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Naval aviation news

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Title:
Naval aviation news
Creator:
United States -- Office of the Chief of Naval Operations
United States -- Navy Dept. -- Bureau of Aeronautics
United States -- Naval Air Systems Command
Naval Historical Center (U.S.)
Place of Publication:
Washington, DC
Publisher:
Chief of Naval Operations and Naval Air Systems Command, Navy Dept.
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monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
: ill., ports. ; 28-30 cm.

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Aeronautics, Military -- United States ( lcsh )
Aeronautics, Military -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
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serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )

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Began publication Oct. 1, 1919.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
026997358 ( ALEPH )
01759530 ( OCLC )
33029553 ( LCCN )
0028-1417 ( ISSN )
Classification:
VG93 .N35 ( lcc )
629.1 ( ddc )

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News letter

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Digital Military Collection

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PAGE 1

MH-60S gunner seatREDESIGNED FOR ENDURANCE WHATS INSIDE HMS Queen Elizabeth Aircrew Meet F-35B EMALS and AAG Prove Viability Osprey Overhaul Underway THE FLAGSHIP P UBLICA T ION OF N AVAL A VIA T ION SINCE 1917 SUMMER 2018

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A C-2A Greyhound assigned to the Rawhides of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 40 prepares to launch aboard aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77).U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Joe Boggio

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rfrntbr SUMMER 2018 3 Flightline Grampaw Pettibone AirscoopThe French Connection: U.S., French Navies Complete Chesapeake 2018 Combined Exercise Catch and Release: EMALS and AAG on USS Gerald Ford UKs HMS Queen Elizabeth Aircrew Meet the F-35B MH-60S Gunner Seat: Prototype Well Received Osprey Overhaul: Updating the MV-22B Fleet Marines Use 3-D Printing to Access Replacement Parts Quickly C-130 Readiness: Navy Learns from Air Force and Coast Guard Winch Hunt: New Cargo Winch Saves CH-53K Program Millions FRCSW Upgrades Its Environmental and Safety Standards Aviation Maintenance Professionals Focus on Improving ReadinessProfessional Reading CNOs Professional Reading Program MH-60S gunner seatREDESIGNED FOR ENDURANCE WHATS INSIDE HMS Queen Elizabeth Aircrew Meet F-35B EMALS and AAG Prove Viability Osprey Overhaul Underway THE FLAGSHIP P UBLICA T ION OF N AVAL A VIA T ION SINCE 1917 SUMMER 2018 On the cover: An MH-60S Seahawk helicopter, assigned to the Chargers of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 26, takes o from the ight deck of Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Pinckney (DDG 91) during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Craig Z. Rodarte) Its been a busy summer in Naval Aviation. In May, aircrew from the HMS Queen Elizabeth, agship of the Royal Navys new class of aircraft carriers, visited Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland, for their rst live glimpse of the F-35B Lightning II (page 24), and a prototype of a new gunner seat for the MH-60S Seahawk debuted to great enthusiasm at the Naval Helicopter Association Symposium (page 28). On May 31, Naval Air Systems Command welcomed its new commander, Vice. Adm. Dean Peters, and he outlines his priorities for us in this issues Flightline on page 4. On July 9, a second MV-22B Osprey entered the Common Conguration-Readiness and Modernization program, or CC-RAM, an eort to consolidate the 70-plus variations in the MV-22B eet by upgrading 129 Block B Ospreys to the current Block C standard. Five days later, USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) entered a yearlong post-shakedown availability period (page 8) after spending the previous year conducting postdelivery test and evaluation, which included the execution of 747 aircraft launches and recoveries with the Navys groundbreaking new Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System and Advanced Arresting Gear (page 21). Meanwhile, Marines are using 3-D printers to produce replacement parts on-demand (page 34), and testing has begun on an alternative, commercially available cargo winch expected to save the CH-53K King Stallion program more than $60 million (page 38). On the back cover: Marines assigned to the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit perform maintenance on an MV-22B Osprey on the ight deck of amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7). (U.S. Navy photo by MCS Dominick A. Cremeans) Inside Back CoverDEPARTMENTS FEATURES ALSO IN THIS ISSUE ON THE COVERSummer 2018 V olume 100, No. 3

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Director, Air WarfareRear Adm. Scott D. Conn, USNEditor in ChiefAndrea Watters, Naval Air Systems CommandEditorial BoardB.R. Brown, Naval Aviation Enterprise Stan Coerr, Headquarters, Marine Corps Cmdr. Ronald Flanders, USN, Naval Air Forces Capt. Craig Lee, USN, Naval Air Systems Command Richard Holcomb, Air Warfare N98 FORCM Bill Smalts, USN, Naval Air Force, AtlanticNaval Aviation News StaFred Flerlage, Art Director, Naval Air Systems Command Je Newman, Sta Writer, Naval Air Systems CommandContributing EditorsEmanuel Cavallaro, Naval Air Systems Command Emily Funderburk, Naval Air Systems Command Noel Hepp, Naval Air Systems Command Melissa A. Johnson, Naval Air Systems CommandColumnistsCmdr. Peter Mersky, USNR (Ret.), Book Review Editor Capt. Ted Wilbur, USNR (Ret.), Contributing Artist Cmdr. Bryan Dickerson, USN (Ret.), Contributing EditorSubmission GuidelinesCommands may send news and announcements such as awards, rescues, milestones and other achievements to nannews@navy.mil. Photos of Naval Aviation-oriented activities are always welcome. For longer feature articles, contact the editor in advance. Military contributors should forward articles about their commands only after internal security review and with command approval. For more information, contact us at nannews@navy.mil or 301-342-6024.Personal Subscriptions and Address ChangesA one-year subscription (four issues) is $23.00 domestic, $32.00 overseas. For online orders go to bookstore.gpo.gov. For mail orders, cite Naval Aviation News and send check, money order, or credit card information to U.S. Government Printing Oce Orders, P.O. Box 979050, St. Louis, MO 63197-9000. For fax orders, call 202-512-2104. For phone orders, call 202-512-1800, Mon-Fri, 0700-1830. For email orders, send to contactcenter@gpo.gov. For changes of address, also send to contactcenter@gpo.gov; include full name and both old and new addresses.Ocial Subscriptions and Address ChangesSubscriptions to military and government agencies are provided free of charge through the Naval Aviation News office. Email nannews@navy.mil, send mail to Naval Aviation News, N A V A IR Public Affairs Office, 47123 Buse R oad, Building 2272, Suite 346, Patuxent R iver, MD 20670 or call 301-342-6024. Naval Aviation News (USPS 323-310; I SSN 0028-1417) is published quarterly for the Chief of Naval Operations by the Naval Air Systems Command. Periodicals postage is paid at Washington, D.C., and additional mailing oces. The Secretary of the Navy has determined that this publication is necessary in the transaction of business required by law. The use of a name of any specic manufacturer, commercial product, commodity or service in this publication does not imply endorsement by the Navy. Any opinions herein are those of the authors, and do not necessarily represent the views of Naval Aviation News, the Department of the Navy or the Department of Defense. Approved for public release: SPR No. 2018-624 Postmaster: Send address changes to Naval Aviation News, N A V A IR Public Aairs Oce, 47123 Buse Road, Building 2272, Suite 346, Patuxent R iver, MD 20670.NAVAL A VIATION NEWS IS ONLINE AT http://navalaviationnews.navylive.dodlive.mil S END Y O UR F EEDBACK T O : nannews@navy.mil4 NAVAL A VIATION NEWSFlightline T ell us about your career.Ive served several acquisition assignments for NAVAIR and worked with our incredible workforce for many years supporting the eet. Having said that, I learned a lot about eet support in my rst cruise as a helicopter pilot back when I was just an ensign ying H-2 Seasprites in the North Atlantic on board USS Jesse L. Brown (FF 1089), a Knox-class frigate. During that cruise, we spent hours tracking and trailing several Victor-class submarines deploying out of area, and I learned the criticality of shipboard operations. Despite successful operations, we also experienced many maintenance and reliability-related chal lenges during that cruise: the loss of an engine and subsequent single-engine landing to the back of a pitching deck during a very dark night. When opening the engine can of the replacement engine, there were multiple components with IOU tags in place of where the components should be. We werent sure exactly why the engine failed, and so it was a little disconcerting to remove the fuel control and oil lter from the failed engine so that we could have a replacement. rough the continual wear of ight deck operations, we also needed to replace the main landing tire. Luckily, there was one available in our pack-up kit, but unluckily, it turned out to be an F-14 main-mount tire. Despite all of these hic cups, there was a singular focus on mission accomplishment that was evident in everyday operations on that ship. Why are you excited about taking command of NAVAI R ?First and foremost is the opportunity to continue to serve the Navy and the Marine Corps. Naval Aviation is an incredible enterprise, with a rich and distinguished past, and the future success of Naval Aviation, to a large degree, is in our hands. Our people are truly the best in the business. ey believe in the mission and are committed to the success of our Sailors and Marines. We have an opportunity to eliminate the reliability and maintenance-related issues that I experienced back in 1987 and give our aircrews more time to operate their mission systems instead of worrying about how the aircra will perform or if it will be available. Secondly, this is an exciting time for NAVAIR. Congress has made an in vestment in strengthening our nations defense. Its up to us to execute smartly. Expectations are high, and I am condent we will deliver.What are the biggest challenges facing Naval Aviation and NAVAI R today?Let me rst talk about opportunities. For many years, weve been in survival mode from a program standpoint, especially when procuring our Q&A with New NAVAIR CommanderVice Adm. Dean Peters, who came aboard May 31 as commander of Naval Air Systems Command, shared his priorities with Naval Aviation News.

PAGE 5

SUMMER 2018 5 aircra and weapons systems, and from a readiness enabler standpoint. With the support of Congress and the administra tion, we now have a coherent National Defense Strategy and clear commanders intent. Congress has appropriated the funds needed for program wholeness and readiness recovery. Our challenge will be to take advantage of this increased support in a timely manner and get the most for every dollar entrusted to us whether its procurement funding, spares or eet support. How did your assignment as the program executive ocer for Air Anti-Submarine Warfare, Assault and Special Mission Programs (PEO(A)) prepare you for your role as NAVAIR Commander? In the grand scheme of Naval Aviation, our program oces are accountable for providing capability and capacity to the eet and coordinating all elements of life-cycle sustainment. e success or failure of NAVAIR can only be measured by the success or failure of our acquisition programs, both in terms of how our current equipment is supported in the eet, and how quickly and eectively new capability is delivered and supported. Having served in multiple acquisition/program manager positions, Ive seen what it takes to be successful: A shared identity (truly comprehending that we are the most responsible for eet readiness and eet capability) A shared vision (to aggressively provide readiness and capability at ever-increasing levels of safety, reliability, interoperability, maintainability and aordability) An organization that trusts and empowers teams to accom plish the visionThe Navys top three priorities are restoring readiness and increasing lethality and capacity to project power and respond to threats. What strengths does NAVAIR bring to the ght?Lets start with readiness. is is our No. 1 priority and strategic imperative. NAVAIR is not the only organization responsible for readiness of the eet, but NAVAIRand Im including the Program Executive Ocesis the organization most responsible for eet readiness. is is an important point. ere are several organizations that contribute to readiness, but no other organization has the visibility and resources to stitch together all stakeholders on the material side. With the right tools, the Air Boss and Marine Corps Deputy Commandant for Aviation can generate readiness in support of our National Defense Strategy. Being the most responsible is an intimidating commitment. But the good news is that we at NAVAIR have the engineering and logistics talent, highly skilled depot artisans, and world-class contracting and nancial managersand Im condent that we have the organizational will to make the eet successful. Lets also touch briey on capacity. is is another area where we have the opportunity to take advantage of increased resources by executing the procurement activities that result in greater capacity. ere is no guarantee that this resourc ing environment can be sustained, so it is imperative that we make the most of the opportunity while the support exists. It also requires us to be honest and timely if we cannot execute resources so they can be directed to other eet needs. HSL 32Invader 135 completed a hot refuel cycle on board the USS Jesse L. Brown (FF 1089), and launched for a night ASW sortie. At approximately 20-25 nm, the caution light panel ickered showing a fuel boost prob lem and then extinguished. Lt. Voorhies (HAC) took control, reported the problem to his ship and turned toward homeplate. Ens. Peters (CP) broke out the pocket checklist and started going through the appropri ate emergency procedures. AW2 Priestley made ready all gear for a possible ditching. The ship closed the aircrafts position. At 18 nm the No. 2 engine uctuated once (a 50 percent drop), regained its power output then completely amed out. Restart at tempts were unsuccessful. At 5-10 nm, with the ship in sight, all ordnance was jettisoned, excess fuel dumped, and the ship turned to the best wind recovery course. Superb airmanship and coordination between air crew and the ships crew resulted in a successful night, single-engine, small-deck landing.Bravo Zulu reprinted from the October 1987 issue of Approach magazine. From left to right, Lt. Gerald J. Voorhies, Ens. Dean Peters and AW2 Charles R. Priestley.Approach Bravo Zulu!Photo courtesy of Approach magazine

