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Windermere Observer

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Windermere Observer
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Windermere, FL
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Observer Media Group, Tracy Craft- Publisher
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weekly
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English

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28.4947399569778 x -81.5352706610884

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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The Windermere Observer Group. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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2 WINDERMERE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 OrlandoHealth.com/Cardiology 321.841.9690Next-Day Appointments Available for New Patients When it comes to your heart, you deserve to be in the very best hands. Orlando Health has an entire institute dedicated to collaborative care to create the best treatment plan for you. When you choose Orlando Health Heart Institute, you choose an experienced team of cardiovascular experts equipped with the latest technology and committed to keeping you healthy. And with Central Florida, you have convenient outpatient services right in your own community. Choose a team dedicated to heart health 267438 Same day Appointments available for new and 267759 Pediatricians Erika Diogene, D.O. Phone: 407-770-1414 1583 E. Silver Star Rd. Ocoee, FL 34761 www.GrowingTogetherPeds.comOpen: Monday-Friday 8am-5pm YOUR CALENDARFRIDAY, MARCH 23FRIDAYS ON THE PLAZA 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 23, at the gazebo on Plant Street in downtown Winter Garden. Enjoy the sounds of the Good Times Jazz Band. (407) 656-4111.SATURDAY, MARCH 24CELEBRATION AMONG THE OAKS 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, March 24, at the Town Meeting Hall, 221 N. Arrington St., Oak land. Families can enjoy visits with the Easter Bunny from 11 a.m. to 1:15 p.m., with the Easter egg hunt at noon. The event will include music by the Good Times Jazz Band, free pony rides, a petting zoo and bounce houses. (407) 656-1117. EVENING AT THE POPS 4:30 p.m. petting zoo, 6:30 p.m. concert Saturday, March 24, at Newton Park, 29 W. Garden Ave., Winter Garden. Sit under the stars and enjoy the Orlando Philharmonic Symphony. This annual event by Lake Apopka supports the Rotary Club of Winter Garden to benet local charities. Tickets are $10 and are available in advance and at the gate. VIP tickets are available also. Facebook.com/ eveningatthepops.TUESDAY, MARCH 27SOUTHWEST BOOK CLUB 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 27, at the Southwest Library, 7255 Della Drive, Orlando. Discuss this months selection, Best. State. Ever.: A Florida Man Defends His Homeland, by Dave Barry. The Pulitzer Prize-winning author presents a riotous exploration of the Sunshine State that challenges negative stereotypes and oers insights into Floridas roles as a venue of history and fun. Ages 18 and older. No registration needed. (407) 835-7323.THURSDAY, MARCH 29VIETNAM WAR 50TH ANNIVERSARY GATHERING 6:30 to 9 p.m. Thursday, March 29, at American Legion Post 63, 271 Plant St., Winter Garden. The get-together is for all U.S. veterans who served between Nov. 1, 1955, to May 1975 and their families. vietnamwar50th. com. (407) 656-6361.FRIDAY, MARCH 30THE WAY OF THE CROSS 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 30, at Quest Church, 1450 Citrus Oaks Ave., Gotha. Witness the dramatic retelling of the story of the crucixion as seen through the eyes of various characters. This years production introduces new characters and actors. Seating is limited. Free. (407) 293-3696.SATURDAY, MARCH 31OCOEE KNIGHTS BAND MATTRESS FUNDRAISER 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, March 31, at Ocoee High School, 1925 Ocoee Crown Point Parkway. Name brands such as Simmons Beautyrest will be sold at up to 50% o retail. Every purchase benets the bands trip to Chicago to participate in the Thanksgiving Day Parade. (407) 9053000.MONDAY, APRIL 2WGHF HELICOPTER GOLF BALL DROP Noon Monday, April 2, at the West Orange Country Club, 3300 West Orange Country Club Drive, Winter Garden. One thousand numbered golf balls will be dropped from a helicopter hovering over a makeshift hole on the driving range. The rst purchased ball in the hole, or closest to the hole, wins $1,000. Tickets are $5 each or ve for $20 and are available at the Winter Garden Heritage Foundation. (407) 656-3244.WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4COMEDY MAKS VARIETY SHOW 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 4, at the Southwest Library, 7255 Della Drive, Orlando. Theres something for everyone in this high-energy variety show. Comedy Maks will dazzle you with juggling, magic, plate-spinning and more. Ages 6 to 12. (407) 835-7323. SMARTER SENIOR SERIES 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, April 4, at the Southwest Library, 7255 Della Drive, Orlando. Learn what legal documents you need to have in place as you age. Presenters at this seminar include an elder law attorney who can answer questions about wills, trusts, probate, directives and estate planning. Others will discuss funeral planning and hospice issues. Presented by Mike Flahaven, a certied Senior Hours professional. Reg istration or RSVP required at youroridahaven.com or (407) 340-5291. You may also register at ocls.info or (407) 835-7323. REALLY PATHETIC & TOTALLY AWKWARD 7 to 10 p.m. Friday, April 6, at the Garden Theatre, 160 W. Plant St., Winter Garden. Be the rst to see this new comedy/ drama. Tickets are $10 and available at TotallyAwkwardMovie.com; they will not be available the night of the event. There will be a Q&A with the cast and crew after the screening. supermegaultraent@gmail. com. PETER RABBITS GARDEN PARTY 10:30 a.m. Friday, April 6, at the Southwest Library, 7255 Della Drive, Orlando. Peter Rabbit loves Mr. McGregors garden, and children ages 3 to 5 will too at this garden party that includes stories and crafts. Seating is limited. Registration recommended at (407) 8357323.

