs Hows & whys of sub leadership 2016 J OO Ys visit U S capitol T raining videos now available underway U S SUBMARINES B ECAUSE STEALTH MATTERS COLUMBIA CLASS U.S. Navys Next Generation SSBN

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UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 3 Undersea Warriors, Greetings from Norfolk! Times are changing fast. The first decade of the 21st century saw our Navy primarily focused on a land war against Middle Eastern regional threats. Our emphasis was on power projection ashore and fighting from relatively uncontested littorals. Since then we have clearly shifted our emphasis toward high-end combat in contested blue water against near-peer competitors. With the increased capability and capacity of our challengers both individually and collectively, the Submarine Force must likewise concentrate on its overall lethality including each submarines high-end combat effectiveness. Let me give you a few examples of what the Submarine Force is doing to meet these new challenges. Weve reinvigorated submarine tactical development by establishing a new Undersea Warfighting Development Center in Groton, Conn. The Center is leading new lines of effort; reorganizing and rekindling our Tactical Analysis Group; and significantly increasing the quantity and quality of tactical development exercises. Beyond new tactics, were working to increase the amount of sub-on-sub experience our crews get.Weve better tuned our Fleet Response Training Plan to both support our empha-sis on the high-end fight and, more basically, to ensure we are working on the right things at the right times in the pre-deployment ramp-up. We eliminated a low-payoff basic training period for crews coming off a deployment vice coming out of a shipyard. Weve eliminated duplication and focused the Tactical Readiness Evaluation on high-end warfighting and focused the pre-deployment evaluation on our challenging peacetime missions that the unit is about to go do. Weve expanded the Pre-Overseas Movement period and right-sized the spacing of focused Intermediate and Advanced Training Periods. Beyond that, we are looking at our foundational crew competencies in new ways. The Force Improvement and Operational Safety, or FIOS, program is the linchpin of this effort. This program was the source of our 2015 policy shifting all submarines to a 24-hour sleep cycle to reduce crew fatigue and mishap risk. We implemented an Operational Safety Officer aboard each submarine in 2016. Last year, we established a new Operational Fundamentals Core Competency, with emphasis on Operational Planning, Communication and Dialogue, and Assessment and Improvement, and integrated human -factors science into our training and doctrine for the first time.Were also improving missile, torpedo, and electronic warfare capability and capacity, servicing targets in all domains. Finally, as discussed in the last issue, we are working to achieve a family of unmanned vehicles to complement each submarines reach and capability. These systems allow a CO to be in multiple places at once. The unmanned vehicles can do the dull, dirty, and dangerous missions to help meet our capacity requirements while the manned platform takes on the high-end capability missions that only a professionally crewed submarine can do. So thats a quick summary of what the Submarine Force is doing to adapt to our new threat environment. But one thing certainly hasnt changed; your Submarine Force remains on scene, unseen all over the world today, providing unequaled access with influence because we have the finest Officers and Sailors in the world. It is only through the continuous self-improvement and leadership of each of us individually and collectively as a team that we will meet the challenges of the future. Thank you for all you do keep charging! Thank you for all you do keep charging! your Submarine Force remains on scene, unseen all over the world today, providing unequaled access with influence because we have the finest Officers and Sailors in the world.J. E. Tofalo An artistic rendering of a Columbia-class ballistic missile submarine (SSN-826) conducting surface operations. Courtesy of General Dynamics-Electric Boat. 20U S D iesel Boats? N ever Again!by Cmdr. Cameron Aljilani, Undersea Warfare Division (OPNAV N97)Q& A with R ear A dm. Gogginsby Columbia Class Program (PMS 397)T eaching Submarine L eadership: A C ommanding O fficers R esponsibilityby Cmdr. Scott McGinnisJ OO Y W eek T hrough O ne Junior O fficers E yesby Lt. Krisandra Hardy T he Submarine L earning C hannel Surfacesby William Kenny, Submarine Learning Center Public Affairs 6 is online at:www.public.navy.mil/ subfor/underseawarfaremagazineF orce Commanders Corner Division Directors Corner Masthead/Medal of Honor T ribute Sailors First Downlink3 4 5 26 27 U S SUBMARINES B ECAUSE STEALTH MATTERS I ssue N o. Winter 2018 THE OFFI CIAL MAGAZINE OF THE U.S. SUBMARINE FOR CE U S SUBMARINES B ECAUSE STEALTH MATTERS On the Cover 22 10 12 U.S. Navys Next Generation SSBN Departments 4 14 18 8 COLUMBIA CLASSSPECIAL INSERT P acific and A tlantic Submarine F orce Organization Map

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UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 5 4 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE In keeping with UNDERSEA WARFARE Magazines charter as the Official Magazine of the U.S. Submarine Force, we welcome letters to the editor, questions relating to articles that have appeared in previous issues, and insights and lessons learned from the fleet. UNDERSEA WARFARE Magazine reserves the right to edit submissions for length, clarity, and accuracy. All submissions become the property of UNDERSEA WARFARE Magazine and may be published in all media. Please include pertinent contact information with submissions.Undersea Warfare Team, I recently relieved as the Director of Undersea Warfare (N97), and I am very impressed with the acceleration of capability development for the Undersea Domain over the past few years. As the new Director, my focus is to ensure the Undersea Domain is appropriately resourced to be ready and lethal today while pursuing capabilities to ensure our nations success in any potential future conflict. I would like to acknowledge our progress over the last year in the two primary warfighting missions: Strategic Deterrence and Theater Undersea Warfare (TUSW). On the Strategic Deterrence front, DoDs number one priority is to ensure the most survivable leg of the nuclear deterrent triad is sustained and modernized to support the requirements of 10 operational SSBNs. We have performed remarkable work to extend the 30-year service life of the Ohio-class submarine to 42 years, and we are committed to modernizing this platform with the sensors and systems similar to the newest fast attack submarines. We have no margin for delay in the delivery of the Columbia-class and there are scores of personnel working tirelessly to ensure the successful class transition while achieving all STRATCOM requirements. The Columbia detailed design contract has been awarded to Electric Boat; construction of the lead ship will start in FY21, and at-sea testing in FY27. The Columbia-class first patrol is scheduled for FY31. Shifting now to the TUSW one of our priorities for undersea warfare is ensuring we have sufficient forces to meet our Combatant Commander needs, both in peace and war. The most recent Force Structure Assessment, published in early 2017, requires 66 submarines. We are committed to building at least two Virginia-class boats per year, even while construction starts on the Columbia. Todays global environment is evolving and the Virginia class is evolving with it. Block III introduced the Virginia payload tubes and Block V will introduce the Virginia Payload Module (VPM) and other capabilities. The first VPM boat will start construction in FY19 and will commission in 2024. This will be the first step in preserving our undersea strike capability, reconstituting SOF capability on Virginia class and providing the capacity to carry innovative payloads and unmanned systems. Another investment priority is accelerating delivery of unmanned systems to the Fleet. Capable UUVs, effectively employed by capable warfighters, will enhance platform performance and increase the Navys area of reach and influence. Our National Strategy is clear. The United States must retain overmatchthe combination of capabilities in sufficient scale to prevent enemy success and to ensure that Americas sons and daughters will never be in a fair fight. I dont want our submarines to ever be in a fair fight. My job is to expand our portfolio of lethal options so submarine crews can always kick down the door for the rest of the Joint Force. In a recent appearance in San Diego, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, General Neller, stated, As a naval force, part of a maritime campaign, we need more attack submarines were going to have to fight to get to the fight. Our primary occupation is to be preeminent warfighters to maintain our dominance in the maritime domain. We own the seas! CHINFO Merit Award Winner Silver Inkwell Award WinnerThe Official Magazine of the U.S. Submarine F orce U S SUBMARINES B ECAUSE STEALTH MATTERS UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 5 Vice A dm. Joseph E. T ofalo Commander, Submarine Forces Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic Rear A dm. Daryl Caudle Deputy Commander, Submarine Forces Commander, Submarine Force U.S. Pacific Fleet Rear A dm. John W T ammen, Jr. Director, Undersea Warfare Division (N97) Master Chief P etty Officer John J. P erryman COMSUBLANT Force Master Chief Master Chief P etty Officer Steven S. Giordano COMSUBPAC Force Master Chief Lt. Cmdr. T ommy Crosby COMSUBLANT Public Affairs Officer Cmdr. Brook DeW alt COMSUBPAC Public Affairs Officer Military Editor: Lt. Cmdr. P Brent Shrader Senior Editor, Design & Layout: Rick Johnston Managing Editor: T homas L ee CharterUNDERSEA WARFARE is the professional magazine of the under sea warfare community. Its purpose is to educate its readers on undersea warfare missions and programs, with a particu lar focus on U.S. submarines. This journal will also draw upon the Submarine Forces rich historical legacy to instill a sense of pride and professionalism among community members and to enhance reader awareness of the increasing relevance of undersea warfare for our nations defense. The opinions and assertions herein are the personal views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy.Contributions and F eedback W elcomeSend articles, photographs (min. 300 dpi electronic), and feedback to: Military Editor, Undersea Warfare CNO N97 2000 Navy Pentagon, Washington, DC 20350-2000 E-Mail: underseawarfare@hotmail.com Phone: (703) 614-9372 Fax: (703) 695-9247 Subscriptions for sale by the Superintendent of Documents P.O. Box 97950, St. Louis, MO 63197 or call (866) 512-1800 or fax (202) 512-2104. http://bookstore.gpo.gov Annual cost: $28 U.S.; $39.20 ForeignA uthorizationUNDERSEA WARFARE (ISSN 1554-0146) is published quarterly from appropriated funds by authority of the Chief of Naval Operations in accordance with NPPR P-35. The Secretary of the Navy has determined that this publication is necessary in the transaction of business required by law of the Department of the Navy. Use of funds for printing this publication has been approved by the Navy Publications and Printing Policy Committee. Reproductions are encouraged with proper citation. Controlled circulation. LETTERS TO THE EDITORSend submissions to: Military Editor Undersea W arfare CNO N97 2000 Navy P entagon W ashington, DC 20350-2000 or underseawarfare@hotmail.com The United States must retain overmatchthe combination of capabilities in sufficient scale to prevent enemy success and to ensure that Americas sons and daughters will never be in a fair fight. J. W. Tammen, Jr. T he P resident of the U nited S tates in the name of T he C ongress presented the M edal of Honor to T orpedoman S econd C lass Henry Breault, USN for service as set forth in the following C itatation: F or heroism and devotion to duty while serving on board the U S S ubmarine O -5 at the time of the sinking of that vessel. O n the morn ing of 28 O ctober 1923, the O -5 collided with the steamship A ban garez and sank in less than a minute. W hen the collision occurred, B REAULT was in the torpedo room. U pon reaching the hatch, he saw that the boat was rapidly sinking. I nstead of jumping overboard to save his own life, he returned to the torpedo room to the rescue of a shipmate whom he knew was trapped in the boat, closing the torpe do-room hatch on himself. B REAULT and B ROWN remained trapped in this compartment until rescued by the salvage party 31 hours later. Henry Breault was born in P utnam, C onn., on O ctober 14, 1900. He en listed in the British R oyal N avy at 16 years of age and, after serving under the W hite E nsign for four years, joined the U S N avy. O n O ctober 28, 1923 T orpedoman 2nd C lass Breault was a member of the crew of USS O-5 ( SS -66) when that submarine was sunk in a collision. T hough he could have escaped, Breault chose to assist a shipmate, and remained inside the sunken submarine until both were rescued more than a day later. F or his heroism and devotion to duty on this occasion, Henry Breault was awarded the M edal of Honor. F ollowing 20 years of U S N avy service, Henry Breault became ill with a heart condition. He died at the N aval Hospital at N ewport, R I ., on D ecember 4, 1941. MEDAL OF HONOR MOMENT

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to accommodate unexpected circumstances. Nuclear-powered submarines do not have these operational limitations; long transits are quick, there is no need to create snorkel windows, there is no need for fuel or battery safety margin management, and there is no need to budget fuel for the return transit.Weapon Volume and DiversityBecause submarines operate alone far for ward without logistical support, it is vital that they carry enough ordnance to make the risk involved in getting in and out worth the impact the submarine makes on sta tion. Modern diesel submarines carry from 8 to 24 weapons, almost all of which are launched from the torpedo tubes. Nuclearpowered fast attack submarines, in contrast, carry 36 weapons that are a combination of 12 vertical and 24 horizontal weapons. Virgnia-class submarines equipped with the Virginia Payload Module will be able to carry an additional 28 Tomahawk-sized missiles or an equivalent volume of other payloads for a total ordnance load of 64 torpedoes/missiles. On Los-Angeles -class submarines and the Virginia-class Block I and II submarines, the vertical payload volume is 12 21 tubes. Only on the Block III Virginias and beyond submarines does an 87-inch payload volume exist. Therefore, a nuclear submarine can carry a payload that is about three times as large as a diesel submarine payload, depending on the diesel submarine in the comparison, and can carry a much more flexible range of payloads able to support a wider range of missions.Sensor CapacitySpace, Weight, Power, and CoolingIn addition to weapons, submarine payloads include sensor systems such as sound navigation and ranging (SONAR), periscopes, and electromagnetic warfare systems. Each of these systems imposes a structural foot printthe SONAR array, the mast arrange ment, the processing and display equip mentthat involves space and weight, including shock mounting, maintenance access, and repair parts storage. In addition, each of these systems places a demand on electrical power and cooling systems. Diesel SpeedSun Tzu said in The Art of War, Speed is the essence of war. Take advantage of the enemys unpreparedness; travel by unexpect ed routes and strike him where he has taken no precautions. A submarines ability to maneuver at high speeds is the key to repo sitioning within a theater of interest and for maintaining the initiative in peacetime or wartime engagements. Speed is vital. Speed gives U.S. submarines the agility to respond to contingencies worldwide. For diesel submarines, the fastest transit posture would be on the surfacean operationally unsatisfactory approach. The best submerged transit speed for a diesel submarine is around 7 knots and depends to some degree on the weather and adversary surface surveillance, which can complicate snorkeling operations to recharge the battery. Todays Virginia-class submarines can operate at three to four times that speed, sustain that speed indefinitely, and is unaffected by weather or adversary surface surveillance. For perspective, a 2,000-nautical mile (nm) transit from Guam to the South China Sea would take about 12 days for a diesel submarine at 7 knots and about three days for a nuclear submarine operating at 25 knots. Speed is also essential when intercepting targets, running down an evader, or escaping from a pursuing adversary. Unclassified estimates of high-end Russian or Chinese nuclear submarines and warships suggest they can operate at speeds in excess of 30 knots. By comparison, a Japanese Soryuclass submarine has a maximum speed of 20 knots submerged but can only maintain this speed for a brief sprint, after which it would have to disengage.EnduranceSubmarine endurance is the ability to transit far from home and then operate unsup ported in a mission posture for an extended period. For diesel submarines, endurance on station is limited by the fuel capacity that remains after the transit, the duration of the operation, and the transit distance required to reach a place to refuel. Endurance in a stealthy mission posture is limited by the need to find an opportunity to securely snorkel to recharge batteries. In addition, diesel submarines need to manage a safety margin of reserve battery capacity or fuel by Cmdr. Cameron Aljilani, Undersea W arfare Division (OPNA V N97) U.S. Diesel Boats? NEVER AGAIN! T o properly address why the U.S. Navy doesnt buy diesel submarines, it is worthwhile to review the purpose of the Navy. From the CNOs Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority, The Navy is a global, forward-deployed force capable of power projection from the sea floor to space, from deep water to the littorals, and in the information domain. This strategic guidance is consistent with our 240-year history of enabling sea control and power projection from the sea around the world to further our national interests. There are several characteristics that make nuclear-powered submarines uniquely capable to meet these global requirements. They are: speed, endurance, weapons volume and diversity, sensor capacity, stealth, sustainability, and cost. A submarines ability to maneuver at high speeds is the key to repositioning within a theater of inter est and for maintaining the initiative in peacetime or wartime engagements. Speed is vital. UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 7 6 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE

