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Warrior Citizen

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Title:
Warrior Citizen
Place of Publication:
Fort Bragg, NC
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U.S. Army Reserve Command
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English

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United States -- Army -- Periodicals
United States -- Army -- Reserves -- Periodicals
Military art and science -- Periodicals
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serial ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.

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rf SPECIAL PULLOUT rf A FOCUS ON INDIVIDUAL READINESS What senior leadership is talking about, straight From the Top GEARING UP FOR BEST WARRIOR The journey to nd the 2018 Soldier and NCO of the Year has begun TASK FORCE COYOTE For Army Reserve units to protect themselves and our allies overseas, training on different weapon systems is a must

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AMERICAS ARMY RESERVEContinue your service: Career mobility across the country

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H ighlighted in From the Top, beginning on page 4meeting the needs of the Army and the Nation begins with ready and deployable Soldiers. This issue of Warrior Citizen spotlights individual readiness. To guide you on the readiness journey, pages 22 and 23 provide an easy-to use-checklist to make the trip a little bit easier. Page 24 focuses on Soldiers who took individual readiness to heart and participated in the 650th Regional Support Groups Best Warrior Competition. On pages 20 and 21, you will nd some advice and tips you wont want to miss from noncommissioned ofcers on leadership and becoming the best NCO you can be. Task Force Coyote, the rst of four gunnery exercises under Operation Cold Steel II, pages 10-15, focuses on increasing the lethality of individual Soldiers and enhancing the combat-readiness of units. Take a step back in time and read about a true baseball legend and Army Reserve Soldier as he recounts his journey from military life to major league stardom, and all the way to the Hall of Fame; page 26. Check out Christa Mary Macks Toa o Samoa on page 40, which describes the Army Reserve support provided to American Samoa in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Gita. These are just some of the many stories of Soldiers honing individual skills, training as cohesive units and making a difference across Americas Army Reserve. We want to help tell your story and welcome submissions. Contact us at usarmy.usarc.ocar.mbx.warrior-citizen@mail.mil. Melissa Russell Editor-in-Chief rf r fn trb editors note Since its founding, Americas Army Reserve force, evolving, in every era, to meet the needs of the Nation. Today, Army Reserve Soldiers to the Army and the Joint Force, wherever and whenever needed, anywhere around the world. LT. GEN. CHARLES LUCKEY CHIEF OF ARMY RESERVE AND COMMANDING GENERAL, U.S. ARMY RESERVE COMMAND

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co n t e n t s rf WARRIOR CITIZEN r Designed to familiarize Soldiers with several different crew-served weapon systems, Task Force Coyote is a part of Operation Cold Steel II. It is focused on increasing the lethality of individual Soldiers and enhancing the combat-readiness of units. STORY BY: SPC. NOEL WILLIAMS, U.S. ARMY RESERVE COMMAND CAPT. VALERIE PALACIOS, 200TH MILITARY POLICE COMMAND MAJ. MARVIN BAKER, 316TH SUSTAINMENT COMMAND (EXPEDITIONARY) 10 ntb THE ROAD TO AWESOME READINESS CHECKLIST 110 YEARS OF THE ARMY RESERVE POSTER SPECIAL PULLOUT: PAGE 22 in this issue nttbnnbb nt n n trained + ready tt communities ttnt road to awesome nnn f Spc. Torrence Saunders a combat documentation specialist with the 982nd Combat Camera Company (Airborne) maneuvers to photograph Soldiers during a react to contact battle drill during Combat Support Training Exercise (CSTX) at Fort Knox, Kentucky, March 15, 2018. PHOTO BY CAPT. DAVID GASPERSON, 335TH SIGNAL COMMAND (THEATER)

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co n t e n t s 24 ntb 28

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ntb tbn A LETHAL FORCE BEGINS WITH A READY SOLDIER. Fit, trained, and medically-ready, the deployable Soldier is the foundation of unit readiness. Americas Army Reserve depends on Soldiers who come to Battle Assembly ready to ght and win on the battleeld. That includes prociency in their individual requirements, including the knowledge, skills and abilities to excel in their military occupational specialties andequally criticalthe ability to perform these missions under highly lethal conditions. Many Army Reserve Soldiers bring years of civilian experience and industry-specic knowledge, expertise and skills in elds such as cyber, articial intelligence, quantum computing and other advanced technology elds, said Lt. Gen. Charles Luckey, chief of Army Reserve and commanding general, U.S. Army Reserve Command. That professional depth makes them highly valuable to ntb tbn Ready Force X units are tasked with sustaining higher Lt. Gen. Charles Luckey, chief of Army Reserve and commanding general, U.S. Army Reserve Command, sergeant major, U.S. Army Reserve Command, sat down with Warrior Citizen Magazine to discuss how Individual Readiness At top: Lt. Gen. Charles D. Luckey, Chief of the Army Reserve, and Commanding General of the U.S. Army Reserve Command, meets Soldiers assigned to the 597th Quartermaster Company at the Convention Center in San Juan, Puerto Rico. October 21, 2017. The 597th Quartermaster Company has been providing laundry and shower services to refugees in the Convention Center who were affected by both Hurricanes, Irma and Maria. PHOTO BY SPC. ANTHONY MARTINEZ, U.S. ARMY RESERVE COMMAND