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WINDERMERE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 3 Enjoy an elegant evening of laughs, sleight-of-hand and a sumptuous surf-and-turf dinner at the Its Magic! dinner show Saturday, March 24, at Winder mere Town Hall. The event begins with a cock tail hour starting at 6:30 p.m, and dinner will be served at 7:30. The magic show begins at 8:15 and features magicians Michael Ammar and Erick Olson. Cof fee and dessert will be served at 9. Tickets are $100 and can be ordered through the Windermere Rotary Club website: windermer erotary.org. All proceeds go back to local schools and charities, said Rotary Club member Judy Black, who helped organize the event. Ammar, 61, originally from West Virginia, lives in Winder mere. He started his magic career in 1980. His career has taken him all over the world and has even taken him to the small screen. I won a big international magic competition in Switzerland, and shortly after I was booked on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Ammar said. I per formed in some pretty cool environments, like Michael Jacksons home, the Playboy Mansion, the 43rd Presidential Inauguration. I have even performed at the Kremlin and the Vatican. Show-goers will not only get to enjoy a performance by Ammar, but they will also get to experience the magical, comedy stylings of Olson. Olson, 48, currently resides in Lakeland. He also has had a long and successful career as a magician and travels often to perform at corporate events. He also has been all over the world because of his career, and he was even featured on the first episode of NBCs Americas Got Talent. He owns Wizardz Magic Theater in Orlando, which hosts magic shows every Monday. I do a little more comedy magic than serious magic, so we thought it would be a good mix to Michaels strong magic, Olson said. Olson said he started doing magic in the third grade and began incorporating comedy as a teen. Every once in a while people started saying, Wow, youre more of a comedian than a magician, and it used to hurt my heart (because) Im a magician, Olson said. Then I realized, wait a minute, funny is good. Ammar and Olson both described some of their earli est experiences in their magic careers. The first trick I ever ordered (was) a trick called Bongos Blooming Bush, Ammar said. They made it sound magnificent in the description, but when it arrived, it was so small and ter ribly disappointing. I learned to stick with the classics after that. My first magic show was for my grade-school library in the third grade, Olson said. I did the old pour the milk pitcher into the paper cone (trick), and it started dripping out the bottom and onto the floor. I opened it up and milk went flying all over everybody. Although Olsons first magic show did not go exactly as according to plan, his classmates still enjoyed his performance and he became hooked on magic. They still liked it, even though I messed up, Olson said. I was bad, but everybody clapped. They were probably just happy to get out of library time. IF YOU GOITS MAGIC! WHEN: 6:30 p.m. Saturday, March 24 WHERE: Windermere Town Hall, 520 Main St., Winder mere TICKETS: $100 and available through the Winder mere Rotary Club website, windermererotary.orgERIC GUTIERREZSTAFF WRITERMagicians will be featured at the Windermere Rotary Clubs magic dinner show.Abracadabra! PREACHBridgewater Middle School students gathered for a memorial Wednesday, March 14, to honor the 17 victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and to participate in National Walkout Day.As Bridgewater Middle School counselor Claudia Lunn read the names of the 17 victims in last months shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, hundreds of Bridgewater students stood in somber silence. A few select students stood behind Lunn and released butter flies as each name was read. What followed was another 17 seconds of silence as students reflected on the tragedy that occurred in Park land, Florida. The Bridgewater students gathered at the schools track field for a memorial in tribute to 17 high school students and staff who lost their lives when a gunman opened fire at their school. The memorial was Bridgewater Middle Schools way of participating in National Walkout Day, an event created to honor the shooting victims. Lunn was chosen to read the victimss names because of a personal connection she has to MSD; she attended the school from 1998 to 2001. I got the best education at Douglas, Lunn said. (The) teachers taught almost like at a college level and really taught you how to argue and debate and think. Its interesting seeing all that coming back now, because I dont think I realized what I received (from Douglas) until everything happened. Although Lunn has family members with children who attend Stoneman Douglas High School, none were harmed. She added she went to Parkland the weekend after the shooting occurred and described her visit to the town as surreal. It just didnt seem real, Lunn said. We drove by the school, and that was the first time Id (been to) the school in quite a while. I saw students who were there cry ing. Their lives changed forever. Thats a place that they dont feel safe anymore. I felt sad that that is the memory that they have of that school now whereas I have the privilege of having really happy memories there. Bridgewaters student body vice president, seventh-grader Nailah James, and president, eighth-grader Amanda Cham bers, both weighed in on their schools memorial in honor of the 17 victims. They said rather than focusing Bridgewaters walkout event on protesting gun violence, their event brings more focus to school safety. We want to give awareness to schoolss protection, James said. We want our school protected. With everything going on, we think that some people are protesting and trying to bring up guns and violence into it, but we want to focus on something positive by having a memorial and being more peaceful, Chambers said. (Were) more focused on safety more than just guns. Chambers said the theme of their memorial lines up with the schools theme for the year: Choose Kind. Many of the stu dents at the memorial including James and Chambers wore matching shirts that read Be Kind. Be Safe. Our theme for the entire year is Choose Kind, Chambers said. If youre kind to one another, everyone is connected. If something does happen, you always have someone to lean on and talk to because you have that connection with them. The back of our shirts say, Be Kind. Be Safe. Thats what we mean. Kindness can lead to being more safe.KINDNESSERIC GUTIERREZSTAFF WRITER Photos by Eric GutierrezHundreds of Bridgewater Middle School Students gathered to hear a speaker during their memorial event. Bridgewater school counselor Claudia Lunn read the names of the 17 victims from the Feb. 14 shooting at Mar jory Stoneman Douglas High School. Many of the Bridgewater Middle School students wore these matching shirts to the memorial.Lunn added that kindness could lead to building strong connections in a community and said, We, as human beings, really want and crave connection at any kind of level. The phrase It takes a village is still so very pertinent today, Lunn said. I think creating that village component that connection where you always have someone to turn to is impor tant to making sure we all feel welcomed and loved and safe. Lunn also said Bridgewaters memorial event is important to let the students know how to peacefully organize towards a goal. The students really want to make the world a better place, Lunn said.