PAGE 6

6 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS A native of Louisville, Kentucky, Vice Adm. Dean Peters graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1985. Peters has post-graduate degrees in aeronautical engineering and telecommunications and is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, Class 102. After earning his wings as a naval aviator in 1986, he ew the SH-2F Seasprite in support of multiple detachments deployed to the North Atlantic, Persian Gulf and Gulf of Mexico, com pleting anti-submarine warfare, surface warfare and counter-narcotics operations embarked on four dierent ship classes. He served as detachment ocer-in-charge aboard USS Thomas C. Hart (FF 1092). As Commanding Ocer of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (HX) 21, the squadron accom plished more than 11,000 ight test hours and was the 2006 recipient of the CNO Safety Award. Peters has served in numerous acquisition billets. From November 2007 through July 2011, Peters served as program manager for the H-60 Helicopters Program Oce, delivering more than 150 helicopters, numerous upgrades and supporting the rst three carrier strike group deployments of the MH-60R and MH-60S Seahawks. From August 2011 to July 2014, Peters commanded the Presidential Helicopters Program Oce, leading the program through Mile stone B and contract award for the Engineering and Manufacturing Development Program. Peters ag assignments include Commander, Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division; Assistant NAVAIR Commander for Research and Engineering; and Program Executive Ocer, Air Anti-Submarine Warfare, Assault and Special Mission Programs (PEO(A)). He has more than 3,800 ight hours in xedand rotary-wing aircraft. Peters assumed responsibilities as Commander, Naval Air Systems Command in May 2018. What are your top three priorities for NAVAIR? My priorities for NAVAIR are the same as my priorities were for my squadron command, my program commands and each subsequent command: mission, people and relationships. Let me talk about each of these, a little out of order. PEO P LE: NAVAIR is a great place to work, because we take care of our people and respond to actionable feedback and because the work is exciting and meaningful. We will not make everyone happy 100 percent of the time, and our environment can be pressurized at times but under the right conditions, our people can accomplish anything. I expect our leaders to en courage people to think dierently, empower them to act boldly and eliminate distractions that get in their way. REL A T I O N SH IP S: NAVAIR is connected to, and dependent upon, many other entities, especially industry (large and small), and we need to cultivate those relationships. It starts with as suming goodwill and maintaining an open dialogue; and as an organization we will make this foundational. M ISS I O N : Mission is our No. 1 priority. Our mission is to acquire new capability (aircra, weapons systems and associ ated equipment) for the eet in a timely and aordable manner and to robustly sustain those aircra and equipment such that they are available and eective when required. Its really that simple. I mention it last to make this point: if we get everything else right and dont accomplish our mission, we have missed the mark.In terms of readiness, where do you think NAVAIR can make the biggest contribution to the eet? As mentioned a few times, NAVAIR is the organization most responsible for eet readiness. It starts with the design process and insisting on reliable and maintainable equipment and com ponents. Delivering operational-, intermediateand depot-level capability with our systems gives the eet the ability to control their own destiny to a much greater extent. We also procure the initial spares, determine the inspection intervals and establish the maintenance planning and sup port equipment requirements. ese are fundamental aspects of our mission. We are introducing new tools for tracking and monitoring maintenance, which will enable the Naval Supply Systems Command and the Defense Logistics Agency to predict parts requirements. Were also using reliability-centered main tenance to attack reliability issues and extend the life of compo nents. I could go on, but I think you get the picture. NAVAIR is integral to the readiness of our eet communities. Anything else you would like to add?Weve talked about speed and responsiveness. e best ideas to ac complish our work will come from those closest to the work. at is what will ultimately make us faster, more responsive and more eective. Its an honor to serve this incredible organization in support of Naval Aviation. ank you for the opportunity to share these thoughts with your readers. U.S. Navy photo by Adam Skoczylas

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SUMMER 2018 7 Gramps from Yesteryear: May-June 2008 Illustration by Grampaw Pettibone Mishaps like this one get Gramps to wondering if anybody out there listens to him at all. If brief the ight, y the brief aint the oldest saw known to them what sport shoes o brown then I dont know what is. I dont care how many times you done own in an op area or how repetitive hops seem. BRIEF THE FLIGHT. FLY THE BRIEF. Oh, and another thing: debrief the ight. We may not have had a fancy ORM set up when I was yin missions, but we knew better than to ignore obvious risks. Not only did these folks ignore brieng proce dures, but then they ignored another tool ol Gramps thinks is pretty good. ORM is that new fangled tool to nd all the risks you might nota seen before they become trouble. Just one more step that might have saved some lives. Oh, you canas Nipper Pettibone saysblow me o if you want. But before you do, think of these four dead aviators and this midair that was oh-so-preventable. Nu said... again. All aircrew involved in a two-ship AH-1W Cobra mission had own a similar event in the same working area at least once in the previous two days. On this day, the mission commander did not use a brieng guide for the brief. ey did not discuss operational risk management during the brief nor did any of the aircrew sign an operational risk management (ORM) assessment. e mission commander did not brief instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) procedures, lost aircra procedures, or how the aircra were to rendezvous in ight if one aircra was delayed. At the conclusion of the brief there were no questions regarding the brief from the aircrew in attendance. Local authorities familiar with the area briefed the crew concerning hazards, noise sensitive areas and aireld operations. Just over an hour later, the lead Cobra launched to conduct night reconnaissance operations in its assigned area. e second aircra had maintenance issues during start up and launched 20 minutes later aer corrective maintenance. Upon checking in, local control trans ferred the division lead to a second facil ity. When Dash 2 checked in, the division lead asked the second aircra to state their position. Dash 2 replied, we are 14 miles northeast. Local control attempted to Cobra Crunch!contact Dash 1 but received no response. Dash 2 oered to relay. e ground control ler passed to Dash 2 where he wanted the second section to conduct ight recon naissance. Dash 2 relayed this information incorrectly. Dash 1s response was roger, we are looking at something, standby. Dash 2 then entered the working area and descended to approximately 300 feet. Eager to begin the reconnaissance mission and knowing that possible targets had been located, Dash 2 did so without determining the position of Dash 1. Less than two minutes later, the ight paths of Dash 1and Dash 2 merged in a coaltitude, right-to-right pass, at a separation of approximately 41 feet. Neither aircra made an evasive maneuver prior to the collision. e two Cobras blades struck approximately 3 feet from the blade tip, tearing the rotor head and transmission assemblies from both aircra. Both aircra crashed and burned with all four aviators killed. e subsequent investigation revealed that two of the mishap aviators had own as a crew a few nights before the fatal ight. During that ight, the crew made numerous procedural errors and examples of poor airmanship, including airspace encroachment without permission. But following that ight, the section did not conduct a debrief. Grampaw Pettibone says

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8 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS A irscoopCompiled by Je NewmanWASHINGTONUSS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) arrived at Huntington Ingalls Industries-Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Virginia, July 14, to begin a yearlong mainte nance and upgrade period. e ships post-shakedown availability/selected restricted availability (PSA/SRA) follows the ships successful completion of its post-delivery test and evaluation. Congratulations to everyone who has helped bring CVN 78 to this historic milestone, said Rear Adm. Brian Antonio, pro gram executive ocer for aircra carriers. Following Gerald R. Fords delivery to the Navy on May 31, 2017, the ships crew has been diligently and successfully conducting post-delivery testing and trial operations that identify construction and design issues. ey have been extremely eective in identifying any issues early, which helps us address them prior to returning to the eet. Operating at sea for 81 days through eight independent steaming events, Ford completed xedand rotary-wing aircra integration and compatibility testing, obtained an air trac control center certication and a JP-5 fuel system certication, participated in daytime and nighttime underway replenishment capability demonstrations and a ships defensive system demonstration, and underwent dual-band radar testing and propulsion plant operations. e ship completed nearly 750 shipboard aircra launches and recoveries against a plan of approximately 400 with the Electromagnetic Aircra Launch System and Advanced Arresting Gear. One year ago this month, we commissioned USS Gerald R. Ford, the worlds most technologically advanced aircra carrier. Since that historic day, Ford has performed exceptionally due to a combination of innovative engineers, skilled crasmen and professional and dedicated Sailors, said Rear Adm. Roy Kelley, commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic. Since commissioning, her accomplishments are many. As she enters a necessary maintenance period, Im excited to see what the future holds for CVN 78 when she returns to sea. No nation on earth can match the capability of USS Gerald R. Ford, a class of ship which will lead our Navy well into the 21st century. e scheduled 12-month PSA/SRA will install remaining combat systems, complete deferred work and correct remain ing discrepancies identied during sea trials and shakedown. e longest sequence of events, or critical path, for this PSA/ SRA period is advanced weapons elevator construction and advanced arresting gear upgrades. Aer the PSA/SRA, Ford will conduct further trials and testing, including full-ship shock trials, before its rst deploy ment. e ship will work up for deployment in parallel with its initial operational testing and evaluation. From Naval Sea Systems Command Corporate Communica tions and USS Gerald R. Ford Public Aairs. USS Gerald R. Ford Begins Post-Shakedown AvailabilityAircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) is pushed by tug boats as the ship enters Huntington Ingalls Newport News Shipbuilding to begin its postshakedown availability.U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Cat Campbell

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SUMMER 2018 9 Aircraft Carrier John F. Kennedy Reaches 75-Percent Structural CompletionNEWPORT NEWS, Va.Aircra carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) is 75-percent structurally complete aer recent instal lation of the forward area of the ships main deck, Huntington Ingalls Industries announced April 30. e second Gerald R. Ford-class carrier, Kennedy has been taking shape since its keel was laid in August 2015 at the companys Newport News Shipbuilding Division. e ship is be ing built using modular construction, whereby smaller sections of the ship are welded together to form structural units called superlis, which are then outt ted with piping, electrical equipment, cable, ventilation and joiner work before being lied from the assembly area into the dry dock. e 750-metric ton forward section of the main deck includes the machinery spaces located over the ships forward diesel generators, as well as the rst piece of the ight deck, which includes com mand and control, pilot ready rooms and additional support spaces, a jet blast de ector and components of the advanced arresting gear system. Following recent superlis, 341 of the ships total 447 sections are currently in place. Kennedy stands approximately 100 feet in height in the dry dock, with only the island and main mast remaining to bring the ship to its full height. A third key milestone was achieved when the rst two generators support ing the electromagnetic aircra launch system were installed. We are very proud of the progress we are making on the Kennedy, said Lucas Hicks, Newport News vice president for the CVN 79 program. e ship now is 75-percent structurally erected and more than 40-percent complete. Many of the improvements we have made over the construction of [USS Gerald R. Ford] CVN 78, including increased pre-outtting and performing more complex assemblies in our shops, will allow us to launch the ship three months earlier than planned. Kennedy is scheduled to be christened next year and delivered to the Navy in the early 2020s. From Huntington Ingalls Industries Media Relations. A forward section of John F. Kennedys (CVN 79) main deck is lifted into place at Huntington Ingalls Industries Newport News Shipbuilding Division. Huntington Ingalls Industries photo by John Whalen

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10 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS First CH-53K King Stallion Delivered to MarinesARLINGTON, Va.e rst CH-53K King Stallion was de livered May 16 to Marine Corps Air Station New River, North Carolina, marking another on-time milestone for the Marine Corps future heavy-li helicopter program. e helicopter, System Demonstration Test Article 3, will not y as a regular asset until next year, but its arrival at New River enters it into a supportability test plan, during which Marines will assess the King Stallions maintenance, sustainment and overall aviation logistics support. e CH-53K program remains on track for initial operational The rst CH-53K King Stallion taxis across the ight line at Marine Corps Air Station New River, N.C. A CH-53K King Stallion on the ight line at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., prepares for night-ight testing and certication. The CH-53K is currently being tested as the replacement for the Marine Corps heavy-lift helicopter program. capability (IOC) aer the Oce of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisi tion, Technology and Logistics approved last spring the Navys request for the King Stallion to enter the production and deployment phase, a decision known as Milestone C. I am very proud of the work accom plished to deliver the most powerful heli copter ever designed into the hands of our Marines, and condent in the teamwork and dedication in this program, which will carry us to IOC, said Lt. Gen. Steven Rudder, deputy commandant for aviation. Since achieving Milestone C, the CH53K test program has completed the following benchmarks: maximum weight single-point cargo hook sling load of 18 tons 60-degree angle bank turns 12-degree slope landings and takeos external load auto-jettison gunre testing participation in the Berlin International Air and Trade Show e King Stallion replaces the CH-53E Super Stallion as the production aircra for the Corps heavy-li mission, providing signicant improvements in range and payload capabilities. From the Oce of Marine Corps Communication. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Matthew CallahanNight Flight PrepU.S. Navy photo by Greg Kuntz

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SUMMER 2018 11 Navy Conducts Historic Osprey FlightNORFOLK, Va.For the rst time, the ight crew for a V-22 Osprey was all Navy, consisting of two Navy pilots and two aircrewmen from Medium Tilt Rotor Training Squadron Detachment (VMTT Det.) 204, during a July 12 ight bound for Marine Corps Air Sta tion (MCAS) New River in Jacksonville, North Carolina. VMTT Det. 204 is the rst unit set to operate and maintain the tiltrotor aircra as it transitions into the eet to replace the xed-wing C-2A Grey hound. e Navys next carrier onboard delivery (COD) platform, the CMV22B Osprey will deliver personnel, mail and cargo to aircra carriers from land-based supply centers, a mission the Greyhound has performed since 1966. e Ospreys addition to the Navy eetthe Marine Corps and Air Force already have their own V-22 variants comes with a merger of skilled xedwing and helicopter pilots, forming a melting pot of expertise as the new CMV-22B community emerges. Let me start by saying thanks for what youre doing here, said Rear Adm. Roy Kelley, commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, during an all-hands call with the Sailors of VMTT Det. 204, a part of Airborne Command and Control Logis tics Wing (ACCLOGWING). You are all pioneers, and as we move into a new platform, I think you all really have an opportunity to lay the keel for where this community is going to go. e Ospreys unique vertical takeo and landing capabilities mirrors a con ventional helicopter while also boasting the long-range cruise abilities of a xedwing airplane. I used to work on MH-60R [Se ahawk helicopter] aircra, and theyre a pretty smart aircra, but the Osprey will tell us almost to the T whats wrong with it, said Aviation Machin ists Mate 2nd Class Samantha Moore, whom Kelley recognized during his visit for her exceptional maintenance work and leadership. e screens are much more descriptive, and theres so much room to work on this aircra. Its mindblowing compared to the helicopters. Weve learned a lot about the Os prey. Its easier to operate, theres newer technology pumped into the cockpit of this aircra and its a lot easier for us to maintain, said Chief Aviation Structur al Mechanic (Safety Equipment) Rich ard Keillor, VMTT Det. 204s aviation life support systems division chief. e Ospreys li capability is greater, and it is capable of aerial refueling, making its range greater than that of the C-2. is aircra also eliminates the need for arrested landings and assisted takeos, because the Osprey takes o and lands like a helicopter. is thing really en compasses the best of both worlds. ACCLOGWING Deputy Commo dore Capt. Matthew Duy spoke about the signicance of this day to the future of Naval Aviation and Navy history. Todays visit was special, Duy said. We had an opportunity to accom pany Rear Adm. Kelley down to MCAS New River to visit the 70 Navy Sailors, the plank owners, the rst generation of pilots, aircrewmen and maintenance technicians that are in training, right now, to y the Osprey. Today was also a historic day, because our ight with Rear Adm. Kelley was the rst time in history that the entire ight crew for the Osprey was all Navyboth pilots, both crew chiefs. Written by Mass Communication Spe cialist 2nd Class K.R. Jackson-Smith. Sailors board an MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft to y from Naval Station Norfolk to Marine Corps Air Station New River, N.C. Sailors pose for a photograph during the historic ight of an all-Navy crew aboard an MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft.U.S. Navy photos by MC2 K.R. Jackson-Smith

