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The Front Page

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The Front Page newsletter of the KoreaCold War Families of the Missing, Inc
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Front page (Farmingdale, N.Y.)
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Korea/Cold War Families of the Missing, Inc
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Farmingdale, NY
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Korea/Cold War Families of the Missing, Inc.
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v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

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Korean War, 1950-1953 -- Missing in action -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Cold War -- Missing in action -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Missing in action -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
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Issue # 1 (Nov. 2003-
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Title from masthead.

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University of Florida
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159937994 ( OCLC )
ocn159937994

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THE FRONT PAGEKOREACOLD WAR FAMILIES OF THE MISSING 12 CLIFFORD DRIVE FARMINGDALE, NY 11735http://www.koreacoldwar.org Aug 201 7 Issue #5 6 POWMIA WE Remember! SEND TO: 2017 TENTATIVE FAMILY UPDATE SCHEDULEAug ust 1011, 2017 Korean Cold War Annual, DC September 9, 2017 Detroit, MI November 4, 2017 Boise. ID January 20, 2018 San Diego, Ca February 24, 2018, Fort Myers, FL March 24, 2018, El Paso TX. April 22, 2018, Rapid City, SDPLEASE NOTE OUR NEW ADDRESSIts time to renew your membership. Help us continue our work. Please note our new addressKorea Cold War Families of the Missing 12 Clifford Drive, Farmingdale, NY 11735 No application is necessary if you are already a member. Please provide your name and address on the check.C ontact your Congressional Reps through the U.S. Capitol Switchboard 1 2022243121 or H ouse Cloak Room at 1 2022257350 (R) and 12022257330 (D) Congressional Contacts : http://cong ress.org/congressorg/home/ US Senate: http://www.senate.gov/ House: http://www.house.gov/ White House: http://www. white house.gov Board of Directors and StaffNational Chai r Irene Mandra, Family Member Vice President Charlotte Mitnick, Family Member Treasurer Gail Stallone, Family Member Secretary VACANT Fundraising Melody Raglin, Family Member Editor Arlene Groden Cohen, Fami ly Member Webmaster Danny Gargus Board of Directors and Staff National Chair Irene Mandra, Family Member Vice President Charlotte Mitnick, Family Member Treasurer Gail Stallone, Family Member Fundraising Melody Raglin, Family Member Webmaster Danny Gargus Editor Tracy Schnurr (TS Printing) 2018 FAMILY UPDATE SCHEDULE* ARLINGTON, VA (ANNUAL KCW MEETING) AUGUST 9TH 10TH August 2018 Issue #60 POW-MIA WE Remember! Contact your Congressional Reps through the U.S. Capital Switchboard 1-202-224-3121 or House Cloak Room at 1-202225-7350 (R) and 1-202-225-7330 (D) Congressional Contacts: http://congress.org/congressorg/home/ US Senate: http://www.senate.gov/ House: http://www.house.gov/ White House: http://www.whitehouse.gov Attention Members We are looking for a new editor for our newsletter. We are also looking to increase our board membership. If interested please email us at imandra@optonline.net