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ntb the military, but if Soldiers are not individually ready and deployable, you dont have an Army. Period. The Army relies on Army Reserve units and Soldiers for additional maneuver, functional and multifunctional support capabilities to enhance the readiness of the Total Force. Collective units-ofaction, made up of ready Warrior Citizens, must be manned, trained, equipped andabove allled to combat-readiness. Whether part of operational or strategic depth forces, every Soldier in Americas Army Reserve must be capable of mobilizing rapidly and deploying with the mobility, survivability, connectivity, and lethality needed to ght and win on the battleeld. TRAINING STRATEGY This year, as hundreds of units and thousands of individual Soldiers and crews cycle through multiple training events, Luckey wants to be clear that at its core, Operation Cold Steel II is about getting after individual readiness and rebuilding leader competencies. Now in its second year, OCS II is also central to a massive push to ensure that Americas Army Reserve is able to generate readiness in a highly lethal environmentand the ability to generate that readiness within its own noncommissioned ofcer corps. Cold Steel II is more than a collective live-re exercise, said Luckey. Its individual Soldiers, building their individual weapons qualications skills, working with their crews and building teams. At its heart, OCS II is about buying back space for NCOs to lead. OCS II is quadrupling the throughput of what was already the largest live-re exercise in Army Reserve history. More than 400 crews trained over seven-weeks in 2017; 3,000 ground crews and 1,000 vehicle crews are expected to be trained in 2018. The gunnery aspect of OCS II combines Mission Essential Task prociency with platform gunnery. Designed to reduce post-mobilization time, this ntb Below: Command Sgt. Maj. Ted Copeland, United States Army Reserve Command (USARC) Command Sgt. Maj., addresses Soldiers from the 374th Sapper Co. from Concord, California, during a lunch break between training iterations as part of the 91st Training Divisions Warrior Exercise (WAREX) 91-17-03 on Fort Hunter Liggett, California on June 12, 2017. PHOTO BY SPC. SEAN MCCALLON, 91ST TRAINING DIVISION PUBLIC AFFAIRS

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training ensures that RFX units and Soldiers have the ability to deploy rapidlyin some cases, in days or weeksgiving the earliest deploying units a leg up on meeting readiness requirements. According to Luckey, exercises such as OCS II have broader long-term implications. Across the Army Reserve, were building our own capability and capacity to train ourselves, while building additional levels of individual Soldier readiness, said Luckey. Were increasing maneuver and leadership space, and enhancing the capability within the noncommissioned ofcer corps to get after training inside their own organizations and formations. That plan includes hundreds of trained master gunners and vehicle crew evaluators, going back to their formations and ooding them with experience. The Army Reserves top noncommissioned ofcer, Command Sgt. Maj. Ted Copeland is ultimately holding every NCO accountable and responsible. We are the action individuals, the standard bearers and the enforcers, he said. After 17 years ntb Above left to right: A Soldier from the 364th Civil Affairs Brigade, radios in a simulated 9-line medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) request during the Combat Support Training Exercise (CSTX) 78-18-03 at Fort Knox, Kentucky, March 15, 2018. CSTX 78-18-03 is a training exercise that ensures America's Army Reserve units and Soldiers are trained and ready to deploy on short-notice and bring capable, combat-ready and lethal repower in support of the Army and our joint partners anywhere in the world. 2017 Army Reserve Best Warrior NCO Runner-up carefully plots his points for land navigation as part of the best warrior train up. 2017 Army Reserve Best Warrior winners and runners up train to prepare for the Department of Army Best Warrior Competition. Spc. Khalil Jenkins, a combat documen tation specialist with the 982nd Combat Camera Company (Airborne), based in East Point, Georgia, provides security during Infantry Movement Techniques Training as part of the Combat Support Training Exercise (CSTX) 78-18-03 at Fort Knox, Kentucky, March 17, 2018. Right: Spc. Shuya Chang, assigned to the 7226th Medical Support Unit, Fort Jackson, South Carolina, meets with physician assistant Capt. Erika Walker for a periodic health assessment at Operation Reserve Care, Womack Army Medical Center at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. PHOTO BY SPC. TORRANCE SAUNDERS, 982ND COMBAT CAMERA COMPANY AIRBORNE PHOTO BY SPC. JESSE COGGINS, 982ND COMBAT CAMERA COMPANY AIRBORNE PHOTO BY CALVIN REIMOLD, U.S. ARMY RESERVE COMMAND PHOTO BY LT. COL. ANGELA WALLACE, ARMY RESERVE MEDICAL COMMAND tbn tbn