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12 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS NAVAIR Delivers First Electronic NATOPS to Triton CommunityPATUXENT RIVER, Md.Shedding the paper and moving from a paradigm as old as Naval Aviation itself, the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) approved and released in June preliminary MQ-4C Triton training, operations and techni cal information manu als exclusively in digital format. Delivering electronic Naval Air Training and Operating Procedures Standardization (NATOPS) and Naval Avia tion Technical Information Products ight manuals meets Triton program requirements and begins the integration of electronic publications into the electronic ight bag. By adopting the electronic NATOPS approach now, Triton will align with the Navys strategic digital transfor mation eorts and is well positioned to fulll future digital cockpit capabilities requirements. e preliminary manuals describe essential aircrew op erating and mission system procedures and technical data to support upcoming Triton employment. NAVAIR is collecting eet operational experience and feedback on the preliminary Triton NATOPS, including the publications usability, readability and accuracy, and will incorporate that feed back in future updates to improve aircrew eectiveness and overall mission readiness. Compared to legacy programs, Commander, Naval Air Forces guidance gives Navy unmanned air systems (UAS) model manag ers the ability to shape the look and feel of their NATOPS based on community-derived requirements. Triton is leading the way by developing its publications to best serve the mission and inuence aircrew electronic publications for the broader Navy and Marine Corps manned and unmanned communi ties. While the Triton preliminary NATOPS is the rst ex clusively electronically delivered NATOPS product set, it is also the fourth UAS type/model/series entry in the NATOPS ight manual inventory in less than three years. As Triton continues system development, so too will the Triton NATOPS product set evolve to respond to the com munitys operational needs. Written by Robert Pudlo, senior airworthiness engineer at the Navy and Marine Corps National Airworthiness and Cybersafe Oce at NAVAIR. Photo courtesy of Northrop GrummanU.S. Navy photoPATUXENT RIVER, Md.e Aus tralian government signed a memo randum of understanding (MOU) with the U.S. Navy June 25 to purchase up to six MQ-4C Triton unmanned air systems (UAS). e MOU outlines the cooperative agreement between the two countries, allowing Australia to inuence the programs future design and develop ment. e Royal Australian Air Force plans to operate Triton alongside the P-8A Poseidon to support its maritime patrol and other surveillance roles. Our team is eager to partner with Australia and enhance our ability to improve Australian and U.S. capabilities An MQ-4C Triton. in that region, said Capt. Dan Mackin, program manager of the Navys Per sistent Maritime UAS Program Oce. is MOU allows for an enhanced partnership with our Australian coun terparts and will allow us to work side by side in further developing the Triton program. e Navy recently delivered the U.S. Navy, Australia Sign Agreement for Triton UASrst operational aircra to Point Mugu, California, to prepare for an early operational capability (EOC) employment to the Pacic later this year. e EOC will include two baseline aircra equipped with multiple maritime sensors. Written by Program Executive Oce Unmanned & Weapons (PEO(U&W)) Public Aairs. The MQ-4C Triton became the rst platform to oer all-digital training and operations manuals in June.

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SUMMER 2018 13 A KC-130J congured with the Marine Corps Harvest HAWK Plus weapons system res a Hellre missile in April during a developmental and operational test at Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, Calif. PATUXENT RIVER, Md.e Har vest Hercules Airborne Weapons Kit (HAWK) Plus (HH+) installed on a newly congured KC-130J transport aircra successfully struck xed and moving targets during a ve-week developmental and integrated test (DT/ IT) live-re event. e successful employment of this capability during live re closed out the developmental and integrated test and positioned us to move into the follow-on test and evaluation phase of the program, said Capt. Steve Nassau, Tactical Airli Pro gram Oce program manager. e KJ [Integrated Warghting Capabilities] IWC team did an outstanding job with our industry partners to correct hardware and soware deciencies with such dramatic results. e HH+ weapons kit will provide a signicant combat multiplier to the Marine AirGround Task Force. e live-re test, conducted at Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, California, in April, also included four KC-130J Completes Successful Harvest HAWK Plus Testingdedicated tactical integration ights to support operational test objectives in conjunction with the weapons tactics instructor (WTI) course at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona. ese ights proved to be some of the most fruitful ights of the entire detachment, said Maj. Nate Houle, test pilot and project ocer for Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 20. e repeated ability of multiple eet operators to rapidly learn and employ the system in an operationally relevant tactical scenario within a short times pan became a staple of each ight. To a Marine, each operator le the ight impressed with the system and eager for eet deployment. Houle recommends capitalizing on any opportunities to integrate DT/IT with WTI courses in the future. e success of the live-re event was directly attributed to the seless dedication and hard work of the KJ IWC [integrated product team] IPT, eet Marines, VX-20 test personnel, China Lake range personnel, industry partners and [Marine Aviation Weap ons and Tactics Squadron (MAWTS) 1] Marines, said Brian Kataaz, KC-130J IWC IPT lead. is is a testament to inter-agency cooperation and team work that needs to be nurtured for future eorts as a recipe for success. e team is devel oping an engineering change proposal to improve the Hellre weapons capacity and allow for future capability expansion by ensuring interoperability. e HH+ helps provide the Marine Corps with extended on-call close air support capabilities, and is an upgrade to the original Harvest HAWK roll-on, roll-o precision strike package weap ons system. Written by Valerie Doster, commu nications support, and Brian Kataaz, KC-130J integrated warghting capabil ity lead. To a Marine, each operator left the ight impressed with the system and eager for eet deployment. An MQ-4C Triton. U.S. Navy photo

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14 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS U.S. Naval Test Pilot School Accepts Flying ClassroomPATUXENT RIVER, Md.e U.S. Naval Test Pilot School (USNTPS) welcomed an Airborne Systems Train ing and Research Support (ASTARS) III aircra, the newest generation of ying classroom, June 29. e third generation of ying class room for the USNTPS curriculum, ASTARS III is a custom tailored C-26A Metroliner equipped with military equipment and subsystems, plus a simu lation lab that was built in conjunction with the aircra to have matching crew stations. e purpose of ASTARS is for students to familiarize themselves with the aircra and its systems in a simulation lab before ying for the rst time, thereby increasing the eciency of ight time spent with instructors in the air. e schools original ASTARS is a divested P-3, while ASTARS II is a leased, modied Saab 340 whose contract ends this fall. e amount of proactive collaboration on this project is unprecedented, said Jerry Swi, director of the Naval Air War fare Center Aircra Division (NAWCAD) AIRWorks program, the systems integration oce that cultivates the commands organic capability to develop rapid warghter solutions. e school received the C-26A in fall 2015 aer it retired from conducting counter narcotics missions along the Mexican border. e aircra arrived with minimal documentation and Navy Adds New UAS Test SquadronPATUXENT RIVER, Md.e Navy will stand up a new squadron Oct. 17 to test and evaluate unmanned aircra systems (UAS) at Webster Outlying Field in St. Inigoes, Maryland. In an April 10 notice, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson approved establishing Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (UX) 24 as a shore command to provide research, development, test and evaluation support for Navy and Marine Corps unmanned avia tion systems. ese tasks are currently performed by the Unmanned Aircra Systems Test Directorate (UASTD), a component of Naval Test Wing Atlantic (NTWL) based at Webster Field, but growth in the eld of UAS requires establishment of a command dedicated solely to that mission, the notice states. To sta UX-24, personnel will be transferred from NTWL and the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircra Division. Retired Vice Adm. Paul Grosklags, then-commander of Naval Air Systems Command, requested the squadrons establishment. Written by Je Newman, Naval Aviation News sta writer. U.S. Navy photo The custom tailored C-26A Metroliner is the United States Navy Test Pilot Schools third Airborne Systems Training and Research Support (ASTARS) used as a ying classroom.maintenance records, requiring extensive work to meet FAA standards. It also needed unique modications to meet the schools ying classroom requirements for future curriculum. e upgrades were a group eort between a number of orga nizationsUSNTPS; AIRWorks; the tactical airli, adversary and support aircra program oce; and M7 Aerospace, a sub sidiary of Elbit Systems of America. Pilots, engineers, artisans, supply chain specialists, program managers, test representa tives and other crew members from each group worked side-byside daily at the modication site in San Antonio. e project structure reduced programmatic cycle times while maintaining the aircras conguration control. e approach was another example of eort coordinated by AIRWorks, bringing together warfare center talent, industrial partnerships and emerging technologies. From NAWCAD Public Aairs. A U.S. Marine Corps RQ-21A Blackjack inight during a training exercise.U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Joselyn Jimenez

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SUMMER 2018 15 ARLINGTON, Va.e Oce of Naval Research (ONR) and Aurora Flight Sci ences won the Howard Hughes Award from the American Helicopter Society May 17 for their joint work on the Autonomous Aerial Cargo Utility System, or AACUS. Developed under an ONR innovative naval prototype program in partnership with Aurora Flight Sciences, AACUS enables rotary-wing aircra to y com pletely autonomously, even in austere environments. e program is now with the Marine Corps for further testing and development. e team is honored to be recog nized for our work, said Knox Millsaps, head of ONRs air warfare and weapons department. But well know if our work has been a real success if it can keep even one more warghter safe and out of harms way during a resupply mission thats our true measure of success. AACUS is a package of sensors and soware that can be integrated into rotary-wing aircra to deliver cargo to Marines in the eld safely, reliably and rapidly using autonomous capabilities. e system employs an intuitive handheld tablet that allows Marines in the eld to call up needed supplies quickly and easily, a capability displayed in December when AACUS successfully completed its nal demonstrationfea turing a UH-1 Huey helicopterat the Urban Training Center at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia. A highlight of the demonstration included a Marine requesting an autonomous resupply aer only 15 minutes of training. e AACUS technology provides a revolutionary way to resupply our forces in the eld, Millsaps said. It could sim plify the logistics train for supplying criti cal warghting cargo to forward-deployed troops and do this in a more economical manner without placing human pilots at risk in high-threat environments. AACUS has also won and been Autonomous Helicopter Technology Wins Another Major Award An UH-1 Huey helicopter equipped with the Oce of Naval Research-sponsored Autonomous Aerial Cargo Utility System (AACUS) kit departs a landing zone following a resupply mission that was requested using a handheld tablet at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va. U.S. Navy photos by John F. Williamsnominated for other high-prole honors. Earlier this month, the program received the Xcellence Award in the category of Detect and Avoid from the Association for Unmanned Vehicles Systems Interna tional. e technology was also a nalist for the National Aeronautic Associations 2017 Robert J. Collier Trophy. Written by Sierra Jones, Oce of Naval Research. A UH-1 Huey equipped with the Oce of Naval Research-sponsored AACUS kit.

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16 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS Coast Guard Cadets Redesign Helicopter Rescue BasketNEW LONDON, Conn.U.S. Coast Guard Academy cadets studying mechanical engineering have prototyped a rescue basket that could revolutionize how the Coast Guard conducts search-and-rescue (SAR) missions with MH-60 Jayhawk helicopters. First class cadets Christian Breviario, Riely Brande, Benjamin Crutcheld, Nolan Richerson and Spencer Smith spent the last year working closely with the Coast Guard Research and Development Center (RDC) to improve the current baskets design aer receiving input from SAR eet operators. In 2009, the RDC conducted an internal Coast Guard study, said M.J. Lewandowski, a research project manager for the RDC. e study noted that the Coast Guards ability to respond to mass rescue incidents was, and still is, some what limited in the methods available to remove large num bers of people from a hazardous marine situation quickly and safely. e RDC and academy leaders approached Breviario and his capstone group at the beginning of their senior year to see if they could improve the current basket design. We have added a means of entry that is easier for people who may be injured or have limited mobility, Breviario said. We have also maximized the space dimensions of the basket, given the dimensions of the MH-60 Jayhawk cabin. With these modications, we have made the basket more accessible, decreased the amount of time needed per hoisting evolution and im proved upon the eectiveness of the Coast Guard during mass rescue incidents. During mass rescue scenar ios in which 18 or more people require helicopter assistance, the cadets have determined the new basketroomy enough to sit two people comfortablycould halve the time required to get everyone hoisted on board. e cadets also recongured the baskets otation system, increasing its buoyancy by 79 pounds of force. is upgrade will also make the basket more comfortable for those being rescued, since they will be surrounded by buoyant material on all sides. Breviario and the rest of his capstone group graduated in May and will enter the eet as ensigns. eir project has garnered interest from the Coast Guards Oce of Aeronau tical Engineering and the Aviation Logistics Center, which will consider whether to take the project into a renement and testing phase. eir project absolutely showcases what theyve learned during their four years as engineering students, as well as pushed them to go beyond what we taught them and learn new topics and techniques on their own, said Cmdr. Mat thew Walker, a pilot and mechanical engineering instructor at the academy. I am intrigued by the teams approach to this project and to see where it goes from here. Breviario said he hopes to see the design implemented into the eet as the new standard rescue basket used in Coast Guard operations. e capstone group is pursuing a patent for its design.Written by Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nicole Foguth, U.S. Coast Guard Academy. Coast Guard Academy cadets studying mechanical engineering test out their new rescue basket design at a simulator facility in New London, Conn.Coast Guard photo by Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nicole Foguth

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SUMMER 2018 17 Milestone MQ-8C Fire Scout Initial Operational Test and Evaluation CompleteSAN DIEGOUSS Coronado (LCS 4) and Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 1 completed the rst comprehen sive initial operational test and evalua tion (IOT&E) for the MQ-8C Fire Scout June 29. Results from this test event will in form decisions on how best to integrate the Navys newest unmanned helicopter with littoral combat ships (LCS) and other platforms. During the IOT&E, the Fire Scout performed several mission scenarios aboard Coronado o the coast of south ern California, important milestones for the LCS and Fire Scout programs that demonstrated cohesion between the surface and aviation platforms. e results, lessons learned and recommendations reported on following this underway test period are absolutely invaluable to the future of the MQ-8C Fire Scouts mission eectiveness and suitability to perform that mission, said Lt. Cmdr. Seth Ervin, lead for the VX-1 detachment aboard Coronado. Test results conrmed that, while it would require extensive planning and coordination across the ship, the MQ-8C and MH-60S Seahawk can be operated and maintained simultaneously. It has been challenging and reward ing to be one of the rst maintainers aorded the opportunity to take both aircra aboard the ship, said Aviation Machinists Mate Second Class Salvatore Greene, a member of VX-1. Working to gether, we made the overall product more functional and ecient for the eet. Meanwhile, the IOT&E gave Coro nados experienced crew an opportunity to contribute to technological and tactical improvements within the LCS community. My crew is excited to build upon their past experiences operating with Fire Scout and continue to improve our prociency as a warghting team, said Cmdr. Lawrence Repass, Coronados Commanding Ocer. e Fire Scouts rst ship-based ight occurred December 2014 aboard USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), and it con ducted previous underway testing with USS Montgomery (LCS 8) in April 2017. Pierside testing of the MQ-8C Fire Scout continued aboard Coronado throughout mid-July with a focus on maintenance and cyber. LCS is a high-speed, agile, shallow dra, mission-focused surface combat ant designed for operations in the littoral environment, yet fully capable of open ocean operations. Written by Lt. j.g. Caroline Zotti, Commander, Littoral Combat Ship Squadron One Public Aairs. Aviation machinists mates prepare the MQ-8C Fire Scout unmanned helicopter for launch aboard littoral combat ship USS Coronado.U.S. Navy photo by Ens. Jalen Robinson