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IN MY OPINIONby Irene MandraDear Members, This article was sent to me by John Zimmerlee, researcher and author. I found it very interesting. I hope you will too Easily Identifiable Remains Await Someone Who Cares by John ZimmerleeIt was 1956. The war had been over for 3 years and family members had been asked not to talk about it. Why? Because secretly our Government knew a lot more than they were telling and they couldnt a fford for the truth to come out! Not only had our g overnment left over a thousand men behind alive in Communist prison camps, they also had done a poor job of identifying remains and shipping the wrong bodies home! The mistakes needed to go somewhere s o they buried them as unknowns in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific . in Hawaii. A few years ago, I acquired the forensic files on the unidentified remains, but more recently someone sent me the spreadsheet of the grave sites and their rel ated unidentified X -files. All of a sudden, I had the potential to associate logical missing men with actual grave sites!! So here are some of my early findings. IN MY OPINION By Irene Mandra I thought you would be interested in the latest news: 19. U.S., North Korea discuss repatriation of remains Washington Post, July 16, Pg. A9 | Adam Taylor Korean counterparts Sunday to discuss the re patriation of the remains of soldiers left after the meeting at the peninsulas demilitarized zone was productive.Although several details about the transfer of the remains still had to be worked out, there was some agreement about how an initial transfer of remains would proceed, said a U.S. of meeting publicly and spoke on the condition of ano uled meeting about the remains, leaving their U.S. counterparts waiting at the demilitarized zones Joint Security Area. The State Department later said the North Korean side had been in contact at midday to cancel that meeting Thursday and had suggested rescheduling to Sunday. Yonhap News reported that three U.S. Forces Korea vehicles were seen driving over the Tongil Bridge and entering the DMZ about 8:20 a.m. The U.S. delegation was led by Maj. Gen. Michael A. Minihan, chief of staff for the U.N. Command, and North Koreas side included a two-star general, the South Korean news agency reported, citing diplomatic sources. The multinational but U.S.-led U.N. Command was formed during the Korean War and now helps Korea since March 2009. The North Koreans put a lot of weight on rank and status, said Rob ert Kelly, a political scientist at South Koreas Pusan National University. Getting a general symbolizes the importance of negotiating with the North. In a statement, Secretary of State next steps, including the transfer of remains that have already collected in North Korea. The two sides also agreed to restart efforts to look for the remains of other Americans who never came home. When President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un met June 12 in Sin gapore, they agreed to restart the repatriation process and both signed a statement promising later denied this but said they were on alert for the transfer of remains, with prearrangements made including the storage of 100 caskets at the DMZ. Pompeo traveled to Pyongyang on July 6 and 7 in a bid to make progress on U.S.-North Korea talks. His visit was widely expected to coincide with the transfer of some of the remains, but none were moved at that time. After Pompeo left North Korea, the countrys Foreign Ministry released a statement that called the U.S. negotiating stance regrettable and criticized the focus on denuclearization. Thousands of Americans were left in Korea either missing in action or as prisoners after the war ended. The United States and North Korea have engaged before in sustained diplomacy to bring back diplomatic tensions rose between the two countries, transfers of remains were halted in 2005 during the administration of President George W. Bush. --Carol Morello contributed to this report

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P2V-3W, Bureau # 124283 Shoot Down November 6, 1951 My brother, AD3 Jack D. Lively USN, was one of ten crewmen on board a Neptune Recon Russia claims they shot the plane down, the exact location of shoot down and information This story is about my brother, Jack. Our family lived in a very small coal mining town in WV. Jack graduated from Pax High School in 1949, a graduating class of ten girls and 2 boys. He enlisted in the Navy on April 18, 1950, just before his nineteenth birthday. According to his enlistment papers, he intended to make the Navy his career. Unfortunately, it was a very short career,one year, six months and 17 days. He was never granted leave to come home from the time he reported to the Navywas sent immediately from Boot Camp in Great Lakes, IL to Millington, TN for Naval Air Technical and Mechanical training. He completed training on Dec. 22, 1950 and was supposed to come home for Christmas. We received a phone call instead, stating he was in San Diego, CA and was being shipped out immediately to Barbers Point, Hawaii. That Christmas was very subdued at our house in 1950, but Christmas, 1951, was much worse!! After Jack arrived at Barbers Point for further training, he was assigned to VP6, The Blue Sharks and shipped out to NAS Atsugi, Japan, in late July 1951, arriving on August 1, 1951. We were unaware of his new destination, as secrecy was in effect for whatever reason. We learned he was stationed at NAS Atsugi because he sent a church bulletin home in a letter. At that time, his address so close to the water, he had to hold his feet up to keep from getting them wet. That secret intelligence missions along the coast of the former Soviet Union, North Korea and twenty missions from that date to November 6, 1951, when his plane was shot down. He was twenty years old. The day we received the telegram is etched in my mind forever. I was walking home from school when something caught my attention at our house. I saw my Dad standing on the back porch, one foot propped up on the railing, his elbow braced on his knee and his head in his hand. I instinctively knew something was wrong. I ran the rest of the way and up the steps.I asked what happened? He raised his head, and with tears streaming down his face..he said, Jack is missing! Our mother had been put to bed at that point and the family doctor was called.My parents never believed Jack was dead, although no details were provided. The telegram they received stated he was missing. We found out through the newspaper articles that the plane had been shot down by the Soviet Union.