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4 WINDERMERE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 WINDERMERE OBSERVER The Windermere Observer (USPS 687-120) is published weekly for $40 per year ($50 outside of Orange County) by the Observer Media Group, 720 S. Dillard St., Winter Gar den, Florida 34787. Periodical postage paid at Winter Garden, Florida. POSTMASTER send address changes to the Windermere Observer, 720 S. Dillard St., Winter Garden, Florida 34787.OrangeObserver.comObserver Media Group Inc.1970 Main St. Sarasota, FL 34236 941-366-3468Editor and CEO / Matt Walsh Vice President / Lisa Walsh Chairman / David BelilesPublishers of the Longboat Observer, East County Observer, Sarasota Observer, Siesta Key Observer, Palm Coast Observer, Plant City Times & Observer, Ormond Beach Observer, West Orange Times & Observer, Windermere Observer, Winter Park/Maitland Observer, Business Observer, Jacksonville Financial News & Daily Record, Jacksonville Realty-Builder Connection, LWR Life, Season Magazine and Baldwin Park Living If we are to build a better world, we must remember that the guiding principle is this a policy of freedom for the individual is the only truly progressive policy. Friedrich Hayek Road to Serfdom, 1944CONTACT USThe Windermere Observer is published once weekly, on Thursdays. It provides subscription home delivery. The Windermere Observer also can be found in commercial locations and at our oce, 720 S. Dillard St., Winter Garden. If you wish to subscribe to, visit our website, OrangeObserver.com, call (407) 6562121 or visit our oce, 720 S. Dillard St., Winter Garden.TO ADVERTISEFor display or digital advertising, call (407) 656-2121. For Classieds, call (407) 656-2121.SEND US YOUR NEWSLet us know about your events, celebrations and achievements. To contact us, send your information via email to Michael Eng, meng@OrangeObserver.com.ObserverWINDERMEREPublisher / Dawn Willis, dwillis@OrangeObserver.com Executive Editor / Michael Eng, meng@OrangeObserver.com Design Editor / Jessica Eng, jeng@OrangeObserver.com Senior Sports Editor / Steven Ryzewski, sryzewski@OrangeObserver.com News Editor / Gabby Baquero, gbaquero@OrangeObserver.com Community Editor / Amy Quesinberry, amyq@OrangeObserver.com Black Tie Editor / Danielle Hendrix, dhendrix@OrangeObserver.com Sta Writer / Eric Gutierrez, egutierrez@OrangeObserver.com Advertising Executives Michelle Gentry, mgentry@OrangeObserver.com Cyndi Gustafson, advertising@OrangeObserver.com Creative Services Tony Trotti, ttrotti@OrangeObserver.com Customer Service Representatives Allison Brunelle, abrunelle@OrangeObserver.com Katie Rehm, krehm@orangeobserver.comObserver Media Group Inc.1970 Main St. Sarasota, FL 34236 941-366-3468Editor and CEO / Matt Walsh Vice President / Lisa Walsh Chairman / David BelilesPublishers of the Longboat Observer, East County Observer, Sarasota Observer, Siesta Key Observer, Palm Coast Observer, Plant City Times & Observer, Ormond Beach Observer, West Orange Times & Observer, Windermere Observer, Winter Park/Maitland Observer, Business Observer, Jacksonville Financial News & Daily Record, Jacksonville Realty-Builder Connection, LWR Life, Season Magazine and Baldwin Park Living 2018 The Observer Media Group Inc. All Rights ReservedIts not every day you see a leprechaun and bagpiper in downtown Windermere unless, of course, its St. Patricks Day. The towns first St. Patricks Day celebration drew hundreds of residents, most dressed up in green or gold, to enjoy the Irish holiday while supporting the Windermere Police Foundation. Longtime resident Dickie Lockman showed up in full leprechaun garb, complete with a pot full of chocolate gold coins. Bagpiper Tim Nazzaro played classic Irish tunes as kids shrieked with laughter while soaking adults in the dunk tank. Residents set up blankets and lawn chairs around Town Hall as the Down Brothers rocked out. And while people chatted, laughed and roamed around, Windermere Police Chief Dave Ogden couldnt help but take it all in. Its really neat when you put on an event youre never really sure if therell be five or 500 or 5,000 that are going to show up, so its awesome to see it (like this) right now, Ogden said. And its exactly what I was hoping for, to be honest. Watching the kids play and doing bounce houses, watching families sit around enjoying themselves and listening to good music. This is really what the foundation was created for, to engage the community and give back to them and have the oppor tunity for them to sit down and talk to our officers, too. Aside from the festivities, though, the community honored the memory of Windermere Police Officer Robbie German, who was killed in the line of duty on March 22, 2014. Until this year the Windermere Police Foundation held an annual softball tour nament in Germans memory, but WPD staff decided to start a community event this year instead. We knew St. Patricks Day was around this time period, and this year it just happened to fall on a Saturday, Ogden said. We just immediately thought, why not combine the two? This really brings the community back into Windermere. This is what we really wanted a community event where everybody can come relax, engage with police officers and do fun things that are around here. Aside from it being a fun community event, all proceeds raised will go straight to the Winder mere Police Foundation, which was established four years ago to RAISE A GLASSDANIELLE HENDRIXBLACK TIE EDITORThe event also honored fallen Windermere Police Ocer Robbie German.Windermere authorized the pur chase of 5.592 acres of railroad right-of-way extending from 12th Avenue to Windermere Road during the March 13 Town Council meeting. The purchase of the rightof-way, which costs the town $250,000, took years to accomplish due to negotiation setbacks, and other delays. However, with the finalized contract completed, the town may now move on. Town staff aims to draft plans on how to best make use of the land and initiate community meetings to receive resident feedback.NEGOTIATION EFFORTSWhen the railroad right-ofway was first vacated years ago, it was offered up for purchase by the landowners to the town, said Windermere Town Manager Robert Smith. However, council members at the time declined to purchase the right-of-way, and the owners offered it to the adjacent property owners, he said. Some property owners agreed to purchase, but when others said no, the land was put up for sale, with the majority of it being purchased by Lynn DP Land Trust and Ward Trust. Because current council members disagreed with the actions of the previous council and asked Smith to begin negotiations. Once I came onboard in 2011, one of the goals of the council at the time was to acquire the railroad right-of-way, Smith said. They pretty much wanted to correct the sins of the past by purchasing it, so I started negotiations a while ago with Ken and Susan Ward on purchasing the property, and through those discussions, we would sometimes make progress and then we wouldnt make progress, and then we had some tax issues, arguments over appraisals ... and then it pretty much just came to a stalemate. Then, probably a month after that stalemate, Susan and Ken passed away in a fire. After their passing, Smith reached out to their sons and agreed on a purchase contract. In honor of the Ward family, the town plans to name any future trail system or linear park constructed on the property after the Wards.MINI WEST ORANGE TRAILAccording to Smith, the towns new ownership of the 5.5 acres provides several options. Whats funny is, when every body drives through town and sees the area between Main Street and old dirt Main, they believe we actually have that piece of property when we dont, Smith explained. But this corrects that, so the town will be able to use it for a myriad of things. Early discussions include plans for a stormwater retention and a trail system the town hopes will increase property values. We can use it for stormwater retention, meaning we could actually curb up Main Street and enhance the look of the roadway itself and improve the roadways drainage system, Smith said. We could create a multi-use path on the roadway connecting every body from South Main and 12th all the way up to Windermere Road. So they could walk, take their bikes or their golf carts to the town square, police department, town admin, the Windermere Elementary School and the parks. And we have plans to extend a multimodal path down Sixth Avenue to the Grove area. So it would be like a mini ver sion of the West Orange Trail. With some pedestrian lighting in there, we can really make it look great. And I think a lot of people would use it. IN OTHER NEWS The town authorized approval of a trac study by Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. The $39,852 study is intended to enhance understanding of the towns trac patterns and reduce cut-through trac on neighborhood streets. Once conducted, Kimley-Horn will prepare a report with the collected data and make recommendations from its analysis. Windermere residents Andy Williams and Chris Sapp were ocially sworn in as council members, and former Councilman John Armstrong and former interim Councilwoman Molly Rose were presented with awards for their service. Windermere Mayor Gary Bruhn was sworn into his eighth consecutive term as mayor.GABBY BAQUERONEWS EDITORRight-of-way purchase support, encourage and benefit citizens served by WPD. Since it was created, the foundation has raised $130,000 and given back $80,000. Later in the evening those in attendance got to hear from Tim German, Robbies father, who saluted his son as community members raised their glasses in a toast to the fallen officer. When I envisioned the foundation and doing community events, this is really what I envisioned, Ogden said. Its pretty cool to see it come to fruition. Were just honored to honor the German family and Robbie and be here to do this. The commu nity has been a great supporter of ours.Photoa by Danielle HendrixThe Down Brothers played some sweet tunes during the event. Audra, Camden and Dana Singer had fun with props in the photo booth.