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of constant deployments in a counter-insurgency ght, success is now being dened by our ability to generate our own premobilization readiness and lethalityversus weeks-long training conducted post-mobilization by our active duty counterparts. Back at their units, these instructors, evaluators and trainers will be available to assist Soldiers in meeting the foundational components of training. All of this is driving a culture change in Americas Army Reserve, said Luckey. This re-invests in individual prociency, competence, and the professional development of our leaders. By 2020, noncommissioned ofcers and leaders who train and supervise will know what right looks like and be able to replicate the training environment and Army standards at home station or local training areas. Beyond weapons qualication, Cold Steels associated Combat Support Training Exercise (CSTX) 18-03 adds multiple tactical training scenarios specically designed to replicate real-world missions that prepare and validate select early-deploying units. The exercise integrated platform gunnery, leader certication, Lethal Warrior (AWT and Battle Drills), Situational Training Exercises (STX Lanes) and an FTX culminating in a Collective Live Fire Exercise. This is tough, realistic, tactical and technical training, including MET assessments and 12 integrated functional exercises in a combined environment, said Copeland. By the time we nish, more than 170 units and 11,500 Soldiers across Americas Army Reserve will have met the rigorous standard required to build readiness for high intensity conict. THE ROLE OF LEADERS IN HELPING SOLDIERS ACHIEVE INDIVIDUAL READINESS Field Manual 7.0 denes what right looks like when it comes to training and developing subordinate leaders in todays threat environment, Commanders ensure that their subordinates know how to think instead of what to think. They develop their subordinates condence, and empower them to make independent, situational-based decisions. Effective commanders develop subordinates with agile and adaptive approaches to problem solving that more easily translate to operations. Copeland pointed to a 2015 KRC Research study commissioned by the Army Reserve that indicated a high correlation between leadership effectiveness and responsiveness, and retention. Mentorship matters more than you know, whether you are talking about retention, setting the standard or leading by example, he said. You are their experienced and trusted advisor, Soldiers are looking to you for demonstrated leadership. BALANCE Todays Army Reserve is a mix of strategic depth units those with adequate time to build readiness, favored to source approximately 200 rotational missions every year, and RFX unitscurrently more than 600 units of action, ready to deploy on short-notice in support of contingency operations. training subordinate leaders and commanders, NCOs, and unit leaders. FM 7.0 TRAIN TO WIN IN A COMPLEX WORLD ntb Below: Specialist Pedro Benavides, from 407th Civil Affairs Battalion, dons his gas mask during the 353rd Civil Affairs Command Best Warrior Competition at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, Nov. 2, 2017. PHOTO BY CATHERINE LOWREY, 88TH REGIONAL SUPPORT COMMAND PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE

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ntb tbn Getting there and staying there relies in no small part on the ability of leaders to understand what is being asked of Warrior Citizens. There is a tension between what we need to accomplish as a force, and the balancing act our Soldiers are conducting every day, said Luckey. Were trying to alleviate that tension between being ready enough to be relevant, but not so ready that our Soldiers cant maintain healthy Family relationships, keep good civilian jobs, and pursue their education goals. Ensuring mechanisms are in place to alleviate the stress on the force is an ongoing challenge, but Luckey wants Soldiers to know that he, Copeland and senior leaders across the Army Reserve, are working hard to provide solutions. We recognize the unique sacrice you make, and we continue to advocate on your behalf through Family readiness groups, employers, universities, Congress and the American people. When it comes to issues such as lack of available training seats or missing a CSTX that conicts with a critical semester, Copeland said leaders need to look at each individual Soldier and use their judgement. It may require some exibility and it may impact short-term manning, said Copeland, but when it comes to training and retaining Soldiers, were investing for the long term. RECRUITING AND RETENTION Readiness means manning, and Luckey is urging every Soldier to rise to the challenge of recruiting and retaining Soldiers where they live and work. That means having access to the right tools and information. Every Soldier is a recruiter, Luckey said. This is an all-volunteer force and its strength is predicated, in our case, on leveraging Soldiers that are out there across America doing great stuff, Top left: Lt. Gen. Charles D. Luckey, Chief of the Army Reserve, and Commanding General of the U.S. Army Reserve Command, recognizes Soldiers assigned to the 597th Quartermaster Company with a coin in appreciation for their job done at the Convention Center in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Oct. 21, 2017. Top right: A drill sergeant from A Company, 2nd Battalion, 485th Infantry Regiment (Initial Entry Training), checks Army Spc. Joshua C. Scott, a Bradenton, Florida native serving as a water treatment specialist in the 431st Quartermaster Detachment, on proper pushup form during an Army Physical Fitness Test conducted March 9, 2017, in Camp Blanding, Florida. A military police Soldier with the 56th Military Police Company returns to camp after a reconnaissance patrol with his troops the night before a Combat Support Training Exercise. PHOTO BY SPC. ANTHONY MARTINEZ, U.S. ARMY RESERVE COMMAND PHOTO BY SPC. AARON BARNES, 321ST MILITARY INTELLIGENCE BATTALION PHOTO BY MASTER SGT. MICHEL SAURET, 200TH MILITARY POLICE COMMAND