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passed away in 1965, at age 60 and my mother passed in 1967, age 59, both still clinging to that hope.but Jack never came home.We all went on with our lives, always wondering what happened to Jack. We married and had families. We lost our oldest brother, a WWII veteran, and our sister, the youngest member of our family, in 2003. Two brothers and happened to Jack. I am bitterly disappointed that so little assistance has been provided by the U.S. Government.The Dept. of State (DOS) withheld news of this incident as it was referred to in government documents, until November 23, 1951. The Department of Navy to ask if an American plane had been shot down by the Soviet Union. The Navy statement maintained until November 7, 1952, one year and one day later, when all ten crewmen were summarily declared dead with no proof of death (PFOD), but due to policy. Presumptive Finding of Death, because no word has been heard from the crewmen for one year and one ten crewmen perished one would not expect contact. However, if in the event they were captured, I doubt their captors would allow contact with the USG or families. So, how do we know for certain they did not survive the shoot down and perhaps were suffering in a prison camp during that one year and one day? They were written off by USG Policy? the truth of what happened to my brother. In December 2011, I received a copy of a USG document, presented by the USG, to Communist Countries on 3 January 1952, almost two months after the shoot down. The document was a list of U.S. Navy and Marine POWS. The names of all ten crewmen of the P2V-3W shot down on November 6, 1951 were on that list. The cover letter states: These men are believed to be..or have been..prisoners of war British, whose family received a letter that he was a prisoner of war. The ten crewmen on the P2V-3W Neptune: Judd Hodgson, Sam Rosenfeld, Donald Smith, Samuel Baggett, Paul Foster, Erwin Raglin, Jack Lively, Paul Juric, William Meyer and Ralph Wigert, Jr. None of the families were ever informed of the possibility of their POW status by the USGnot then and as of this date. The document was provided by a private researcher, to whom I am very grateful. During the past year, a team of experts from DPAA re-opened the investigation into this shoot down and the fate of the ten crewmen. I am still hopeful that we, the families who loved ones and waiting for so long for the truth. All families deserve that, and our service members deserve to be accounted for, as honorably as their commitment and dedication to perform their duty for their government and the citizens of the U.S. Patricia Lively Dickinson Sister of Jack D. Lively

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Joint Statement of President Donald J. Trump of the United States of America and Chairman Kim Jong Un of the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea at the Singapore Summit President Donald J. Trump of the United States of America and Chairman Kim Jong Un of the Democratic President Trump and Chairman Kim Jong Un conducted a comprehensive, in-depth and sincere exchange of opinions on the issues related to the establishment of new US-DPRK relations and the building of a lasting and robust peace regime on the Korean Peninsula. President Trump Convinced that the establishment of new US-DPRK relations will contribute to the peace and building cam promote the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, President Trump and Chairman Kim Jong Un state the following: 1. The United States and the DPRK commit to establish new US-DPRK relations in accordance with the desire of the peoples of the two countries for peace and prosperity. 2. The United States and DPRK will join their efforts to build a lasting and stable peace regime on the Korean Peninsula. complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula 4. The United States and the DPRK commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the and for the opening up of a new future, President Trump and Chairman Kim Jong Un commit to implement the stipulations in the joint statement fully and expeditiously. The United States and the DPRK commit to hold follow-on negotiations, led by the US Secretary of State, Mike outcomes of the US-DPRK summit. President Donald J. Trump of the United States of America and Chairman Kim Jong Un of the State Affairs Commission of the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea have committed to cooperate for the development of new US-DPRK relations and for the promotion of peace, prosperity, and the security of the Korean Peninsula and of the world. CHIT CHAT NEWS by Irene Mandra