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uring the exercise, Sailors with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 and the French navys (Marine Nationale) CVW (Groupe Aerien Embarque) embarked Bush from May 7-18 to conduct training and carrier qualicationsa series of arrested landings and takeos from an aircra carrier to maintain their prociencywhile the French aircra carrier Charles de Gaulle (R 91) undergoes maintenance. Charles de Gaulle is the only other short form takeo nuclear carrier outside the U.S. Navy. e French CVW consists of one E-2C Hawkeye, 12 Rafale Marine multirole combat aircra and 27 pilots. e exercise began in April at Naval Air Station Oceana, Virginia, and continued at sea, where approximately 3,700 U.S. Navy and 301 French Sailors maintained, launched and recovered aircra to strengthen interoperability be tween the two naval forces. e French sailors acclimated very well to the U.S. carrier and the environ ment because of their experience operating o the Charles de Gaulle, said Capt. Sean R. Bailey, Bushs Commanding Ocer. Our Sailors were very welcoming and supportive of the French sailors coming on board. Having the op portunity to live, interact and work together created strong bonds and friendships By MC3 Zachary P. Wickline and MC3 Joe BoggioA Rafale Marine assigned to squadron 17F of the French navy lands on the ight deck of aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Zachary P. Wickline 18 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS

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between the U.S. and French sailors, which, consequently, was an essential component for such success during this underway. Chesapeake 2018 provided valuable training for the U.S. and French car rier air wings as they conducted multiple combat scenarios, including cyclic ight operations and combat search-and-rescues, and a series of arrested landings and launches by aircra from both countries. In addition, more than 180 training evolutions and missions were accomplished on board the ship. One of the highlights was the arrival of the highest ranking ocers from each navy: Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson and Chief of Sta of the French navy Adm. Christophe Prazuck. While aboard, Richardson and Prazuck toured the ship and spoke with crew from both navies about interoperability and relations between the two. As I look out on the ight deck, waiting to see the next launch, its almost impossible to tell the dierence between U.S. Sailors and French sailors as they prepare for the next launches, Richardson said. is is exactly the level of teamwork were going to need as we confront our high-end competitors in high-end blue water warfare. Richardson and Prazuck praised the crews for their commitment to performing well and to the long hours they put in to maintain combat readiness. All this is not merely a technical or a diplomatic exercise, Pruzack said. What were really doing is preparing to ght together in the future if we are ever called to do so, proving our seamless interoperability is a very powerful message. In April, both navies conducted air strikes on Syrian chemical weapons infra structures, and in June 2016, Richardson presented Charles de Gaulle with a U.S. Meritorious Unit Commendation for the French navys success as the only non-U.S navy entity to take command of U.S. Naval Forces Central Commands Task Force 50 dur ing Operation Inherent Resolve. Mass Communication Specialists 3rd Class Zachary P. Wickline and Joe Boggio are members of USS George H.W. Bush Public Aairs. Marine Nationale (French navy) Sailors are assigned oat coats in preparation for an underway aboard aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). From right to left in front, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson and Chief of the French navy Adm. Christophe Prazuck watch a video during their visit aboard aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77).U.S. Navy photo by MC1 Sean Hurt U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Joe Boggio SUMMER 2018 19 A Rafale Marine attached to squadron 17F of the French navy awaits pre-ight checks before ight operations aboard aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Joe Boggio

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20 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS ATLANTIC OCEAN As part of French Air Defense week in July, French Dassault Rafale M Fighters conducted exercises with F/A-18E/F Super Hornets and E-2D Hawkeyes from Carrier Air Wing 1 (CVW) embarked aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). The week long exercise is designed to demonstrate interoperability and increase readiness as U.S. aircraft integrated with French Navy counterparts during training and simulation maneuvers. France is our oldest ally and a vital partner in ensuring security and stability in the region and across the globe, Rear Adm. Gene Black, commander, Carrier Strike Group 8, said in a statement. The opportunity to integrate with French Naval Aviation helps us enhance our interoperability as we work to achieve common objectives. This is the second time this year French naval aviators trained with the U.S. Navy. Its always an honor to have our great friends and partners aboard Truman, said Harry S. Truman Commanding Ocer, Capt. Nick Dienna. This visit caps o a phenom enal few weeks operating in Sixth Fleet. Our Sailors were graciously welcomed in Marseille, and we are now working bilaterally with our French counterparts to hone our skills for joint operations whenever, wherever we are needed. From USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Public Aairs. A French Dassault Rafale M Fighter touches down on the ight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75).U.S. Navy photos by MC3 Rebekah A. WatkinsFRENCH AVI A TORS Train Aboard T RUM AN F/A-18 Super Hornets, assigned to Carrier Air Wing One, and French Dassault Rafale M Fighters y over the Nimitz class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Navy photo by MC3 Rebekah A. Watkins NAN 18-20_FrenchNavy_Summer2018.indd 20 8/17/2018 11:07:58 One year after they debuted on the newly commissioned USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), the Navys revolutionary new aircraft catapult and arresting gear have demonstrated their viability.SUMMER 2018 21By Je Newmanince rst launching and recovering aircra at-sea July 28, 2017six days aer Fords commis sioningthe Electromagnetic Aircra Launch System (EMALS) and Advanced Arrested Gear (AAG) have successfully executed 747 day-and-night catapult launches and arrestments of F/A-18E/F Super Hornets. e initial goal was to conduct between 400 and 500 such cycles prior to the post-shakedown availability (PSA) Ford began July 14, said Capt. Stephen Tedford, the former program manager for the Aircra Launch and Recovery Program Oce at Naval Air Systems Command. Tedford led the pro gram oce from September 2014 until his change of command on July 12. Fully installed on Ford, the four EMALS catapults and AAG, which comprises three engines powering three arresting wires, are set for initial operational capability in 2019 and 2021, respectively, prior to the ships rst scheduled deployment. rough January, Ford had six at-sea periods, four of which included EMALS launches and AAG recoveries. Multiple times, the systems launched and recov ered more than 80 Super Hornets in a single day, including one day with more than 110 cycles, and another with more than 130, Tedford said. We had a very successful fall demon strating on CVN 78. We have an awful lot of work to do still, and we will always have work to do to maintain these systems and sustain them in the future, but they do work, Tedford said. To me, the proof that we are doing things right is when I talk to the Sailors on 78, and when those Sailors tell me that they never want to go back to Nimitz, we got something right. Aer all, its EMALS and AAG that truly make Ford an aircra carrier.Systems Deliver AdvantagesEMALS and AAG are designed to, respectively, launch and recover a wider envelope of aircra than the legacy steam catapult and MK 7 arresting gear. ey also weigh less and require signicantly less manningAAG alone saves 65 tons and requires half the manning of the MK-7. e dierence in performance, you can denitely feel it, said Lt. Cmdr. James Struck, a pilot with Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23, who ew the rst launch-and-recovery o Ford in July 2017. With the old arresting gear, you catch the wire and have a constant deceleration until you stop. With AAG, it tries to reduce the load on the aircra. Its not a constant deceleration; its con trolled by soware, so you catch the wire, and you can feel the system adjusting your deceleration prole. Struck said launching with EMALS also feels just a little bit dierent than with steam catapults. EMALS is also driven by soware, so the acceleration prole is slightly dier ent, a little smoother, he said. EMALS and AAG also promise signicant quality-of-life improvements for Ford Sailors. e all-electric systems also generate far less noise and heat than the legacy steam catapult and hydraulic MK-7 arresting gear. On the ight deck, EMALS largely resembles the steam catapults on Nimitzclass carriers, but below deck, its a dier ent story, said Aviation Boatswains Mate (Launching and Recovery) Petty Ocer 1st Class (ABE1) Daniel Rivera. e steam cats are made up of main ly hydraulic, pneumatic and mechanical components, so maintenance on them is very dirty, oily and usually under highly volatile conditions, he said. On the other hand, EMALS is electrical. ere are numerous cabinets and enclosures containing various electrical components A Sailor from USS Gerald R. Fords (CVN 78) air department loads an F/A-18F Super Hornet on to the electromagnetic aircraft launching system (EMALS).Navy photo by MC3 Liz Thompson

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One year after they debuted on the newly commissioned USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), the Navys revolutionary new aircraft catapult and arresting gear have demonstrated their viability.SUMMER 2018 21By Je Newmanince rst launching and recovering aircra at-sea July 28, 2017six days aer Fords commis sioningthe Electromagnetic Aircra Launch System (EMALS) and Advanced Arrested Gear (AAG) have successfully executed 747 day-and-night catapult launches and arrestments of F/A-18E/F Super Hornets. e initial goal was to conduct between 400 and 500 such cycles prior to the post-shakedown availability (PSA) Ford began July 14, said Capt. Stephen Tedford, the former program manager for the Aircra Launch and Recovery Program Oce at Naval Air Systems Command. Tedford led the pro gram oce from September 2014 until his change of command on July 12. Fully installed on Ford, the four EMALS catapults and AAG, which comprises three engines powering three arresting wires, are set for initial operational capability in 2019 and 2021, respectively, prior to the ships rst scheduled deployment. rough January, Ford had six at-sea periods, four of which included EMALS launches and AAG recoveries. Multiple times, the systems launched and recov ered more than 80 Super Hornets in a single day, including one day with more than 110 cycles, and another with more than 130, Tedford said. We had a very successful fall demon strating on CVN 78. We have an awful lot of work to do still, and we will always have work to do to maintain these systems and sustain them in the future, but they do work, Tedford said. To me, the proof that we are doing things right is when I talk to the Sailors on 78, and when those Sailors tell me that they never want to go back to Nimitz, we got something right. Aer all, its EMALS and AAG that truly make Ford an aircra carrier.Systems Deliver AdvantagesEMALS and AAG are designed to, respectively, launch and recover a wider envelope of aircra than the legacy steam catapult and MK 7 arresting gear. ey also weigh less and require signicantly less manningAAG alone saves 65 tons and requires half the manning of the MK-7. e dierence in performance, you can denitely feel it, said Lt. Cmdr. James Struck, a pilot with Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23, who ew the rst launch-and-recovery o Ford in July 2017. With the old arresting gear, you catch the wire and have a constant deceleration until you stop. With AAG, it tries to reduce the load on the aircra. Its not a constant deceleration; its con trolled by soware, so you catch the wire, and you can feel the system adjusting your deceleration prole. Struck said launching with EMALS also feels just a little bit dierent than with steam catapults. EMALS is also driven by soware, so the acceleration prole is slightly dier ent, a little smoother, he said. EMALS and AAG also promise signicant quality-of-life improvements for Ford Sailors. e all-electric systems also generate far less noise and heat than the legacy steam catapult and hydraulic MK-7 arresting gear. On the ight deck, EMALS largely resembles the steam catapults on Nimitzclass carriers, but below deck, its a dier ent story, said Aviation Boatswains Mate (Launching and Recovery) Petty Ocer 1st Class (ABE1) Daniel Rivera. e steam cats are made up of main ly hydraulic, pneumatic and mechanical components, so maintenance on them is very dirty, oily and usually under highly volatile conditions, he said. On the other hand, EMALS is electrical. ere are numerous cabinets and enclosures containing various electrical components A Sailor from USS Gerald R. Fords (CVN 78) air department loads an F/A-18F Super Hornet on to the electromagnetic aircraft launching system (EMALS).Navy photo by MC3 Liz Thompson

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22 NAVAL A VIATION NEWSthat require regular inspection, but the spaces are well-ventilated, and the equip ment contains little to no grease or oil. ere is a huge dierence between both systems, ABE1 John ompson said of AAG and the MK-7. Along with being able to handle dierent types of aircra, it also brings a completely dif ferent lifestyle for Sailors who will be operating the equipment. Going from a system which is primarily operated by hydraulics to a system driven by electric ity and computer soware and sensors, it greatly reduces the amount of main tenance from both a preventative and corrective standpoint. Built-in diagnostics identify compo An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the Black Lions of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213 prepares to land on the ight deck of aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78).U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Ryan Carternents in need of repair, making EMALS and AAG far more reliable and easier to maintain than the legacy systems. Life as a maintainer is much easier working on EMALS than on steam catapults, Rivera said. When there is a problem with EMALS, the system is able to determine exactly what is wrong, so there is less manpower needed to troubleshoot. Once the problem is identied, EM ALS is more plug-and-play than steam catapults, meaning Sailors can simply remove a failed component instead of at tempting to x it on the spot. is results in less downtime of the equipment and more availability to complete the ships mission of launching and recovering aircra.Test and Evaluation PhaseHaving completed land-based develop mental testing at its test site at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey, EMALS will soon begin an integrated test and evaluation (IT&E) period, which will include system reliability testing. A key performance parameter for any new aircra system, reliability ensures operational readiness for the eet. Single-day shipboard operations have shown that both systems are able to meet operational requirements. In developmental testing, were try ing to nd problems with these systems, Tedford said. We then take that data and do the best we can to generate pre dictions of what we think our reliability will be when we get to the ship. What we learned on CVN 78 last year was that our reliability for both systems was signicantly better than our land-based data was predicting, which is a good thing. As for AAG, the team has made in credible progress over the last two years, Tedford said. e system has conducted more than 2,000 arrestments using deadloads, weighted sleds that replicate the mass andwhen pushed by a jet car force of an aircra. Following its year-long PSA, Ford is set to undergo ight deck certication with components of the entire air wing sometime in 2020, Tedford said.Training and Logistics Underwaye Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division in Orlando, Florida, is developing a virtual training classroom that will allow Sailors to practice on vir -These are the systems of the future for the Ford class. Both systems have proven, demonstrated performance on Ford, and were already in production on both systems for CVN 79 and CVN 80. SUMMER 2018 23tual EMALS and AAG systems displayed on 55-inch touchscreens. e classroom will be stood up at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training at Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia, so that when the Ford is in homeport, students can go straight from the virtual environment to the ship for direct, hands-on experience. Ford Sailors will also be able to deploy with a condensed version of the training program, so that they can train new ship mates as they arrive. e training should be ready for EMALS in scal 2020 and AAG in 2022, Tedford said. Meanwhile, logistics teams are also working on both systems Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals (IETMs), which allow Sailors to pull up drawings and other reference material when per forming maintenance. ese are the systems of the future for the Ford class, Tedford said. Both systems have proven, demonstrated performance on Ford, and were already in production on both systems for CVN 79 and CVN 80. Its not a question of if they will work; they do work. Now its a question of getting all of the other pieces of any systems debut in line. at includes everything related to maintainability, reliability, spare parts, training and logistics, the pieces that typically come together toward the end of any development program, Tedford said. His team is working with the Naval Supply Systems Command and Defense Logistics Agency to establish an EMALS and AAG supply chain, and planning kicks o next year for both systems depot facilities. Weve got EMALS and AAG debuted, so now the focus is on how we posture ourselves and the eet to sustain them as a system, making sure that were train ing the crew adequately and ensuring we are positioned for the future with CVN 79 and CVN 80. Instead of focusing on a single system, we are focusing on a eet of systems. ats the challenge ahead of us, Tedford said. Je Newman is a sta writer for Naval Aviation News. An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 performs an arrested landing aboard USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). The E-2C Hawkeye completes its rst arrestment with Advanced Arresting Gear in Lakehurst, N.J., in June. U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Cathrine Campbell U.S. Navy photo