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ntb primarily in the private sector or in other aspects of the public sector. Talk about what youre doing with this awesome team, and learn about the benets educational, healthcare, bonuses and experience gained. Dont think we can outsource this responsibility. We cant, and we wont. THE ROAD TO AWESOME As minor as it may seema morning run, a dental checkup, updating personal recordsthe focus on meeting individual requirements enhances the Army Reserves ability to achieve its number one priority: Readiness. Ive said it before, but it bears repeatingthe Army universe revolves around the noncommis sioned ofcer corps, said Copeland. We know what individual readiness means, but that noncom missioned ofcer, theyre the responsible party. The demonstrated leadership, energy and execution of every individual Soldier ensures Americas Army Reserve remains the most capable, combat-ready, and lethal federal reserve force in the history of the Nation. This is the Road to Awesome, said Luckey. Stay on it. WE GO THROUGH A LOT OF TRAINING AS A UNIT after going to school for eight months to become combat camera specialists, said Spc. Torrence Saunders, but that's okay, because it trains us to eventually end up where we need to bewhich is overseas in the ght, capturing imagery. Saunders was among the combat camera specialists from 982nd Combat Camera Company (Airborne), 335th Signal Command, participating inand providing support toCSTX 78-18-03. The only unit of its kind in the Army Reserve, the 982nd is one of only two combat camera companies in the Army. Capabilities range from aerial photography and airborne qualication to Special Forces reconnaissance and underwater photography. They operate forward, with maneuver elements, combat arms and special operations forcesnot just as documentation specialists, but as tactical warghters as well. We provide a directed imagery capability in support of operational movement, planning operations during wartime, contingencies and world crisis, said Saunders. The imagery we capture can go pretty far up the chain of command, sometimes even ending up on the desk of the Commander in Chief. At 21 years old, Saunders already has airborne school and a 2017 deployment to Iraq under his belt. He's also competing for Best Warrior, representing his unit and the 359th Theater Tactical Signal Brigade at the 335th Signal Command-level competition. Saunders advice? Live your life by the Army Values. Take care of your battle buddies, take care of yourself, he said. When you live your life by the Army Values, it will stick with you for the rest of your life. Those values are the reason I know I will be successful and fulll every short and long term goal that I have set for myself. Story and photo by Capt. David Gasperson, 335th Signal Command (Theater) Spc. Torrance Saunders, a combat documentation/ production specialist with the 982nd Combat Camera Company (Airborne) photographs Soldiers during a react to contact battle drill during Combat Support Training Exercise (CSTX) at Fort Knox, Kentucky, March 15, 2018. We are the action individuals, the standard bearers and the enforcers. After 17 years of constant deployments in a counter-insurgency ability to generate our readiness and lethality COMMAND SGT. MAJ. TED COPELAND COMMAND SERGEANT MAJOR OF THE ARMY RESERVE

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BY MASTER SGT. MICHEL SAURET 200TH MILITARY POLICE COMMAND f ntb A WEST COAST UNION

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f ntb PHOTO BY SGT. WILLIAM WASHBURN, 20TH PUBLIC AFFAIRS DETACHMENT

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f ntb Left: A Soldier with the 11th Military Police Brigade, prepares ammunition for the M16 qualication range at Camp San Luis Obispo Range, California. Below: A Soldier with the 11th MP Brigade checks all weapons before leaving the ring range at Fort Hunter Liggett, California, March 2017. At Bottom: A Soldier from the 42nd Military Police Brigade, observes and instructs a junior MP during a stress re lane at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. PHOTO BY SGT. WILLIAM WASHBURN, 20TH PUBLIC AFFAIRS DETACHMENT Weve got to grow together and work together now because at the end of the day, on our uniform it says U.S. Army. It doesnt say Army National Guard. It doesnt say Army Reserve. It says U.S. Army. COMMAND SGT. MAJ. WINSOME LAOS 11TH MP BRIGADE

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rf frntbnrnr fntn fnnrrf tnf rrfrf nnrrf trfnrrb ntnrtnnr fnnfnr ftnnrnrrf fftnnn COMMAND SGT. MAJ. TED COPELAND COMMAND SERGEANT MAJOR, U.S. ARMY RESERVE COMMAND NCO Creed No one is more professional than I. I am a noncommissioned ofcer, a leader of Soldiers. As a noncommissioned ofcer, I realize that I am a member of a time honored corps, which is known as The Backbone of the Army. I am proud of the Corps of noncommissioned ofcers and will at all times conduct myself so as to bring credit upon the Corps, the military service and my country regardless of the situation in which I nd myself. I will not use my grade or position to attain pleasure, prot, or personal safety. Competence is my watchword. My two basic responsibilities will always be uppermost in my mindaccomplishment of my mission and the welfare of my Soldiers. I will strive to remain technically and tactically procient. I am aware of my role as a noncommissioned ofcer. I will fulll my responsibilities inherent in that role. All Soldiers are entitled to outstanding leadership; I will provide that leadership. I know my Soldiers and I will always place their needs above my own. I will communicate consistently with my Soldiers and never leave them uninformed. I will be fair and impartial when recommending both rewards and punishment. Ofcers of my unit will have maximum time to accomplish their duties; they will not have to accomplish mine. I will earn their respect and condence as well as that of my Soldiers. I will be loyal to those with whom I serve; seniors, peers, and subordinates alike. I will exercise initiative by taking appropriate action in the absence of orders. I will not compromise my integrity, nor my moral courage. I will not forget, nor will I allow my comrades to forget that we are professionals, noncommissioned ofcers, leaders!