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submarines are smaller and therefore necessarily must constrain the size of the sensors and support systems they can carry. Large acoustic arrays, for example, are problematic. The design and operation of a diesel submarine necessitates the limiting or rationing of power and cooling demands, which often means shutting down systems or system components. Nuclear submarines are much less constrained on structure, power, and cooling. They are able to carry large arrays, large processing banks, long towed arrays, robust display consoles, and the necessary parts and logistic support. Nuclear submarine crews do not have to decide whether they want all of the systems operating or just some of the systems to conserve resources for a prolonged mission posture until the next snorkel opportunity. In summary, nuclear submarines have larger and more capable sensors, more flexibility on sensor options, and are able to fully employ those sensors without compromise.Stealth and VulnerabilityA well-designed diesel submarine that is pro fessionally operated, submerged and running on the battery, and lying in ambush is perhaps the stealthiest and most capable maritime threat today. This particular posture plays directly to the strengths of a diesel submarine. U.S. Navy submarines have other missions to carry out that are not so well suited to diesel submarines as is the above scenario. And even in this ideal ambush mission, there are other phases of the operation that must be performed, and in those phases the weak nesses in stealth and vulnerability of diesel submarines come into play. The submarine must transit to its ambush location, it must periodically recharge while lying in wait, and it must return home. In general, these are not strengths of a diesel submarine. That said, there are countries whose only submarine mission is local defense. For such countries, there would be no transit and the mission location would be in home waters. This also means that there would be no surface or air threats to the diesel submarine while recharging. These countries should buy diesel submarines because they are a perfect match for their mission and circumstances. The United States is not in this situation. We will not have submarines lying in ambush in our local waters waiting for a threat to arrive. We have global responsibilities and a broad range of missions. We have to transit long distances quickly, and we need the best stealth that can be achieved to support this mission set. When a submarine is operating far forward, the crew must carefully manage the risk of detection. All submarines are designed to limit their acoustic signature and can further limit their visual and radar vulnerabilities by not operating at periscope depth or, when they are at periscope depth, by minimizing the signature produced through good operational discipline. The signature produced by a diesel submarine snorkeling is much greater than the signature of a prudently exposed periscope. Even with Air-Independent Propulsion systems, which also depend on consumables with limited onboard supply, nonnuclear submarines remain more operationally constrained in speed and flexibility. For nuclear submarines, the ability to produce essentially unlimited electricity and propulsion while submerged enables limiting mast exposure to the bare minimum needed for sensor effectiveness. When a nuclear submarine accepts detectability risk to gain information or conduct an operationfor example, exposing a periscope or launching a missileit is a deliberate choice made as a calculated risk in pursuit of an operational gain. It is not a step imposed on the crew due to a limitation in the platforms performance, as is the case with a diesel submarine forced to snorkel.SustainabilitySustainability refers to how effectively the Navys support infrastructure is able to pro vide for the needs of the submarine. This includes food, repair parts, repair equipment and training, crew training, and the avail ability of fuel and other consumables. As a forward-deployed Navy, our surface and air forces have mature supply lines and a devel oped expeditionary sustainment capability. Some of our sustainment capability comes from allied and partner-nation support. In a contested environment, this regional support may be unavailable due to political sensitivities or physical destruction of infrastructure. To compensate for this possibility and to add operational flexibility, Military Sealift Command has a fleet of ships that provide underway replenishment. There is no sustainment infrastructure for diesel submarines in the U.S. Navy; a large percentage of the equipment on diesels would be specialized and unique, and so too would be the support. This entire infrastructure would have to be built up from scratch, requiring investment in a separate independent support network compared to nuclear submarines. Nuclear-powered submarines are largely self-sustaining while forward deployed and, for the work that must be done while forward, the infrastructure already exists and is finely tuned.CostThe most common argument in favor of diesel submarines is that they cost less to build than nuclear submarines. For per spective, a German Type 212 diesel subma rine sold to Norway for delivery in 2019 cost 560 million Euros (~US$623M) while todays Block III Virginia-class submarines cost ~US$2.7B. Based on these numbers, proponents for diesel submarines argue that the United States could get four diesel sub marines for the cost of one Virginia-class submarine. However, this is not an applesto-apples comparison because the four Type 212 submarines cannot do all the things that the one Virginia-class submarine can do. A closer but still imperfect comparison would be to analyze Australias most recent contract with French shipbuilder DCNS for 12 Shortfin Barracuda Block 1A submarines (to be modified from nuclear to diesel). This contract was $50B Australian dollars (~US$38B) for 12 submarines, which averages to about US$3B per submarine including engineering costs for modification, materials, and infrastructure to build the submarines in Australia. This includes costs for Lockheed Martins Submarine Warfare Federated Tactical Systems (SWFTS) advanced fire control and SONAR system, which is used by both the United States and Australia. When thinking about cost, it is prudent to remember that we are not purchasing submarineswe are purchasing a set of operational capabilities. Imagine a swim-off between the four Type 212 submarines and a Virginia-class submarine in Hawaii. Assume a contingency develops in the Western Pacific that requires a flexible response and a 4,000-nm transit. The Virginia-class submarine would be there in six days, the diesel submarines in more than three weeks. The diesel submarines would be vulnerable to tracking and interdiction in transit due to frequent exposure. When they finally arrive on station, their remaining endurance would be a small fraction of that of the Virginia-class submarine. The four Type 212s would bring twice as many torpedoes as the Virginia-class submarine but would have very little mobility to run down adversaries to administer a torpedo attack. They would bring no strike weapons. They would have a limited sensor suite. They would not be able to transit in the company of a carrier strike group due to speed constraints. They would not be able to do high speed acoustic searches to clear an area. Any repositioning of the diesels would depend on the plan for refueling thema risky operation when operating far forward. All this is not to criticize diesel submarines outright, it is to criticize them as a poor match for the operational environment and requirements facing the U.S. Navy. Type 212 submarines would be excellent for local operations in European littoral waters as part of the German or Norwegian navy. They would be ineffective, however, in supporting the missions of the U.S. Submarine Force due to their slow speed, limited endurance, limited payload size and mix, and their stealth vulnerabilities. It should be clear to see why diesel submarines do not meet the U.S. Navys operational requirements.Industrial BaseAnother aspect to consider is how the Navy would build diesel submarines. The cost of a single diesel submarine is most appeal ing when it is available for purchase off an already operating production line, but the United States has not produced a dieselpowered submarine since 1959. Today, U.S. nuclear shipbuilders are designing and pro ducing Virginia-class Blocks III, IV, and V submarines and designing the Columbiaclass SSBN, and there is not sufficient industrial capacity to take on additional projects without detracting from the Navys current shipbuilding plan. In fact, the Navy would like to accelerate production of fast attack submarines beyond two Virginia-class sub marines per year to more quickly reach a total of 66 fast attack submarines but cur rent industrial capacity limitations prevent immediate acceleration. A new design and build effort would detract from existing efforts and would require significant capital investment in the public and private shipyards to produce, design, and maintain diesel submarines and their equipment.Real-World TrainingOne other argument for the U.S. Navy to have diesel submarines is to be able to train with them. Some argue that the procurement of diesel submarines would enable more real istic training for the U.S. Submarine Force. The U.S. Navy acknowledges the benefit of training with diesel submarines at sea. To accomplish this, the Navy has existing ave nues through bilateral and multilateral train ing exercises with our allies and through the Diesel-Electric Submarine Initiative, which holds Fleet pre-deployment exercises and bilateral tactical development events. While this training is effective, it does not require purchasing diesel submarines. The U.S. Navy not only has no compelling reason to abandon its nuclear-only Submarine Force policy, it has every incentive to stay the course. In a world beset by powerful competitors, rogue nations, and violent non-state actors, there is no question that the United States has an obligation to ensure the safety and freedom of Americans as well as other less powerful partner states and allies. Our national requirement to operate far forward and quickly respond to crises worldwide requires the speed, stealth, and endurance inherent in our current and future fast attack and ballistic missile submarines. Comparitive Analysis at a Glance Diesel Submarine Nuclear SubmarineSpeed Surface: 17 knots Surface: >15 knots Submerged: ~20 knots (max) Submerged: >25 knots (max) Transit: 7 knots Transit: >25 Edurance Limited by fuel capacity Unlimited W eapons Torpedoes Cruise missiles Cruise missiles Ballistic missiles Torpedoes SEAL Delivery Vehicle Sensors Limited due to space Full array P ower Limited Unlimited Cooling Limited No limitations Stealth Limited by battery No limitations Sustainability No infrastructure for support Self-sustaining & existing global infrastructure Cost >$600M ~$2.7B 8 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 9

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How long have you been the Columbia Program Manager? I took the job in June of 2015. Prior to Columbia, I served as the Virginia Class Submarine Program Manager. How does Columbia compare or differ with Ohio? Columbia and Ohio are approximately the same size (approximately 560 long and 43 diameter compared to approximately 560 and 42 diameter) although there are eight fewer missile tubes on Columbia. Rather than develop a new missile system, Navy assessments determined it to be more cost-effective to extend the life of the current Trident D5 missile and use the existing Strategic Weapon System design. A key benefit of life extension is that the Navy can avoid the cost and schedule risk of developing an upgraded or new weapon system at the same time it is building a new class of submarine. Columbia will also share systems and components from Virginia class such as the ship control system, sonar, torpedo fire control, radio, universal modular masts, sanitary system, pumps, and valves. This commonality will result in significantly reduced logistics costs in addition to the savings incurred from leveraging existing technology. The Columbia design incorporates a life-of-ship reactor that will not require the mid-life refueling performed on Ohio-class submarines, enabling the planned force of 12 Columbia SSBNs to provide the same at-sea presence as the current force of 14 Ohio SSBNs. Columbia also integrates an electric drive propulsion train along with other mission-essential technologies to ensure the platform remains survivable through the 2080s. What is your assessment of the Columbia -class program status? Columbia is on track to commence long lead time material procurement for the lead ship next year, commence construction in FY21, and to deliver the first Columbia-class submarine to the Fleet in FY28 with initial deployments in FY31. To ensure we are on track, we have established a key program metric to achieve 83% design completion at construction start, and today we are right on our goal. The push for a high design maturity (>80% complete) as of construction start comes from lessons learned during the construction of previous classes by Columbia Class Program (PMS 397) David Goggins career began as a Submariner aboard USS Tecumseh (SSBN 628) where he served as the Electrical A ssistant, Reactor Controls A ssistant, Sonar Officer, and A ssistant Operations Officer. He was then selected into the Engineering Duty Officer Community and reported to the Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair (SUPSHIP) in Groton, Conn. A t this command, he was the Lead Ship Coordinator for PCU Connecticut (SSN 22) from initial hull construction to the initial stages of post-shakedown availability planning. Subsequent shore duty tours included serving as the A ssistant Repair Officer at Naval Submarine Support F acility in New London, Conn.; SeaWolf Class Project Officer and Program Managers Representative at SUPSHIP Groton; SSGN Conversion Project Officer and Program Managers Representative at SUPSHIP Groton; Virginia Class Submarine A ssistant Program Manager (APM) for P ost Delivery and APM for New Construction; and a staff assignment within the Office of Chief of Naval Operations, Undersea W arfare Division (N97). of submarines to minimize design changes that result in increased costs and prolonged delivery schedules. Maintaining 83% design completion and the Integrated Enterprise Plan (IEP) are two of many factors positioning the Columbia-class submarine program to provid ing needed capability at an affordable price on the timeline needed to meet national strategic deterrence requirements. What is the Integrated Enterprise Plan? We are challenging our industrial partners to determine the optimal build plan for the Columbia-class across three facilitiesuonset Point, Groton, and Newport Newswhile not interrupting the current build plan to the Virginia and Ford programs. The IEP is a comprehensive, government-informed industry initiative evalu ating shipbuilder capability and capacities to ensure readiness to construct and deliver the Columbia-class in concert with the other ships. The IEP provides the overall framework of the required facil ity investments, manning, hiring requirements, and trade school demands, as well as the strategy to prepare the vendor base for the significant increase in workload. What milestones have been achieved to date? The Columbia Program completed the Defense Acquisition Board (DAB) review for Milestone B approval on November 4, 2016. An Acquisition Decision Memorandum (ADM) granted Milestone B approval on January 4, 2017. Milestone B is the Milestone Decision Authority (MDA) to enter into the Engineering & Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase of acquisition. In its simplest form, it is the transition from preliminary design to detailed design efforts. During the EMD phase, Columbia will complete all needed hard ware and software detailed design, component development, and engineering integration efforts in addition to conducting develop mental testing and evaluation to prepare for production. On September 21, 2017, the Navy awarded the Detail Design and Construction Readiness contract to General Dynamics Electric Boat (GDEB). What does the Detail Design and Construction Readiness contract include? The scope of the Detail Design and Construction Readiness con tract includes completion of detail design, Missile Tube Module Rear Adm. David Goggins (right) the Columbia Program Director, with Capt. Tom Smith (left) of the UK MOD Dreadnought Programme, during a tour of Electric Boat facilities at Quonset Point, RI. Columbia and Dreadnought Construction teams during a tour of Electric Boat Facilities at Quonset Point. Early missile tube quad pack during proof of concept testing at Electric Boat. Rear Adm. Goggins UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 11 10 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE

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(MTM) prototyping, component and technology development, cost reduction efforts, and United Kingdom (UK)-unique design and manufacturing efforts for the Dreadnought-class SSBN Common Missile Compartment. What is the next major milestone? Our next milestone will be in 2020 with the Lead Ship Authorization DAB. At this DAB, we will gain authorization from the MDA to commence construction on Columbia. Prior to our Lead Ship Authorization decision point in 2020, the program will verify the maturity of its design through the Critical Design Review and its readiness to commence construction through the conduct of a Production Readiness Review. What, if anything, is already being built? We have begun construction of the lead ship MTM first article pro totype. The MTM is composed of four quad packs, with each quad pack consisting of four missile tubes and their associated hardware support equipment. This prototype has validated our vendor base for missile tube construction and our Integrated Tube & Hull robotic construction process. Our first quad pack efforts also support the UK Dreadnought Program, which will leverage our construction processes for their missile compartment. In addition to validating our construction techniques, early production of the MTM will provide the program much needed schedule margin to ensure we deliver Columbia on time. What challenges lay ahead? The biggest challenges are vendor base readiness and program afford ability. For Columbia, we established a Design for Affordability program early in the acquisition process as well as the IEP discussed earlier. We have challenged each member of the team, both govern ment and contractor, to seek opportunities to drive cost savings while maintaining requirements. This has certainly reaped its ben efits as specifically cited in the Milestone B Acquisition Decision Memorandum as the total reduction from the original procurement cost estimate has been nearly 40%, approximately $50B in 2017. We aggressively pursue cost reduction opportunities, which allows for a more affordable fleet. Another significant challenge is executability. We must execute the design products and construction process on time. Just as with cost, we are challenging our team to drive margin into the schedule because in our business, if you are on schedule, you are behind. Our team is answering that challenge by driving opportunities to create schedule margin in component development and advance construction opportunities. We are also conducting deep dives into the construction process, ensuring we can execute from a work force, facilities, and assembly standpoint. We will deliver an on-time and affordable platform. Where will the Columbia -class submarine be built? GDEB in Groton is the prime contractor and is responsible for the design, construction, and delivery of the 12 Columbia-class submarines. Huntington-Ingalls Industries (HII)-Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) in Newport News, Va. will participate in the design and construction of major assemblies and modules, leverag ing their experience on Virginia-class submarines. The estimated construction split is 78:22 between GDEB and HII-NNS. Both shipbuilders will continue to deliver Virginia-class submarines with some future shift in deliveries toward HII-NNS in recognition of Columbia Program priority. When do the first crewmembers of the Columbia report? The first crewmembers of Columbia will report in June of 2024. The crewmembers report in six increments aligned to key construction events and crew certification for the Blue and Gold crews. All crewmembers will arrive by January 2027 for a complement of 155 personnel per crew. Initial crew certification will occur in May 2027 to support sea trials. What about Columbia excites you the most? I am truly most excited to be part of the team that transitions the design from paper to steel. As we begin the new phase of acquisition for the program, it is time to prepare for construction start in FY21. To make sure we deliver on time, our focus for the next three years is construction readiness regarding our design products, facilities, resources, material, and integrated schedules. Why 12 ?SSBN force structure is dependent on the number of submarines required to be maintained operationally ready, not the num ber of warheads or missiles carried by the SSBNs. The subma rines must be continuously postured across large areas in two oceans. The Force is sized to keep the required number of SSBNs properly positioned, postured, and survivable at all times. A minimum of 10 operational SSBNs are required to continuously meet this requirement. A force of 12 total Columbia SSBNs en sures that at least 10 operational SSBNs are always available, even when some are ofine conducting mid-life overhauls. This is the smallest number of SSBNs that will still meet presiden tial guidance and satisfy U.S. nuclear employment plans. Any further reductions in warheads or missiles do not result in a reduction in the number of required Columbia SSBNs. Columbias Rear Adm. David Goggins (right) during a tour of EB facilities at Quonset Point. U.S. naval uniforms are a visual display of the proud heritage of our maritime ghting forces. One of the most important uniform initiatives for Submariners is the reintroduction of the submarine sweater as an ofcial uniform item. U.S. submarine Sailors have worn the sweater in various forms since World War I and typically been an olive drab (brown), ve button, V-neck sweater, made of 100 percent wool or 100 percent acrylic fabric. Although authorized as organizational clothing, the sweater was never formally included in the Navys uniform regulations. The sweater was originally worn by diesel boat sailors to keep them warm during operations in colder climates. Unlike nuclear-powered submarines, diesel submarines have to manage the electricity used for auxiliary loads, which includes cooling and heating systems. While the wool Navy peacoat provided warmth, it was too restrictive to wear below decks on a submarine. The proposed uniform change is in response to overwhelming Submarine Force feedback regarding the desire to have a uniquely identiable, historically-based, standard submarine uniform item. The submarine sweater represents the rich history of the Submarine Force, is well coordinated with the Service Khaki and Enlisted Service Uniform, and is functional both at sea and ashore in cold weather. Recently, NAVADMIN 310/17 announced a number of updates to Navy uniform policy and included several Navy uniform initiatives. For now, the submarine sweater is authorized for wear by personnel currently serving at Submarine Force commands or personnel serving at non-Submarine Force commands who are qualied in submarines. Ashore the submarine sweater may be worn with Service Khaki (E7 and above) and the Enlisted Service Uniform (E6 and below). A standard hook and loop back, 2 inch x 4 inch, black leather name tag will be attached and placed in the same position as the ribbon bar and warfare device. New submarine sweaters are not available for purchase from the Navy Exchange yet. Individuals with submarine sweaters in good condition (free of snags and holes) may attach a name tag and wear them ashore. The Return of a Classic 12 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 13