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WINDERMERE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 5 A road-construction project many have long anticipated might soon receive the final green light. With the approval of the recommendation for the Reams Road Roadway Conceptual Analysis Study by the Countys Planning and Zoning Commission on Thursday, March 15, the studys findings and recommendations will go to the Board of County Commissioners for a work session in April and a hearing in May. The study, which began in April 2017, was recently completed in early 2018. It involved the collection and analysis of traffic data and evaluation of public feedback received from two community meetings held in October and December 2017. Three roadway-widening project design options were presented during the meetings, with the Centered/Hybrid Alignment Alternative Design being the preferred option to combat the traffic congestion of Reams Road. The centered/hybrid alignment was recommended because it has no impact on residential or commercial structures, said Blanche Hardy, the project manager. It would maintain the existing centerline of the road. To accomplish this project option, the county will need to acquire right-of-way for both the north and south side of the road. According to the study, between 14,100 to 16,800 vehicles travel Reams Road daily, and by 2045, its estimated to increase to somewhere between 26,700 and 29,900 vehicles. Hardy added the roadway is already failing west of Floridian Place and the entire roadway is could fail by 2045 if nothing is done. The project would widen the roadway to four lanes measuring a total of 22 feet on both sides of a 19.5-foot median. A five-foot continuous sidewalk on the south side and a 14-foot multi-use trail on the north would also be constructed, with a wildlife crossing just east of Greenbank Boulevard. If the studys recommendations are BCC-approved, construction will begin in 2021 and is expected to take up to two years. 259070 (407) 870-1561info@WindsorAtCelebration.comWindsor at Celebration Discovery Center715 Bloom Street, Suite 140 in Downtown CelebrationWindsorAtCelebration.com AL Facility #: Pending Thoroughly modern senior living with imagination & innovation. OPENING SPRING 2018PREMIUM VIEWS going fast! JUST IMAGINE! 266025 270122 1 8 0 1 E C o l o n i a l D rG e t yo u r C a l l f o r a FR E E c o n su l t a t i o n (4 0 7) 7 5 5 -0 0 1 2 Fa st Fr i e n d l y C e r t i f i c a t i o nCh ro n i c P ai n P T S D, Ca n cer, S ei z u re s, E p i l ep sy, P ark i n so n s, M S HI V / AI DS Ch ro n s, I BS G l au co m a, F i b ro m yal g i a, & m o re! M edical M ariju ana t rea t s ov er 250 m edical c ondit ions He re a jus t a f ew:No ap p o i n t m en t r eq u i r edWalk-in MedicalM o n F r i 9 a m t o 6 p m S a t u r d a y 1 0 a m t o 2 p mc e r t i f i e d m a r i j u a n a d o c t o r s. c o m 7 loc at ions t o c hoos e f romM e d i c a l M a r i j u a n a CardMarijuana Clinic Countys planning commission OKs Reams Road RCA study Planning and zoning commissioners agreed to recommend the Reams Road RCA study for approval to the Board of County Commissioners.GABBY BAQUERONEWS EDITOR PROJECT COST Design: $3.79 million Right-of-way acquisition: $7.18 million Utility relocation: $4.2 million Wetland mitigation: $690,000 Construction: $25.2 million CEI: $3.79 million TOTAL: $44.9 millionCourtesy RenderingThe roadway-widening project extends from south of Summerlake Park Boulevard to Taboreld Avenue.

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6 WINDERMERE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 269518 62 nd Annual Easter Sunday ServiceIn front of Mosaic at Woodlawn Memorial Park Easter message with prayers & music Sermon by Je Pritchard of Starke Lake Baptist Church Continental breakfast will follow service in funeral home lobby Sunday, April 1, 2018 7:30 a.m. You are cordially invited to the Woodlawn Memorial Park and Funeral Home 400 Woodlawn Cemetery Road Gotha, Florida 34734 For additional information, please call 407-293-1361 268235 WCC owner Bryan DeCunha and the county have been at odds in the fight for development rights for nearly two years now. DeCunha purchased the country club in April 2011, but it met its demise due to declining membership and shuttered in April 2016. Since then, he has proposed converting the course into a new subdivision. The county holds the development rights as per a 1986 developers agreement, and under the golf courses zoning represented by a 1985 cluster plan development is prohibited from deviating from the cluster plan. DeCunhas attempts to obtain development rights have been denied by the county twice, and his plans for development have been met with opposition from nearby homeowners. His appeals to overturn the previous two board decisions rest in the hands of the circuit court, as do the countys motions to uphold them. No decision has been made yet on these. County documents show that in October 2017 he served the county a notice of claim for compensation or other relief under the Bert Harris Act a process for resolving certain types of land disputes between property owners and government and requested a written settlement. According to the notice, DeCunha asserted that the countys decisions have inor dinately burdened his property. He included for commissioners review an appraisers report that estimates its value has dropped by $19 million. WCC welcomes the oppor tunity to engage in a meaningful dialogue designed to result in an amicable resolution of this matter without the need of pursuing its remedies for judicial relief under the Harris Act or under applicable provisions of the Constitutions of the State of Florida or the United States, DeCunhas attorneys wrote to Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs in WCCs compensation claim. Under the Bert Harris Act, the county was required to offer a settlement to resolve the dispute. That offer, approved unanimously by commissioners at the meeting, proposes no changes to the actions taken by the board in October 2016 and January 2017 and includes a written statement of the allowable uses for the property whether that be a golf course or another use that ensures it remains as permanent open space, documents state. The county offer was, keep everything the same under the statute, said Kurt Ardaman, an attorney who represents the Windermere Club homeowners association. The local government has no obligation to compromise their decision. They stood very firm unanimously rejecting Mr. DeCunhas corporations position. If DeCunha rejects the boards settlement offer and statement of allowable uses, he may then file a claim for compensation in the cir cuit court, which the county said it would then continue to fight.WCC battle continuesFROM CLUB PAGE 1

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THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 BLACK TIEORANGEOBSERVER.COM ALSO INSIDE: Noor 17: Vegan Gala. 8 Orlando Magic Youth Foundation: Black Tie & Tennies Gala. 9Golf fans took a break from the Arnold Palmer Invitational tournament to enjoy food and wine at the Arnold Palmer Invitational Wine & Dine on 9 event on Friday, March 16. Put together by the Rotary Club of Dr. Phillips, the annual event had numerous vendors oering a variety of tasty meals and delicious drinks right next to the courses ninth hole. Guests also bid on prizes at the silent auction, which beneted Dr. Phillips public institutions. HARRY SAYER Carlos Rodriguez, Alex Garcia and Omar Vega were a fun trio. Skip Kohlscheen and Bernie Triano met at the event. Frances Maestro and Ivan Melendez walked around together. Nancy Asche and Ruthann Dilauri from the Rotary Club of Dr. Phillips worked hard to have a successful event. Leslie Heimer and Amanda Newstreet tried out some mango popsicles. ONLINESee more at OrangeObserver.com Arnold Palmer InvitationalWine & Dine on 9 Photos by Harry SayerThe owners of John Dorough Brothers Development and Nona Blue dressed up for a fun day.

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8 WINDERMERE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 JO BARSH rfrfrnntfb brrrn r| r All proceeds benet charities supported by the Rotary Club of Winter Garden bfn ftbff nnnttbIf needed, Rain Date is scheduled for 3/25/2018t 268549 267734 In beautiful Historic Downtown Winter GardenPresented by Bloom & Grow Garden Society and Co-sponsored by the City of Winter Garden Join us for a two-day festival with many plant, nature and wildlife related vendors. Raffles and festival shirts will be available at the Bloom & Grow booth at Plant St & N. Boyd St. Kidzone will host educational programs for children of all ages. Learn more about water conservation and your environment. Live entertainment throughout both days. Finally dont miss the Chalkin It Up Sidewalk Art Contest, which will be held on Saturday. springfeveringarden.com 18th AnnualApril 7th 9 am 5 pm April 8th 11 am 4 pm 268764 Herbivore GaloreVegans and vegetarians alike received a special treat at Noor 17s Vegan Gala, held Saturday, March 17. The evenings gala celebrated the health benets of an allvegan lifestyle and oered delicious vegan meals to enjoy by vegan caterers based in Central Florida. Noor 17 co-founder Imari Denise encouraged any nonvegan attendees considering a plant-based diet to make the transition, adding that the main goal of the event was to support the vegan movement, increase awareness and make plantbased diets more mainstream. GABBY BAQUERO Photos by Gabby BaqueroThe coowner of OhmWoke, a vegan/ vegetarian meal deliv ery service based in Orlando who served as one of the three caterers at the gala. Jennifer Agravat and Rebecca Villar jumped at the chance to attend the gala once they learned about it from the Vegetarians of Central Florida Facebook page. Dancers from Vida Florida: Voice of Indonesians in Florida entertained gala attendees onstage with a traditional Indonesian dance.