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youre not going to know everything... Do not be afraid to say I dont know. At the end of the day, youre a leader, and these Soldiers are now going to look to you. STAFF SGT. DAVID GILES ON LEADERSHIP I dont think anybody gets the gist of what it means to be an NCO until you actually have Soldiers underneath you. A lot of people assume that once you become an NCO, that just means you get to tell people what to do Once you get those Soldiers you learn what it means to actually guide them and mentor them. STAFF SGT. MATTHEW KENNEDY ON TAKING CARE OF SOLDIERS To me, being an NCO means two things: one, procient at your job... the second part, taking care of Soldiers. So an NCO is a father gure, a brother gure, a friend gure. It has to cover a lot of different aspects, not only being a Soldier. SGT. 1ST CLASS DMITRIY YURGANOV ON TAKING CARE OF SOLDIERS nnnr nf rfnrfn rrnfnb fn tnrtrtn nfrt rf fb n trnrrnnnr rnrr SGT. ANDREA HOWARD ADVICE TO LEADERS ... Remember that this is not all about you... Understand that Soldiers will take direction from you, and they will learn from you. They will always be watching you. But ultimately, your interest should be in [their] interest. And never forget that your decision will impact them. Trust in your decisions. Make the decisions. But accept when youre wrong. Congratulations. SGT. 1ST CLASS JOEL OSER ON ASSUMING THE RANK

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WEAPONS QUALIFICATION

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GEARING UP FOR BEST WARRIOR TWO SOLDIERS FROM THE 650TH REGIONAL SUPPORT GROUP ADVANCE

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ntb

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ntb

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ntb BY SGT. 1ST CLASS BRENT POWELL 76TH U.S. ARMY RESERVE OPERATIONAL RESPONSE COMMAND Firing a .50 caliber machine gun mounted on a moving vehicle while engaging enemy targets more than 900 meters away under the cover of complete darkness is a daunting task for even the most seasoned Soldiers, but nearly 60 Army Reserve warriors are tackling that challenge and more, as they prepare for an upcoming deployment. A Soldier res a M2 .50 caliber machine gun mounted on a Humvee at Fort Hood, Texas. Tracer rounds are included in the ammunition to help the gunner aim at pop-up targets visible through night vision goggles.

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ntb PHOTO BY CPL. MICHAEL SMITH, 1ST CAVALRY DIVISION SUSTAINMENT BRIGADE

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r ntb S oldiers from the 318th Chemical Company, 490th Chemical Battalion, 415th Chemical Brigade, 76th Operational Response Command, conducted a variety of training, including individual and crew-served weapons familiarization and qualications, since arriving on January 18. Perhaps one of the biggest training challenges facing the Soldiers has been the live-re qualication ranges for the vehicle mounted M2 .50 caliber machine gun. Our mission here is for each of our Soldiers to build a solid skill set with their weapons systems and gain condence with those skills, so they can successfully defend themselves and others in a convoy, said 1st Lt. Bradley Burch, executive ocer, 318th Chem. Co., 490th Chem. Bn., 76th ORC. Before putting live rounds downrange, each Soldier received plenty of instruction and hands-on training. Prior to partici pating in the live re exercise, the Soldiers spent time training on the weapons systems using the Engagement Skills Trainer (EST), said Burch. ey also conducted live-re familiar ization with the weapons, and now that training culminates with putting what theyve learned to the test, Burch added. Before we conclude our training we will validate all primary and alternate weapons crews through both daytime and nighttime gunnery exercises. ey also conducted live-re familiar ization with the weapons, and now that training culminates with putting what theyve learned to the test here in the daytime and nighttime live-re qualication. In order to successfully complete the live-re qualication course the Soldiers break up into 12 teams of three. Each team then loads into a Humvee or Light-Medium Tactical Vehicle (LMTV) with an M2 .50 caliber machine gun mounted on top. Some of the mounted weapons systems required the Soldiers to manually aim and re them, while others used the Common Remotely Operated Weapon Station (CROWS), which allows Soldiers to aim and re the gun using a monitor and joystick while remaining inside the vehicle. Before driving onto the course, each team was required to boresight their weapons, conduct radio checks, draw and load ammunition, check their gear and prepare themselves for the challenge ahead. is has been some intense training, said Cpl. Jerome Overton, decontamination specialist, 318th Chem. Co., 76th ORC. Its the rst time Ive ever put my hands on a .50 caliber machine gun. Its denitely been a learning experience, but its also been pretty fun. Echoing Overtons comments was one of his fellow crew members. is training has been challenging, said Spc. Daniel David, a decontamination specialist, 318th Chem. Co., 76th ORC. Its not for the faint of heart. It requires a lot of you, physically, mentally and emotionally, but Ive enjoyed it. e crews will spend a couple of days on the range honing their gunnery skills before moving on to other challenges, which will include shooting the M249 squad automatic weapon, the M203 grenade launcher, the At top: Spc. William Laws (left), a chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear specialist assigned to the 318th Chemical Company, 490th Chemical Battalion, 415th Chemical Brigade, 76th Operational Response Command assists Spc. Destiny Wright, a CBRN specialist also assigned to the 318th Chem. Co., in reassembling a M2 .50 caliber automatic machine gun at a gunnery range on Fort Hood, Texas, Jan. 27, 2018. Above: Spc. Caleb Hawkins, a CBRN specialist assigned to the 318th Chemical Company, checks the bore sight on a M2 .50 caliber machine gun at a gunnery range on Fort Hood, Texas. Opposite: Spc. Everett Mcaboy (right) a CBRN specialist assigned to the 318th Chemical Company, gives some guidance to another Soldier manning a M2 .50 caliber machine gun at a gunnery range on Fort Hood, Texas, Jan. 27, 2018. FORT HOOD, TEXAS