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by Cmdr. S cott M cGinnis, USN Most likely for the year prior to your command you were thinking about what you would want to do in command; were you also thinking about your command tour for the prior 15 years? If not, then maybe you were focused on your next tour as executive officer (XO) or department head. Although it is logical to focus on the upcoming milestone, this short-term focus may not result in the type of deep self-reflection the Navy requires in its commanding officers (COs). Leadership styles are definitely different for different billets, but if we are to develop the best COs, command leadership should be started as a junior officer and should be a priority during your command. Today is the day to properly prioritize leadership training in your wardroom. While COs tend to focus on all the necessary day-to-day requirements, we, may fall short in long-term personnel development while in command. Following your tour in command, however, you will relish the successes of your people and quickly forget the small casualties of your commands day-to-day submarine life. If you had 15 years of formal preparation for command, how well thought out would your first day in command be? This article should serve as a reminder that training your relief as a CO starts with formal leadership training of the entire wardroom. If you have not started leadership training with your team, start today by asking them to read this. Then review it with them and listen to their feedback. There doesnt need to be a Navy program or requirement; this is an implied duty for any captain, and as each CO is different, your style of leadership training will be different, but no less effective. Formal leadership training coming from the captain is the most influential way you can make a positive impact on your wardroom, ship and Navy. Responsibilities of commandSo, what do you actually do as CO? There are abundant examples and rich tradition depict ing your role. There are naval regulations that precisely define your responsibilities, but you set the priorities and the pace for executing those responsibilities. How you outline, com municate, and execute your priorities is important. You are the role model for your crew, and especially for your wardroom. Your actions will define what acceptable leadership looks like. No single person will have a larger impact on your teams leadership future than you, and, if done properly, your example alone will have a positive effect on your team. Leadership, however, takes constant effort, discipline, learning, and practice. If you believe you are a leader because you are in charge of people, are you then a pianist for owning a piano? How did you learn to lead? What did the Navy invest in you that gave the Navy confidence and trust in your ability to command? If you cant answer this, or if you can only point to the formal schools that the Navy provided or on-the-job training, then you may not have been provided with the best possible tools. While it is incumbent on you to continue your self-education as CO, there is really no time to grow into the job. Every day you did not spend preparing for the leadership challenges ahead is a day of lost preparation, from which your current team cannot benefit. Start today by thinking of your team as prospective COs and treating them that way. Discuss with them the challenges of command and provide them with the tools you have acquired over your years in the Navy. A Commanding Officers ResponsibilityYou say the words, I relieve you and report your relief to the Commodore, Commodore, I have properly relieved as Commanding Officer. So now what? TEACHING SUBMARINE LEADERSHIP: 14 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 15

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standard time slot on a given day while underway. Leadership topics should include ethics. There are numerous ethics case studies from the Navy Leadership and Ethics Course, the Naval Academy, and the various military professional universities. While these case studies are great in the classroom, there is nothing more powerful than using these with your team and making them relevant to the leadership decisions they are currently making. In addition to using case studies, ask your team members to write down three leadership traits they valued prior to joining the Navy, a powerful example of a leader they admire, three worst leadership traits, or a time they were inadequately prepared for a leadership challenge and what, if anything, makes them ready now to handle such a challenge. ConclusionAll professions require study and effort for improvement and not just on-the-job training and experience. The leadership style you used and were comfortable with as an engineer may not serve you well as a CO. As your responsibilities grow, your ability to communicate and delegate must also grow. Each leadership opportu nity presents unique challenges that will require different leadership tools just as different maintenance jobs require differ ent tools, even though the same person is accomplishing the task. You, as CO, need to address the different leadership demands and tools with your team members now so they are better prepared for the challenges they are to face. I hope that reading this article has energized you to make regular leadership training an appropriately high priority on your boat and discuss your teaching methods with others on the waterfront. If we believe our greatest asset is our people, and if we define what taking care of our people really means, then we will quickly come to the conclusion that, by investing the time to formally teach leadership to our teams, we are investing in our own futures as well as theirs. By talking about it and socializing new ideas, we become better as a force. Dont rationalize away your most important toolyour direct involvement. Make the time investment today and formally train your teams on leadership.The limit of timeWhy dont COs make formal leadership training a higher priority? There are a lot of tasks competing for our time onboard a submarine. We have important engineering, operational, and maintenance tasks but, if you make leadership training an equally high priority, you will see improvement across those areas. Your team will increase its efficiency, improve proper delegation, and free up more time to allocate to other tasks. We perceive time as the primary restricting factor when it comes to giving leadership training a low priority, but time may be the best reason to give it a higher priority. Since time is a zero-sum game, whats the benefit of taking the time to do this? By teaching leadership, you are preventing problems in the future that will take your time when it is least convenient. You will eventually have a negative counseling session with someone on your team, and you are committing now to spend that time in a productive manner, vice a reactive one later. Through formal leadership training, you are communicating your vision of the culture you want in your team. By vocalizing and reviewing actual decisions you have made on the boat, you open yourself up for feedback from your team as well as providing an opportunity to convey your decision-making calculus to your team. This will flatten your organization, making it more efficient. If training is executed properly, your team will be clear about your intentions, and you and your crew will be using a common leadership lexicon, making communications and counseling easier. By investing time now in preparing your wardroom for command, you will gain larger, future returns on your time than you originally invested. Start now, though. Make that down payment on the future.Prioritizing leadership trainingYour priorities are laid out daily by the plan of the day. If you have scheduled your day with maintenance meetings, then clearly maintenance is your priority. If you are scheduled to be at the trainer all day, that is your priority. Your presence is the single most non-verbal indicator of your priorities, and your schedule shows where you are. By having a formal leadership training sched ule, you will be demonstrating that this is a priority for you. Teaching leadership has the additional benefit of requiring you to continue to grow and improve. Because of numerous competing priorities, it is easy to push self development aside. If you do not continue to work to improve your own leadership, you will become stale, similar to resting on the fact that you have a great one-mile running time. If you do not continue to train, you will soon find that your ability to run that mile has atrophied. By scheduling required leadership training, you are holding yourself accountable to your team to allocate the time in pursuit of leadership improvement. This requires discipline. By voicing your priority to conduct leadership training, you are spreading this discipline burden across your team. ExecutionNow that you prioritized leadership train ing, how is it executed? How often should you be training? Lets assume you are con ducting formal leadership training with your wardroom quarterly, chiefs quarters semi-annually, and crew annually. This can also include sub-groups: department heads and XO quarterly and the chief of the boat with the chiefs quarters quarterly. Chiefs and division officers can work with their teams on a regular basis. You can use existing structures such as CPO365 or a Below are 10 submarine-centric topics you may want to discuss with your team to get started. expected of them? For example, would you decide to not drink alcohol because you believe that is the best role-model? Would you drink alcohol to fit-in, even though you wouldnt normally? How should alcohol be treated in our organization? How do we treat people who come in to work intoxicated? you want a different opinion? Who should be able to say no in your team? sleep? How should decisions be made while underway when someone is asleep? or help the organization? How? Should leave be taken during an underway? How do we reward excellent work? What are the levers each chief or officer has in discipline and reward? How do you perform mid-term counseling? Why is it important? are the commands responsibilities toward its team regarding physical fitness? How do you set the example and what is the balance required? your team? account? Do you tweet? Should you? Should you have a friend who is on the boat? How do you handle a negative comment on the ships facebook page? How do you handle an inappropriate comment? prepare for your next challenge? What should you post on social media? What are your duties in your online life? Here are the rationalizations, mostly subconscious, that we use to give formal leadership training a low priority. I want to be seen as a natural born leader. Leadership is an innate ability that cannot be taught. Leadership is a taught skill, and it requires practice, feedback, and self-evaluation to improve. No great athletes or musicians, despite whatever natural talents they may have, improved their performance without a coach or teacher. Who is better suited to coach your team in leadership than you? I dont want to be seen as prescriptive. If I tell my team I consciously stop typing when they are talking to me, they will think I am cookie cutter instead of genuine. Perhaps, but isnt the benefit of having incredible leaders in the future outweighed by this risk of perception? Doesnt it say something to your team that you make the effort to consciously think about your own leadership and work hard to improve it? I dont want to be held accountable for the leadership traits that we discuss because I might involuntary or voluntarily violate them at some future time. Are you not already poorly, in time, if you do not take the opportunity to develop your team. My team doesnt want something else added to their plate. There is enough to spend our time on and, by me adding this topic to it, they will either not do the preparation or resent the fact. Once you engage your team members at this level, they will recognize the investment the organization is placing in them and may actually complain when you have to skip leadership training due to a higher, emergent priority. Do not underestimate the power of your investment in your team. 16 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 17

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I never thought that, nearly five years after graduating from the United States Naval Academy, anything could make me feel like a Midshipman again. It turns out that rank and experience have very little to do with thwarting that feeling. When you are standing in a group of lieutenants, dazed and lost in the halls of the Pentagon wearing Service Dress Blues, a youthful foolishness quickly returns. Yet there we stood, amidst side glances and confusion, the Submarine Force Junior Officers of the Year (JOOY) for 2017.The Junior Officer of the Year (JOOY) program is an incredibly rewarding recognition of junior officers in the Submarine Force who have demonstrated superior skills in leadership and management, operational planning, technical prowess, and overall seamanship. Each boat in the fleet nominates a junior officer for this award, and each squadron is tasked with picking one from among all of the boats in the squadron. Submarine tender candidates are also submitted and chosen by the ships commanding officers. The tremendous distinction that accompanies this award is one that catches most of its winners by surprise. Submarine wardrooms are brimming with motivated, intelligent junior officers, but there was a distinct sense of humility that could be seen in all of the JOOY winners present. When congratulated, it was not uncommon to hear I dont know what I did differently. I was just doing my job. The visit to Washington D.C. provides JOOYs the opportunity to meet with senior officials to discuss current fleet challenges and possible solutions. Our trip began with us quietly introducing spouses and reuniting with friends wed not seen since our nuclear training pipeline. Many of us were simply glad for the break from our respective boats.Meetings with Navy LeadersThe first afternoon consisted of watch ing our group of naval officers frantically attempting to gather on the same subway car en route to the Pentagon. Later, these same officers were clumsily making their way through Pentagon security to gather in the tour waiting area (in stark contrast to the practiced efficiency of seasoned Pentagon visitors). The tour of the Pentagon, awash in epaulettes, ribbons, medals, and myriad uniforms, only whetted our appetites. Here, I offer advice to the ladies who attend this trip in the future: if you wear heels, make sure they are short heels We came at last to the kickoff of our weeklong trip: a meeting with Vice Adm. James Foggo, Director, Navy Staff. Surrounded by the highly decorated walls of Adm. Foggos Pentagon office, we began to more fully appreciate the unique opportunities that were presented by this trip. The afternoon meetings with Adm. Foggo and Cmdr. Deichler (N133) allowed us a rare insight into the high-level decisions that eventually affect the lives of submarine crews. Cmdr. Deichler, who addressed the first-ever Junior Officer Symposium earlier in the year, informed us of the immediate changes it yielded and the long-term changes being considered. The reassurance that our recommendations and concerns were being actively addressed gave all of us a sense of ownership of our futures. Overall, that first afternoon offered us a unique perspective into the background of the plans, missions, and decisions that we had been executing daily with our crews. I hope our meeting also gave these leaders some added perspective into the implications of their daily decisions as well. The following morning, we met with Rear Adm. William Merz, Director of Undersea Warfare Division (N97). The open discussion we had about our concerns affecting our skills and warfighting abilities was refreshing and enlightening. It was the first opportunity for us to share our unique experiences aboard our respective submarines, and I realized that I had never considered the many different styles of leadership, mission sets, and exercises that exist outside the sphere of my own squadron. The outcome of this discussion was surprising in an important wayit brought a new excitement to what we did, opening channels of discussion that we were all equally capable of contributing to and offering a certain significance to the roles we played individually. Among the host of influential individuals we were invited to speak with were Adm. James Caldwell, Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program and Adm. John Richardson, Chief of Naval Operations. These two prestigious gentlemen as well as Adm. Caldwells lovely wife, Kim, shared with us personal stories about their own failures and successes, philosophical insights on leadership, and the road ahead for the Submarine Force that we were paving. That future, as later events would emphasize, includes the Columbiaclass submarine, the size of our force in the years to come, and the evolving threats we were only beginning to see in the world. Mrs. Caldwell directly addressed our significant others, recognizing their particular challenges, and offered invaluable advice from her many years of experience. The recognition of our significant others was important. I certainly could not have made it through the past years without the support of my fianc. They are not always in the spotlight, but they should be. The emotional stress they must overcome, the lives they continue to support at home while we are away, and the long hours and temperaments they must endure are the sacrifices we ask them to pay. They are the driving force behind the entire submarine community. Lt. Hans Nowak II, Squadron 20, said it best when he said of his civilian wife, Nicole Nowak: The sacrifice Nicole has made overshadows anything I have done.by L t. L t. Krisandra Hardy, USS F lorida ( SS G N 728) (B) JOOY Week Through One Junior Officers Eyes In photo above, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson meets with Lt. Hardy and the Submarine Force Junior Officers of the Year at the Pentagon.Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nathan LairdRep. Joe Courtney meets with the Submarine Force Junior Officers of the Year. 18 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 19

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Cutting-edge Navy contractor workNear the end of our week, we took a step into the civilian aspects that influence our force. A long and rainy drive found us at the unassuming facility housing the famous Lockheed Martin Area 51 in Manassas, Va. Meeting the people who develop the technology we use to execute missions and keep our nation safe was an incredible expe rience. We were even given sneak-peeks of future projects and current developments (which were, to be frank, very cool). Lt. Joe Buonaccorso, Squadron 1, commented, Through this visit we gained a firsthand appreciation for our countrys defense con tractors, who are tirelessly working to ensure our Navy maintains its tactical superiority for years to come. Here, we saw the physical evidence behind an emerging submarine doctrine: a call for a return to warfightingits principles, its creativity, and its technological innovation. This theme would carry on to the Capitol, where we had the incredible opportunity to meet Representative Joe Courtney of Connecticuts 2nd Congressional District. Two Sub Joe, as he is known, was the driving force behind Electric Boats increased Virginia-class submarine annual output. If we had ended our trip there, it would have already been a tremendous experience. Despite the gray weather, we had all indulged in D.C.s cheerful cherry blossom season, which was in full bloom throughout our stay. Many of us were determined to pack in as many sights as we could. Needless to say, D.C. alone provided an incredible experience for our JOOY group, and we were all rewarded with new friends, memorable meetings, and an excitement for our futures and the future of the Submarine Force.The JOOYs high pointBut the week was not over yet. While White House Visit had always been the last item on our itinerary, the details of what the White House visit would actually entail had been (in true Submariner fashion) writ ten in mud. Though we reminded ourselves not to get our hopes up, its difficult to simply ignore the possibility that you might come face to face with the President of the United States of America. Standing in the Roosevelt Room, the White House staff informed us that the President was in an adjacent room signing an executive order on trade. Unfortunately his schedule was running just a little too tight to meet with us. We were, however, afforded the opportunity to meet Vice President Pence, and there was no loss of excitement in that honor. When he walked in, the excitement in the room was palpable. His smile was big and genuine. After welcoming our group, he immediately showed his Hoosier pride by calling out the Indiana natives in our groupLt. Hans Nowak and his wife, Nicole. It was an honor meeting Vice President Pence. He was extremely welcoming, Lt. Nowak commented. In true millennial fashion, we took a group selfie that he tweeted instantly. The Vice President then gestured to the door we had all been eyeing since we had walked in the room, the one leading to the Oval Office. He informed us that President Trump had made time to meet our group of submarine officers. We could hear him before we could see him, the voice Id heard on the television and radio countless times in the last year. With tempered expectancy we entered the room and there he was, the leader of the free world, my boss. As Lt. Buonaccorso recalls it, Sitting behind the Resolute Desk, the President welcomed us in and showed us his genuine appreciation for our service and for the sacrifices that our spouses make. We are all grateful to Rear Adm. Kreite of the National Security Council for setting the visit up. As we filed out of the office, the President congratulated us and shook hands with each of us. Its not every day that you receive an atta-boy in the Submarine Force; its rarer still to receive that from the very top of your chain of command.Unanticipated BenefitsThat short week rekindled an excitement and love for the challenges I am able to face in this unique career. Being able to have discussions with other officers about our contributions on our own boats and hear the perspectives of the people who delegate the orders that we carry out was beneficial in a way I could not have imagined. [It was] amazingthe extent to which the senior leaders we engaged with were interested in our opinions; soliciting feedback from our group as to what challenges we face as young leaders serving in todays Submarine Force, said Lt. James Halsell of Squadron 7. The interactions during our trip left me excited about the path ahead for our force and our Navy as a whole. I hope that the submarine community will consider instituting frequent smallgroup gatherings of geographically diverse junior officers in more casual forums. I cannot quite capture the significance of being able to meet with other officers across the globe to simply talk about what makes us the same and what makes us different. Where our frustrations were similar, we discussed solutions to what could be force-wide issues. When our frustrations differed, I was able to reconsider what about my command was driving the difference and reflect on whether I could promote change. I would love for other officers to be able to share the same kind of rejuvenation and community-building offered by the JOOY trip. None of us could have imagined the opportunities and memories afforded by winning JOOY. Its not really an award that you seek to win. Its not even an award that you singularly win. Lt. Nowak offered sentiments that echoed those from all in our group: I would not be where I am without the Sailors I have been honored to lead. They are the foundation for all my accomplishmentsmy Sailors are amazing. On behalf of our entire group of JOOYs, I sincerely thank all of the officials who met with us and restructured our perspective of this force. I also want to thank all of the amazing crews who work tirelessly and shape the impressive people who make up our community. Lt. Joseph Buonaccorso Rochester, N.Y. USS Texas (SSN 775) Lt. Anthony Testino Pequannock, N.J. USS Springfield (SSN 761) Lt. Adam Garfrerick Florence, Ala. USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) Lt. Luke Talbot St. Joseph, Miss. USS Newport News (SSN 750) Lt. James Halsell Anderson, Ind. USS Columbia (SSN 771) Lt. Bryan Keck Spearfish, S.D. USS Pasadena (SSN 752) Lt. Brent Shawcross Fairfax, Va. USS Annapolis (SSN 760) Lt. Peter Pappalardo Allentown, Pa. USS Topeka (SSN 754) Lt. Krisandra Hardy Okinawa, Japan USS Florida (SSGN 728) (B) Lt. Martin Schroeder Minneapolis, Minn. USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (B) Lt. Katherine Castro Hialeah, Fla. USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (B) Lt. Hans Nowak Terre Haute, Ind. USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) Ens. Jace Waller Concord, N.C. USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) 2017 Submarine Force Junior Officers of the Year (JOOY) Vice President Pence meets with the Submarine Force Junior Officers of the Year at the White House. President Trump and Vice President Pence meet with the Submarine Force Junior Officers of the Year at the White House. 20 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 21