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SUMMER 2018 23tual EMALS and AAG systems displayed on 55-inch touchscreens. e classroom will be stood up at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training at Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia, so that when the Ford is in homeport, students can go straight from the virtual environment to the ship for direct, hands-on experience. Ford Sailors will also be able to deploy with a condensed version of the training program, so that they can train new ship mates as they arrive. e training should be ready for EMALS in scal 2020 and AAG in 2022, Tedford said. Meanwhile, logistics teams are also working on both systems Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals (IETMs), which allow Sailors to pull up drawings and other reference material when per forming maintenance. ese are the systems of the future for the Ford class, Tedford said. Both systems have proven, demonstrated performance on Ford, and were already in production on both systems for CVN 79 and CVN 80. Its not a question of if they will work; they do work. Now its a question of getting all of the other pieces of any systems debut in line. at includes everything related to maintainability, reliability, spare parts, training and logistics, the pieces that typically come together toward the end of any development program, Tedford said. His team is working with the Naval Supply Systems Command and Defense Logistics Agency to establish an EMALS and AAG supply chain, and planning kicks o next year for both systems depot facilities. Weve got EMALS and AAG debuted, so now the focus is on how we posture ourselves and the eet to sustain them as a system, making sure that were train ing the crew adequately and ensuring we are positioned for the future with CVN 79 and CVN 80. Instead of focusing on a single system, we are focusing on a eet of systems. ats the challenge ahead of us, Tedford said. Je Newman is a sta writer for Naval Aviation News. An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 performs an arrested landing aboard USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). The E-2C Hawkeye completes its rst arrestment with Advanced Arresting Gear in Lakehurst, N.J., in June. U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Cathrine Campbell U.S. Navy photo

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By Je Newman UKs HMS Queen Elizabeth Aircrew Meet the F-35BAircrew members from HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08), the agship of the Royal Navys new class of aircraft carrier, visited Naval Air Station (NAS) Patuxent River, Maryland, May 15, for their rst peek at the F-35B Lightning II.24 NAVAL A VIATION NEWSThat aernoon, approximately 20 members of the HMS Queen Elizabeth y ing control and ight deck control teams witnessed two F-35B test aircra taxi, conduct short takeos and perform two vertical landings apiece. e ground shook as each aircra approached the tarmac for its vertical landings, hovering for several seconds before descending. e landings and takeos were led by the F-35 Pax River Integrated Test Force (ITF) team. e next day, the ships team took over and, acting as landing signal ocers, taxied and refueled an F-35B for the rst time. Steady rain limited the teams activities on the third day of its visit before its departure for the United Kingdom. In terms of getting his crew familiar with the F-35B before this years rst ship trials o the U.S. East Coast, the trip was a success, said Royal Navy Cmdr. James Blackmore, Com mander Air aboard HMS Queen Elizabeth. Its the rst time theyve ever seen the jet or been up close to it as its performing its ight maneuvers, Blackmore said. So they got to feel the environment of what its like the sort of noise, the heat, the sound and the pressure of the aircraso that when it comes to deck for the rst time, its not a surprise. It was a chance to actually see the aircra ying properly, operate it, be close to the air cra in its operation, move a real aircra around, refuel a real aircra, said Cmdr. Stephen Crockatt, U.K. lead at the ITF. e U.K. does have some models, which we use for ight deck training, but those are models. eyre representative, but not to the level of having a real aircra. For instance, Crockatt noted, attaching a fuel hose to a quiet, model aircra is far Lockheed Martin photo by Dane Wiedmann SUMMER 2018 25 Royal Navy aircrew from HMS Queen Elizabeth observe an F-35B Lightning II land vertically May 15 at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md. The fthgeneration ghter will conduct its rst ship trials aboard the new carrier this fall.

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SUMMER 2018 25 Royal Navy aircrew from HMS Queen Elizabeth observe an F-35B Lightning II land vertically May 15 at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md. The fthgeneration ghter will conduct its rst ship trials aboard the new carrier this fall.

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dierent an experience than doing so to an F-35B with its engine on. It actually gave them the realism thats needed, he said. So the eect of appreciating the real aircra is going to be a lot greater aer this visit, and when we bring the aircra to land on the carrier, itll be more of a known element. e F-35Bs rst-of-class ight trials aboard HMS Queen Elizabeth will be conducted in three phases, Crockatt said. is is quite a massive trial for not only the U.K., but for the ITF, he said. Just as important for the HMS Queen Elizabeth crew was meeting and working with the ITF members who will be aboard the ship during trials, ensuring both teams understand how each operates and will work together. As we get toward the trial, that kind of mutual understanding will make it better, Crockatt said. Because when we go to the trial, we are not the ITF or Queen Elizabeth; we are the total capability, which is getting a rst-of-class ight trial operating envelope for the Lightning II for the future for the U.K. Aer the ship trials, the U.K. will conduct opera tional test and evaluation for its F-35B maritime opera tions next year, Crockatt said. As HMS Queen Elizabeths air boss, Blackmore is in charge of all aviation on board a ship thats been designed specically for the F-35, he said. At roughly 65,000 tons, HMS Queen Elizabeth is much smaller than U.S. Navy carriers, but its ight deck and hangar are approximately the same size, Blackmore said. e key dierence between the two nations air cra carriers is the Queen Elizabeth classs ight deck, which is designed exclusively to handle helicopters and the F-35B, the short-takeo-and-vertical-landing vari ant of the h-generation ghter. From the keel up, its all been about F-35 from day one, he said. For the U.K., the F-35B represents a return to car rier aviation, one that holds particular signicance for Blackmore, who, in November 2010, piloted the last Harrier II ight o the HMS Ark Royal, the U.K.s last aircra carrier. Equally tting, the Ark Royals captain at the time, Commodore Jerry Kyd, is now captain of HMS Queen Elizabeth. So if you like, I almost closed down what we used to do, Blackmore said. e fact that, eight years later, Im now here opening that back up with the team is really good. Despite that years-long gap in U.K. carrier aviation, HMS Queen Elizabeth will have plenty of experienced 26 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS Two members of HMS Queen Elizabeths aircrew share observations during their rst live look at the F-35B. Aircrew from HMS Queen Elizabeth watch as an F-35B taxis by. BF-02 was one of two F-35B Lightning II test aircraft to demonstrate vertical landings for visiting HMS Queen Elizabeth aircrew May 15 at Naval Air Station (NAS) Patuxent River, Md.Lockheed Martin photos by Dane Wiedmann SUMMER 2018 27 Cmdr. James Blackmore, Commander Air aboard HMS Queen Elizabeth.I was fortunate enough to y the last ever Harrier launched from a U.K. aircraft carrier in 2010, so if you like, I almost closed down what we used to do. The fact that eight years later, Im now here opening that back up with the team is really good.HMS Queen Elizabeth aircrew members discuss procedures for towing an F-35B. Aircrew from HMS Queen Elizabeth practice attaching a tow bar to the landing gear of an F-35B during their visit. A landing signal ocer from HMS Queen Elizabeth practices directing an F-35B.carrier pilots and crew on boardin recent years, the Royal Navy has embedded personnel on U.S. carriers so we can keep that skill set alive, Crockatt said. But even then, the alive skill set is on an F/A-18 or on a Harrier, he noted. e Lightning II is, of course, a dierent beast. Blackmore called the F-35B a step change for the U.K. in how were going to conduct business. e fact that its a F-35 is pivotal, because youre in the h-generation game now with aircra, which brings stealth, sensor fusion, advanced weapons and the ability to project aviation and power ashore at your choosing, he said. Je Newman is a sta writer for Naval Aviation News. Lockheed Martin photos by Dane Wiedmann

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SUMMER 2018 27 Cmdr. James Blackmore, Commander Air aboard HMS Queen Elizabeth.I was fortunate enough to y the last ever Harrier launched from a U.K. aircraft carrier in 2010, so if you like, I almost closed down what we used to do. The fact that eight years later, Im now here opening that back up with the team is really good. HMS Queen Elizabeth aircrew members discuss procedures for towing an F-35B. Aircrew from HMS Queen Elizabeth practice attaching a tow bar to the landing gear of an F-35B during their visit. A landing signal ocer from HMS Queen Elizabeth practices directing an F-35B.carrier pilots and crew on boardin recent years, the Royal Navy has embedded personnel on U.S. carriers so we can keep that skill set alive, Crockatt said. But even then, the alive skill set is on an F/A-18 or on a Harrier, he noted. e Lightning II is, of course, a dierent beast. Blackmore called the F-35B a step change for the U.K. in how were going to conduct business. e fact that its a F-35 is pivotal, because youre in the h-generation game now with aircra, which brings stealth, sensor fusion, advanced weapons and the ability to project aviation and power ashore at your choosing, he said. Je Newman is a sta writer for Naval Aviation News. Lockheed Martin photos by Dane Wiedmann

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MH-60s Gunner Seat: PROTOTY P E WELL R ECEIVED Written By Aircrew Systems Program Oce, Photography by Mikel Lauren Proulx28 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS Fleet replacement Aircrewman (FRAC) Eugene Schoen, with Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 2, demonstrates the typical seated position of an MH-60 gunner in May. Note that the barrel on the M240 gun is missing. n the MH-60S Seahawk, aircrew can spend hours at a time in the helicopters gunner seat, which was de signed for crashworthiness, but not necessarily op erator endurance. Among MH-60S aircrews, the seat is notoriously uncomfort able, to the extent that it can be detrimental to long-term aircrew health, and elding a replacement is Naval Aviations No. 2 safety priority, right behind resolving physiological episodes. You were able to crash in [the cur rent seat], but you werent able to sit in it for extended periods of time, said Rabea Shaiboon, student control and curriculum chief petty ocer at Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 2. Shaiboon, who is more than six feet tall, has been serving as the stand-in for the end user for the program oce team. In May, the Aircrew Systems Program Oce debuted its second prototype (PT2) of the new MH-60S gunner seat at the Naval Helicopter Association Symposium (NHA) in Norfolk, Virginia, where it was met with excitement and gratitude on the part of the Navy Sailors who sat in it. New features on PT2 include: height adjustability, lumbar sup port, adjustable additional leg room, the ability to recline, a ip-up seat bot tom, redesigned restraints, a redesigned headrest to ac commodate the night-vision goggle battery, and tracks to allow the seat to move to and from the window. e same week that PT2 was unveiled at NHA, ight and ground testing began at HSC-2 in Norfolk. Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (HX) 21, Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 1 and the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircra Divisions (NAWCAD) Crashworthy and Escape Sys tems Branch continued ight, ground and lab testing, all of which was completed June 15. With ight test completed, the team will continue to tweak the design to incor porate issues learned during test, said Fillip Behrman, integrated product team (IPT) lead of the project. While the engineering and design teams nailed it on the feature set, component tolerances needed some work. Also, based on eet feedback during test, we learned that we gave the eet a little too much leg room, so the design team will add When it comes survivability has topped comfort for the past few doesnt mean comfort isnt a when comfort aircrew endurance and mission performance. SUMMER 2018 29 Right, Naval Aircrewman Petty Ocer Third Class (AWS3) Hunter Hill, a Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) instructor with HSC-26, and AWS2 Thomas Denys, with HSC-2, evaluate the features of the gunner seat prototype during a simulated ingress procedure.

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n the MH-60S Seahawk, aircrew can spend hours at a time in the helicopters gunner seat, which was de signed for crashworthiness, but not necessarily op erator endurance. Among MH-60S aircrews, the seat is notoriously uncomfort able, to the extent that it can be detrimental to long-term aircrew health, and elding a replacement is Naval Aviations No. 2 safety priority, right behind resolving physiological episodes. You were able to crash in [the cur rent seat], but you werent able to sit in it for extended periods of time, said Rabea Shaiboon, student control and curriculum chief petty ocer at Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 2. Shaiboon, who is more than six feet tall, has been serving as the stand-in for the end user for the program oce team. In May, the Aircrew Systems Program Oce debuted its second prototype (PT2) of the new MH-60S gunner seat at the Naval Helicopter Association Symposium (NHA) in Norfolk, Virginia, where it was met with excitement and gratitude on the part of the Navy Sailors who sat in it. New features on PT2 include: height adjustability, lumbar sup port, adjustable additional leg room, the ability to recline, a ip-up seat bot tom, redesigned restraints, a redesigned headrest to ac commodate the night-vision goggle battery, and tracks to allow the seat to move to and from the window. e same week that PT2 was unveiled at NHA, ight and ground testing began at HSC-2 in Norfolk. Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (HX) 21, Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 1 and the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircra Divisions (NAWCAD) Crashworthy and Escape Sys tems Branch continued ight, ground and lab testing, all of which was completed June 15. With ight test completed, the team will continue to tweak the design to incor porate issues learned during test, said Fillip Behrman, integrated product team (IPT) lead of the project. While the engineering and design teams nailed it on the feature set, component tolerances needed some work. Also, based on eet feedback during test, we learned that we gave the eet a little too much leg room, so the design team will add When it comes survivability has topped comfort for the past few doesnt mean comfort isnt a when comfort aircrew endurance and mission performance. SUMMER 2018 29 Right, Naval Aircrewman Petty Ocer Third Class (AWS3) Hunter Hill, a Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) instructor with HSC-26, and AWS2 Thomas Denys, with HSC-2, evaluate the features of the gunner seat prototype during a simulated ingress procedure.

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30 NAVAL A VIATION NEWSin additional seat movement capability back toward the window. Ultimately, the team wants to eld a seat that will increase both safety and comfort while improving aircrew mission perfor mance and endurance. BackgroundIn May 2017, the team got the green light that the eort could commence. Once funding was identied, one of the key or ganizations tapped to support the eort was NAWCADs AIRWorks Division. AIRWorks is a key component of this eort. ey have rapid prototyping capa bilities, as well as contract vehicles in place that allowed us to accelerate the eort, Behrman said. In addition, a 10-person Gunner Seat Fleet Task Force (GSTF) was created to allow the eet to provide real-time input during each step of the prototypes devel opment. e GSTF is also a resource the IPT uses to vet ideas, support t checks and provide the conduit into the gunner com munity, Behrman said. In June 2017, the design kick-o meet ing was held in San Diego. e eort was supported by the GSTF, Naval Air Systems Command/NAWCAD program team and HSC-3. Most of the features incorporated into PT2 were borne out of that initial design meeting. FRS instructor AWS2 Thomas Joyce instructs AWSAN Meriah Romo on the proper method for donning the new harness. AWS1 Matthew Estep evaluates the ergonomics of the new headrest and lower back support as AWSCM Jason Van Buren, HSCWL, examines the seat from behind. AWSANs Eric Cumpian and Caleb Overton participate in the ground evaluation of the new gunner seat. Lindley Bark, Crashworthy and Escape Systems Branch head at Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, explains the improvements to the new harness to AWSAN Marcus Douglas. Capt. Dave Padula, Aircrew Systems program manager, checks out the new harness.