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f ntb M16A2 service rie and completing a land navigation course. ey will also tackle a host of mandatory classes to help ensure they have the knowledge needed for their upcoming deployment. Despite the long hours, various weather conditions and a host of challenging training, most of the Soldiers seem to relish the opportunity to improve their existing skills and learn new ones. Ive really enjoyed the training weve had here, said Sgt. Stephen Wilson, decontami nation specialist, 318th Chem. Co., 76th ORC. Ive learned a lot from my team out here. One of the things Ive learned is that you are going to make mistakes; you just have to learn from those mistakes and just keep on keeping on. This training has been challenging. Its not for the faint of heart. It requires a lot of you, physically, mentally and emotionally, but Ive enjoyed it. SPC. DANIEL DAVID 318TH CHEM. CO., 76TH ORC Above: Spc. Caleb Hawkins, a CBRN specialist assigned to the 318th Chemical Company, 490th Chemical Battalion, 415th Chemical Brigade, 76th Operational Response Command attaches a bore sight to a M2 50 caliber automatic machine gun at a gunnery range on Fort Hood, Texas. Hawkins and nearly 60 other Soldiers spent nearly two-weeks at Fort Hood to hone gunnery and marksmanship skills, as well as complete a host of other mandatory training as they prepare for an upcoming deployment. ALL PHOTOS ON THIS SPREAD BY SGT. 1ST CLASS BRENT C. POWELL, 76TH U.S. ARMY RESERVE OPERATIONAL RESPONSE COMMAND

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ntb Maple Resolve

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ntb Soldiers with the 993rd Transportation Company from Palatka, Florida transfer rations to Canadian troops from 2 Service Battalion during Maple Resolve 17 at Camp Wainwright, Alberta, Canada on May 24, 2017. The U.S. military is providing a wide array of combat and support elements for the Canadian Armys premier brigade-level validation exercise designed to enhance unit readiness and interoperability.

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ntb Below: Soldiers with the 993rd Transportation Company stow cargo tie-down straps after unloading supplies. Soldiers with the 993rd Transportation Company from Palatka, Florida, transfer rations to Canadian troops from 2 Service Battalion during Maple Resolve 17 at Camp Wainwright, Alberta, Canada on May 24, 2017.

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Below: Soldiers with the 993rd Transportation Company from Palatka, Florida, unload equipment from a palletized load system during Maple Resolve 17 at Camp Wainwright, Alberta, Canada. The 993rd provided logistical support during the Canadian Armys premier brigade-level validation exercise was designed to sharpen individual skill sets and enhance unit readiness. ntb

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FORT BELVOIR, Va Soldiers from the 7250th Medical Support unit used their technical expertise to provide medical services to more than 150 Army Reserve and active Soldiers during Operation Capital Medic, an operation that allowed reserve component Soldiers to use active-duty military facilities to provide services here on Dec. 10, 2017. The Army Reserve Soldiers provided medical services during Solider Readiness Processing, a system designed to ensure each Solider is medically t for duty. They did an amazing job getting us through the SRP in a timely manner, I made it through in about two hoursthats a fantastic turnaround, said Cpt. Jeffrey Havens, Commander, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. Normally we have to make different appointments at separate times throughout the week. We were able to come get it done in one day. Havens said he has talked with other commanders in the capital city region who agreed that getting Soldiers appointments in a timely manner has been a challenge that has had an effect on overall unit readiness. Some Soldiers are being scheduled out as far as two months for basic dental, hearing or behavioral health screenings. Todays SRP will have a direct impact on his units readiness. We SRPd both ourselves and an active duty unit this weekend, processing about 150 Soldiers, said Maj. Erika Fowlkes, ofcer in charge of Capital Medic. This is the rst time an Army Reserve unit has carried out this mission across the country, and it allowed us to function in our military specialties getting hands-on experience. ntb trained + ready rfntrfnb ntb Clockwise from above: Capt. David Alexander, 7417th Troop Medical Clinic, conducts an ear exam during Soldier Readiness Processing at Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Dec. 10, 2017. Spc. Tracy Ortiz, 7417th Troop Medical Clinic, draws blood during Operational Capitol Medic, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital. Sgt. Owen Roberts, 7250th Medical Support Unit, checks an x-ray during Soldier Readiness Processing at Fort Belvoir Community Hospital.