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WINDERMERE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 9 CHURCH DIRECTORY Advertise your Services or Events on this page weekly.This page appears weekly in the Windermere Observer and online at orangeobserver.com.To advertise in the Church Directory call 407-656-2121 or email AdvertiseNow@orangeobserver.com270063EPISCOPALCHURCH OF THE ASCENSION 4950 S. Apopka-Vineland Rd., Orlando Sun.Serv 8:30am, 10:30am, 5:30pm. 407-876-3480 www.ascension-orlando.org Non-DenominationalHAVEN OF GRACE BIBLE CHURCH 13520 Foxcrest Blvd. Winter Garden, FL 34787 Services 9:30 and 10:30AM 407-952-0510 Matthews Hope Chest Creations Custom Furniture Repaired, Refinished and Repurposed Wood Furniture Pallet Art & FurnitureFollow us at https://www.facebook.com/groups/MatthewsHopeChest/Visit our New Workshop Location at 930 Carter Rd. Suite #311, Winter Garden 1/4 Mile North of W. Colonial Dr. 407.905.9500 8am-5pm Mon Sat XNSP15668 267749 Trane Comfort Specialists. Quality Work & Customer Satisfaction is our #1 PriorityCall us and catch a great deal!407-470-7014 Get hooked on great Service!www.DuncansACOrlando.comSALES SERVICE INSTALLATION MAINTENANCE 1319 Green Forest Ct, Suite 412 Winter Garden, FL 34787 www.westorangehabitat.org267744Spring cleaning?Donate your gently used building supplies, furniture, appliances and more to the ReStore!Call (407)905-0406 for FREE pick-up or bring smaller items to the ReStore 13369 West Colonial Drive( between 9th and Dillard Street, behind Taco Bell in Winter Garden)Hours: Monday through Friday, 9 am to 5 pm Saturday, 8 am to 4 pm. Closed Sunday Saturday, March 24 11 am to 1 pmCome in to do an Easter egg craft and have a cupcake. e Way of the Cross Quest Church is proud to present this years production of1450 Citrus Oaks Ave. Gotha, FL 34734 SEATING IS LIMITED AND ADMISSION IS FREE. 269283 We have some new characters and actors to make this years production dierent from previous years. Mark your calendars, you wont want to miss this! The Way of the Cross is a dramatic retelling of the story of the crucixion as seen through the eyes of The Centurion, Simon of Cyrene, Mary Magdalene, Pontius Pilate and his wife Claudia Procula. Good FridayMarch 30th 7:30pmDoors open at 7:00pm BLACK TIEIt was a good run, but after 28 years the Orlando Magic Youth Foundation has decided to hang up the tennis shoes on its Black Tie and Tennies Gala. OMYF hosted its nal gala at the Amway Center on Saturday, March 17. The gala serves as a premier fundraising event and on average brought together 700 guests. In 2017, it raised more than $500,000 for Central Florida youth. Guests got to enjoy a multi-course dinner, cocktail reception, live entertainment, silent and live auctions and, of course, interaction with Orlando Magic players and sta. DANIELLE HENDRIXOrlando Magic Youth Foundations Final Black Tie & Tennies Gala Photos by Danielle HendrixAbove: Max Lynch stood with his parents, Thad and Jennifer, as he got his basketball signed by an Orlando Magic player. Left: R.K. and Faron Kelley and Kevin and Catherine Carlson coordinated in shades of blue. Far Left: Orlando Magic dancers lined the stage as head coach Frank Vogel made his appear ance. Left: Event emcees Dante Marchitelli, the Orlando Magic broadcaster, and Cori Yarckin, the Orlando Magic in-arena emcee, welcomed guests to the nal Black Ties and Tennies gala. Orlando Magic dancers Robyn G. and Cierra P. smiled for a photo with Debbie Higgins. Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer thanked at tendees for their support of the Orlando Magic Youth Foundation.