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SGT. PHILIP V. MANDRA By Irene Mandra Dedicated to Sgt. Philip V. Mandra, my beloved brother, my friend, my playmate, my protector, till we meet again. Born May 2,1931, Philip was my older brother. We attended Catholic grammar school and had the good fortune to belong to a closely knit Italian family. Phil was an alter boy. He was deeply religious throughout his life. There was a three year difference in our ages; yet we double dated together and had mutual friends. When the Korean War broke out, Philip join the Marines in September 1950. Our basic training, you deserved it. It wasnt willed to you. It isnt a gift. The title Marine is a title few can claim. No one may take it away. It is yours forever. Phil loved the Marine Corp. Phil landed in Korea January 1952 as part of D Company Battalion-5 Regiment, First Marine yet he wrote home telling us not to worry. He was awarded the purple heart with a cluster. It wasnt the attackers. Encountering one of the enemy, armed with an automatic gun, Phil maneuvered his the intruder with his bayonet. Phil rendered invaluable assistance to the outpost commander, conspicuous gallantry, and courage in helping other wounded Marines, Phil was awarded the Silver Star. I accepted that medal on Phils behalf, telling myself that Phil will be surprised when he comes home. On August 7, 1952 a day that is emblazed in my heart till I die, my brother disappeared. I did not with my brother. Bronco Hill is the outpost for a larger hill called Hook. The four other Marines who disappeared with my brother are Sgt. Junior J. Nixon, Sgt. Robert H Malloy, Cpl. Thomas L. Edwards and Pvt. Thomas Montoya. Some of these men were wounded due to concussion grenades thrown by Chinese forces. My brother was one of the men that was hit and knocked unconscious. wounded men disappeared. I dont think I have to tell MIA family members about the anguish and tears, when you dont know where a loved one is and how a loved one is surviving. In September of 1993, a Russian Colonel contacted the American Embassy in Russia. He heard a radio broadcast that the U.S. government was looking for Americans who were brought into Russia as prisoners of war. Anyone with information was asked to contact the USA Task Force. In the and this reorganization essentially dismantled the task force as we knew it. The US task force visited a Colonel Malinin in the Soviet Union, who spoke of seeing an American POW in a prison in Magadon, Siberia in 1962. When the task force showed Colonel Malinin an album of approximately 100 pictures of missing men; the Colonel picked my brothers picture out twice.

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Two different pictures, one when he was young and a computerized age enhanced picture of Phil at age sixty. Colonel Malinin told the story of visiting a prison which was part of his job and going brought out of his cell and walked in the court yard. The Colonel asked the Commandant, who was this man. The explanation given was that he is an American, sent to him from the Gulag. This took place in 1962, and Colonel Malinin saw the same American in 1965 when visiting the prison, again. When I learned this news, I packed and left for Russia. I met with Colonel Malinin and he told me that as he was leaving the prison, he heard three prisoners yelling out the window, Im American. brothers face as the prisoner that he saw in that courtyard. I showed him other pictures of my brother not allowed to be with other prisoners walking in that courtyard. I also visited the Commandant, who claimed he didnt remember my brother and denied that there were any Americans in that prison. I spent two weeks in Russia searching for answers; but hitting many a brick wall. My oldest brother Sal, accompanied me to this frozen land. Sal and I gave interviews, visited prominent people, made a video. Our story appeared in the local newspapers in Moscow but the major newspaper, Izvestiya promised to write our story; but never published it. The media claims that Russia is no longer Communist, I disagree. The Russians were polite but gave no information except the names of people involved in my brothers case, (which I might add my government refused to give me). While I was in Russia, Vice President Gore was there. I visited his hotel and left a note for him asking for his help and explaining who I was and what my mission was about. I never heard from our Vice President. I wrote Vice President Gore a letter, when I got back to the states, asking for his him that was so cold and heartless, it enraged me so, that I sent it to my Congressman. There is much to be done for the MIAs from Korea and Cold War. The most important of which for many family members is the cooperation of Russia and China. These countries still refuse to admit to us that they did indeed transfer Americans from North Korea into China and the Soviet Union. MIA issue and will pressure these nations to give us an honest accounting. I still hope and pray that some day soon, I will received the answers I so truly desire. heard a saying the other day that applies to each and every unaccountedfor MIA, TO LIVE IN THE HEARTS OF THOSE LEFT BEHIND, IS NEVER TO HAVE DIED. Although I can no longer hug you, the tears have never ceased. Till we meet again, my beloved brother. A Veterans Prayer Written by, Ralph Calabrese (Korean War Veteran) You called and I answered. I gave my all. I left my books, my desk, my machine, my store. Yes, I even left my mom and dad, my wife and kidsmy entire family. I put my life on hold because you needed me. I do not hesitate to answer your call. I went to foreign lands with out question on your command. There too, I left many things behindmy foot, my leg, my arm, my eyes. Yes even my mind. I left my life, my family, my happiness. Now, Im asking for your help, for me and mine. Please dear God, dont let America turn its back on me.