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The need to work together and to hone their skills was a sentiment echoed by the commander of the 7250th. Theres a real need for this. Weve never done anything like this, said Lt. Col. Patrick McNutt, Commander, 7250th MSU. I have policemen, reghters and IT professionals that dont get a chance to do this daily with this equipment in a real-world environment. Many of the Soldiers in the 7250th are medical professionals in their civilian capacities. However, some of the younger Soldiers are still going through school and are gaining valuable experience during the event. Im going to school for nursing, but having experienced sergeants and ofcers here who are also nurses in their civilian lives has been great, said Spc. Tracy Ortiz, a health care specialist with the 7250th, I learned a lot of great techniques, because every patient is different, and the patient comes rst. The unit was also able to practice working together and learned how to operate smoothly and effectively. Our unit was created to plug in different medical facilities, both CONUS and OCONUS, said Sgt. Terrelle Fields, the noncommissioned ofcer in charge of Capital Medic. This has been a challenge, but the Soldiers have adapted quickly, and Im proud of what they accomplished today. ntb rfntrfnb ntb fffrttfr rnffntrnfntfrtf rbbnfntfnttnbfrrbf fftrtntt MAJ. ERIKA FOWLKES OFFICER IN CHARGE OF CAPITAL MEDIC

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SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico Soldiers of Delta Company, 249th Engineer Battalion (Prime Power), were recognized during an award ceremony for their crucial work during power restoration efforts in Puerto Rico. Delta 249th specializes in restoring overhead power distribution. Platoon Sergeant Sgt. 1st Class Jason Henley, from Kingston, Massachusetts, said that, in his 15 years as a lineman, he has never witnessed this level of damage to power infrastructure. Ive witnessed a lot of storms, and Ive seen a lot of devastation throughout my career, everything from ice to hurricanerelated destruction, but nothing on this scale. The 249th arrived in Puerto Rico on Oct. 10, 2017 and, from the start, adapted their skills to a different electrical system. Learning the differences in this system was our biggest challenge, but we quickly adapted to the needs for each situation, said Prime Power Overhead Distribution Specialist Spc. Hunter Browning, from tn communities Opposite page: Delta Company, 249th Engineer Battalion Soldiers pose for a group photo with USACE South Atlantic Division Commander, Brig. Gen. Diana Holland and Task Force Power Restoration Command Col. John Lloyd after an award ceremony highlighting the units successful mission during hurricane recovery operations in Puerto Rico. Below: Sgt. 1st Class Jason Henley, a Platoon Sgt. assigned to Delta Company, 249th Engineer Battalion (Prime Power), received an award for his work during hurricane recovery operations in Puerto Rico. USACE South Atlantic Division Commander Brig. Gen. Diana Holland presented the award. nntn tfnn ntb

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Preston, Connecticut. We dont use very many concrete poles stateside, and here we had to gure out how to set them to restore power to residential neighborhoods. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers South Atlantic Division Commander Brig. Gen. Diana Holland recognized each of the 23 Soldiers during the ceremony. USACE took on a historic and unprec edented mission, and I am so proud of every single one of you, said Holland. The fact that you all volunteered to help our own goes to show the best of America. Through all the challenges overcome by Delta 249th, Browning stated the one thing he will remember most is the strength and kindness of the people of Puerto Rico. This woman we met had been without power for over two months, she came out with a huge American ag, said Hunter of one of the many missions in Puerto Rico. She was so proud Soldiers were here, and she said we were her heroes. Everywhere we went to work people came out, some who didnt have much, and would offer us what they had, added Henley. Holland closed the ceremony by encouraging the Soldiers to pass on their experience in Puerto Rico. I encourage you to tell the storytell your story of what you saw and whats going on here. The 249th Engineer Battalion (Prime Power) is a versatile power generation battalion assigned to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that provides commercial-level power to military units and federal relief organizations during full-spectrum operations. Puerto Rico has 2,400 miles of transmission lines across the island and 30,000 miles of distribution lines with 300 sub-stations. It is estimated that 80 percent of the grid was affected by Hurricane Maria tn ntb nrtf rtfnf nnnfn ntfr nffr rtr rnnnb rt r n SPC. HUNTER BROWNING 249TH ENGINEER BATTALION (PRIME POWER)

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r ntb PAGO PAGO, American Samoa Long before it was upgraded to a Tropical Cyclone, the effects of Tropical Storm Gita, along with a torrential downpour from a concurrent monsoon, created a path of destruction across the island of American Samoa Feb 9-10. Trees, toppled and upended by gusts up to 80 miles per hour, caused widespread damage to powerlines, roofs and infrastructure for thousands of residents. Of 1,400 homes assessed, more than 200 were destroyed and more than 600 sustained major damage. An emergency declaration allowing aid to be distributed to the island territory was made by Lolo Matalasi Moliga, governor of the tt communities Toa o Samoa