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10 WINDERMERE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 267722 Because You CareFAMILY OWNED & OPERATED (407) 695-CARE (2273) WWW.DEGUSIPEFUNERALHOME.COM THREE LOCATIONS FOR YOUR COMFORT Maitland9001 N.Orlando Ave. Maitland, FL 32751West Orange1400 Mathew Paris Blvd.Ocoee, FL 34761Sanford905 Laurel Ave. Sanford, FL 32771 All Inclusive Direct Cremation$795 352-394-8228921 S. US Hwy 27 Minneola, FLOne block north of Citrus Towerwww.cremationchoicesfl.com Direct Cremation$675Plus Container We offer a non-traditional setting for families to feel comfortable when planning for themselves or their loved ones. For more information and a complete list of prices, please visit our website: www.cremationchoicesfl.comCremation Choices offers an affordable alternative to expensive funeral homes and cremation services in the Central Florida area. 267302 www.winteroakfuneralhome.com1132 E. Plant Street, Winter Garden, FL 34787 LIC #F080822 We have the largest chapel in West Orange County. Owned and operated by the Romano family. Thats My WishDirect Cremation for:$795.00 Call for details407-614-8350 Home of the areas rst certied therapy dog. Feel free to stop in and say hello to Charley Girl! 267723 We Proudly offer: Traditional Burial and Cremation Services Prearranged Funeral Services 407-656-2233 www.baldwinfairchild.com 428 E. Plant Street Winter Garden, FL 34787Baldwin Fairchild Funeral Home Winter Garden 267720For the celebration of a lifetime, let us plan every detail. r See Page 15 of this weeks paper Windermere High rolls with rst Day of Percussion Grab your drumsticks and join other drummers at the first Day of Percussion Saturday, March 24, at Windermere High School. The event which will take place from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., will feature several guests, including Glen Sobel, drummer for Alice Cooper; Randy Van Patten, of Vanz Drumming; Anthony Par rulli, who will be host a session on theme-park drumming; and performances by Blue Man Group drummers Colin Robinson and Kevin Connolly. Connolly has been drumming for the Blue Man Group band for 17 years. His passion for drum ming means that performing with the group hardly ever feels like work. I can honestly say that I still laugh at something new every night, Connolly said. I have the most fulfilling job: to play music and create memories with my friends. Robinson lives in Windermere but grew up in rural Canada. Although hes a drummer for the Blue Man Group band, he clarified that he is not an actual Blue Man. Robinson got his first drum set in high school, however, he started playing drums in a nontraditional way before he got his first set. I would find all these different pillows and I would find the ones that made different sounds, Robinson said. I would set them up like I thought a drum set should be set up. And then I would play on them and take plastic buckets or whatever I could find (and play those). Like many musicians, Robinson has a long history of playing in a number of bands. In addition to playing the drums, he also plays the guitar and bass guitar. I was always, always a member of some band or another; a lot of high school bands just play ing cover music, Robinson said. When I moved to Toronto to go to college and started getting into bands that actually paid money. I started traveling more and more. From there, Robinsons career afforded him the opportunity to tour all over the world. He went on to play gigs with artists such as The Black Eyed Peas, Lenny Kravitz and Janet Jackson, among others. Eventually, I started playing with bands that were signed to (record) labels, Robinson said. (I) was on tour busses, and air planes, and (performing for) Jay Leno and Ellen Degeneres and starting to do these really big gigs. (I) opened for Justin Timber lake over in Europe, Robinson said. He was such a nice guy. At the beginning of the tour, he came into our green room (and) introduced himself to each of us. At the end of that two-weeklong tour, he rented out an entire bowling alley and brought all the bands and crew from our band and his band and we just bowled all night. Bowling next to Justin Timberlake was just a cool experience. Robinson also went on a threeyear tour with Canadian singersongwriter Fefe Dobson. Toward the end of that tour, Robinson auditioned in Toronto for the Blue Man Group. The group was play ing a show in Toronto at the time, and Robinson seized the oppor tunity to audition. April will mark his 13th year as a drummer for Blue Man Group band. Now Im still playing drums, but I can come home every night instead of living out of a suitcase, Robinson said. I just like the energy of live performance.ERIC GUTIERREZSTAFF WRITER IF YOU GOWINDERMERE HIGH SCHOOL DAY OF PERCUSSION WHEN: 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, March 24 WHERE: Windermere High School, 5523 Winter Garden-Vineland Road, Windermere, TICKETS: Tickets are $20 and can be purchased at schoolpay.com/link/WHSdayofpercussion. BENEFICIARY: A portion of the proceeds will benet Windermere High Schools Wolverine Band.Colin Robinson is a drummer for the Blue Man Group band and will be among the performers at this inaugural event. Eric GutierrezColin Robinson has been a drummer for the Blue Man Group band for about 13 years. LARRY A. GRIMESDIED SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2018.Larry A. Grimes, 83, of Winter Garden, Florida, passed away on Saturday, March 17, 2018. A lifelong resident of Winter Garden, he was born on May 26, 1934, to Lee A. Grimes and Mable Dillard Grimes. J.L. Dillard, his grandfather, was one of the founders of Winter Garden. Larry was the owner of L.A. Grimes Realtors Agency, which his father began in Winter Garden in 1943. He was a devoted member of the First United Methodist Church Choir for more than 50 years, and he was a long-time member of the Winter Garden Rotary Club with 53 years of per fect attendance. He loved to play tennis, cook and travel the back roads of Flor ida. He also enjoyed history and was very active in the Winter Garden Heritage Museum and has furnished many of its pictures. Larry is survived by his lov ing wife of 57 years, Harriette; his sons, Larry Grimes Jr., Marc (Karen) Grimes and Lee (Suzanna) Grimes; by his grandchildren, Ashlee, Katie, Jason and Justin; and by his great-grandchildren, Cheyenne, Hadlee, Hunter, Mattie, Reese and Dillard. A celebration of Larrys life will be held at 3 p.m. Friday, March 23, 2018, at the First United Methodist Church of Winter Garden, 125 N. Lakeview Ave. Casual attire requested. Memorials may be made in memory of Mr. Grimes to Rotary International, which works to eradicate polio, or to the First United Methodist Church of Winter Garden. Arrangements entrusted to Baldwin Fairchild Funeral Home, Winter Garden. baldwinfairchild.com. OBITUARIES

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1 The boys and girls tennis teams for Olympia High each defeated West Orange 7-0 March 15. The respective wins improved each team to 10-0 on the season.2 The Windermere Prep boys lacrosse team is 5-3 so far this spring, most recently defeating Dr. Phillips 6-5 March 9. Jackson Grinell scored three goals and Ross Fournet had a pair of goals and a pair of assists for the Lakers.3 Hannah Schaible, a Dr. Phillips High alumna and former Division I college basketball player at George Washington University, was named Player of the Week in the womens professional basketball league in Denmark, Danish Dameligean. Schaible scored 36 points in a recent victory for her team.4 The Dr. Phillips baseball team defeated Bishop Moore 5-2 March 19. Jacob Hartman had two hits, two runs scored and an RBI and Josh Arent was credited with the win on the mound. The Panthers are 7-4 as of March 19.5 Often referred to as Orlandos signature sports event, the Arnold Palmer Invitational concluded this past week end at Bay Hill Club and Lodge in Bay Hill. Rory McIlroy shot a remark able 64 in the nal round Sunday afternoon to win the tournament at eightunder-par. HIGH5 SPORTSMARCH 22, 2018 Dr. Phillips senior Alex Kaiser is an Academic All-American in three sports. Page 12The baseball and softball fields at Olympia High, adjacent to one another, have seen some strong play as of late. The Titans baseball and softball teams have been on respective hot streaks over the past two weeks. Olympias baseball team, which is competing in the Florida League High School Invitational this week, has won seven games in a row and eight of its past nine as of March 19. At the plate, Austin Vetter has a team-best 11 RBIs, as well as the Titans only home run. Meanwhile, Richey Lakes is hitting .500 with an on-base per centage of .619 and a team-high 17 runs scored. Lakes and Colin McMahon each have nine RBIs so far this spring, behind only Vetter, and Jeslyn Whitehead is second on the team with 13 hits, behind 16 hits from Lakes. On the mound, Jacob Drury has three wins and 22 strikeouts in 16 innings of work, in addition to a 2.19 ERA, and Whitehead has two saves while largely working in relief this spring. Included in Olympias winning streak is a pair of district wins against Wekiva, moving the Titans to 2-0 in Class 9A, District 3.Olympia baseball, softball trending upTwo teams for the Titans have enjoyed winning streaks in recent weeks.STEVEN RYZEWSKISENIOR SPORTS EDITORSEE BASEBALL PAGE 13 Steven RyzewskiJeslyn Whitehead has two saves in relief for the Olympia baseball team.Steven RyzewskiOlympia High athletic trainer Barry Walters tapes an ankle for a student-athlete after school March 14. March is National Athletic Training Month, marking an opportunity to recognize the Athletic Trainers who keep high-school athletes in southwest Orange safe.Athletic trainers spend the majority of their time working in the background. Theyre on the sidelines during practices and games. They are on location hours before a highschool sports game for setup and are often among the last if not the last people to leave after ward. Theyre not intended to be the center of attention, nor do they want to be. But then there are the moments when a large oh from the crowd is followed by silence, when play has stopped and there is a student-athlete on the ground in pain and, suddenly, everyone is looking very intently at the athletic trainer. Its a moment that local trainers from Olympia, Windermere, Dr. Phillips, Windermere Prep and The First Academy know well. And while each has his or her own unique explanation of what comes over them during those moments, the essence is the same: there is a laser-focus on athlete. The one thing they teach you in school is you never want to feel rushed, explained Jillian Sutton, UNSUNG HEROESSTEVEN RYZEWSKISENIOR SPORTS EDITORSEE TRAINERS PAGE 12