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SUMMER 2018 31Design ChallengesDepending on the mission, the gunner operates the externally mounted gunor a hoist during search-and-rescue missions and sits for extended periods of time. Its a role and an environment to which conventional design standards do not neatly apply. ats why the program oce has been working closely with the eet to determine the optimal dimensions, features and functionality for the new seat, said Lindley Bark, head of the crashworthy and escape systems branch. e dierent occupants sizes, the mission proles, the evolutionswhat they have to do with the seat is unlike anything youll nd in an ergonomic standard, Bark said. So we needed to work with them in order to get this right. In the back of the helicopters cramped cabin are three seats, two gunner seats and a rear-facing center seat. Working with the H-60 program oce, the gunner seat team was able to eliminate the rear-facing seat to free up additional space, allowing the two gunner seats to move farther away from the window, Behrman said.Next Stepse team is incorporating design tweaks into an updated drawing package in preparation for the critical design review (CDR). Once the CDR is complete, production representative test articles are expected to be manufactured this fall. Test articles will be put through a rigorous set of environmental and destructive tests, leading to a new round of ight testing. Once those tests are complete, the program will transition to the produc tion phase, which includes the building of gunner seat kits to support all aircra and eet trainers. An engineering change proposal and technical directive will be developed for incorporation of the new gunner seats into the MH-60S at the organizational level. Initial operating capability is planned for scal 2019, when initial gunner seat kits will have been delivered to the eet. Written by the Aircrew Systems Program Oce. Following the Naval Helicopter Association symposium in May, Sailors with HSC-2 in Norfolk had an opportunity to try out the new seat, which includes improvements such as height adjustability, lumbar support, adjustable additional leg room, the ability to recline, a ip-up seat bottom, redesigned restraints, a redesigned headrest to accommodate the night-vision goggle battery, and tracks to allow the seat to move to and from the window.

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Photos courtesy of Boeing32 NAVAL A VIATION NEWSBy Je Newman With the July 10 induction of a second aircraft at a new Boeing facility in Philadelphia, the eort to consoli date the myriad congurations in the Marine Corps eet of tiltrotor MV-22B Ospreys is fully immersed in its discovery phase.er an independent review that found signicant impacts to readiness as a result of the 70-plus distinct congurations in a eet of 300-plus MV-22Bs, the Marine Corps under took an initiative to upgrade 129 Block B Ospreys, which ceased production in 2012, to the standard currently rolling o the line of Block C aircra. Known as Common Conguration-Readiness and Mod ernization (CC-RAM), the eort will reduce the number of congurations in the MV-22B eet to a handful, in hopes of streamlining maintenance times by making repairs more predictable. Based on the current dierence in readiness rates between Blocks B and C aircra, the program oce expects to see a 15-percent improvement in the mission-capable rate of Ospreys that go through CC-RAM, said Col. Matthew Kelly, program manager for the V-22 Joint Program Oce. e independent review concluded in 2016 that the varia tion among MV-22Bs contributed to an increasing number of non-mission-capable aircra because of maintenance require ments and supply shortages. e uncertainty maintainers encountered when working on so many dierent versions of Ospreys also meant increasing life-cycle support costs and, generally, negative net eects to all aspects of MV-22B sus tainment. Several factors led to the disparate congurations; chiey, the constant demand for new requirements from the eet across a decade-plus of combat operations. When the eet says we need this capability right now to support troops in combat, we ramp up and do it, Kelly said. e dierences between congurations are signicant, ranging from pieces of hardwaresuch as weather radar, a new mission computer or even the avionics boxto the placement and function of wiring bundles. Some of the aircra even have dierent fuel dump systems. eres a lot of dierent types of things it could be, but theyre fairly signicant, to the point that when a maintainer opens up the aircra, hes going to see something dierent, Kelly said. Its not a nut here or a bolt there. Such capabilities upgrades were generally limited to small batches of aircra coming o the production line, but you do a number of those over time, and you wind up with subsets of 20 to 40 aircra that have dierent things in them, and you end up with a big conguration issue, Kelly said. ere should only be a handful of congurations across the eet once the 129 Block B aircrawhich accounts for the bulk of the dierenceshave been retrotted, Kelly said. e idea is to put them in the same squadron. It will never get to the point where the entire eet is the same conguration, so maybe we have ve or six congurations across the entire Osprey Overhaul An MV-22B Osprey receives an overhaul at a Boeing facility in Philadelphia as part of the platforms Common Conguration-Readiness and Modernization (CC-RAM) initiative, an eort to consolidate the 70-plus aircraft congurations throughout the MV-22B eet.

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SUMMER 2018 33 eet, but each location, each squadron, will have its own con guration, which will be really helpful, he said. Once they only have one conguration of Osprey to worry about, maintainers will know what to expect during repairs and can stockpile spare parts, Kelly said. When you have a squadron that has the same congura tion of aircra, you have the same technical data, maintenance manuals, troubleshooting procedures, supply chain, kit parts, tools and support equipment, Kelly said. When they go out to do troubleshooting or some procedure on an aircra, they wont have to wonder what theyre going to nd. ey wont mistakenly use the wrong procedure or grab the wrong tool. And when they need a part, they wont have ve dierent ver sions to potentially choose from. eyll know the one part that they need, and theyll already have it on the shelf. Having a common aircra to support buys you a signicant upgrade in readiness. Pre-engineering work for CC-RAM began in August 2017, and the rst two MV-22s were inducted Jan. 24 and July 10 at the Boeing facility in Philadelphia, which combined the platforms production line with that of CC-RAM so technicians on both can share engineering expertise as well as tools and equipment. e two Ospreys are meant to serve as learning aircra, informing the rest of the CC-RAM program, and should take about the same amount of time to complete, with the rst scheduled to be done by summer 2019, Kelly said. Were pleased with the progress that weve seen on the rst aircra, and the rst couple are meant to help us understand how to most eciently do this kind of complex modication, where youre taking 60 to 70 dierent engineering changes that were designed independently and now doing them all together, he said. ese lessons will then be applied to the third Osprey, which will arrive in Philadelphia in January and be used to solidify procedures for the remaining aircra, which should take sig nicantly less time. As Boeing technicians continuously rene their process, the goal is to have each CC-RAM aircra turn around in approxi mately eight months, with upwards of 20 being completed annu ally, Kelly said. Depending on funding and pricing negotiations, the total ef fort should take about eight years, he added. No program has been dened beyond the initial 129 aircra, but the long-term goal is to ultimately cycle back and upgrade the roughly 200 aircra that make up the remainder of the MV-22 eet, Kelly said. A part of every at-sea Marine Expeditionary Unit and landbased deploymentand soon the Navys carrier onboard delivery (COD) platformMV-22s are everywhere, Kelly said. We are the backbone of Marine Corps self-support, and the Navy has the COD requirements, but we think theyll probably nd some other things that they might want to do with V-22. Kelly noted roll-on, roll-o capabilities under development such as the V-22 Aerial Refueling Systemas well as digital interoperability packages that help connect battleeld networks as emerging technologies that will only make the MV-22 more popular in the eet. e V-22 is the most in-demand aircra in the Department of Defense. We are the lead platform for a number of dierent capabili ties, so the ability for the aircra to be reliable, maintainable and y able is paramount, Kelly said. ose capabilities dont mean much if the airplane isnt ready to go, and CC-RAM is the foundation for V-22 readiness for the next 30 years. Improving reliability while reducing life-cycle costs is going to make this a sustainable aircra for the next generation of Marine aviators that come y it. Je Newman is a sta writer for Naval Aviation News. Osprey Overhaul CC-RAM will see 129 Block B Ospreys upgraded to the Block C standard currently coming o the production line. The V-22 program oce expects to see a 15-percent increase in the rate of missioncapable MV-22Bs as a result of CC-RAM. The rst two aircraft were inducted into the program Jan. 24 and July 10.

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An F-35B Lightning II assigned to the Green Knights of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 121 launches from amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1). U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Levingston Lewis34 NAVAL A VIATION NEWSBy Cpl. Stormy MendezWhile aoat, our motto is, Fix it forward, said Chief Warrant Ocer 2 Daniel Rodriguez, CLB-31s maintenance ocer. 3-D printing is a great tool to make that happen. CLB-31 can now bring that ca pability to bear exactly where its needed moston a forward-deployed MEU. Additive manufacturing uses 3-D printing soware to break down a digital model into layers that can be reproduced by the printer, which then builds the model from the ground up, layer by layer, creating a tangible object. Proving this concept in April, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 121 ew an F-35B Lightning II aircra suc cessfully with a part that was supplied Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion (CLB) 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), are using additive manufacturing, also known as 3-D printing, to access replacement parts wherever they are needed. iRobot 310 small unmanned ground vehiclea part that did not exist at the time. CLB-31s 3-D printing team designed and produced the part, which is now operational. e templates will be shared Marine Corps-wide to make them accessible to any unit with the same needs.3-D Printing is the Futuree Marines deployed here use their 3-D printer as an alternative, tempo rary source for parts. As a permanently forward-deployed unit, its crucial for the 31st MEU to have access to the replacement parts it needs for sustained operations. 3-D printing capabilities dovetail with the MEUs expeditionary mandateto deploy at a moments notice by CLB-31s 3-D printer. e F-35B had a plastic bumper on a landing gear door wear out during a recent training mis sion. ough a small and simple part, the only conventional means of replacing the bumper was to order the entire door assemblya process thats time-consum ing and expensive. Using a newly released process from Naval Air Systems Command for 3-D printed parts, the squadron printed the bumper, had it approved for use and installed within a matter of daysmuch faster than waiting for a replacement part to arrive from the U.S. Making further use of 3-D printing, the MEUs explosive ordnance disposal team requested a modication part that acts as a lens cap for a camera on an Marines Use 3-D Printing to Access Replacement Parts Quickly

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SUMMER 2018 35 Sgt. Adrian Willis, a computer and telephone technician with Combat Logistics Battalion (CLB) 31, prepares to print a 3-D model aboard USS Wasp (LHD 1). Chief Warrant Ocer 2 Daniel Rodriguez, a maintenance ocer with CLB-31, holds a 3-D printed plastic bumper for an F-35B Lightning II landing gear door while underway aboard USS Wasp. when the nation callsbecause it cant wait for replacement parts shipped from halfway around the world. Sgt. Adrian Willis, a computer and telephone technician, said he was thrilled to be selected by his command to work with a 3-D printer. I think 3-D printing is denitely the futureits absolutely the direction the Marine Corps needs to be going, he said. e Marine Corps is all about mission accomplishment and self-reliance. In boot camp, Marine recruits are taught to have a gure-it-out mindset, and 3-D printing is the next step for a Corps that prides itself on its self-suciency. Finding innovative solutions to com plex problems really does harken back to our core principles as Marines, Willis said. Im proud to be a part of a new program that could be a game-changer for the Marine Corps. Time is of the Essence As a commander, my most impor tant commodity is time, said Lt. Col. Richard Rusnok, the squadrons Commanding Ocer. Although our supply personnel and logisticians do an outstanding job getting us parts, being able to rapidly make our own is a huge advantage. e 31st MEU continues to brain storm new opportunities for its 3-D printer, such as aviation parts and mechanical devices that can be used to x everyday problems. ough only in the beginning stages of development, of cials said, the 31st MEU will continue to push the envelope of what 3-D printing can do to make the MEU a more lethal and self-sucient unit. Cpl. Stormy Mendez is with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Stormy Mendez Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bernadette Wildes

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36 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve (CNAFR) has approved the standup of a centralized repair facility (CRF) in hopes of increasing C-130T Hercules aircraft availability and saving millions annually.The CRF concept should improve C-130 isochronal inspections (ISOs) throughput velocity, with the expected benet of a 25-per cent increase in aircra availability and more than $80 million in annual savings to Navy-unique Fleet Essential Airli customers, consisting of combatant com mands, the Fleet Response Plan and DOD logistics customers worldwide. e decision from Rear Adm. Michael Crane, CNAFR, comes aer a bench marking study of how the Air Force and Coast Guard maintain their respective C-130 eets. Commander Fleet Logistics Support Wing (CFLSW) Commodore Capt. Chad Baker commissioned the benchmarking study in mid-2017, with onsite process evaluations performed at Coast Guard Station Elizabeth City, North Carolina, and Air Force Special Operations Com mand (AFSOC), Hurlburt Field, Florida. CFLSW comprises the Navys entire mediumand heavy-airli eet. e study found both services employ reliability-centered maintenance (RCM), but in dierent ways. e Coast Guard divides traditional phased maintenance requirements for the C-130 into dis crete tasks on a maintenance due list that can be performed independently between ights or in conjunction with unscheduled maintenance, maximizing operational availability for a small eet that must maintain a high state of readi ness for emergencies. Also, instead of performing daily inspections, the Coast Guard opts for weekly checks, reducing maintenance tasks without any apparent safety impacts. Meanwhile, AFSOC has decreased scheduled inspection requirements signicantly by expanding the window between its ISOs. Using a CRF staed by C-130 READINESS Navy Learns from Air Force and Coast GuardBy Lt. Cmdr. Christopher BaxterCoast Guard aviation maintenance technicians install a leading edge on an HC-130 Hercules aircraft wing.