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f ntb U.S. territory of American Samoa, and approved by President Donald Trump. Army Reserve Forces in American Samoa took immediate action. The islands only military facility, which belongs to the 9th Mission Support Command, served as the staging base for federal agencies conducting recovery operations. In concert and coordination with various federal, state, local, interagency, and non-governmental organization partners, Army Reserve Soldiers transported Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and American Red Cross relief supplies and equipment to the Federal Staging Area. The islands two Army Emergency Preparedness Liaison Ofcers, both Army Reserve captains, were mobilized to help coordinate the military response. Captains Saipale Vaouli and Hanna Vaouli were born and raised in American Samoa, and both are former active duty Soldiers who transitioned to the Army Reserve. Saipale Vaouli, who works at the American Samoa courts as a probation ofcer and translator in his civilian life, felt well-prepared for the mission. I had just completed DSCA [Defense Support of Civil Authorities] training last August, he said. Everything they taught was still pretty fresh. Below: The aftermath of Tropical Storm Gita on American Samoa. Of 1,400 homes assessed, more than 200 were destroyed and more than 600 sustained major damage. Army Reserve Forces in American Samoa took immediate action, transporting 100,000 gallons of potable water across the debris-covered roadways in just four days.

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ntb tt communities

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ntb with the American Samoa Power Authority, coordinated with eight Army Reserve Soldiers from the Forward Support Company, 411th Engineer Battalion, to move water from the islands water distribution system to a portion of the system that was severed by a water main break. The team successfully transported 100,000 gallons of potable water across the debris-covered roadways in just four days, nearly cutting the weeklong mission in half. Their actions actuated the system of pumps and tanks that moved water up the mountain to isolated villages and provided running water to dozens of families. As the island rebuilds, American Samoas Army Reserve Soldiers will continue to engage with their Families and neighbors and provide much-needed capabilities. As Seybold sees it, its an honor to give back to a community, one that he has come to call his own. The expression Toa o Samoa means Warriorsor heroesof Samoa, said Seybold. We are members of this community and it is ours to protect. Clockwise from opposite lower left: Maj. Ullisses Taymes, Theater Support Group, loads luggage and supplies for Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) personnel that have arrived at Pago Pago International Airport to support relief operations for Tropical Storm Gita. The Theaters Support Group is a subordinate unit of 9th Mission Support Command based out of Fort Shafter Flats, Hawaii. Aftermath of Tropical Storm Gita on American Samoa. (Photo courtesy Lt. Col. Clinton Seybold, Commander) Staff Sgt. Faiupu Tagaleoo, supply NCO, Theater Support Group (TSG), Detachment, American Samoa, unhooks cargo netting for supplies received at the SFC Konelio Pele Army Reserve Center as part of the FEMA response for Tropical Cyclone Gita which occurred Feb. 9, 2018. LT. COL. CLINTON SEYBOLD COMMANDER OF ARMY RESERVE AMERICAN SAMOA DETACHMENT PHOTO BY LT. COL. CLINTON SEYBOLD, COMMANDER OF ARMY RESERVE AMERICAN SAMOA DETACHMENT PHOTO BY COL. WILLIAM NUTTER, 9TH MISSION SUPPORT COMMAND

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nnrr ftrbbnf Based on individual Soldier choices and the nature of the wound, injury or illness, some RC Soldiers will elect to use the medical benet provided by their employers for treatment and return to civilian employment while in the healing process. If a Soldier pursues this, opportunities to pursue Soldier-support programs may still be available as need arises. rfrbbtfrf Soldiers may choose to avail themselves of select programs Examples for medical care might include Line of Duty care, TRICARE's TAMP health benet, or VA-administered care (if VA-eligible). Administrative examples might include ling for Incapacitation Pay to offset lost civilian income due to the inability to perform required duties and responsibilities. bbtfrf A fully integrated approach to healing is characterized by entrance into a Warrior Transition Unit (WTU) Soldiers attached to a WTU are on active federal service orders while completing the requirements of the individualized medical treatment plan. The Warrior Care and Transition Program (WCTP) is the Armys comprehensive warrior-care program. nrfnrbntrtrnrntnntnr nrrrtnrnrnnrrnbtrtnrnnr ttnrnnrnn ntb t road to awesome Any follow-on medical care requires the completion of a line of duty determination. Report the injury or illness to your chain of command. In coordination with your unit, seek medical care and ensure a Statement of Medical Examination (DA 2173) is completed. rnrfftnnr Based on duty status and eligibility determination, the following approaches may be pursued. nnrn You must have the required documentation, and immediate action is key. PHOTO BY RODNEY JACKSON, 196TH INFANTRY BRIGADE, JOINT PACIFIC MULTINATIONAL READINESS CAPABILITY

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TO AMERICAS ARMY RESERVE nn n rr r r rrr n rr r HAPPY BIRTHDAY 110 TH Are you sure those were candles on that cake?