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Army Cpl. Francisco Ramos-Rivera, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on July 12. In July 1950, Ramos-Rivera was a member of Company H, 2nd Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations against North Korean forces near Taegon, South Korea. Army Master Sgt. Leonard K. Chinn, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on July 12. In late 1950, Chinn was a member of Company D, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division. Army Pvt. Delbert J. Holliday, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on July 12. In November 1950, Holliday was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 7th Cavalry Division Army Pfc. Joe S. Elmore, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for July 3. In late November, 1950, Elmore was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Marine Corps Pfc. Roger Gonzales, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for April 4. In late November, 1950, Gonzales was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division. Army Cpl. Morris Meshulam, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on June 4. In late November 1950, Meshulam was a member of Battery D, 82nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion (Automatic Weapons,) 2nd Infantry Division. Marine Corps Sgt. Meredith F. Keirn, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on May 22. In late November, 1950, Keirn was a light machinegun section leader for Company F, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division. Army Cpl. DeMaret M. Kirtley, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on May 4. In late November 1950, Kirtley was a member of Battery A, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division. Army Cpl. Terrell J. Fuller, captured and killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on April 13. In February 1951, Fuller was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, supporting Republic of Korea Army attacks against units of the Chinese Peoples Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an area known as the Central Corridor in South Korea. Army Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum, missing from the Korean War, was accounted for on April 23. In late November 1950, Ketchum was a member of Medical Detachment, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division. Army Sgt. Donald L. Baker, missing from the Korean War, was accounted for on April 2. In September 1950, Baker was a member of Company H, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry between his unit and enemy forces near Haman, South Korea. Army Cpl. Thomas W. Reagan, missing from the Korean War, was accounted for on March 30. In August 1950, Reagan was assigned to Company A, 14th Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, participating in the defense of the 24th IDs main supply route and the town of Yongsan in an area known as the Naktong Bulge, in South Korea. Army Sgt. Eugene W. Yost, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on March 28. In September 1950, Yost was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. Army Sgt. Julius E. McKinney, missing from the Korean War, was accounted for on March 18. In late November 1950, McKinney was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. Recoveries