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by William Kenny, Submarine Learning Center Public AffairsFor Navigation Electronics Technician Senior Chief Petty Officer Rafael Arriaga, training on demand is an achievable reality even submerged on a submarine. Arriaga coordinates the SLCs, Submarine Learning Channel (SUBLC). SUBLC, says Arriaga, is a You-Tube like video series available on every submarines Local Area Network (LAN) using the SEAWARE application designed and maintained by Division 2532, Under Sea Warfare (USW) Combat Systems Trainer Technology Development Branch of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC). NOFFS Bench P ress S trength E xerciseSEAWARE is on every afloat Submariners desktop and is the interface to SOBTs library of interactive courseware (ICW) Submarine Learning Channel videos, Fleet Lessons Learned messages, and at the end of 2017 over 75 Undersea Warfighting Development Center (UWDC) publications in an E-Library format. Its more than one-stop shopping. It is bringing training to the Sailor when theyre ready to learn it. Division 2532, Under Sea Warfare (USW) Combat Systems Trainer Technology Development Branch at NUWC, Newport, our strategic partner, distributes all SOBT and SUBLC products via a hard drive biannually to every submarine crew. Now that were continuing to expand our library, with over 130 videos of varying lengths and subjects, were expanding IN THE A GE OF INFORMATION, LOOKING UP A HOW TO ON NEARL Y ANY SUBJECT CONCEIV ABLE CAN MEAN A VISIT TO YOUTUBE. NOW, THANKS TO SUBMARINE LEARNING CENTERS (SLC) SUBMARINE ON BOARD TRAINING (SOB T), EVEN WITH THE LOSS OF CONNECTIVITY HOW TO VIDEOS ARE READIL Y A V AILABLE IN EVERY AFLOAT SUBMARINERS WORK SPACE. The Submarine Learning Channel Surfaces In the photo above: the Submarine Learning Centers Learning Channel (SUBLC) welcome screen is the first stop for a quick review of an ever growing number of procedures for which a Sailor may be seeking a refresher. Sonar Technician Second Class (Submarines) Zachary Watts, right, an instructor at the Naval Submarine School fire-fighting trainer, reviews a procedure with Navigation Electronics Technician Senior Chief Petty Officer Rafael Arriaga, center, as Michael Polizzi of Epsilon Systems Solutions records the explanation to incorporate into a SUBLC product on the wearing of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 23 22 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE

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to each homeport annually and within SEAWARE theres a feedback function that generates a report to SOBT. to support schoolhouse courses that dont have facilities for demonstration. that indicate where we need to focus our training efforts. SOBT has worked with afloat units, maintenance facilities, and schoolhouse labs to create SUBLC videos. We have funding and a process to record and develop. What we are continuously requesting is knowledgeable personnel to give the demonstration and a facility to record it. Having a knowledgeable and invested professional makes the training click in the Sailors head. There are two critical questions. Does SUBLC work, and how is its effectiveness measured? Yes, says Arriaga to the first. We have quantifiable evidence with recorded afloat usage numbers that indicate the products are being used. Effectiveness will be a much longer qualitative review. Regarding effectiveness, assessing afloat inspection results and direct fleet feedback through the SEAWARE application will be the catalyst for us to grow or change course. Its all measurable feedback. SEAWARE logs every time a product, video, or ICW is used and/or completed, so we have gross numbers in terms of views and visits. But SUBLC also has thumbs up and thumbs down icons on every video and a feedback window for comments just like YouTube. All this feedback comes to SOBT via NUWC, so when the ships hard drive is returned, we have hard numbers and a very real sense in nearly real-time of which products are being viewed and which are helping our distribution beyond submarines to include every homeport school house technical library. SOBT has been the onboard training resource for the Submarine Force since 1983, evolving along with both the delivery technology and fleet requirements for applied knowledge. In a sense, SUBLC was a logical next step for a Submarine Force driven by technological innovations. Arriaga explains, SUBLC addresses training deficiencies that a standard click next PowerPoint presentation just cant. Specifically, when a Sailor asks us How do I, a video demonstration is often a lot more intuitive than a slide presentation. This aligns with the environment on a submarine, which involves as much doing as knowing. But, he concedes, thats not the most significant difference. We are primarily using Sailors to give the training rather than contracting a professional narrator to read a script. The intention is to have someone talking to the camera and making the video whom the Sailor recognizes as experienced and whom the Sailor can better relate to. The turn-around on a finalized video is about three times faster than interactive courseware (ICW). The feedback we have received so far from afloat units indicates that Sailors prefer being assigned a series of videos to review because the information gets absorbed far more quickly than through ICW. You can address small training deficiencies that arent significant enough to dedicate a large ICW or classroom to with a threeto five-minute video. And were hearing from the Fleet that subject matter taught by a fellow Sailor tends to be better received. Job-Specific Training Wherever You Might BeOn a day Arriaga and a commercial video production crew from Epsilon Systems Solutions are recording in Naval Submarine Schools fire-fighting trainer, theres a sense of structure and organization that Arriaga says is essential to the timely development of short videos, which are beginning to populate SLCs SUBLC. Previous recordings include a variety of subjects (soldering, small arms, welding inspections, topside safety, plastic waste management, towed array tie-off, etc). Everyone has a job and a role, he says. SLC has military project managers like me who coordinate efforts, military subject matter experts who review content for accuracy, and learning standards officers who enforce Navy-wide learning standards on each SOBT product. The entire content production process for a SUBLC video is defined in the SOBT developers guide, but is straightforward to keep the focus on rapid, deployed learning. The trigger to create a video clip can vary but includes: High temperatures in simulated conditions such as this bilge fire in the Naval Submarine School fire-fighting mirror those that can be found in real-world situations where proper SCBA wear is essential. Sitting, from left to right: Bryan Burman, Bradley Gonthier, Will Nichols. Standing, from left to right: Adam Miga, Nick Massa, Brian Sardinha, Denise Myrick, Alfonso Guzmn-Vzquez, Ryan Proulx, Gene Czepiel. Not shown: Josh Sadeck and Tim Sweetour Sailors. Computer-based training has had a negative connotation in the fleet in the past. We are attempting to close the feedback loop by receiving input directly from the Sailors afloat and grow the products to meet their needs instead of polishing the cannon ball. And while SUBLC is still new, Arriaga has a sense of whats next. I see us working on 360-degree videos, he says. For instance, I see us producing a video for a ship traveling inbound to a selected port or harbor, integrating videos into ICW to replace slides, and reaching out to non-submarine training pipelines to share our products that apply to any Sailor or other branch of service. Putting the service members back into computer-based training products is crucial in order for them to buy into the relevancy of what they are learning.That same SEAWARE application we use to push products to the fleet will have the capability to upload videos produced by afloat commands to share with SOBT for potential re-use and distribution to better integrate and collaborate.SLC and SOBT are gaining momentum, and its a great time to be in an organization where we can identify a fleet-wide problem and then most importantly be able to provide a fleet-wide solution.The people behind the programUSW Combat Systems T rainer T echnology Development Branch provides advanced development, systems engineering support, and fleet support for multiple Navy training and combat systems. Main products from this branch include multiple variants of the Seaware learning management system, including Submarine On Board T raining (SOB T), as well as distance support for SOB T Code 2532 also focuses on human systems integration (HSI) research and engineering, providing products such as user-centered design, heuristic evaluations, experimentation, and HSI acquisition plans to multiple undersea warfare stakeholders SS S oldering SS R J-45 C onnector SS FLIR T hermal I mager SS T orque W rench SS M 9 S ervice P istol SS M 16 S eries R ie SS M ossberg 500 S hotgun SS M K48 M achine Gun SS NFTI SS SEIE Suit SS F ire F ighting SS D amage C ontrol SS F iber O ptics SS F looding SS Greasing F undamentals SS P lastic W aste M anagement SS O scilloscope SS S ignal Generator SS S pectrum A nalyzer SSN 688 S hip C ontrol SS T opside S afety SS C able T roubleshooting EMAT F irst A id SS T owed A rray T ieO ff SS S ubmarine M ishaps SSN 774 S hip C ontrol SS D iesel L ube O il S ample SS LELT I ntegrity SS LAN Box T roubleshooting SS Hand M easuring T ools SSN 688 D iesel F reshwater S ample SSN 774 Virginia C lass I nterior C ommunication S ystem ( ICS) SS I nertial N avigationSubmarine Learning Channel Topics 24 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 25

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UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 27 Changes of CommandCOMSUBPAC Rear Adm. Daryl Caudle relieved Rear Adm. Frederick Fritz Roegge COMSUBGRU 9 Rear Adm. Blake Converse relieved Rear Adm. John Tammen COMSUBGRU 10 Rear Adm. Michael Holland relieved Rear Adm. Randy Crites COMSUBRON 4 Capt. Brian Sittlow relieved Capt. John McGunnigle COMSUBDEVRON 5 Capt. Stephen Mack relieved Capt. Robert Gaucher COMSUBRON 11 Capt. Christopher Cavanaugh relieved Capt. Brian Davies COMSUBRON 16 Capt. Eric Nash relieved Capt. Adam Palmer COMSUBRON 17 Capt. Nicholas Tilbrook relieved Capt. Mark Schmall COMSUBRON 19 Capt. Michael Lewis relieved Capt. Brian Humm COMSUBRON 20 Capt. Bob Wirth relieved Capt. Thomas Buchanan NSSC Pearl Harbor Cmdr. Christopher C. Lindberg relieved Cmdr. Michael D. Eberlein Trident Refit Facility, Kings Bay Capt. Paul Dinius relieved Capt. Gunter Braun USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (B) Cmdr. Jeff Yackeren relieved Cmdr. Paul Reinhardt USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (B) Cmdr. Dave Brooks relieved Cmdr. David Forman USS Buffalo (SSN 715) Cmdr. Paul Lee relieved Cmdr. Micah Maxwell USS California (SSN 781) Cmdr. Dave Payne relieved Cmdr. Eric Sager USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) Cmdr. John T. Gonser relieved Cmdr. John W. Stafford USS Colorado (PCU 788) Cmdr. Reed Koepp relieved Cmdr. Ken Franklin USS Columbus (SSN 762) Cmdr. Peter French relieved Capt. Albert Alarcon USS Connecticut (SSN 22) Cmdr. Carl Trask relieved Cmdr. Brian Taddiken USS Florida (SSGN 728) (G) Capt. Greg Kercher relieved Capt. Bill McKinney USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (G) Capt. Doug Jordan relieved Capt. Mike Badorf USS Greeneville (SSN 772) Cmdr. Terry A. Nemec relieved Cmdr. Gabe A. Anseeuw USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) Cmdr. Keith Floyd relieved Cmdr. Melvin Smith USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (B) Cmdr. Kenneth Roman relieved Cmdr. John Hale USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (G) Cmdr. James Hurt relieved Cmdr. Brian Freck USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (G) Cmdr. Martin E. Sprague relieved Cmdr. Melvyn N. Naidas USS Louisville (SSN 724) Cmdr. Robert Rose relieved Cmdr. David Cox USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (B) Cmdr. Jesse Pruett relieved Cmdr. Geoff Patterson USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (B) Capt. Bradley Terry relieved Capt. Joseph Turk USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (G) Capt. James Belz relieved Capt. Gustavo Gutierrez USS Missouri (SSN 780) Cmdr. George Howell relieved Cmdr. Fraser Hudson USS New Hampshire (SSN 778) Cmdr. Todd Brandon relieved Cmdr. Jason Weed USS North Dakota (SSN 784) Cmdr. Mark Robinson relieved Cmdr. Mike Hollenbach USS Pasadena (SSN 752) Cmdr. Corey Poorman relieved Cmdr. Kenneth Douglas USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720) Cmdr. Jason Deichler relieved Cmdr. Neil Colston USS San Juan (SSN 751) Cmdr. Ravi Desai relieved Cmdr. John Craddock USS Scranton (SSN 756) Cmdr. Aaron Peterson relieved Cmdr. Ronald Stowe USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (B) Cmdr. Paul Seitz relieved Cmdr. Chas McLenithan USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) Cmdr. Jon Schaffner relieved Cmdr. Chris Bohner USS Washington (SSN 787) Cmdr. Gabe Cavazos relieved Capt. Jason Schneider USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (B) Cmdr. Jared Wyrick relieved Capt. Joe ColemanQualified for Command Lt. Cmdr. Christopher Abplanalp Naval Submarine School Groton Lt. Cmdr. Richard Ali USS Nevada (SSBN 733) (G) Lt. Garrett Allen USS Tucson (SSN 770) Lt. Christopher Andrews USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) Lt. Cmdr. David Beam USS Vermont (SSN 792) Lt. Cmdr. Vincent Bove CTF 69 Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Braden COMSUBGRU 7 Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Bray COMSUBRON 11 Lt. Cmdr. Burnes Brown COMSUBRON 1 Lt. Cmdr. Kyle Calton USS North Dakota (SSN 784) Lt. David Camp USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (B) Lt. Cmdr. Rene Cano DNI/DDNI NISS Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Cashin USS Maine (SSBN 741) (B) Lt. Cmdr. Timothy Chadwick USS San Juan (SSN 751) Lt. Cmdr. John Chester NWID Kings Bay Ga. Lt. Cmdr. Amando Cope USS Asheville (SSN 758) Lt. Jeffrey Cornielle NSTCP SITE FTT Lt. Cmdr. Dennis Crump CTF 69 Lt. Cmdr. Scott Edminster NPTU Charleston BOS Lt. Luis Estrada USS Bremerton (SSN 698) Lt. Cmdr. Danial Fickling N1 STUDENTS & TT Lt. Matthew Fisher USS Columbia (SSN 771) Lt. Cmdr. Michael Fritts CPFLT NPEB Lt. Cmdr. Michael Furlan COMSUBRON 12 Lt. Cmdr. Jeffrey Gammon USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (B) Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Garcia USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720) Lt. Cmdr. Sean Genis USS Bremerton (SSN 698) Lt. Cmdr. Preston Gilmore USS Illinois (SSN 786) Lt. Cmdr. Jason Goeller USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (G) Lt. Cmdr. Chad Guillerault USS Virginia (SSN 774) Lt. John Hartsog USS Florida (SSGN 728) (G) Lt. Donald Head USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (B) Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Hilger OPNAV Lt. Andrew Hill USS Minnesota (SSN 783) Lt. Cmdr. Joseph Huck OPNAV Lt. Cmdr. Michael Humara COMSUBPAC Lt. Cmdr. Jeremy Janney Dir. Div. Naval Reactors DOE Lt. Cmdr. Towney Kennard FFC Nuclear Propulsion Exam Board Lt. Cmdr. Justin Kirkpatrick Presidents Board of Inspection & Surv. Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Lail FFC Nuclear Propulsion Exam Board Lt. Cmdr. Andrew Lawrence USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (G) Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Lewis USS Virginia (SSN 774) Lt. Cmdr. Joseph Lopiccolo Trident Training Facility Bangor Lt. Joshua Ludwig USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (B) Lt. Cmdr. Kerry Major FFC Nuclear Propulsion Exam Board Lt. Cmdr. Jonathan Martin USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (G) Lt. Cmdr. Gregory McCarthy COMPACFLT 26 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE Navy Sets New Physical Fitness Standard to Start Boot CampBeginning Jan. 1, Recruit Training Command, the Navys only boot camp, will require recruits to pass an initial run standard before they may commence basic military training. The initial run standard is evaluated on the 1.5 mile run of the rst Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA) at boot camp. The initial run standard for male recruits will be 16 minutes 10 seconds and 18 minutes 7 seconds for female recruits. To graduate boot camp, all recruits must score a satisfactory medium on the ofcial Navy PFA. To ensure recruits advance toward this goal over their eight weeks of training, the initial run standard sets the minimum run time at which recruits must start training in order to meet their expected level of progress. Recruits that fail to meet the initial run standard will have one chance to retest within 48 hours. If they fail the retest, recruits will be discharged from the Navy with an entry-level separation, which allows them to reapply at a later date with a waiver from Navy Recruiting Command. For recruits who prove they are serious about physical tness by achieving an outstanding high on their nal PFA at boot camp, they will be meritoriously advanced to the next pay grade upon graduation. Navy Recruiting Command provides recruits with a tness and nutrition guide, which they can follow on their own or with the help of their recruiting ofce. Using the tness and nutrition guide to prepare for the initial run standard, more recruits will report to boot camp physically t, reducing attrition due to PFA failures and raising the quality of Sailors that reach the eet. DOD Releases 2018 Basic Allowance for Housing RatesThe Department of Defense has released the 2018 Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) rates. BAH increased an average of 0.7 percent as of Jan. 1. An estimated $21 billion will be paid to approximately one million Service members. Continuing to balance the growth in compensation costs, the 2018 BAH program expands the member cost-sharing element (out-of-pocket expense). Based on the authority provided in the FY 2016 National Defense Authorization Act, the cost-sharing element has increased to 4 percent for 2018, which means a typical member will absorb 4 percent of the national average housing cost by pay grade. Even with the increase in cost sharing, on average, BAH rates will increase approximately $10 per month. A typical mid-grade enlisted member with dependents, for example, will nd his/her BAH about $19 per month higher than last year, while a typidents will nd his/her BAH about $16 higher than last year. An integral part of the BAH program is the provision of individual rate protection to all members. No matter what happens to measured housing costs, including the out-of-pocket costwho maintains uninterrupted BAH eligibility in a given location will not see his/her BAH rate decrease. This ensures that members who have made long-term commitments in the form of a lease or contract are not penalized if the areas housing costs decrease. For more information on BAH, including the 2018 rates and 2018 rate component breakdown, visit www.defensetravel. dod.mil/site/bah.cfm. Service members can calculate their BAH payment by using the calculator at www.defensetravel.dod.mil/site/bahCalc.cfm.Navy e-Learning Updates W eb A ddressDirect access to the online Navy e-Learning (NeL) management system website became available Oct. 23, 2017 at a new web address. The direct NeL link of https:// learning.nel.navy.mil is available 24/7 and will take Sailors directly to the My Learning and Course Catalog tabs of the NeL learning management system after logging on. Although direct access to NeL is available through the Internet, a Common Access Card (CAC) is still required for NeL login. Courses on NeL have been standardized to run using the Internet Explorer browser. Trainees using NeL complete over ve million online courses a year, from a comprehensive catalog of 12,500 distance learning courses. The Naval Education and Training Command relies on NeL for use in schoolhouses for individual skills and skill refresher training. To access NeL through a link on My Navy Portal (MNP), select the Professional Resources drop-down menu, then Navy elearning Online Courses. Users will need to update their saved bookmark to the new NeL URL. A Sailor assigned to the submarine tender USS Frank Cable (AS 40) reunites with his family during his homecoming to Apra Harbor, Guam. Frank Cable de parted Guam March 7, 2017 supporting maritime expeditionary operations in the U.S. 3rd Fleet area of operations and underwent a dry-dock phased maintenance availability at Vigor Industrial shipyard in Portland, Ore.Photo by MCS 3rd Class Alana Langdon Welcome Home! S ailo rsFirst