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SUMMER 2018 37contractors at Hurlburt Field, AFSOC performs ISOs four times faster than those conducted by Air Force aircra custodians. In contrast, Navy C-130 squadrons operate on an ISO cycle less than half as long as AFSOCs, with a turnaround time more than four times as long. In total, Navy C-130s spend more than ve times as many days in schedules maintenance as AFSOC C-130s. CFLSW is working with Oce of the Chief of Naval Operations resource spon sors and the Navys C-130 program oce to fund implementation of the Coast Guard technical directive to prevent longerona longitudinal structural com ponent of an aircras fuselagecorro sion issues on the Navys C-130 eet. e study also included a tour of the Coast Guards C-130 Aviation Logistics Center in Elizabeth City, which per forms depot maintenance and houses the services equivalents of airworthiness and eet support teams. A key insight from the tour was the centers development more than a decade ago of a $7,600 kit that has eliminated airframe corrosion and associated periodic inspections in the area of the ight-critical sloping longeron below the aircras bathroom. e area has been a recurrent readiness degrader on CFLSW aircra. e center also performs more indepth, standard depot-level maintenance, which takes up to twice as long as the Air Force and Navys standard 135-day pre ventative maintenance inspection cycles but allows the Coast Guards C-130s to operate for four years without major organizational-level phased inspection events. Other CFLSW initiatives spurred by the benchmarking study include: RCM analysis to optimize intervals between Navy C-130 ISOs Evaluation of an AFSOC tool that uses an aircras estimated time on wing to predict engine failure before its next scheduled ISO, which facilitates engine changes in conjunction with ISOs in a controlled maintenance environment with maximum support rather than during critical, high-priority missions Exploration of partial implementation of a xer-yer aircrew man concept in the C-130 community to facilitate expedited fault isolation and readiness recovery during extended missions away from home guard Maximized reuse of experienced C-130 personnel to align more closely with Air Force, Coast Guard and Marine Corps detailing practices, where technicians remain on the same platform for their entire careers. is would deepen technical expertise over time and aligns with the vision of retired Vice Adm. Mike Shoemaker, who, as commander, Naval Air Forces, said in April 2017, It is imperative to the future of Naval Aviation that we develop and retain maintenance, logistic and operational experts within our Navy enlisted ratings, particularly at the journeyman and supervisory (E5 thru E8) levels. While initial training serves as a foundation, true expertise in our complex warghting systems can only be achieved through the accumulation of years of experience and knowledge in a particular type/model/series. Navy C-130 technicians are currently detailed back to the same airframe less than 38 percent of the time Evaluation of micro vanes, which are proven to improve fuel eciency by approximately 4.3 percent in the altitude range typically used for FLSW C-130 missions While the Air Force, Coast Guard and Marine Corps are in the midst of multi year procurements of new C-130Js, the Navys C-130swhich average 25 years of service and are far more in demand than availableare expected to remain in service through the mid-2020s. Lt. Cmdr. Chris Baxter was the Readi ness and Innovation Ocer for Fleet Logis tics Support Wing. A Coast Guard aviation maintenance technician conducts maintenance on an auxiliary power unit combustion liner.U.S. Coast Guard photos by Petty Ocer 1st Class Charly Hengen

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38 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS WINCH H UNTBy Je NewmanWhile trying to cut costs for the CH-53K King Stallion, the Marine Corps new heavylift helicopter platform, the H-53 program oce found an obvious solutionthe aircrafts cargo winch, which was set to cost $350,000 each.With the CH-53K eet set to number 200 aircra, the H-53 program oce deemed a total cost of $70 million not far from the $87 million it takes to build an entire King Stalliontoo rich for a component Marines use sparingly on the current heavy-li platform, the CH-53E Super Stallion. In search of a more cost-eective alternative, now-retired Col. Hank Vanderborght, then-pro gram manager of the H-53 Program Oce, asked the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircra Divisions Cargo and Special Operations team what they could come up with. With a major assist from now-retired Gunnery Sgt. Peter Montalvo, who was mission systems crew chief for the H-53 program oce, the cargo team found its solution on an industry shelfthe Warn 1500AC, an $800 winch capable of pulling 1,500 pounds. Even factoring in additional equip ment needed to let the winch run o the King Stallions auxiliary powerand the expectation it would need to be replaced several times over the helicopters lifecyclethe winch is still expected to save more than $60 million, nearly 86 percent of the original winchs price tag. A Warn 1500AC winches a fully-loaded lightweight tactical vehicle into an MV-22B Osprey on June 20 at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Divisions cargo lab at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.U.S. Navy photo by Fred Flerlage

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SUMMER 2018 39Stronger, safer, better. Navy and Marine Corps cargo aircra currently are equipped with a centerline, hydrau lic winch mounted in the forward part of the cabin, near the cockpit, and the initial plan was to install something similar on the CH-53K.ockpit, and the initial plan was to have something similar on the CH-53K. e intent was to design a winch that would be permanently installed and never need to be replaced, said Joe Holman, a mechanical engineer with the cargo team and lead on the winch project. Instead, were scaling down to the Warn 1500AC, which is an o-the-shelf, consumable part, and when it dies, we can replace it. e team has made no major modications to the 1500AC, other than replacing its 3/16-inch steel cable with a 3/16-inch synthetic rope. Were trying to move away from steel cable, Holman said, explaining that when a steel cable pulls something and snaps, energy stored inside the cable releases and creates a dangerous whipping action. When synthetic rope breaks, all the bers just snap back in line. It doesnt have the same whipping motion, so itll be a huge benet in safety for the guys in the eet, he said. e synthetic rope also proved stronger in testing, breaking at about 6,000 pounds, whereas the steel cable broke at 5,500 pounds. ough synthetic rope comes standard on many newer commercial winches, Holman said, to his knowledge, this is the rst time a military winch will use anything other than steel cable. Accordingly, the cargo team is working on a standard that will inform Marines of the characteristics of synthetic rope and how to inspect it. Its always been steel cable for everything, so theres actually no military standard for synthetic, Holman said. ats how new this concept is for military applications. Meant to be mounted on vehicles or trailers, the 1500AC operates at a standard 60 hertz. Aircra operate at a much higher 400 hertz, so the winch will be delivered to the eet as part of a kit that will include a frequency converter and power distribution unit, which will plug into the aircras utility receptacle and power the entire unit. e three components will be mounted onto a plate that can be moved around the aircra and secured using standard cargo straps. A fabrication shop at Naval Air Station (NAS) Patuxent River, Maryland, will manufacture the plates. At 44 pounds, the relatively light kit can be moved around the cabin, giving Marines much more exibility when loading cargo, Holman said. Currently, if Marines need to winch something into an aircra thats already loaded with cargo, they use snatch block pulleys to wrap the winch line around any obstructions. But with the Warn winch, Marines can move and secure the plate in front of any existing cargo. e concept behind the plate is giving the eet exibility with where they can position the winch. Its only ever been a centerline, oor-mounted winch, Holman said. In addition, the move to an electric winch has allowed for removal of the hydraulic lines that were going to power the original winch, reducing the CH-53Ks weight. e Aircra Prototype Systems Division at NAS Patuxent River made three kits for qualication testing over the summer, which will determine how oen the winch might need to be replaced over the life of the King Stallion. Whatever the results of that testing, Holman said he was condent it will prove to be far more cost eective than the current winch design. e cargo teams initial estimate is that the Warn winch will need to be replaced every 100 cycles at max load. Since the original winch was supposed to last 1,000 cyclesa requirement meant to last the life of the aircraHolman gures each Warn winch would ultimately need to be replaced 10 times. ats just for the winch itself, which is the cheapest part of the whole assembly, said Tim Reese, the CH-53K programs deputy integrated product team lead for mission systems, landing gear and airframes. Plus, not everything winched into an aircra constitutes a max load, Holman noted. e estimates that we provide to the program oce are going to be very conservative, assuming that every time I pull something into the aircra, Im maximizing the capability of this winch, which is not going to happen, he said. But thats the current estimatethat I can make this winch last at least 100 cycles. Another four prototypes will be made for initial operational test and evaluation next year, aer qualication testing is complete, Holman said. A commercial winch meant to be mounted on vehicles or trailers, the Warn 1500AC has a 1,500-pound pulling capacity and will be mounted on a plate that can be moved around a CH-53K King Stallions cabin, giving Marines more exibility when loading the aircraft.U.S. Navy photo by Emanuel Cavallaro

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40 NAVAL A VIATION NEWSThe cargo teams initial estimate is that the Warn winch will need to be replaced every 100 cycles at max load. Given that the original winch was supposed to last 1,000 cyclesa requirement meant to last the life of the aircraft. I promise you its go ing to work. e idea for a scaled-down winch originated in 2014 with the cargo teams initial demonstration of the V-22 Osprey as an option for at-sea delivery of an F-35 Lightning II en gines power module. During the demonstration, the team used a handheld winch called the PullzAll, another Warn product, to pull a representative skid into a V-22. We had one in the front and one in the back, and we main tained positive control over the module as it was coming inside the aircra, and thats what started everything, Holman said. We wondered, Why cant we just use these in the 53K? But with a capacity of 1,000 pounds and line that only ex tends 15 feet, the battery-operated PullzAll didnt pass muster as a fully capable cargo winch. Nonetheless, CH-53K squadrons will receive them in addition to the Warn 1500AC kits, giving eet Marines a winch to use when the aircra is shut down. ose will be handy if the eet has to go somewhere; aer they land and shut down the aircra, they can use those with out having to start up the auxiliary power unit, Reese said. He estimated each CH-53K squadron will receive about 20 of the 1500AC kits and 10 PullzAlls. Aer zeroing in on the Warn 1500AC, Holman and Mon talvo visited Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron (MAWTS) 1 in Yuma, Arizona, to get eet feedback. ey were able to secure time on a CH-53E, and a group of Marines gath ered to watch them load various pieces of ground support equipment. Holman recalled a crew chiefs In order to be compatible with the CH-53Ks power system, the winch will come packaged with a frequency converter (beige box in the rear) and power distribution unit (black box in the middle). All three components will be mounted on a plate, with the entire assembly expected to weigh 44 pounds.doubts that a winch capable of pulling 1,500 pounds could move a 7,000-pound hydraulic cart, the heaviest piece of equipment at the demonstration. But Holman was unfazed. I said, I promise you its go ing to work, and I showed him the math, he said. e winch pulled in the cart without diculty, stunning the crew chief. e misconception is that the weight of the cargo or vehicle equates to the amount of load being put into the rope, and thats not the case, Holman said. A line pull of 1,500 pounds equates to pulling a vehicle between 4,000 and 5,000 pounds up an 18.5-degree ramp. And once you use a snatch block and eectively double the winchs strength, now you can pull a 10,000-pound vehicle up that ramp. Noting that the CH-53K is restricted to 10,000 pounds of internal cargo, the Warn 1500AC winchwith the help of a pulleywill be able to pull in anything that can physically be transported inside a King Stallion, said Mike Jackson, a me chanical engineer with the cargo team. Holman said some Marines have voiced concerns the Warn 1500AC spools in more slowly than the winches currently on the CH-53E and MV-22B, but ultimately they prefer the new winch for its relative simplicity. e current winches have a lot of intricate, little micro switches that you have to adjust for the winch to work, or even spool out and back in, which can make them frustrating for eet Marines to operate, Reese said. e line speed of the 1500AC is slower than the previous winch, but it gives the eet a lightweight, mobile solution that can be used to support the mission at hand, and at the end of the day, its a better option than pushing cargo in yourself, Holman said. In some cases, slower might even be better. Jackson said the winch would end up having a big impact in the V-22 commu nity, which has expressed interest in the winch project to load tactical vehicles by driving them in, only to have the tires slip on the loading ramp and hit the longerons. Its going to be a training and paradigm shi, Jackson said. Its going to take more time, but its usually not a fast eort when youre winching something. Its not going to slow down your day that much. Take the extra two minutes, and youll be ne. Je Newman is a sta writer for Naval Aviation News. U.S. Navy photo by Emanuel Cavallaro

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SUMMER 2018 41FRCSW Upgrades Its Environmental and Safety StandardsBy Jim MarkleFleet Readiness Center Southwest (FRCSW) recently upgraded its environmental and safety management standards to emphasize its commitment to improving performance.Intertek, an international company that certies compli ance independently with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and British Standard (BS), audited FRCSW and issued both certications in June. Environmental Management System FRCSW follows the ISO 14001 standard for its environ mental management system (EMS) and was upgraded from the ISO 14001:2004 standard to ISO 14001:2015. e 2015 standard requires continual improvement, and performance is measured and reported to management. Top management now owns the whole system, which is a big change between the 2004 and 2015 standard. So, theres a lot more buy-in at all levels within the organization, environmental engineer Shelli Craig said. Other changes in the 2015 standard expand the EMS coverage and scope and require interac tions with external parties, new documentation, legal compliance and operational control. To certify the upgrade, auditors examined three years of data for all work shis and looked for indications of continual improvement over that period. ey found FRCSW met all its goals. FRCSW became the rst federal facility to adhere to ISO 14001 when it established its EMS and registered to the envi ronmental standard in 1999. e EMS is required in a lot of Navy installations, but it is Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers (COMFRC) who is asking us to maintain our EMS to that 14001 standard, Craig said. e EMS encompasses six dierent programs, includ ing air, water and pollution prevention. Four environmental protection specialists monitor the EMS in 20 command locations. EMS extended stang includes approximately 30 mate rial management specialists with environmental collateral duties, 10 environmental representatives, 17 members of the Environmental Program Oce and six chemical handlers who collect and dispose of hazardous waste. Our facility gets continued and repeated high marks for housekeeping, Craig said. is is a hugely meaningful strength in that the corners are clean, theres no hazmat all over the place, and trash and hazardous wastes are clearly labeled, marked and separated. Good housekeeping speaks to many overlapping areas and gives auditors a sense of a tight ship. Safety Management System Formed in 2014, FRCSWs safety management system (SMS) ensures certication and conformance to the BS Occupa tional Health and Safety Assessment Series 180001 standard. For the certication, we needed to prove to them with audits, metrics, graphs and documentation that we are do ing exactly what we say we are going to do, occupational health and safety specialist Chris Gibson said. e SMS has three primary components: An internal audit group, which includes a second party auditor from National Technology Associates to evaluate command spaces An implementation team comprised of wage-grade em ployees, managers, supervisors and the same top-level managers who oversee the EMS A third-party auditor to verify and authenticate the standard e SMS established the criteria used in its internal audit. When we meet these criteria, we report up to COMFRC and advance through one of three levels. Were currently at the bronze level, Gibson said. We have about 30 people who manage various FRCSW buildings. ey are called champions. ey meet with the safe-site leads, who are oen wage-grade employees that serve as shop safety representa tives as a collateral duty. A successful SMS or EMS and standard conformance both rely on employee compliance within their daily opera tions, Gibson said. Jim Markle is a public aairs specialist at Fleet Readiness Center Southwest. NAN 41_FRCSW_Summer2018.indd 41 8/3/2018 11:59:04

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42 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS