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12 WINDERMERE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 an athletic trainer at Winder mere High. Your main priority is the athlete. Outside of these moments, athletic trainers operate relatively as unsung heroes of the high-school sports community. Each March presents an opportunity to disrupt that, though, with National Athletic Training Month. Sponsored by the National Association of Athletic Trainers, the effort is geared toward awareness about the important work of athletic trainers and the 2018 slogan is Compassionate care for all.MOVING PAST MISCONCEPTIONSSomething athletic trainers experience often something that National Athletic Training Month can help offset are misconceptions about what they do. For starters, they are athletic trainers not personal trainers or sports-performance trainers. Theyre also certified medical professionals and they do a lot more than most would think. Athletic trainers are healthcare professionals, said Jennifer Ovando, head athletic trainer at Windermere High. Its more than just tape and water bottles. Though many may not recognize them as such, athletic trainers are also a type of first responder. Were the first line of response any time theres an injury, said Dianna Ellis, the head athletic trainer at Windermere Prep. Beyond responding to injuries during competition, what goes unseen is the work athletic trainers do on a day-to-day basis: helping athletes rehab and return to the field. Most days after school, the athletic trainers office can be a busy place and the services offered to the student-athletes are rather impressive. Something that, if you went through your insurance company would cost $50 an hour, we offer it to our athletes here, said Barry Walters, the head athletic trainer at Olympia High.A LABOR OF LOVEThe hours are long for athletic trainers to do the work they love. For us, spring is the busiest season, said Trey Tyler, an athletic trainer for The First Academy. Im married, and often my wife wonders if were still married. For athletic trainers at the high-school level who are fulltime staff members at their schools, there are often additional responsibilities, as well. Whatever (the injury) may be, were that rst line of response being somebody that is here on campus. Barry Walters, Olympia HighMost Orange County Public Schools high schools have dedicated athletic trainers and those staffers often are asked to teach during the school day. For someone who chose the career based on the desire to do the work out in the field, working additionally in the classroom may require a bit of a learning curve, but its something many athletic trainers say they find rewarding. The first semester was inter esting, Ovando said. Ive only been teaching since August and its different. This semester has been much easier. In some ways, athletic trainers are also by default the most loyal fans for many highschool sports programs, hav ing to be at so many games. Several say they have become invested in the success of teams they work with. For example, Sutton, who worked regularly with Windermere Highs boys basketball team, said she even went to a Wolverines road game on her night off. Beyond the teams success in the scorebook, relationships are formed with individual student-athletes that help make the job rewarding. I dont get as emotionally invested in wins and losses, but I get invested in the kids, themselves, Tyler said. Athletic trainers at local schools are cognizant that the student-athletes are watching them and that they may end up being the inspiration for the next generation of athletic trainers. Several say they have had former students go on to pursue the field, and a common origin story involves a memorable athletic trainer from when they were in high school. I kept hanging out in the athletic training office I was one of the annoying kids who never went home, Sutton recalled. My athletic trainer became a mentor to me and she kind of was like if youre going to be here everyday, youre going to help me. State Farm, Bloomington, IL Family. Friends. Community. Were all in this together.1211007Shannon Till, Agent Fowlers Grove 3279 Daniels Rd Winter Garden, FL 34787 Toll Free: 855-742-1591 www.shannontill.com State Farm has a long tradition of being there. Thats one reason why Im proud to support West Orange county.. Get to a better State. State Farm, Bloomington, IL Family. Friends. Community. Were all in this together. 1211007Shannon Till, Agent Fowlers Grove 3279 Daniels Rd Winter Garden, FL 34787 Toll Free: 855-742-1591 www.shannontill.com State Farm has a long tradition of being there. Thats one reason why Im proud to support West Orange county.. Get to a better State. State Farm, Bloomington, IL Family. Friends. Community.Were all in this together. 1211007 Shannon Till, Agent Fowlers Grove 3279 Daniels Rd Winter Garden, FL 34787 Toll Free: 855-742-1591 www.shannontill.comState Farm has a long tradition of being there. Thats one reason why Im proud to support West Orange county.. Get to a better State. Shannon Till, AgentFowler Groves 3279 Daniels Road Winter Garden, FL 34787 Toll Free: 855-742-1591 www.shannontill.com Hablamos EspaolAthlete of the Week Sponsored by...267751 Wills/Advance Directives Estates Corporation/LLC Commercial transactions Landlord/Tenant Attorney At Law 407-656-5521 425 South Dillard St. Winter Garden, FL 34787 B M. JProudly serving West Orange County for over 36 years.www.blairjohnsonlaw.com Real estate: Contracts, Closings, Short Sales, Deed in Lieu And other matters 267719 Whats it like to find out youve been recognized as an Academic All-American? Its great. It feels like everything is starting to pay off, getting recognition. Why do you value academics and work so hard at having success in the classroom? Getting into college and making sure thats a secure option, that I can get into bigger schools that I want to get into. Conversely, why do you value athletics? It takes your mind off studying, for sure. Its like a de-stresser for me, going to practice after school and putting in some hard work. Do you know where youre going to go to college? Most likely UF. My mother went there and theyve got a great engineering program and student life. Whats the athletic accomplishment youre most proud of? I would say we just broke the school record for consecutive wins in water polo. That felt pretty good. What do you enjoy about swimming, diving and water polo, respectively? Diving, I love because it probably looks the coolest. Water polo, I love it because its a great team sport and you have a lot of fun with your friends. SwimSPORTS SPOTLIGHTDr. Phillips High senior Alex Kaiser has had plenty of success in the pool and outside of it during his time on campus. Kaiser, a standout in swimming, diving and water polo, recently became the rst student-athlete in Panthers history to earn Academic All-American honors in three sports.SPONSORED BY SHANNON TILLSTATE FARM IN FOWLER GROVESAlex Kaiser ming is great because it really shows you how much practice pays off because of the small decreases in your time. Whats been your favorite class at Dr. Phillips over the years? Id say calculus with Mr. (Gregory) Keith Ive had him for three years in pre-calculus, calculus AB and calculus BC. Why do you enjoy calculus? Ive always been good at math, and to start working on problems that you can see translate into the real world is kind of cool. What are you hoping to major in? Engineering. Off the top of my head, Im not sure (which discipline) yet. Im going to do an introductory class, but its look ing like mechanical (engineer ing) right now. What draws you to the field of engineering? My father was an engineer and my brother was one, too. Whats your favorite sport to watch on television? Football. Green Bay is my favor ite pro team because thats where my dad is from, and then UF is my favorite college team because my mom went there. If you were stuck on an island with a television, a Blu-Ray player and only one movie, which movie would you choose? Thats a tough one. I would say Lord of the Rings the last one. Return of the King. If you could travel anywhere, where would you go? I would say Africa. Theyve got cool animals there. It would be cool to see an elephant those things are massive. STEVEN RYZEWSKI THE BASICSAge: 17 Year: Senior Sports: Water polo, swimming and diving Swimming events: 100 y, 50 freestyle Club team: YCF Hometown: Orlando GPA: 3.85/4.76 weightedTrainersCONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 I like to tell people that you dont pay me for what I do, you pay me for what I can do. When something happens, thats when you want someone that is certied. Trey Tyler, The First AcademyI dont think about (the crowds or the pressure) so much in the moment because my focus is on the kid. Dianna Ellis, Windermere PrepI spent a lot of time in my high-school athletic training room. I tried it out and 14 years later Im still doing athletic training. Jennifer Ovando, Windermere HighYou have to learn about all of the sports, because that helps us with the mechanisms of injury and also the return-toplay protocols when you get into that later stage of sportsspecic rehab. Jillian Sutton, Windermere High