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UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 29 Lt. Jordan Foley USS Annapolis (SSN 760) Lt. Patrick Foley NSSC Kings Bay Lt. Ryan Fritz USS Charlotte (SSN 766) Lt. Robert Gacki USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (G) Lt. j.g. Francisco Galindez de Jesus USS Indiana (SSN 789) Lt. Bryant Giorgi USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) (B) Lt. j.g. Alexander Graham USS Missouri (SSN 780) Lt. j.g. Ian Gray USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (G) Lt. Robert Greer USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (G) Lt. j.g. William Gregory USS Colorado (SNN 788) Lt. j.g. Kevin Grothe USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (G) Lt. j.g. Andrew Haggerty USS Topeka (SSN 754) Lt. Matthew Hait USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (G) Lt. j.g. Ganesh Harihara USS Providence (SSN 719) Lt. j.g. Cameron Harrigan USS Newport News (SSN 750) Lt. j.g. Jeremy Heimke USS Charlotte (SSN 766) Lt. Douglas Heinzel USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (G) Lt. j.g. Kevin Heister USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) (G) Lt. Kevin Hickey USS Missouri (SSN 780) Lt. j.g. Aaron Hoffman USS Topeka (SSN 754) Lt. j.g. Erik Hoffstadt USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) (B) Lt. Joshua Hyland USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (B) Lt. Robert Inglis USS Key West (SSN 722) Lt. Charles Johnson USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (G) Lt. j.g. Jeremy Jorge USS Montpelier (SSN 765) Lt. j.g. Thomas Kasmer USS North Dakota (SSN 784) Lt. David Kennedy USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (B) Lt. j.g. Ryan Keyes USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723) Lt. j.g. Michael Kirkpatrick USS Washington (SSN 787) Lt. Walker Klenk USS New Mexico (SSN 779) Lt. j.g. Ryan Koller USS Toledo (SSN 769) Lt. j.g. Jason Koncsol USS Pennsylvaina (SSBN 735) (G) Lt. Owen Kownacki USS Colorado (SSN 788) Lt. Brooks Knutson USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (G) Lt. j.g. David Kramer USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (B) Lt. Jarod Kramer USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (B) Lt. j.g. Thomas Krysil USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (G) Lt. Justin Lamothe USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (G) Lt. Daniel Lee USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) (G) Lt. Philip Lee NROTC USD SDSU DC Lt. j.g. Jacob Liebert USS Nevada (SSBN 733) (G) Lt. j.g. Christopher Linich USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) Lt. j.g. Keaton Lockhart USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (B) Lt. David Mann USS North Dakota (SSN 784) Lt. Tilford Mansfield USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (B) Lt. Kevin Martin USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (G) Lt. j.g. Christopher Masters USS Dallas (SSN 770) Lt. j.g. Joseph McAndrews USS Jefferson City (SSN 759) Lt. j.g. George McClymont USS Santa Fe (SSN 763) Lt. j.g. Dylan McCrea USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (G) Lt. j.g. Peyton McDonald USS Boise (SSN 764) Lt. Scott McLennan USS San Francisco (SSN 711) Lt. Michael McPherson USS Washington (SSN 787) Lt. j.g. Daniel Meaney USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (B) Lt. j.g. Quinilan Melvin USS Colorado (SSN 788) Lt. Keegan Merkert USS Connecticut (SSN 22) Lt. Trevor Milford USS Greeneville (SSN 772) Lt. j.g. Andrew Miller USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (G) Lt. j.g. Jeffrey Mitchell USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (B) Lt. j.g. Killian Monley USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) Lt. Gregory Morgan USS Tucson (SSN 770) Lt. j.g. Zachary Motter USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723) Lt. Cmdr. Samuel Mills S NLEC Newport Lt. Cmdr. Gregory Mischler USS Seawolf (SSN 21) Lt. Cmdr. Dennis Monroe DIRSSP Washington, DC Lt. Cmdr. Jacob Montoya USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (G) Lt. Cmdr. William Murphy USS Nevada (SSBN 733) (B) Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Peters CPFLT Nuclear Propulsion Exam. Bd. Lt. Cmdr. Jarrad Pilgrim USSTRATCOM SPPAC Lt. Cmdr. Andrew Regalado USS Alaska (SSBN 732 (G) Lt. Cmdr. Jeffrey Roberts S NSS Groton, Conn. Lt. Jason Rogers USS Buffalo (SSN 715) Lt. Cmdr. Martin Roschmann SUBLANT Training & Evaluation Lt. Cmdr. Brian Ross Dir. Div. Naval Reactors DOE Lt. Cmdr. Karl Sault COMSUBLANT Lt. Cmdr. Michael Smith CNAVPERSCOM Millington Lt. Cmdr. Reid Smythe USS Alexandria (SSN 757) Lt. William Spears USS Columbia (SSN 771) Lt. Cmdr. Jason Spray COMSUBRON 6 Lt. Cmdr. Andrew Streenan FFC Nuclear Propulsion Exam. Board Lt. David Taweel USS Columbia (SSN 771) Lt. Cmdr. Scott Tedrick USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (B) Lt. Cmdr. Alan Teele USSTRATCOM NAOC Cmdr. Adam Thomas USSTRATCOM Lt. Cmdr. Dillon Tolmie USPACOM Lt. Cmdr. Terry Turner USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) Lt. Nicholas Tuuk USS Seawolf (SSN 21) Lt. Nicholas Vilardi USS Annapolis (SSN 760) Lt. Cmdr. John Walker COMSUBRON 11 Lt. Damien Wall USS Dallas (SSN 700) Lt. Cmdr. Grant Wanier USPACOM Lt. Cmdr. George Watkins COMSUBRON 16 Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Weiss Trident Training Facility Bangor Lt. Cmdr. Dustin White Student Marine Corps Univ. Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Williams PSBFOROPS COMP Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Wolf Pres. Board of Inspection & Surv. S D Lt. Cmdr. Adam Zaker USS Texas (SSN 775) Lt. Cmdr. Bradley Zingone USSTRATCOM SPPACQualified in SubmarinesLt. j.g. Danny Abdeen USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (G) Lt. j.g. Eric Alamillo USS Hampton (SSN 767) Lt. j.g. Gilesa Allison USS Mississippi (SSN 782) Lt. j.g. Payton Alsup USS New Mexico (SSN 779) Lt. j.g. Steven Arnold USS Columbia (SSN 771) Lt. Jorge Arvelo USS Newport News (SSN 750) Lt. Kelby Aten USS Key West (SSN 722) Lt. j.g. Mark Atkins USS Providence (SSN 719) Lt. j.g. Austin Baker USS Toledo (SSN 769) Lt. j.g. Lee Becker USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) Lt. j.g. Mitchell Bell USS Olympia (SSN 717) Lt. j.g. Brian Benedicks USS Asheville (SSN 758) Lt. j.g. Jordan Bennett USS Hartford (SSN 768) Lt. j.g. Nicholas Biela USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (B) Lt. Eric Biggs USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) Lt. Nicholas Birger NROTC University New Mexico Lt. j.g. Aaron Bishop USS California (SSN 781) Lt. j.g. Reston Bishop USS Colorado (SSN 788) Lt. Jason Bombardier USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) (B) Lt. j.g. Robert Bostock USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (G) Lt. Clayton Bosworth USS California (SSN 781) Lt. Ryan Boyer USS Minnesota (SSN 783) Lt. Erik Breitenbach USS Bremerton (SSN 698) Lt. Casey Brown USS Scranton (SSN 756) Lt. Jeremy Brown USS John Warner (SSN 785) Lt. j.g. Jacob Brumbach USS Connecticut (SSN 22) Lt. j.g. Grant Buckley USS Alexandria (SSN 757) Lt. Samuel Butts USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) (B) Lt. Michael Byrge USS Hampton (SSN 767) Lt. Rafael Byron USS Buffalo (SSN 715) Lt. Thomas Cahill USS Providence (SSN 719) Lt. Taylor Calibo USS Greeneville (SSN 772) Lt. j.g. Zachary Callahan USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (B) Lt. j.g. Benjamin Canfield USS Columbia (SSN 771) Lt. j.g. Thomas Catalano USS Connecticut (SSN 22) Lt. Scott Cebulksi USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (G) Lt. Robert Chavez USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (B) Lt. j.g. William Chilton USS Greeneville (SSN 772) Lt. Jacob Christiansen USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (B) Lt. j.g. Justin Cline USS North Dakota (SSN 784) Lt. Benjamin Cook USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (B) Lt. Michael Cristiano USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (B) Lt. j.g. Sean Cunningham USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) Lt. j.g. Tracy Daniels USS San Francisco (SSN 711) Lt. Robert Darby USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (B) Lt. j.g. Hugh Davison USS Montpelier (SSN 765) Lt. j.g. Katherine Dawley USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (G) Lt. j.g. Christopher Debarge USS Charlotte (SSN 766) Lt. j.g. Vincenzo Delvillano USS Toledo (SSN 769) Lt. j.g. Isaac Derego USS Indiana (SSN 789) Lt. Gaddis Diazperez USS Albany (SSN 753) Lt. j.g. John Dickmann USS Tucson (SSN 770) Lt. Patrick Dillow USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (G) Lt. Matthew Disher USS New Mexico (SSN 779) Lt. Thomas Dowd USS Alexandria (SSN 757) Lt. Jon Drake USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (G) Lt. j.g. Corey Drozdowski USS New Hampshire (SSN 778) Lt. j.g. Ryan Duffy USS Mississippi (SSN 782) Lt. j.g. Aaron Dupere USS John Warner (SSN 785) Lt. Malcolm Eaton USS Illinois (SSN 786) Lt. j.g. Matthew Eblin USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (G) Lt. j.g. Alexander Egber USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (B) Lt. j.g. Nathan English USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (B) Lt. j.g. Nicholas Evans USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (B) Lt. Paul Evans USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (B) Lt. Stephen Fitzpatrick USS Providence (SSN 719) Lt. j.g. John Flores USS Alexandria (SSN 757) 28 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE SUBRON 1 USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) Cmdr. S. Faulk Lt. Cmdr. L. Arbuckle (D) Lt. Cmdr. A. Stutzman (R) ETRCM K. Rollert (D) ETRCS R. Branam (R) SUBDEVRON 5 USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) Cmdr. M. Smith (D) Cmdr. E. Floyd (R) Lt. Cmdr. A. Wilson CMDCM S. Peirsel (D) CMDCM P. Walters (R) SUBRON 7 USS Columbia (SSN 771) Cmdr. D. Edgerton Lt. Cmdr. T. Bullock (D) Lt. Cmdr. J. Smith (R) CMDCM A. Torres (D) ETVCS J. Karns (R) SUBRON 11 USS Pasadena (SSN 752) Cmdr. K. Douglas (D) Cmdr. C. Poorman (R) Lt. Cmdr. J. Smith (D) Lt. Cmdr. H. Martin (R) ITSCM M. Kwiecinski SUBRON 15 USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723) Cmdr. T. Odonnell Lt. Cmdr. S. Welch (D) Lt. Cmdr. C. Christofk (R) FTCM B. Edmiston SUBRON 17 USS Alabama (SSBN 731)(B) Cmdr. P. Reinhardt (D) Cmdr. J. Yackeren (R) Lt. Cmdr. D. Latia (D) Lt. Cmdr. R Lowe (R) FTCM T. Leonard (D) MMACS M. Pearson (R) USS Alabama (SSBN 731)(G) Cmdr. M. Chapman Lt. Cmdr. J. Quimby CMDCM S. Rauch SUBRON 19 USS Ohio (SSGN 726)(B) Capt. D. Soldow Lt. Cmdr. T. Dixon (D) Lt. Cmdr. A. Simons (R) FTCM S. Bice USS Ohio (SSGN 726)(G) Capt. G. Miranda Lt. Cmdr. J. Parm MMACM A. Lee Special Category Submarine Tender USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) Capt. D. Bradley Cmdr. R. Lopez CMDCM W. Greene Special Category ARCO (ARDM 5) Lt. Cmdr. Z. Harry Lt. Cmdr. N. Chiudioni CMDCM J. Gruber Special Category Undersea Rescue Command Capt. M. Hazenberg (D) Cmdr. M. Eberlein (R) Lt. Cmdr. J. Babick HMCM F. LazarinCOMSUBPAC Winners of 2017 Battle E Efciency Competition Awards:

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UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 31 30 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE Lt. Samuel Murphy USS La Jolla (SSN 701) Lt. j.g. Sean Murphy USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (B) Lt. j.g. Michael Naclerio USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (G) Lt. j.g. Tyler Newland USS Hawaii (SSN 776) Lt. j.g. Christian Nicholson USS Pasadena (SSN 752) Lt. Michael Nielson USS Colorado (SSN 788) Lt. j.g. Eric Nordquist USS Maine (SSBN 741) (B) Lt. Temitope Ohiomoba USS Bremerton (SSN 698) Lt. Ryan Olehausen USS Columbia (SSN 771) Lt. j.g. Matthew Padilla USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (B) Lt. j.g. Richard Padron USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (B) Lt. Gregory Pavone USS North Dakota (SSN 784) Lt. j.g. Marcus Perez USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) Lt. j.g. Andrew Podgorski USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (G) Lt. j.g. Gregory Poser USS Connecticut (SSN 22) Lt. j.g. Zachary Powers USS Dallas (SSN 700) Lt. j.g. Joshua Prince USS New Hampshire (SSN 778) Lt. Travis Probe USS Scranton (SSN 756) Lt. j.g. Andrew Pytlinski USS Toledo (SSN 769) Lt. j.g. Michael Quinlan USS Hawaii (SSN 776) Lt. j.g. Mason Rabalais USS Mississippi (SSN 782) Lt. j.g. Lyndel Raiford USS Springfield (SSN 761) Lt. Braden Reiner USS Columbus (SSN 762) Lt. j.g. Christopher Reynolds USS Topeka (SSN 754) Lt. Philip Reynolds USS Providence (SSN 719) Lt. Wesley Riley USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) Lt. Jonathan Rodgers USS Dallas (SSN 700) Lt. Peter Roemer USS Tucson (SSN 770) Lt. Christopher Rogeness USS Alexandria (SSN 757) Lt. j.g. Josiah Ross USS Olympia (SSN 717) Lt. j.g. Thomas Rowland USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (G) Lt. Wesley Rudy USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (B) Lt. Andrew Rydalch USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (B) Lt. j.g. Stephen Ryker USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (B) Lt. j.g. Michael Schmitz USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) Lt. Kristin Schoemaker USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (G) Lt. j.g. Gerald Schrader USS Florida (SSGN 728) (G) Lt. j.g. Joseph Scordino USS Illinois (SSN 786) Lt. Michael Selover USS Virginia (SSN 774) Lt. j.g. Matthew Sheeler USS Topeka (SSN 754) Lt. Derrick Simons USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (G) Lt. Michael Sjoholmsierchio USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (B) Lt. j.g. Benjamin Smith USS North Dakota (SSN 784) Lt. j.g. Isaac Smith USS Topeka (SSN 754) Lt. Joshua Smith USS Seawolf (SSN 21) Lt. Samuel Smith USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (B) Lt. j.g. Scott Smith USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (B) Lt. j.g. Stephen Smith USS Georgia (SSBN 729) (B) Lt. j.g. Nathan Staats USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (B) Lt. Jonathan Stack USS Annapolis (SSN 760) Lt. Christopher Stevens USS Mississippi (SSN 782) Lt. Nicholas Stiegman USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (G) Lt. Matthew Storm USS Louisville (SSN 724) Lt. j.g. Blake Stout USS Hampton (SSN 767) Lt. j.g. Mark Strine USS Annapolis (SSN 760) Lt. j.g. Cody Stueve USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) Lt. j.g. Michael Sullivan USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) Lt. j.g. Tyler Susa USS Florida (SSGN 728) (B) Lt. Ross Sygulla USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (B) Lt. j.g. Elliot Sykora USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) Lt. Manasseh Szwabowski USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) Lt. j.g. Joshua Taft USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (G) Lt. Troy Tauber USS Missouri (SSN 780) Lt. Andrew Taylor USS Key West (SSN 722) Lt. Alexander Teator USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (B) Lt. j.g. Whitney Tharp USS Mississippi (SSN 782) Lt. Nathan Thiem USS Louisville (SSN 724) Lt. j.g. Tyler Thomas USS Tucson (SSN 770) Lt. j.g. Mackenzie Threlkeld USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (B) Lt. j.g. Connor Timmins USS North Carolina (SSN 777) Lt. j.g. Benjamin Todd USS North Carolina (SSN 777) Lt. j.g. Laura Towle USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (B) Lt. Emanuel Towns USS Annapolis (SSN 760) Lt. James VanKirk USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (G) Lt. j.g. Justin Versteeg USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) Lt. j.g. Derek Von Disterlo USS Springfield (SSN 761) Lt. Michael Vongonten USS North Dakota (SSN 784) Lt. j.g. Zachary Vrtis USS Chicago (SSN 721) Lt. j.g. Laura Wainikainen USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (B) Lt. Johnathan Wargi USS Connecticut (SSN 22) Lt. Eric Washkewicz USS Hartford (SSN 768) Lt. j.g. Thomas Wegener USS Florida (SSGN 728) (G) Lt. j.g. Aleksander Weismantel USS Annapolis (SSN 760) Lt. j.g. Nicholas Weithman USS Maine (SSBN 741) (G) Lt. Andrew Wilkins USS Olympia (SSN 717) Lt. j.g. Jon Williams USS Charlotte (SSN 766) Lt. j.g. Sean Williams USS Charlotte (SSN 766) Lt. j.g. Heather Willis USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (B) Lt. Jordan Wingate USS Greeneville (SSN 772) Lt. j.g. Benjamin Winter USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (B) Lt. Albert Wong USS Olympia (SSN 717) Lt. j.g. Cole Yager USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (B) Lt. j.g. Andrew Zellman USS Seawolf (SSN 21) Lt. j.g. Matthew Ziesmer USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (G)Qualified Nuclear Engineering OfficerLt. j.g. Danny Abdeen USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (G) Lt. Brian Acquaviva USS North Dakota (SSN 784) Lt. Travis Adams USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (G) Jared Anongos USS Nevada (SSBN 733) (B) Lt. Stuart Ardissono USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) Lt. Nathan Arnold USS Columbia (SSN 771) Lt. j.g. Steven Arnold USS Columbia (SSN 771) Lt. Jorge Arvelo USS Newport News (SSN 750) Lt. j.g. Ryder Ashcraft USS Maine (SSBN 741) (G) Lt. Harrison Askew USS Washington (SSN 787) Lt. Kelby Aten USS Key West (SSN 722) Lt. j.g. Mark Atkins USS Providence (SSN 719) Lt. Andrew Austin CNRC Millington, Tenn. Lt. David Baxter S PG MIT Cambridge Mass. Lt. Andrew Beliveau USS Maine (SSBN 741) (B) Lt. Leonardo Benavides USS Olympia (SSN 717) Lt. j.g. Brian Benedicks USS Asheville (SSN 758) Lt. j.g. Jordan Bennett USS Hartford (SSN 768) Lt. Martin Bennett CTF 69 Lt. Tyler Bergman LSFO OPCON CTR Lt. j.g. Nicholas Biela USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (B) Lt. Eric Biggs USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) Lt. Nicholas Birger NROTC University New Mexico Lt. Michael Birnbaum USS Missouri (SSN 780) Lt. John Blake USS Tucson (SSN 770) Lt. Brian Bloom USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720) Lt. Nicholas Bogart USS John Warner (SSN 785) Lt. Jason Bombardier USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) (B) Lt. Benjamin Bondurant CTF 65 Lt. Evan Boyce USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) Lt. Ryan Boyer USS Minnesota (SSN 783) Lt. William Boykin USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (G) Lt. Erik Breitenbach USS Bremerton (SSN 698) Lt. Andrew Brink USS Scranton (SSN 756) Lt. Lindsay Brock NNPTC Charleston, S.C. Lt. Casey Brown USS Scranton (SSN 756) Lt. Chase Brown USS Alexandria (SSN 757) Lt. Jeremy Brown USS John Warner (SSN 785) Lt. j.g. Jacob Brumbach USS Connecticut (SSN 22) Lt. j.g. Grant Buckley USS Alexandria (SSN 757) Lt. Andrew Butler NROTC Carnegie Mellon Univ. Lt. Edward Butler USS Nevada (SSBN 733) (B) Lt. Taylor Butler USS Maine (SSBN 741) (G) Lt. Samuel Butts USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) (B) Lt. Michael Byrge USS Hampton (SSN 767) Lt. Rafael Byron USS Buffalo (SSN 715) Lt. Taylor Calibo USS Greeneville (SSN 772) Lt. Elijah Callaghan USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (B) Lt. j.g. Zachary Callahan USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (B) Nicholas Campbell USS Newport News (SSN 750) Lt. j.g. Benjamin Canfield USS Columbia (SSN 771) Lt. Lauren Carpenter USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (G) Lt. Antonio Carreno USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (G) Lt. Charles Celerier USS Topeka (SSN 754) Lt. Robert Chavez USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (B) Lt. Jacob Christiansen USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (B) Lt. Evan Christman DIRDIVOFNREACDOE Lt. Codi Clark USS Bremerton (SSN 698) Lt. Nicholas Clark USS Mississippi (SSN 782) Lt. Trevor Cleary USS Connecticut (SSN 22) Lt. j.g. Justin Cline USS North Dakota (SSN 784) Lt. j.g. Mark Colby USS Pasadena (SSN 752) Lt. Devon Colmer USS San Juan (SSN 751) Lt. Benjamin Cook USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (B) Lt. Edgard Corea USS Alexandria (SSN 757) Lt. Michael Cristiano USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (B) Lt. Chase Cummins USS Greeneville (SSN 772) Lt. Matthew Cutts USS Hartford (SSN 768) Lt. Robert Darby USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (B) Lt. j.g. Hugh Davison USS Montpelier (SSN 765) Lt. j.g. Katherine Dawley USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (G) Lt. j.g. Christopher DeBarge USS Charlotte (SSN 766) Lt. Matthew Dehart USS Toledo (SSN 769) Lt. j.g. Isaac Derego USS Indiana (SSN 789) Lt. Benjamin Desch USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (G) Lt. Gaddis Diazperez USS Albany (SSN 753) Lt. Matthew Dickerman USS Springfield (SSN 761) Lt. Steven Digiannurio NROTC Forida A&M Univ. Lt. Patrick Dillow USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (G) Lt. William Dorriety USS Toledo (SSN 769) Lt. Jon Drake USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (G) Lt. j.g. Corey Drozdowski USS New Hampshire (SSN 778) Lt. Christopher Duffy USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) Lt. j.g. Aaron Dupere USS John Warner (SSN 785) Lt. Malcolm Eaton USS Illinois (SSN 786) Lt. Nicholas Eberhart USS Minnesota (SSN 783) Lt. j.g. Scott Ebert USS Columbia (SSN 771) Lt. j.g. Alexander Ebger USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (B) COMSUBRON 4 USS Minnesota (SSN 783) Capt. B. Tanaka Lt. Cmdr. L. Patterson ETRCM(SS) R. Snyder COMSUBRON 6 USS Helena (SSN 725) Cmdr. J.Pittman Lt. Cmdr. E. Kasse (D) Lt. Cmdr. C. Rose (R) ETVCM(SS) A. Owens COMSUBRON 12 USS Hartford (SSN 768) Cmdr. M. Fanning Lt. Cmdr. S. Bell (D) Lt. Cmdr. S. Halle (R) CMDCM(SS) J. Williams (D) STSCM(SS) N. Chappelle (R) COMSUBRON 16 USS Georgia (SSGN 729)(B) Capt. G. Perez Lt. Cmdr. D. Burke MMACM(SS) B. Doebler USS Georgia (SSGN 729)(G) Capt. M. Badorf (D) Capt. D. Jordan (R) Lt. Cmdr. B. Bozin (D) Lt. Cmdr. C. Holland (R) CMDCM J. R. Rosario COMSUBRON 20 USS West Virginia (SSBN 736)(B) Capt. J. Coleman ( D) Cmdr. J. Wyrick (R) Lt. Cmdr. A. Aviles MMWCM{SS) J. Riley USS West Virginia (SSBN 736)(G) Cmdr. T. Clark Lt. Cmdr. A. Domina STSCM(SS) M. Williams COMSUBLANT Winners of 2017 Battle Efciency Competition Awards:

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UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 33 32 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE Lt. j.g. Matthew Eblin USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (G) Lt. Isaac Eckers USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (G) Lt. Kyle Elam USS New Mexico (SSN 779) Lt. John Emery USS Illinois (SSN 786) Lt. j.g. Nathan English USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (B) Lt. Paul Evans USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (B) Lt. Justin Feltkamp USS Columbia (SSN 771) Lt. Joseph Finkle USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) Lt. Joseph Fiore USS Seawolf (SSN 21) Lt. j.g. Alexander Fishman USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (B) Lt. Kenneth Fletcher NPTU Ballston, N.Y. MARF Lt. j.g. John Flores USS Alexandria (SSN 757) Lt. Patrick Foley NSSC Kings Bay Ga. Lt. j.g. Erin Ford USS Florida (SSGN 728) (G) Lt. Joseph Frank USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (G) Lt. j.g. Francisco Galindez de Jesus USS Indiana (SSN 789) Lt. Daniel Gallagher USS San Francisco (SSN 711) Lt. Timothy Galvin USS Annapolis (SSN 760) Lt. Maggie Gardner USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (G) Lt. Timothy Garrett USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (G) Lt. Joshua Gaston USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (G) Lt. Christopher Gear USS San Juan (SSN 751) Lt. James Giesemann USS Florida (SSGN 728) (G) Lt. Bryant Giorgi USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) (B) Lt. j.g. Benjamin Goclano USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (G) Lt. Timothy Goins USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723) Lt. Laura Gorinski USS Virginia (SSN 774) Lt. Paul Graeter TTF Kings Bay Ga. Lt. j.g. Alexander Graham USS Missouri (SSN 780) Lt. John Grant USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (B) Lt. j.g. Ian Gray USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (G) Lt. Collin Grier USS Pasadena (SSN 752)\ Lt. Garrett Griffin USS Newport News (SSN 750) Lt. Jacob Grogan USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (B) Lt. Brian Gureck USS Louisville (SSN 724) Lt. Alexander Gutzler USS New Hampshire (SSN 778) Lt. Jon Hamilton USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (B) Lt. Ryan Hard S Post Grad. Monterey, Calif. Lt. j.g. Cameron Harrigan USS Newport News (SSN 750) Lt. j.g. Jeremy Heimke USS Charlotte (SSN 766) Lt. Douglas Heinzel USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (G) Lt. Kevin Hickey USS Missouri (SSN 780) Lt. Ross Hieatt COM NAV Marianas Lt. j.g. Erik Hoffstadt USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) (B) Lt. Christopher Holmes USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (G) Lt. David Hoyle USS Newport News (SSN 750) Lt. Kyle Hrutkay USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) (B) Lt. Joshua Hyland USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (B) Lt. Robert Inglis USS Key West (SSN 722) Lt. David Irons COMSUBGRU 7 Lt. David Jackson USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (G) Lt. Sarah Jaeger COMSUBRON 6 Lt. Mary Janowski S SNTWIP SpaceX Lt. Charles Johnson USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (G) Lt. David Johnson USS San Juan (SSN 751) Lt. Wesley Johnson TTF Bangor Wash. Lt. j.g. Jeremy Jorge USS Montpelier (SSN 765) Lt. Michael Keane USS New Mexico (SSN 779) Lt. David Kennedy USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) Lt. Firas Khoury USS San Francisco (SSN 711) Lt. j.g. Matthew Kilby USS Florida (SSGN 728) (B) Lt. Andrew King USS Nevada (SSBN 733) (B) Lt. Alexander Kinney TFF Bangor Wash. Lt. j.g. Michael Kirkpatrick USS Washington (SSN 787) Lt. Walker Klenk USS New Mexico (SSN 779) Lt. Daniel Klinge USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (B) Lt. Brooks Knutson USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (G) Lt. Alexander Kornick USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720) Lt. Samuel Kowalczyk USS Jefferson City (SSN 759) Owen Kownacki USS Colorado (SSN 788) Lt. j.g. David Kramer USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (B) Lt. Jarod Kramer USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (B) Lt. Jordan Kronshage USS Minnesota (SSN 783) Lt. j.g. Thomas Krysil USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (G) Lt. Michael Lacey USS Buffalo (SSN 715) Lt. Justin Lamothe USS Wyoming (SSBN 736) (G) Lt. Eric Lantz USS New Hampshire (SSN 778) Lt. Tyler Lawlor USS Annapolis (SSN 760) Lt. Philip Lee NROTC USD SDSU DC Lt. Victor Lee USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (G) Lt. Bradley Lentz USS Louisville (SSN 724) Lt. William Levi USS Columbus (SSN 762) Lt. Nicholas Linsodonnell USS Asheville (SSN 758) Lt. Mark Livengood USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (G) Lt. j.g. Keaton Lockhart USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (B) Lt. Rory Loughran USS San Juan (SSN 751) Lt. Bryan Lowry USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) Lt. Calvin Luzum COMDESRON 26 Lt. Owen Lynch USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) (G) Lt. David Mann USS North Dakota (SSN 784) Lt. Michael Martin NAVAL ACADEMY Lt. j.g. Christopher Masters USS Dallas (SSN 700) Lt. j.g. Joseph McAndrews USS Jefferson City (SSN 759) Lt. David McClain USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (B) Lt. Cameron McCord USS Helena (SSN 725) Lt. j.g. Peyton McDonald USS Boise (SSN 764) Lt. William McDonald USS Dallas (SSN 700) Lt. Brandon McDowall USS Hawaii (SSN 776) Lt. Michael McGetrick USS Tucson (SSN 770) Lt. Kevin McKee DNS CMARCAD VALI Lt. Connor McLemore USS Bremerton (SSN 698) Lt. Scott McLennan USS San Francisco (SSN 711) Lt. Michael McPherson USS Washington (SSN 787) Lt. Barry McShane USS California (SSN 781) Lt. Thomas McSweeney USS Santa Fe (SSN 763) Lt. j.g. Daniel Meaney USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (B) Lt. Curran Meek USS Asheville (SSN 758) Lt. Samuel Melick USS Hampton (SSN 767) Lt. William Melton USS Alexandria (SSN 757) Lt. Keegan Merkert USS Connecticut (SSN 22) Lt. Kyle Milden NAVAL ACADEMY Lt. Trevor Milford USS Greeneville (SSN 772) Lt. j.g. Andrew Miller USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (G) Lt. Nicholas Miller NUSWCD N NWCF Lt. Ryan Miller USS Jefferson City (SSN 759) Lt. Mark Moeller USS Chicago (SSN 721) Lt. j.g. Killian Monley USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) Lt. Jan Morales USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (B) Lt. Shane Moran USS Montpelier (SSN 765) Lt. Christopher Morgan COMSUBRON 21 Lt. Brett Morris USS Chicago (SSN 721) Lt. Devonta Morrison NPTU Charleston S.C. D MTS Lt. Eric Mosher USS Newport News (SSN 750) Lt. j.g. Zachary Motter USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723) Lt. Samuel Murphy USS La Jolla (SSN 701) Lt. j.g. Sean Murphy USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (B) Lt. Steven Musselwhite USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) Lt. Kristina Nelloms USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (B) Lt. Taylor Newman USS Boise (SSN 764) Lt. Kevin Nguy CNRC Millington, Tenn. Lt. j.g. Eric Nordquist USS Maine (SSBN 741) (B) Lt. Cory Oberst USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (G) Lt. Morgan Oblinsky USS Hartford (SSN 768) Lt. Temitope Ohiomoba USS Bremerton (SSN 698) Lt. Ryan Olehausen USS Columbia (SSN 771) Lt. Lindsay Olsen NSTCPACPHFLT TT Lt. Tyler Otteson USS San Francisco (SSN 711) Lt. Joshua Otto USS New Hampshire (SSN 778) Lt. j.g. Richard Padron USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (B) Lt. Gregory Pavone USS North Dakota (SSN 784) Lt. Jacqueline Penichet USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (G) Lt. j.g. Marcus Perez USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) Lt. j.g. Andrew Pfau USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) Lt. Mark Pfender TTF Kings Bay FLT TT Lt. Charles Peirsall USS Helena (SSN 725) Lt. Julie Plessinger USS Minnesota (SSN 783) Lt. Landon Pogue USS Montpelier (SSN 765) Lt. Eugene Portner NOPF Whidbey Island Lt. j.g. Gregory Poser USS Connecticut (SSN 22) Lt. George Prieto USS Missouri (SSN 780) Lt. Travis Probe USS Scranton (SSN 756) Lt. Michael Protesto USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (B) Naval Education and Training Command (NETC) announced its 2017 Military Instructors of the Year (IOY) during a ceremony at the National Naval Aviation Museum aboard Naval Air Station Pensacola on Dec. 14. For one IOY nominee standing before the crowd, the drive to be a better leader started with simply being a better mentor. Lt. Christopher DeMatteo, assigned to Submarine Learning Facility (SLF), Norfolk, understands that teaching is not just measured by how well information is presented but also how relevant that information is and how well his students understand it.DeMatteo teaches about 25 students a month, which includes junior officers and enlisted Submariners, and attributes his success to his exposure to good and bad instructors and mentors early in his career. To expand his own knowledge as an instructor, DeMatteo pursued his Master Training Specialist (MTS) qualification. The MTS designation, not earned by all instructors, serves to recognize outstanding individual effort and command training professionalism. As an MTS-qualified instructor, not only must DeMatteo demonstrate highly effective teaching skills but also take a leadership role in mentoring, instructing, and evaluating instructors and curriculums.The NETC Military IOY award program recognizes Navy and Marine Corps instructors and facilitators who exemplify personal excellence and display outstanding instructional and leadership performance. The program highlights the significant contributions of individuals from throughout the Naval Education and Training enterprise who have been nominated by their commands based on their sustained superior performance, accomplishments, community involvement, and personal and professional growth over the course of the past year. Submarine Learning Facility Officer Awarded IOY for 2017