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Army Cpl. James I. Jubb, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on March 15. In August 1950, Jubb was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Army Cpl. Leonard V. Purkapile, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on February 15. In late November 1950, Purkapile was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations against the Chinese Peoples Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of Unsan. Army Pfc. David Baker, captured during the Korean War, was accounted for on February 9. In late November 1950, Baker was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, positioned in the vicinity of Yongbyong, North Korea. Army Cpl. Albert E. Mills, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on July 13. In July 1950, Mills was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, blocking the Korean Peoples Army. Marine Corps Sgt. Meredith F. Keirn, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on May 22, 2018. In late November, 1950, Keirn was a light machinegun section leader for Company F, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division. He was reported to have been killed Nov. 30, 1950 while defending a hill overlooking the Toktong Pass, a critical main supply route between the villages of Hagaru-ri and Yudamni, North Korea Army Cpl. Ernest L.R. Heilman, accounted for on Aug. 19, 2016, will be buried June 8 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. Heilman, 19, of Greenup, Kentucky, was captured and killed during the Korean War. On Feb. 13, 1951, Heilman was a member of Battery B, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, and was declared missing in action when his unit was breaking a roadblock in the vicinity of Hoengsong, South Korea. Army Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum, missing from the Korean War, was accounted for on April 23, 2018. In late November 1950, Ketchum was a member of Medical Detachment, 57thField Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. Army Cpl. Terrell J. Fuller, captured and killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on April 13, 2018 In February 1951, Fuller was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, supporting Republic of Korea Army attacks against units of the Chinese Peoples Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an area known as the Central Corridor in South Korea. After enduring sustained enemy attacks, the American units withdrew to Wonju, South Korea. Army Cpl. Albert E. Quintero, accounted for on Aug. 28, 2017, will be buried May 14 in Long Beach, California. Quintero, 23, of Los Angeles, was missing from the Korean War. Army Sgt. John W. Hall, captured and killed during the Korean War, was accounted for June 6, 2017. In late November 1950, Hall was a member of Headquarters Battery, 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division Recoveries continued Adrian Joseph Cronauer, 79, of Troutville, Virginia, passed away on Wednesday, July 18, 2018. Secretary of Defense and at various outside functions including liaison with the leadership of vet erans service organizations as well as family and activist groups. He had lead responsibility for DPMOs dealings with international organizations such as the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Tripartite Commission. For his efforts, he holds the Secretary of Defense Medal for Exceptional Public Service. Prior to turning to the law, Cronauer spent seven years in New York City voicing television and radio commercials. Before that, he owned his own advertising agency, man aged a radio station, was program director of a television station, and was a TV news anchorman. He has taught broad casting at the university level and authored a textbook on radio & TV announcing, used by many colleges and universi ties.

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I did not understand, way back then Of life or war or men. I met a Russian man when I was ten, He taught me a big lesson way back then. To take my hate and give it a mend, And that you cant judge all Russians from way back then. This Russian man creeps back in my mind, I actually told him I hated all Russians, but his response was so kind. He was painting our living room a long time ago, I wish I could thank him Id like him to know. Such lessons he taught me, he opened my eyes, A Russian man painting our living room made me wise. To forgive-to withhold judgement, to understand. My Mom knew this; otherwise she wouldnt have hired a Russian man. To contemplate what this all means, Such an old memory it feels like a dream. 65 years have gone on by, And I rack my brain as I still try To get answers from what happened way back then And I realize, I still dont understand life or war or men. Melody Raglin Daughter of Doyle Raglin USN MIA: Nov 6, 1951 Crew of ten all unaccounted for. Plane shot down near Vladivostok, Russia The Washington Post April 26th 2018 Kim Jong Un walks across border to meet South Korean president, South Korean President Moon Jae-in welcomes Kim Jong Un to a summit that Moon hopes will lay the groundwork for a meeting between the North Korean leader and President Trump and that will remove the cloud of another war from the peninsula. The summit represents an astounding turn of events after 2017 was marked by major advances in North Koreas nuclear and missile programs, sparking a war of words between Kim and Trump that many feared might turn into actual military action. But Trumps maximum pressure policy of tough sanctions and tougher words, combined with Kims heightened nuclear-powered swagger, has created an environment for talks in which the United States and North Korea each think they have the upper hand A former U.S. Air Force sergeant, Cronauer co-authored the original story for the major motion picture, performance was nominated for an Academy Award. He sat on the Board of Directors of the Natl DDay Memorial and has served as a member of the Virginia Public Broadcasting Board, on the Arling ton County (Virgin ia) Cable TV Advisory Committee, and the Board of Governors of the New School for Social Research in New York City. He served two terms as a trustee of the Virginia War Memorial. He was preceded in death by his beloved wife, Jeane Steppe and also his stepson, David Muse; and grandson, Kevin Muse. Cronauer and his late wife, resided in Troutville, VA and are survived by step son, Michael Muse and daughter-in-law Mary Muse; also four grandchildren, Matthew Muse and wife, Kelley and their son, Hudson, Dr. Sarah (Muse) Minter and husband, Ryan; granddaughter, Christa Buchanan; and grandson, Cameron Buchanan. The family will receive friends on Sunday, July 22, 2018 from 1 to 4 and 6 to 8 PM at Oakeys East Chapel. A private interment will be held at a later date Adrian Joseph Cronauer continued