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WINDERMERE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 13 TITANS SOFTBALL WINS SIX OF PAST SEVENThe action directly south of Olympias baseball field has been favorable to the home team, as well. Coach Hank Largins team is 9-4 entering spring break and won six games in a row before a 6-5 loss to Lake Brantley March 15. Freshman standout Cameryn Orland is on a 13-game hitting streak and pitcher Megan Wilder, a senior, has put in several strong outings as a starter and in relief. Olympia, which is 2-3 in its district, will return to action March 28 with a home game against Apopka. The Blue Darters are 13-1 so far this spring and are 6-0 in the district. Apopka won the first matchup of the two teams back on Feb. 20, 7-4. BaseballCONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 Call us at 407-656-2121Email us at AdvertiseNow@OrangeObserver.comor Subscribe@OrangeObserver.comVisit us at rfnftfb 266851 Register Online at SommerSports.comWindermere Run Among the Lakes 17th Annual UMCSaturday, April 14, 2018 267554 Steven RyzewskiOlympia softball returns to the eld against Apopka March 28.The Dr. Phillips softball pro gram has officially entered uncharted waters. The Panthers 12-5 win over Lake Nona March 15 extended the teams current winning streak to 13 games setting a program record. Dr. Phillips, which gets a breather next week for spring break, has not lost in a month the Panthers lost to Bishop Moore Feb. 16. In DPs most recent win, senior catcher Hannah Eden went 5-for5 with two doubles, driving in five runs and scoring twice. Panthers ace Raychel Trocki again got the win for DP her 13th of the season. Trocki, a junior, has a whopping 118 strikeouts so far this spring. On the season, Eden leads the team at the plate with 18 RBIs and a .446 average. Daija Benn and Gracie Lopez lead the team in onbase percentage (.525 and .524, respectively) and runs scored (26 and 23, respectively). As a team, Dr. Phillips is aver aging 8.27 runs per game. Its not just one person doing it (hitting well) theyre all hit-Win streak now a record for DP softballThe Panthers sweep of Lake Nona last week brings them to 14-1 on the season and extended the team's current win streak to 13 games.STEVEN RYZEWSKISENIOR SPORTS EDITORting very good right now, head coach Mike Gale said. Gale said his team has benefited from playing a rugged schedule in the fall season and in the preseason, during which he said the Panthers routinely got our butts kicked. There aint no secret, Gale said, reflecting on the teams early success. We went out and played the hardest teams we could find. We got our butts kicked, but it makes you better. The Panthers return to action after spring break in an away game at Apopka March 27. Steven RyzewskiAbove: Deija Benn has scored a teamhigh 26 runs. Left: Gracie Lopez has six extra-base hits this spring.

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14 WINDERMERE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 www. OrangeObserver.com/CalendarSEARCH FIND POST Looking for local events to attend? Want us to inform the public about your local event?Visit Our Community Calendar Today! 269473 WEATHER ONLINE See other winning photos at OrangeObserver.comI LOVE WEST ORANGE YEAR TO DATE: 2018 3.04 in. 2017 3 .12 in. MARCH TO DATE: 2018 0.86 in. 2017 0.16 in. THURSDAY, MAR. 22High: 71 Low: 49 Chance of rain: 0%FRIDAY, MAR. 23High: 75 Low: 51 Chance of rain: 0%SATURDAY, MAR. 24High: 82 Low: 58 Chance of rain: 0%SUNDAY, MAR. 25High: 85 Low: 61 Chance of rain: 10% Tuesday, March 13 0.00 Wednesday, March 14 0.00 Thursday, March 15 0.00 Friday, March 16 0.00 Saturday, March 17 0.00 Sunday, March 18 0.00 Monday, March 19 0.71 SUNRISE / SUNSET Sunrise Sunset Thursday, March 22 7:28a 7:38p Friday, March 23 7:27a 7:39p Saturday, March 24 7:26a 7:39p Sunday, March 25 7:25a 7:40p Monday, March 26 7:24a 7:41p Tuesday, March 27 7:23a 7:41p Wednesday, March 28 7:21a 7:42pMOON PHASES RAINFALL FORECAST April 8 Last March 31 Full April 15 New April 22 FirstWindermere resident Debra Neill shot this photo at Lake Down Park. She calls it, Quiet Splendor. The West Orange Times and Observer is hosting this weekly contest, and winners will have their photograph featured and receive a $20 prize. To enter, email your photo, along with your name, city and a caption, to amyq@ orangeobserver. com; put I Love West Orange in the subject line. Please include your mailing address to receive your prize. 3-22-18 rfntrbnr rf ntb nf nnr nf n n nr r n tr n b f br f ff nf ttrf f tf n f f b f f bf r r t r nr r frf tb f rf ttf tnnn tfb t t tf f nt nnff nf tbfb frf f nfb f br n r bf r t n f f fb n nb f ff f rf r tr nf rr r ff tb r r t nf fr b b b b nb r b tb t trfrbf tr tb f f nrf r frf f r f n nr n nb nb nrb nfr r fntbt b r r r

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WINDERMERE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 15 PET SERVICES AUTO SERVICE rfnftrbnfrrrrfnfn rfntb PEST CONTROL AUTO SERVICE ATTORNEY rfrntrfrntfrnbttt trffnrft rfntbnrf rf rn t nf bnnfbb 930 Carter Rd #202 Winter Garden, FL 34787 Telephone: (407) 614-3827 rdtransautorepair@c.rr.comRay Cornell Jr. Doug GallingerWorking Owners www.r-dauto.comIn House Towing AvailableBattery Testing Scheduled Transmission and Computerized Tune-Ups and Tires and and Replacement Maintenance Engine Repair Diagnostics General Repair Alignments rfntbr rfntt b b tbb b LAWN CARE 407-625-0742 cnalawns@gmail.comrrtfrtrfnrtrnbf bnrft b frf bfnrtf brtrfr brtrrft C&A LAWN SERVICECarlos Arteaga Owner/Operator b rfnt bbnbnftbb bb t REALTORS nnt ttfrf r rrf ntHomeRebateRealty.com ROOFING rf nt bfn nr ftf bfn rfr r267848 Merchandise Wanted Thursday, March 22, 2018 rfntb nn nnff btbf Help Wanted S A W M I L L S F R O M only $4397.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmillCut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N fcan3/22 Lawn & Garden Equipment 2018 rfn tbbf rf rntb r tbbf n tttnfr rtb ft 2018 rfn tbbf rf rntb r tbbf n tttnfr rtb ft Visit us online at OrangeObserver.com Sign up today for our FREE eNewsletter and get News You Can Use delivered right to your inbox!Just enter your email address in the subscribe here box at the bottom of our home page at: www.OrangeObservercom rfr r 267848 Merchandise Wanted Thursday, March 22, 2018 rfntb nn nnff btbf Help Wanted S A W M I L L S F R O M only $4397.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmillCut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N fcan3/22 Lawn & Garden Equipment SEARCH FIND POST Visit OrangeObserver.com/Calendar

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16 WINDERMERE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018 262493