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UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 35 34 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE Lt. Eric Provost USS Buffalo (SSN 715) Lt. j.g. Lyndel Raiford USS Springfield (SSN 761) Lt. Michael Rawls USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (G) Lt. William Reach USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (G) Lt. Joseph Rego USS Hawaii (SSN 776) Lt. Kristopher Restel USS Chicago (SSN 721) Lt. Philip Reynolds USS Providence (SSN 719) Lt. Wesley Riley USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) Lt. Daniel Roberts USS San Francisco (SSN 711) Lt. Jason Roberts USS Hampton (SSN 767) Lt. Jeremiah Roberts USS Asheville (SSN 758) Lt. Ryan Robins COMSUBRON 21 Lt. Cosmas Robless USS Buffalo (SSN 715) Lt. Ethan Rockett USS Nevada (SSBN 733) (G) Lt. Christopher Roehrborn USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (G) Lt. Logan Roy USS Annapolis (SSN 760) Lt. Andrew Rydalch USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (B) Lt. James Schlaerth USS Seawolf (SSN 21) Lt. j.g. Michael Schmitz USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) Lt. Kristin Schoemaker USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (G) Lt. j.g. Joseph Scordino USS Illinois (SSN 786) Lt. Michael Selover USS Virginia (SSN 774) Lt. j.g. Matthew Sheeler USS Topeka (SSN 754) Lt. James Sheil USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) (G) Lt. Daniel Shen USS North Carolina (SSN 777) Lt. Avery Sheridan USS Greeneville (SSN 772) Lt. Darren Sill USS Scranton (SSN 756) Lt. Derrick Simons USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (G) Lt. Michael Sjoholmsierchio USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (B) Lt. Joshua Smith USS Seawolf (SSN 21) Lt. Kara Smith USS Virginia (SSN 774) Lt. j.g. Scott Smith USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (B) Lt. j.g. Stephen Smith USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (B) Lt. Jason Snyder USS Dallas (SSN 700) Lt. Clinton Spencer USS Florida (SSGN 728) (G) Lt. j.g. Nathan Staats USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (B) Lt. Jonathan Stack USS Annapolis (SSN 760) Lt. Christopher Stevens USS Mississippi (SSN 782) Lt. Daniel Stickles USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (B) Lt. j.g. Mark Strine USS Annapolis (SSN 760) Lt. j.g. Cody Stueve USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) Lt. j.g. Tyler Susa USS Florida (SSGN 728) (B) Lt. Andrew Sweeney USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (G) Lt. Ross Sygulla USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (B) Lt. Manasseh Szwabowski USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) Lt. j.g. Joshua Taft USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (G) Lt Nicholas Takeuchi USS Missouri (SSN 780) Lt. Scott Tangen USS Virginia (SSN 774) Lt. j.g. Branden Tatasciore USS Albany (SSN 753) Lt. Andrew Taylor USS Key West (SSN 722) Lt. Alexander Teator USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (B) Lt. j.g. Whitney Tharp USS Missouri (SSN 782) Lt. Nathan Thiem USS Louisville (SSN 724) Lt. James Thomas USS Annapolis (SSN 760) Lt. Andrew Thompson USS Topeka (SSN 754) Lt. j.g. Mackenzie Threlkeld USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (B) Lt. j.g. Connor Timmins USS North Carolina (SSN 777) Lt. Bryan Tobin USS Boise (SSN 764) Lt. David Towle USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (G) Lt. Andrew Tresansky USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720) Lt. Harry Tuazon USS Florida (SSGN 728) (B) Lt. Michael Vahsen S PG USC Lt. James Van Kirk USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (G) Lt. Sean Vanosdale USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (G) Lt. Matthew Vegliante USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (G) Lt. j.g. Justin Versteeg USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) Lt. Michael Vongonten USS North Dakota (SSN 784) Lt. j.g. Zachary Vrtis USS Chicago (SSN 721) Lt. Michael Walker USS Topeka (SSN 754) Lt. Johnathan Wargi USS Connecticut (SSN 22) Lt. Christine Warnick USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (G) Lt. Eric Washkewicz USS Hartford (SSN 768) Lt. j.g. Thomas Wegener USS Florida (SSGN 728) (G) Lt. David Weise CTF 69 Lt. Andrea Weiss USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (B) Lt. j.g. Nicholas Weithman USS Maine (SSBN 741) (G) Lt. Zachary Westlake USS Jefferson City (SSN 759) Lt. Andrew Wilkins USS Olympia (SSN 717) Lt. j.g. Jon Williams USS Charlotte (SSN 766) Lt. Joshua Williams CNAVPERSCOM Millington Lt. j.g. Sean Williams USS Charlotte (SSN 766) Lt. j.g. Kevin Wilson USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720) Lt. Jordan Wingate USS Greeneville (SSN 772) Lt. j.g. Benjamin Winter USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (B) Lt. Michael Wissehr NNPTC Charleston SC Lt. Ryan Wisz COMSUBPAC Lt. Louis Wood USS Springfield (SSN 761) Lt. Curtis Wynar USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (B) Lt. Michael Wynveen USS Olympia (SSN 717) Lt. j.g. Cole Yager USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (B) Lt. Eddie Zeng USS Seawolf (SSN 21) Lt. j.g. Matthew Ziesmer USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (G)Qualified Engineering Department Master ChiefETNCS Nathaniel Abel TTF Bangor TT EMNCS Antonio Aguialdo PH SMMS MMNC Michael Allen USS Indiana (SSN 789) ETNCM Robert Amerman NSTCPACPHFLT TT ETNCM Brian Anderson COMSUBRON 17 EMNC Christoper Anderson USS Delaware (SSN 791) MMNCS Jonathan Andrews NPTU Charleston BOS MMNC Steven Andrews PH SMMS EMNCS Dean Anton USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (B) EMNCS Eric Armbrister USS Florida (SSGN 728) (B) EMNCS Michael Armstrong SMMSPMT Norfolk MMNCM Joaquin Arroyo COMSUBRON 4 ETNCS Kevin Audrain SUBTRAFAC Norfolk FLT EMNC Jonathan Baggett USS Florida (SSGN 728) (G) EMNCM Brent Bagwell USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (B) MMNCS Aaron Bailey USS Springfield (SSN 761) EMNC Matthew Bailey USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (G) MMNCS Thomas Baldwin USS Montpelier (SSN 765) EMNCM John Bale COMSUBRON 11 MMNC Samuel Barfuss COMSUBRON 1 EMNC John Barnett USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (B) ETNC Keith Bauer S NPTU Ballston EMNCM Christoper Bean COMSUBRON 1 ETNCS Joshua Bean USS La Jolla (SSN 701) MMNCS Tommy Beman USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) ETNCM James Berhalter NETPDC Pensacola Fla. MMNCS Paul Bermingham USS Asheville (SSN 758) MMNCM David Blake NRMD MD New London MMNC Daniel Blakeslee COMSUBRON 20 EMNCS Matthew Blankenship COMSUBRON 12 MMNC Richard Bolton TTF Bangor TT MMNCS Darrin Bostater USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (G) MMNCS Nicholas Bottoms COMSUBRON 1 MMNC Robert Bowen USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (G) EMNCS Matthew Brake USS New Mexico (SSN 779) MMNCS Joel Bradt NPTU Charleston D MTS ETNCM Jamie Brigman NNPTC Charleston S.C. EMNCM Stephen Brooke COMSUBLANT MMNC Tommy Brooks NRMD Point Loma MMNCM Michael Brougher USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) MMNC Timothy Brown USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (B) MMNCS Justin Buckman NUFLDASCOL Charleston MMNCS Joseph Buehring USS Emory Land (AS 39) M/SC MMNCS Andrew Burness COMSUBRON 7 ETNCM Robert Burns NPTU Charleston GST MMNCM Brandon Busch COMSUBRON 15 MMNCS Matthew Campanile COMSUBRON 6 EMNC Shane Cary USS San Juan (SSN 751) MMNC Joseph Cefaratti USS California (SSN 781) MMNCM Ronald Cervone Dir. Div. of Naval Reactors DOE EMNCS David Chechile USS Columbus (SSN 762) ETNCS Leon Chen COMSUBGRU 8 ETNCS Damian Chenot USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (G) ETNCS Patrick Childs NPTU Ballston Spa BOS MMNCS Andrew Chupashko USS Illinois (SSN 786) MMNCM Darrin Clarke TTF Kings Bay FLT TT MMNCM Jason Clough COMSUBRON 17 ETNC Kenneth Cochran USS San Juan (SSN 751) MMNC Cory Codd USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (B) EMNCM Aaron Coffey COMSUBLANT EMNCS Aaron Coffey USS Maine (SSBN 741) (B) MMNCS Michael Coffman COMSUBLANT ETNC Timothy Coleman USS Nevada (SSBN 733) (B) MMNCS Chase Connell COMSUBRON 11 MMNC Anthony Conner NRMD PAC MMNC Aaron Cook USS Greeneville (SSN 772) MMNC Brian Cooper USS Helena (SSN 725) MMNCM Jason Cox COMSUBRON 20 MMNC Seth Crain USS Washington (SSN 787) MMNC Ian Cross NPTU Charleston GST MMNCS Justin Daggett NSUBSUPF New London Conn. ETNCS John Daigle COMSUBRON 4 MMNC Aaron Dankof USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (G) ETNCS Evan Davis USS Virginia (SSN 774) MMNCS Robbie Davis USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (G) EMNCM Johnny Dawes COMSUBRON 7 MMNCS Arthur Dearmond USS Ohio (SSBN 726) (G) ETNCM Kieth Deliteris NUFLDASCOL Charleston ETNCS Daniel Denault COMSUBRON 19 MMNCM Joseph Devore PH NSYD & IMF ETNCS Shaun Dewar NPTU Ballston Spa MARF EMNCS Derek Diener PSBFOROPS COMP MMNCS Jason Dill USS Buffalo (SSN 715) MMNC Craig Double COMSUBRON 6 MMNCS David Drury NSSC New London, Conn. OTH MMNCM Ryan Dwyer NPTU Ballston Spa BOS ETNCS Hunter Dyer USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723) EMNCS Christopher Echeandia S NPTU Charleston S.C. MMNC James Echtle USS Buffalo (SSN 715) EMNCS Michael Edwards USS Columbia (SSN 771) MMNC Kalani Eli NSTCPACPHFLT TT MMNCM Eric Emrick COMSUBLANT MMNCS Alan Engle SMMS PMT Bangor MMNC Jeremy Erickson COMSUBRON 17 MMNCM Christopher Farrell PSBFOROPS COMP EMNCM David Field USS Oregon (SSN 793) EMNC Christopher Fisher COMSUBRON 7 ETNCM Brad Flemmons USS Louisville (SSN 724) ETNCS Gregory Foerster SHPYD REP Portsmouth EMNCS Anthony Fortner SMMS PMT Kings Bay EMNCS Sean Fortney COMSUBRON 17 ETNCS Adam Foster USS Boise (SSN 764) MMNCM William Foutz PSBFOROPS COMP MMNC Nicholas Francis COMSUBRON 4 EMNCS Cory Frazier USS Chicago (SSN 721) ETNC Kevin Frey USS Montpelier (SSN 765) MMNC John Fronek USS Colorado (SSN 788) MMNC Victor Fuller USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (B) MMNC Bruce Fullmer USS Tucson (SSN 770) EMNC James Gagnon SUBTRAFAC NORFLT EMNCM Angelo Galindo COMSUBGRU 8 ETNCS Zachary Gallegos USS North Carolina (SSN 777) ETNC John Garcia NPTU Charleston GST MMNCM Franklin Gardner Dir. Div. of Naval Reactors DOE