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SUMMER 2018 43 AEROSP A CE MAINTENANCE PROFESSIONALS FOCUS ON IMP ROVING R EADINESSDiscussions covered readiness and modernization initiatives, train ing improvements, facilities and equipment upgrades, ways to build more quality into parts to minimize main tenance and replacement, and building closer relationships between logistics and supply commands. When most people think of Naval Avia tion, they think of aviators and naval ight ocers, said Rear Adm. Mike Zarkowski, commander, Fleet Readiness Centers, as he kicked o the symposium. We, the aerospace maintenance professionals, are the ones who keep the aircra ying. We x for the ght, day in and day out. With reduced ight hours attributed in part to tight budgets, he said maintenance personnel are not getting the opportunity to work on aircra as oen as they should to perfect their skills. e recent budget approved by Congress will allow more ight hours for pilots and crews. Maintenance professionals will, in addition, be able to work on aircra more oen to increase their experience with the aircra, compo nents and parts. Rear Adm. Mark Whitney, director of Fleet Maintenance, U.S. Fleet Forces Com mand, challenged leaders to be innovative and creative in nding solutions to improve readiness. e challenge for leadership is to make status quo more dangerous than the chal lenge of trying something new, he said. One innovative idea oers virtual train ing at the Fleet Readiness Centers to allow artisans to experience the look and feel of painting aircra without the expense or potential damage. Attendees agreed that a vital part of an eective maintenance program is a wellfunctioning supply system. Guest speakers Air Force Brig. Gen. Linda Hurry, dual-hatted as commander, Defense Supply Center Richmond and Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Aviation, Richmond; and Rear Adm. Duke Heinz, Naval Supply Systems Command Weapons System Support, spoke about their commitment to ensuring their teams work closer together so parts and supplies are available when and where needed. Adm. Heinz and I are joined at the hip and the key to our success is to make sure we are linked and synched, and we understand collectively what your requirements are, Hurry said. Our goal, at least from a DLA perspective, is that we will try new things [to improve support]. If its not illegal, immoral or too terribly fattening, were going to try it. e symposium also included panel discussions and mentoring sessions with retired ag ocers and senior aviation maintenance leaders. Gary Younger is a public aairs special ist supporting Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers. By Gary Younger More than 300 aviation maintenance professionals gathered May 13-15 in Virginia Beach, Virginia, to discuss ways to im AEROSP A CE M A INTEN A NCE C O MM UNITY C ELEBR A TES 50 Y E A RS O F S ERVICEAlthough the Aerospace Maintenance Duty Of cer (AMDO) community has only been around for ve decades, its history has been intertwined with Naval Aviation for more than a century. Shortly after pilot Eugene Ely launched his Curtis Pusher o the deck of USS Birmingham (CL62) more than a century ago, the Navy recognized the value of bringing aircraft to the ght. Keeping that aircraft ight-worthy and ready to launch became an instant requirement, said Rear Adm. Mike Zarkowski, commander, Fleet Readiness Centers and senior AMDO, as he opened the 2018 Aerospace Maintenance Professional Symposium (AMPS) in Virginia Beach, Virginia, May 13-15. Once the Navy embraced the idea of launching aircraft from ships, there was no turning back. From the wood and fabric open-cockpit ght ers to the fth-generation F-35 Lightning II, Naval Aviation has progressed, and with it, aviation maintenance has kept pace. Before World War II, the senior aviation chief maintenance mate ran every aspect of the squad ron maintenance program, which was largely selfdeveloped and passed down from chief to chief. He answered to the commanding ocer and managed his own supply bins. Success or failure depended on his maintenance program, since squadrons were more or less self-supporting. During and after World War II, aviation main tenance management became more centralized as planners understood more about maintenance and its impact on aviation. Regulations, instruc tions and manuals were produced to provide more guidance to maintainers. The standardized Naval Aviation Maintenance Program (NAMP) was instituted in 1961 and detailed the responsibilities of the organizationaland intermediate-levels of maintenance. Before the standup of aviation maintenance as a career eld, consistency of aviation maintenance varied from squadron to squadron. In the 1950s and 60s, various CNO-directed studies identied a

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44 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS AEROSP A CE M A INTEN A NCE C O MM UNITY C ELEBR A TES 50 Y E A RS OF S ERVICE Five of the original 100 AMDOs receive Professional Aviation Maintenance Ocer (PAMO) pins during the 2018 Aerospace Maintenance Professional Symposium in Virginia Beach, Va., May 13-15. Rear Adm. Mike Zarkowski, commander, Fleet Readiness Centers, left, and Capt. Keith Nixon, commander, FRC Mid-Atlantic, right, celebrate aviation maintenance pioneers by making them honorary PAMOs. From left are retired Lt. Cmdr. Jack Jeords, Capt. Tom OConnor, Capt. Don Taggart, Capt. Vern Listol and Capt. Mack Prose. need for an ocer corps dedicated to provid ing full-time, professional aircraft maintenance. These studies came from a growing concern that new generations of sophisticated and ex pensive weapon systems being introduced to the eet would pose reliability and maintain ability problems to Naval Aviations operational readiness and safety. In July 1968, several professional mainte nance ocers, including Capt. Howard Goben and Cmdr. Virgil Lemmon, lobbied the Secre tary of the Navy to establish the AMDO com munity with designator 152X. In December 1968, the original 100 AMDOs, ve of whom attended AMPS, were selected from the ranks of naval aviators, general aviation, aviation lim ited duty and aeronautical engineering duty ocers, to become the nucleus of the AMDO community. The rst 100 ocers included 47 lieutenants, 43 lieutenant commanders, nine commanders and one captain, and the AMDO community now boasts more than 400 active members and continues to grow. In 1969, transfer boards began transitioning qualied, eet-experienced ocers into the AMDO community, and entry-level AMDOs began entering from the U.S. Naval Academy, Aviation Ocer Candidate School, Ocer Can didate School, Reserve Ocers Training Corps and unrestricted line communities.AMDO Community AchievementsSince its inception, the mission of the AMDO community has been to help guide the development, establishment and implemen tation of maintenance and material manage ment policies and procedures to support naval aircraft, airborne weapons, attendant systems and related support equipment. Ask any AMDO why their community is important, and youll hear how it drives Naval Aviations readiness to ght now and in the future. Over time, AMDOs have matured the NAMP from its initial body of unintegrated policies and processes in the late 1950s, to its rst formal release in 1961, to development of todays Naval Aviation maintenance standard operating procedures. In 1966, CNO Adm. David McDonald ap proved a new aircraft maintenance and mate rial management manual creating three lev els of maintenance, and this new 3M system was implemented. The seeds were planted for an Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Depart ment (AIMD) aboard all aircraft carriers, and AMDOs played a critical role in helping CNO establish them in 1967. That same year, six Navy and Marine Corps Overhaul and Repair Departments were re-designated as separate commands called Naval Air Rework Facilities or NARFsprecursors to todays Fleet Readi ness Centers (FRC). The current FRC structurewhich includes four depot maintenance sites, four intermedi ate maintenance sites and a headquarters commandwas a result of the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure Commission recom mendation that realigned and merged depot and intermediate maintenance activities. On Nov. 13, 2008, AMDOs marked a historic moment when the Professional Aviation Main tenance Ocer warfare pin was approved, and again on Dec. 9, 2009, when the rst AMDO, Rear Adm. Mike Bachmann, was pinned. For more on the A MD O history, visit www.amdo.org. Ask any AMDO why their community is important, and youll hear how it drives Naval Aviations U.S. Navy photo

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SUMMER 2018 45In this period of centennial observances, we have seen quite a few books published on the development of Naval Aviation from its early years of the 20th century into the incredible force it has become. In On Wave and Wing: e 100-Year Quest to Perfect the Aircra Carrier, respected aviation historian Barrett Tillman gives his own take on the subject, writing in his knowledgeable and occasionally acerbic style, lacing the facts and dates with his strong opinions on events and the personalities that helped create them. A new book by Tillman is always an event, and this one is no exception. He begins with a lengthy discussion of the early British experiments in launching and recovering aircra from ships. ose experiments took place at the same time the U.S. was pursuing the same endeavor, mainly in the form of two Professional ReadingBy Cmdr. Peter Mersky, USNR (Ret.) ONWAVEAND WINGTHE 100 YEAR QUEST TO PERFECT THE AIRCRAFT CARRIERBARRETT TILLMAN US Navy F-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War 1969-1973By Peter E. Davies, Osprey Publishing, UK. 2018Peter Davies has written many books for Osprey Publishing, including quite a few deal ing with the F-4 Phantom in Vietnam. His new book, U.S. Navy F-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War 1969-1973, continues the story he started in his previous work on the F-4 in Vietnam from 1964 to 1968. is latest books appearance more than two years aer that rst volume (published in 2016), shows how much work goes into writing these great little books. It might be one of his best. Beginning with an excellent description of the early war years, Davies chronicles how Navy Phantom crews dealt with the North Vietnamese MiG force, a deceptively simple but complicated setup involving outdated but still potent MiG-17s paired with more sophisticated MiG-21s, including the latest MF model, which rst appeared in 1972. e descriptions in this book of the operation of the F-4s missile and radar capabilities when ghting MiGs are among the most technical I have seen. ey should elicit new respect and provide a greater understanding of the teamwork between the ghters pilot and radar intercept ocer. I also have never seen described in such detail the complicated train of events of May 10, 1972, when U.S. ghter aircra shot down 11 North Vietnam MiGs and U.S. forces lost two Air Force F-4s and two U.S. Navy aircra during that wars most intense day of air-to-air combat. is new research should serve as a reference for historians and enthusiasts alike. Scottish artist Gareth Hectors usual stunning cover illustration was of particular interest to this reviewer as it shows the last MiG kill of the war on Jan. 12, 1973, when a VF-161 Phantom crew shot down a MiG-17. e pilot of the F-4 was a fellow member of the Navys Aviation Ocer Candidates School Class 10-68. Hectors piece places the viewer right on Lt. Victor Kovaleskis port wing, at about the high seven oclock position. e books folio of side drawings also puts Jim Lau riers traditionally ne prole work on full display. On Wave and Wing: The 100-Year Quest to Perfect the Aircraft Carrier By Barrett Tillman Regnery Publishing, Washington D.C. 2017

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46 NAVAL A VIATION NEWS Brewster F2A Bualo and Export Variants By Richard Dann and Steve Ginter, Steve Ginter, Simi Valley, California, 2017 Naval Aviation and World War II historians love to argue the merits of the Navys rst monoplane ghter aircra, the Brewster F2A Bualo, debating the question of just how goodor badthe tubby little ghter was. From the American point of view, it was really a disaster. e aircra was very maneuverable, and its huge greenhouse canopy presented its pilot an excellent view, but it was underarmed and its underpowered engine aorded its pilots little protection in a dogght. It was also equipped with the weakest landing gear of any front-line ghter of that period. As authors Richard Dann and Steve Ginter note in their new book, Brewster F2A Bualo and Export Variants, the Bualo nonetheless saw its share of action with the Navy and Marine Corps as well as with the aviators of Britains Royal Air Force (RAF), the Dutch and most especially the Finns, who boasted a number of Bualo aces during their war against the Soviet Union. e 104th entry in Ginter Books long-running Naval Fighter series, this book features a large compendium of photos, drawings and technical data along with interviews with pilots. On its back pages, the book includes the series regular model kit coverage, discussing several model kits of the Bualo, including a large 1/32 scale kit from Czechoslovakia. e text is rich with detail, including initial aircra assignments in the Navy, but the photos and captions also oer rare insights. One example concerns the large gun camera mounted in a bracket on the right side of the fuselage just ahead of the cockpit. Seldom seen in photos, this bulky device must have been very cumbersome and probably used only once in a while. Besides covering the aircras service with the Finns, the work also devotes coverage of the aircras service with the Belgians, the Netherlands East Indian Air Force, and chronicles how the RAF used the export Bualo in their very brief and ultimately very unsuccessful wars against the Germans and Japanese. e hard-pressed RAF had a rough time handling the Japanese bombers and their ghter escort over Burma. Sometimes partnered with the Flying Tigers and their P-40s, the British gave a fairly good account of themselves in 1942 until overwhelmed. All of these countries time with the Bualo is briey but well described in this work, which I must say is one of the best overall histories of the Bualo I have seen. milestone ights by Eugene Ely in 1910 and 1911, but the U.S. cared little about aviation in those days, giving European aviators the initial lead. e sequence of growth during World War I dramatically illustrated how very far behind the U.S. was. Tillman then moves into the post-war period when the rst true aircra carriers appeared, with the U.S., Great Britain and Japan leading the way. Although Tillmans facts come from previously published sources, the style and opinions are strictly his. At times, the book becomes a battle history of the aircra carrier, with the author incorporating anecdotes and glimpses of the individuals involved in each event, but he always gives us a fresh mini-history of the carrier war in the Pacic and the Atlantic. e writing is more than just another date-by-date history of regurgitation of battles. Tillman brings his own characteristic prose to the material thats usually hard to fault and unique in its presentation. e chapter on World War II is quite long, and it merges into another a succession of conicts, including those in Korea and Vietnam, along with a much abbreviated description of late wars in southwest Asia and the Middle East. As he approaches the modern era, Tillmans descriptions become more brief, describing operations in Southwest Asia and problems with nding replacements for existing, veteran aircra such as the A-6 Intruder, which had served so long and well from Vietnam to Desert Storm. e book concludes with a few short appendixes listing famous carrier personalities who went on to other accomplishments and classic movies about carriers.

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Chief of Naval Operations Professional Reading ProgramWarfare is a violent, intellectual contest between thinking and adapting adversaries. The team that can think better and adapt faster will win. As we prepare for operations and war with an increasingly complex set of potential adversaries, we must do more to sharpen our thinking, learn the lessons from history and expand our minds. The books on this list are those that have inuenced my leadership development. It is our responsibility as leaders to continue to grow and to always question the status quo. These books have helped me do just that. If you nd just one book on this list that challenges you as a leader, then it has been a success. I encourage you to discuss what has challenged you as a leader in our new forum. Remember never to stop striving to expand your mind. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson THE CANONThese books comprise core knowledge that is fundamental to the naval profession. Understanding the causes of conict, the dynamics of power, and the intersections of politics, diplomacy, economics, and military power is part of the core knowledge each Sailor should have.CORE ATTRIBUTESFour core attributes of our professional identity will serve as guiding criteria for our decisions and actions. If we abide by these attributes, our values of honor, courage and commitment should be clearly evident in our actions. NAVAL POWERBooks classied under Naval Power provide a strong foundation of knowledge on classic and modern maritime strategy, emerging issues and new threats and opportunities. Historical works in this category span the Age of Sail to the many naval battles of World War II and beyond; studying the history of Naval Power deepens the context and oers precedent for the challenges of the present.FAST LEARNINGCreating a learning environ ment, from the deck-plates to the Pentagon, is critical to the success of our eet. Applying the best concepts, techniques and technologies accelerates learning for individuals, teams and organizations. Clearly knowing the objective and the theoretical limits of perfor mance comes through practice and education. We must adapt processes and thinking to be inherently receptive to innova tion and creativity.NAVY TEAMWe are one Navy Team composed of a diverse mix of active duty and reserve Sailors, Navy Civilians, and our families with a history of service, sacrice and success. We will build on this history to create a climate of operational excellence that will keep us ready to prevail over all future challenges.PARTNERSHIPSDeepening operational relationships with other services, agencies, industry, allies and partners who operate with the Navy to support our shared interests make the Navy a stronger organization. Furthermore, joint and combined partnerships fundamentally strengthen warghting capacity. These books illustrate the importance of forging domestic and international partnerships that strengthen naval power. For more information, visit: http://www.navy.mil/ah_online/CNO-ReadingProgram/index.htm lPhoto by pedrosala/Shutterstock.com

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