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SERVICE CASUALTY OFFICES Service Casualty Offices serve family members. Each Military Department maintains a service casualty office. The Department of State does the same for civilians. The officials in these offices serve as the primary liaisons for families concerning personnel recovery and accounting. Full time civilians who have worked this issue for many years and are experienced and knowledgeable help answer family member questions. Military officials also assist to help explain the methods used to account for families missing loved ones. Air Force HQ AFPC/DPFCM 550 C Street West, Suite 15 Randolph AFB, TX 781504716 (800) 5315501 Army Department of the Army Attn Past Conflicts AHRCPDCR 1600 Spearhead Division Ave, Dept 450 Fort Knox, KY 401225405 (800) 8922490 Marine Corps Headquarters U. S. Marine Corps Manpower and Reserve Affairs (MRC) Personal and Family Readiness Division 3280 Russell Road Quantico, VA 221345103 (800) 8471597 Navy Navy Personnel Command Casualty Assistance Division POW/MIA Branch (PERS 13) 5720 Integrity Drive Millington, TN 380556210 (800) 4439298 State Department U.S. Department of State CA/OCS/ACS/EAP SA17, 10thFloor 4th Floor Washington, DC 205521707 Phone: (202) 4856106 Honor Our Prisoners and Missing Show Your Support Delicate 1 x 1 round lapel pin. Beautiful Color Price $5.50 includes shipping and handling. To Order: Send Check or Money Order to: Korean Cold War 12966 Daisy Blue Mine Road Nevada City, Ca. 95959 E Mail Melody Raglin at raglinmia@yahoo.com

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NORTH, U.S. TO START SEARCH FOR SOLDIERS BODIES Remains of about 5,300 service members are still in the country July 17,2018 5,300 American soldiers missing from the 1950-53 Korean War, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said between American and North Korean generals in nine years productive and cooperative and said they landmark summit in June between North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and U.S. President Donald Trump in Singapore, where they signed a joint statement committing to the recovery and repatriation of American prisoners of war and those missing in action.Pompeo said the two sides discussed the return of U.S. service commitments made by Chairman Kim at the Singapore Summit.Working-level meetings between American the transfer of remains already collected in North Korea.The generals meeting came after initial lower-level arranged by Pompeo during his third visit to Pyongyang on July 6 and 7. The United States and North Korea are also working on repatriating the remains of about 200 American service members already found, a U.S. happen in the next 14 to 21 days, the source said.There are about 7,700 U.S. service members unaccounted for from the Korean War, according to the U.S. Defense Department. Some 5,300 are believed to be in North Korea, according to the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, which tracks the remains of fallen American soldiers overseas, with the highest concentration believed to be in the Chosin Reservoir area, the site of a major battle in late 1950.From 1990 to 1994, North Korea returned 208 caskets of U.S. soldiers of more remains. The project ended as North Korea was building up its nuclear weapons program. The joint project resulted in 229 caskets being sent to the United States. North Korea last returned the remains of what are believed to be six people in 2007.Analysts believe that repatriation of U.S. soldiers remains could bring needed momentum to deadlocked denuclearization talks. On June 23, the U.S. Forces Korea and United Nations Command transferred about 100 wooden caskets to the Joint Security Area to prepare for the retrieval of American soldiers remains. Another 158 metal caskets were transferred to Osan Air Base in Gyeonggi. discussions between North Korean and U.S. generals on the repatriation of remains.We look forward to successful discussions between the North and the United States through the working-level talks set for among some analysts about the standstill in denuclearization talks, President Trump has been upbeat about no nuclear tests and we got back our hostages. Who knows how it will all turn out in the end. BY SARAH KIM [kim.sarah@joongang.co.kr]