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UNDERSEA WARFARE WINTER 2018 37 36 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE EMNC Michael Garland USS New Hampshire (SSN 778) ETNCM Craig Garner USS Florida (SSGN 728) (G) ETNCS David Gaughan COMSUBGRU 8 MMNCM Joshua Geasey NPTU Charleston BOS ETNCS James Gerow USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) (B) EMNC John Gibbons USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (G) MMNC Robert Gilkerson USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (G) MMNCM Matthew Glisson COMSUBGRU 10 MMNC Christopher Godt COMSUBRON 15 EMNC Patrick Golub USS Hawaii (SSN 776) ETNC Raymond Gomez USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (G) ETNC Edwardo Gonzalez USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723) ETNCM James Gorman USS Indiana (SSN 789) EMNCS Nathan Gottsch USS Columbus (SSN 762) EMNCS Matthew Gowan TRIREFAC Kings Bay MMNC Alex Gozzola USS Minnesota (SSN 783) MMNCS Brian Green COMSUBRON 12 EMNCS Jonathan Green USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (B) EMNCS Kenneth Green COMSUBRON 15 PMT EMNC Robert Green USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (B) MMNCS Michael Griffith COMSUBRON 19 EMNC Theodore Griffith COMSUBRON 4 MMNCS Dominick Grimaldi USS Providence (SSN 719) EMNCM Derek Gruell NPS Charleston BOS ETNC Michael Halajian USS Charlotte (SSN 766) MMNCM Jimmy Hall NUFLDASCOL Charleston EMNCS Randy Hall USS Dallas (SSN 700) ETNC Matthew Hallbauer USS Buffalo (SSN 715) MMNCS Michael Haraburda USS Olympia (SSN 717) ETNC Brian Harper USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) MMNCS Paul Harton NPTU Ballston Spa GST ETNCM Corey Haselerhansen NSTCP SITE FTT MMNC Jace Hastert COMSUBRON 16 MMNCS Todd Hatch USS Scranton (SSN 756) MMNCS William Haussler COMSUBRON 12 MMNCS Jason Hays COMSUBRON 15 EMNCM David Hefel NPTU Charleston BOS MMNCM Scott Heinchon SHPYD REP Newport News EMNCS Craig Heinzeroth USS Toledo (SSN 769) EMNCM Todd Hennon NPTU Charleston GST MMNC James Henrie SMMS PMT N L MMNCM Bryan Henry USS La Jolla (SSN 701) EMNCS Adrian Hilderbrand USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (G) ETNCS Jeremy Hill USS Seawolf (SSN 21) MMNCS Christopher Hisey USS Alabama (SSBN 731) (G) EMNCM Robert Hitchcock USS Frank Cable (AS 40) M/SC ETNC Donovan Hixson USS Newport News (SSN 750) MMNC Matthew Hoff COMSUBRON 12 MMNC James Hoffmeyer USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (G) ETNCM Shane Hollander USS Delaware (SSN 791) ETNC Matthew Holman USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) EMNCS Richard Holtmeyer USS California (SSN 781) MMNCM Gerry Hooker SUBTRAFAC Norfolk FLT ETNCS Zane Hornsby SUBSCOL FLT TT EMNCS Mark Hubble SUBDEVRON 5 STAFF ETNCS Kevin Hudson TTF Kings Bay FLT TT EMNC Jeremy Hughes USS John Warner (SSN 785) MMNC Gregory Hunt NUFLDASCOL Charleston S.C. ETNCS Justin Huntley NPTU Ballston Spa BOS EMNC James Hutchinson COMSUBRON 6 ETNCS Edward Jackson USS Washington (SSN 787) MMNCS Paul Jackson USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) (G) MMNCM Lynn Jacobson COMSUBRON 7 MMNCS Jesse Jelinek NRMD Kings Bay MMNC Wayne Jenkins USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (B) MMNCM Charles Johnson USS Bremerton (SSN 698) MMNCS Roy Johnson USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (B) MMNCS Steven Johnson NRMD PAC MMNCS Michael Johnston TTF Bangor TT MMNCM Hans Jones NPTU Charleston BOS MMNC Gary Kalapinski USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (B) EMNC Curtis Kammerer USS South Dakota (SSN 790) MMNCS Timothy Kenny COMSUBRON 19 MMNCS Ronald Kielbasa USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) ETNC Scott Kimbler USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (B) MMNCS John King USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (B) ETNCS Alan Kinman CNAVPERSCOM Millington ETNCS Joshua Knauer SHIPYARD REP Groton, Conn. EMNC Scott Koenig USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) MMNCM Christopher Konopka COMSUBRON 6 ETNC Joshua Kornmann SUBDEVRON 5 STAF MMNCS David Labreche USS Key West (SSN 722) MMNCS George Landsberger NPTU Charleston GST MMNCS Jeffrey Larrabee NPTU Charleston BOS ETNCS Christopher Lawrence USS Jefferson City (SSN 759) MMNCS Elton Lee USS San Juan (SSN 751) ETNCM Anthony Liss USS North Dakota (SSN 784) ETNCS Christopher Little NUFLDASCOL Charleston EMNC Matthew Looney USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) MMNCM James Lucky BUREAU PERSONNEL EMNC Daniel Macomber USS Virginia (SSN 774) EMNC Mitch Mahan USS Louisville (SSN 724) ETNCS Nicholas Manning USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) (B) MMNC Justin Marchione USS San Francisco (SSN 711) ETNC Thomas Marsland USS Connecticut (SSN 22) MMNCS Brandon Martin USS Albany (SSN 753) ETNCS Frank Mason USS Charlotte (SSN 766) MMNC Christopher Matter USS Illinois (SSN 786) MMNCM Matthew Matteson CNR Arlington Va. ETNCS Bradley May TTF Bangor TT MMNCM Wayne Maynor NUFLDASCOL Charleston ETNCS Ethan Mayo USS Texas (SSN 775) ETNC Anthony Mazza NPTU Charleston D MTS MMNCS Edward McGuire USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (B) ETNC Brian McInvale USS Missouri (SSN 780) ETNCM Steven McKee COMSUBRON 16 MMNCS Stephen McKinley USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) (G) ETNCM Thomas McKinney COMSUBLANT MMNCM Michael McMurtray SHIPYARD REP NNSY EMNCM Matthew McNulty COMSUBRON 16 ETNCS Ryan McVeigh NPTU Charleston D MTS ETNC Ronald McVicker USS Minnesota (SSN 783) EMNCM James Meador USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (G) MMNCS David Medert USS Topeka (SSN 754) EMNCS Michael Mercer NUFLDASCOL Charleston MMNC Jesse Miller USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (B) ETNCS Lyle Milner FSC Great Lakes EMNC Bradley Monell USS Dallas (SSN 700) EMNCM Zachary Montello SR ENL ACAD ETNC John Moran MTS 701 Charleston S.C. ETNCM Scott Morgan CSP SHIPYARD REP PS EMNCS Michael Morris USS La Jolla (SSN 701) MMNCS Randall Morris NPTU Charleston D MTS MMNCS Michael Mrsny NPTU Charleston D MTS MMNC Kenneth Murray USS Annapolis (SSN 760) EMNCM Mark Murray NPTU Ballston Spa BOS MMNCS Steven Nagle TTF BANGOR ETNCM Richard Nantell USS South Dakota (SSN 790) MMNCS Ben Narkis COMSUBRON 20 EMNC Wayne Neufeld USS Alabama (SSBN 731) G) MMNCS Joshua Newcomb NPTU Ballston Spa BOS MMNCS Jonathan Noll Dir. Div. of Naval Reactors DOE MMNCS Matthew Noury USS New Hampshire (SSN 778) MMNCS Michael Nutt USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (B) MMNC Alex Oconnor COMSUBRON 11 EMNCM Shawn Olmstead USS Vermont (SSN 792) MMNCS David Olsen COMSUBRON 15 PMT MMNC Cody Olson USS Scranton (SSN 756) EMNC Peter Olson USS Minnesota (SSN 783) MMNCM Jacob Orlowski USS Hartford (SSN 768) MMNCS Edward Oskorep USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720) ETNCM John Oviatt TRIREFAC Kings Bay MMNC Jeffrey Owen NRMD MD New London MMNCM Steven Owens TTF Bangor TT MMNCS James Oxendine USS Minnesota (SSN 783) MMNCS Dustin Palmer SUBDEVRON 5 STAF MMNCS Jonathon Parks SUBTRAFAC Norfolk FLT EMNC Trent Parrish COMSUBRON 6 MMNCM Ryan Parsons COMSUBRON 19 ETNC Jeremy Patin USS Bremerton (SSN 698) ETNCM Matthew Payne COMSUBGRU 9 MMNC Apollo Pedersen SMMS PMT Kings Bay MMNC David Pefley USS Pasadena (SSN 752) EMNC Brett Percich COMSUBRON 19 MMNCS Robert Perry USS Hampton (SSN 767) ETNCS Joshua Peterson COMSUBRON 12 MMNC Glen Phillips USS John Warner (SSN 785) ETNCM Eric Playdon COMSUBPAC EMNCS Donte Polson USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) ETNC Jason Polzin USS Hawaii (SSN 776) MMNC Brian Ponder USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (G) MMNC Joseph Powell COMSUBRON 19 ETNCM Gregory Prichard PSBFOROPS COMP MMNC John Primm TTF Kings Bay EMNCS Michael Quackenbush NPTU Ballston MARF MMNCS James Qualls USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (G) EMNCS Travis Radzyminski USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723) ETNCS Steven Ralph NUFLDASCOL Charleston MMNC Nathaniel Ranck SHIPYARD REP Newport News MMNC William Ransdell NRMD Kings Bay MMNCM Sanjiv Rao PSBFOROPS COMP EMNC Jonathan Ray NPTU Charleston GST EMNC Jesse Rayburn USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (G) ETNC Robert Reed TRIREFAC Kings Bay EMNCS Jason Reifsnyder USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (B) EMNCS Michael Reuss USS Hawaii (SSN 776) EMNC Timothy Rhodes USS Michigan (SSGN 727) (B) MMNCS Alan Rice CSP SHIPYARD REP PS EMNCM Eric Riddle NPTU Charleston BOS EMNC Charles Rivers NRMD Kings Bay 2017 Stockdale Award Recipients AnnouncedNavy announced the two 2017 Vice Admiral James Bond Stockdale Leadership Award recipients in NAVADMIN 215/17. Cmdr. Brian M. Drechsler, former commanding officer of Sea, Air, Land (SEAL) Team Five is the Pacific Fleet recipient and Cmdr. Eric M. Sager, former commanding officer of USS California (SSN 781) is the Fleet Forces recipient. The two recipients were nominated by their peers, who were also eligible for the award, and chosen from among eight finalists to receive the award. The Stockdale award was established in honor of Vice Adm. Stockdale whose distinguished naval career symbolized the highest standards of excellence in both personal conduct and leadership. It is presented annually to two commissioned officers on active duty in the grade of commander or below who are serving in command of a single ship, submarine, aviation squadron, Sea, Air, Land (SEAL) team, naval special warfare squadron, SEAL delivery vehicle team, special boat team, explosive ordnance disposal mobile unit, mobile diving and salvage unit, or Navy special clearance team and who serve as examples of excellence in leadership and conspicuous contribution to the improvement of leadership in the Navy.

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38 WINTER 2018 UNDERSEA WARFARE MMNCM Courtney Roach NPTU Ballston Spa GST EMNCS James Robinson USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (G) EMNCS Andrew Rockman USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (B) EMNCM Ryan Rolfe NPTU Ballston Spa BOS MMNCS Anthony Romano SHIPYARD REP Groton EMNC James Ross COMSUBRON 20 MMNCS Michael Rossow S NPTU Charleston S.C. MMNCS Jason Rubenstein USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (B) MMNCS Steven Rueschenberg USS Mississippi (SSN 782) ETNC Aaron Ruffin USS New Hampshire (SSN 778) ETNC Steven Rush COMSUBGRU 7 MMNCS John Russo USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) (G) ETNCM Justin Ryman USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (G) MMNC Arnoldo Saenz BANGOR SMMS PMT ETNC Michael Schaefer USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (B) ETNCS Todd Schaefer NRMD Kings Bay ETNCS Darby Schaff SLCDET San Diego FLT TT MMNCM Brian Schlapkohl NPTU Charleston GST MMNCM Christopher Schlegel PSBFOROPS COMP ETNC Justin Schow COMSUBRON 20 ETNCM Eric Schroeder USS Maine (SSBN 741) (B) EMNCS Eric Schulte USS Tucson (SSN 770) MMNCS Benjamin Schulz USS Colorado (SSN 788) EMNC Steven Schulz USS Bremerton (SSN 698) ETNC Zachary Scott USS Indiana (SSN 789) MMNC Daniel Selby USS Nevada (SSBN 733) (B) MMNCS Shane Shadrick NNPTC Charleston S.C. EMNCS Joseph Shaffner USS Greeneville (SSN 772) ETNCS Robert Shawver COMSUBRON 17 EMNCM Jonathan Sheldon SUBSCOL FLT TT MMNCM John Shingleton TTF Kings Bay FLT TT EMNCS Heath Shirley USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (B) MMNCS Wesley Shuman NRMD Point Loma ETNC Joseph Simecek NUFLDASCOL Charleston S.C. EMNCS Bitt Sims USS Santa Fe (SSN 763) EMNCS Michael Sims USS Pasadena (SSN 752) MMNCM Charles Skelton NPTU Charleston BOS EMNCS Jerome Smallwood TTF Kings Bay EMNCS Alexander Smerz PH NSYD & IMF ETNCS Colin Smith COMSUBRON 19 EMNCS Daniel Smith SLC Groton Conn. ETNCS Matthew Smith USS John Warner (SSN 785) ETNCS Randy Sparks USS Annapolis (SSN 760) ETNCS Duston Spicer USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (B) MMNC David Spisak COMSUBRON 4 MMNC Eric Stanton NPTU Ballston Spa BOS EMNC Randell Stark SUBTRAFAC Norfolk FLT MMNCS Jason Statler USS Nevada (SSBN 733) (B) MMNCM Aaron Stein SUBTRAFAC Norfolk FLT ETNCS Jonathan Stephens NPTU BALL MARF MMNCS Scott Stephenson SLC Groton Conn. EMNC Mark Steward USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) (B) EMNCS Robert Stough USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) (G) EMNC Jonathan Sword USS Illinois (SSN 786) MMNC Scott Tadevich COMSUBRON 1 MMNC Albert Taylor USS Santa Fe (SSN 763) MMNCM Glenn Teter USS Missouri (SSN 780) MMNC Bryan Thebo COMSUBRON 16 EMNC Richard Thompson NNPTC Charleston S.C. ETNCS Ivan Tirona USS Santa Fe (SSN 763) MMNCM Christopher Tolliver CNAVPERSCOM Millington EMNC Nathaniel Toole COMSUBRON 1 ETNCS Luis Torres USS Alexandria (SSN 757) ETNC Joel Tortoriello USS Oregon (SSN 793) ETNC Bradley Tracy NPTU Charleston D MTS MMNC Erik Turner USS Missouri (SNS 780) ETNCS Terrance Tyson COMSUBRON 15 EMNC Matthew Vance NPTU Charleston D MTS MMNCS Gary Van Dyke COMSUBRON 20 MMNCS Jason Vangorden USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) (G) EMNC Anthony Vezina SUBDEVRON 5 STAFF MMNCS Craig Vivian USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (G) MMNC Joshua Walton USS Florida (SSGN 728) (B) ETNCS Anthony Waters USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (B) EMNCM Michael Watson PSBFOROPS COMP MMNC Walter Webb USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (B) EMNCS David Welch USS Nevada (SSBN 733) (G) EMNCS Travis White USS San Francisco (SSN 711) ETNC Auston Whitmer S NUFLDASCOL S.C. MMNCM Theodore Whitmer COMSUBGRU 7 MMNCS Christopher Wilkerson USS La Jolla (SSN 701) EMNC Carl Will NPTU Charleston D MTS MMNC Joshua Willett USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723) MMNCS Joseph Winn USS Helena (SSN 725) ETNC Joseph Wisniewski USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) (B) EMNC Peter Woelkers USS Washington (SSN 787) MMNCS Benjamin Woellert NPTU Ballston Spa BOS ETNCM Leonard Wolf COMSUBRON 20 ETNC David Wright COMSUBRON 7 MMNCS Joseph Wright COMSUBRON 7 ETNCS Andrew Yates USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (B) MMNC Timothy Zenner USS Mississippi (SSN 782) MMNC Jason Zerweck USS Springfield (SSN 761) UNDERSEA WARFARE Magazine is looking for this years top submarine-related photos for the 19th Annual Photo Contest. The best of the best will be published in the Summer 2018 edition. Established in 1999 and co-sponsored by the Naval Submarine League and the Director, Submarine Warfare (OPNAV N97), we recognize four winning photos each year with the following cash awards: 1st Place: $500, 2nd Place: $250, 3rd Place: $200 and Honorable Mention: $50.PhotoANNOUNCING: Note: Entries must be received by June 15, 2018. However time permitting, photos received shortly after the deadline will be considered. Digital submissions must be at least 5 by 7, at least 300 dots-per-inch (dpi), and previously unpublished in printed media. Each person is limited to five submissions, which can be sent as JPG or other digital photo format to the email address below. Printed photos may also be mailed to the following address: Military Editor Undersea W arfare CNO 2000 Navy P entagon W ashington, D.C. 20350-2000 Or email to: underseawarfare@hotmail.com Dont Let the Sun go Down on Your Chance to Enter the 19th Annual NSL Photo Contest Naval Leagues 19th Annual Submarine Contest Sunset in the Bahamas by SCPO (SS) Greg Foerster, USN

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A Brief History of U.S. Submarines